Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption at the Heart

Postby admin » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:45 pm

NOTES

PREFACE


1. Among its other topics, Jeffery Paine's 2004 book Re-Enchantment: Tibetan Buddhism Comes to the West discusses the problems caused by romantic relationships between dharma students and three teachers in the Tibetan tradition: two Tibetan men (Kalu Rinpoche and Chogyam Trungpa) and one American woman (Catherine Burroughs). The latter is also the subject of Martha Sherrill's 2001 book The Buddha from Brooklyn. In addition, Shoes Outside the Door: Desire, Devotion, and Excess at San Francisco Zen Center put out by Michael Downing in 2002 tells the story of an American Zen master, Richard Baker Roshi, who ran into problems partially because of liaisons with devotees.

2. Four books were published in 2003 and 2004 on the Karmapa, all raking the side of the Dalai lama's candidate Ogyen Trinley. The first of these was Michele Martin's 2003 biography of the young lama, Music in the Sky: The .Life, Art & Teachings of the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje. In 2004, three books on the Karmapa controversy followed: Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation by Lea Terhune, The Dance of 17 Lives: The Incredible True Story of Tibet's 17th Karmapa by Mick Brown, and Wrestling the Dragon: In Search of the Boy Lama Who Defied China by Gaby Naher. An earlier book, Rogues in Robes published in 1998 by Tomek Lehnert, discussed the controversy from the experience of a follower of Shamar Rinpoche. I will occasionally refer to these books in my discussion.

INTRODUCTION

1. The titular head of the Gelug school is known as the Ganden Tripa (or Tri) Rinpoche, the abbot of Ganden monastery. The post is filled on a rotating basis by high lamas in the school, but never by the Dalai Lama himself. The current throne-holder, the 101st Ganden Tri Rinpoche, Khensur Lungri Namgyel, is a French national. Now in his seventies, he was appointed by the Dalai Lama in 2003.

2. Dalai Lama, "Human Rights and Universal Responsibility." Address to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, Vienna, Austria, June 15, 1992, http://www.tibet.com/DL/vienna.html , accessed September 12, 2005.

3. P. Christiaan Klieger, Tibetan Nationalism, 89.

4. Flight of A Karmapa. Directed by Yoichi Shimatsu. Hong Kong: Nachtvision, 2001.

5. Rumtek Sangha Duche. Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference. New Delhi, 1996.

6. Karmapa Charitable Trust vs. the State of Sikkim and Gyaltsab Rinpoche, Civil Suit No. 40 of 1998 in the Court of the District Judge, East and North Sikkim in Gangtok.

7. "Affidavit of Geoffrey Brian Samuel," Lama vs. Hope and Ors, CIV-2004-404-001363, High Court of New Zealand Auckland Registry, November 11, 2004.

8. Dhoring Tenzin Paljor, True Account of the Dhoring Gazhi Family. The edition I used (with the help of Tibetan translators) was published in 1988 in Tibetan by People's Publications of the Tibet Autonomous Region in Lhasa. In the Wylie system of transliteration, the title is Ga' bzhi ba'i mi rabs kyi byung ba brjod pa zol med gtam gyi rol mo zhes bya ba gzhugs so.

9. Compared to other major religions, Buddhism is the fastest growing in the United States. According to a 2001 study, since the previous survey held in 1990, Buddhism had grown 12% versus 11% for Christianity and 10% for both Judaism and Islam. Interestingly, Buddhism grew overall 33%, but at the same time shrank 23%, making it one of the "high turnover" religions in the study. See Egon Mayer, et al., American Religious Identification Survey, City University of New York, 2001, http://www.gc.cuny.edu/faculty/research ... ndings.htm , accessed June
28, 2005.

1 BAYONETS TO RUMTEK

1. "Protector Practices," http://www.kadampa.org/english/practice ... ctices.php, accessed July 24, 2005.

2. "The Dharma Protector Dorje Shugden," http://www.kadampa.org/english/traditio ... hugden.php , accessed July 24, 2005.

3. Stephen Bachelor, "Letting Daylight into Magic: The Life and Times of Dorje Shugden," Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, Vol. 7 No. 3, Spring 1998.

4. Parvathi Menon, "Of the Dalai Lama and a Witch-hunt," Frontline, Vol. 17 Issue 26, December 23 to January 5, 2001.

5. Jeffery Paine, "Reply to Jay Landman," Washington Post Book World, August 1, 2004.

2 THE PLACE OF POWER

1. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 207.

2. Rumtek monastery website, http://www.rumtek.org, accessed July 10, 2005.

3. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 207.

