Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tsu

Every person is a philosopher by nature; however, we are quickly dissuaded from this delightful activity by those who call philosophy impractical. But there is nothing more practical than knowing who you are and what you think. Try it sometime.

Re: Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tsu

Postby admin » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:36 am

SEVENTY-NINE

After a bitter quarrel, some resentment must remain.
What can one do about it?
Therefore the sage keeps his half of the bargain
But does not exact his due.
A man of Virtue performs his part,
But a man without Virtue requires others to fulfill their obligations.
The Tao of heaven is impartial.
It stays with good men all the time.

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Re: Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tsu

Postby admin » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:37 am

EIGHTY

A small country has fewer people.
Though there are machines that can work ten to a hundred times faster
than man, they are not needed.
The people take death seriously and do not travel far.
Though they have boats and carriages, no one uses them.
Though they have armor and weapons, no one displays them.
Men return to the knotting of rope in place of writing.
Their food is plain and good, their clothes fine but simple,
their homes secure;
They are happy in their ways.
Though they live within sight of their neighbors,
And crowing cocks and barking dogs are heard across the way,
Yet they leave each other in peace while they grow old and die.

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Re: Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tsu

Postby admin » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:37 am

EIGHTY-ONE

Truthful words are not beautiful.
Beautiful words are not truthful.
Good men do not argue.
Those who argue are not good.
Those who know are not learned.
The learned do not know.

The sage never tries to store things up.
The more he does for others, the more he has.
The more he gives to others, the greater his abundance.
The Tao of heaven is pointed but does no harm.
The Tao of the sage is work without effort.

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Re: Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tsu

Postby admin » Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:37 am

A NOTE ABOUT THE TRANSLATORS

Gia-fu Feng was born in Shanghai in 1919, was educated in China, and came to the United States in 1947 to study comparative religion. He holds a BA from Peking University and an MA from the University of Pennsylvania. He has taught at the Esalen Institute, Big Sur, and now directs the Stillpoint Foundation, a Taoist community in Manitou Springs, Colorado. He is the author (with Jerome Kirk) of Tai Chi -- A Way of Centering -- & I Ching, which was published in 1970. Jane English, whose photographs form an integral part of this book, holds a BA from Mount Holyoke College and has received a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin for her work in high energy particle physics. She taught a course in Oriental thought and modern physics at Colorado College (with Gia-fu Feng as guest lecturer). She was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1942. Chuang Tsu/Inner Chapters (1974), a companion volume to Lao Tsu/Tao Te Ching, is a direct outcome of the successful collaboration between Gia-fu Feng and Jane English on the Tao Te Ching.
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