4. Rumtek Sangha Duche, Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference, 44. My discussion of Rumtek before and during the takeover relies heavily on testimony presented at the 1996 event, the International Karma Kagyu Conference. Billed as "A Gathering of the 16th Karmapa's Devotees Organized by the Rumtek Sangha Duche [monk's body]," the meeting was held at the Karmapa Institute in New Delhi from March 28 through March 30, 1996. Shangpa Rinpoche, the leader of Karma Kagyu centers in Singapore, organized the event, which featured speeches by Shamar, Topga, and Khenpo Chodrak. In addition, monks living at the monastery gave first-hand, eyewitness accounts of what they had experienced and seen during the takeover of Rumtek in August 1993. More than three hundred supporters attended the conference, including lamas and monks from Rumtek and other Karma Kagyu monasteries, and lay people from East Asia and Western countries. The hundreds of centers founded by Ole and Hannah Nydahl were particularly well represented at the event, with devotees coming from as far away as Australia, Spain, Japan, and Venezuela.

5. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 198.

6. Rumtek Sangha Ouche, Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference, 45.

7. A remarkable woman, Bedi was known in India as the mother of Bollywood heartthrob Kabir Bedi and the grandmother of talk-show host Puja Bedi.

8. Christopher Hitchens, "Blaming bin Laden First," The Nation, October 22, 2001.

3 AN ANCIENT RIVALRY

1. Tsepon W.D. Shakabpa, Tibet: A Political History, 50-56.

2. John T. Davenport has translated the Sakya Lekshe as Ordinary Wisdom: Sakya Pandita's Treasury of Good Advice, published in 2000.

3. Tsepon W.D. Shakabpa, Tibet: A Political History, 65.

4. In The Religion of Tibet, 81, Sir Charles Bell wrote that the order's original name was Ga-luk, the "Ganden Way," after the sect's main monastery outside of Lhasa, Ganden, which means "the Joyous." But since "this seemed to suggest the way of pleasure, a slight change was made, and it became Ga-luk, 'The Virtuous Way.'"

5. Shakabpa's text, Tibet: A Political History, is the standard modern source on the history of Tibet in both its Tibetan original and its English translation. However, the two-volume Tibetan version contains much information that has been edited out of the single-volume English translation. The translation leaves out emotional prose that is acceptable in Tibetan works but that might offend Westerners, as well as numerous historical facts that conflict with Shakabpa's thesis that Tibet was independent of China throughout most of its history or that might impugn the reputation of the Dalai Lamas.

6. The primary sources for the conflict between the Tsangpa kings and the Karma Kagyu on one side and the Depa or Duke of Lhasa. the Mongols, and the Gelugpa on the other are two works by the fifth Dalai Lama, his autobiography and a history of Tibet, as well as Shakabpa's own two-volume history of Tibet in the original (but not in its single-volume English translation, which omits mention of the Duke of Lhasa).

7. Called the Bod Kartso Chig Gyur, this system of government would have given Tibet a level of centralization that such European powers as France and England were beginning to achieve at the same period.

8. Fifth Dalai Lama, Autobiography, vol. 1, 255-256. See also Tsepon W.D. Shakabpa, An Advanced Political History of Tibet, vol. 1, 392. Both of these works are in Tibetan language. I use translations courtesy of Shamar Rinpoche.

9. Fifth Dalai Lama, Autobiography, vol. 1, 201.

10. These figures come from Khenpo Chodrak Tenphel.

11. Dawa Norbu, Tibet: The Road Ahead, 265.

12. Quoted by Elliot Sperling in "Orientalism and Aspects of Violence in the Tibetan Tradition," included in Imagining Tibet edited by Thierry Dodin and Heinz Rather, 319. Sperling uses this passage from the Autobiography of the fifth Dalai Lama to explain the pitfalls of taking historical material out of context and applying contemporary standards to it: "One may say with some confidence that the Fifth Dalai Lama does not fit the standard image that many people today have of a Dalai Lama, particularly the image of a Nobel Peace Prize laureate."

13. Sir Charles Bell, The Religion of Tibet, 107.

14. Isabel Hilton, The Search for the Panchen Lama, 63-75.

4 THE ORIGIN OF THE KARMAPAS

1. Nik Douglas, Karmapa: The Black Hat Lama of Tibet, 33.

2. Karma Thinley, The History of the Sixteen Karmapas of Tibet, 42.

3. In his book History as Propaganda: Tibetan Exiles versus the People's Republic of China, John Powers discusses in great derail the conflicting interpretations of tribute missions by lamas. among other topics, as part of the ongoing argument over the historical relationship between Tibet and China.

4. Karma Thinley Rinpoche, The History of the Sixteen Karmapas of Tibet, 74.

5. The rest of the story comes from a version told to me by Shamar Rinpoche.

6. Lea Terhune. Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 111.

7. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 34. Later, in July 2005, Brown apologized to Shamar Rinpoche for making this claim and promised to remove it from future editions of his book.

5 A LULL IN HOSTILITIES

1. Patrick French, Tibet, Tibet, 14.

2. I draw on two main sources for information about the United Party initiative and the sectarian conflict that followed it: Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 19-21,and "Division and Reunification of Chushi Gangdrug." http://www.chushigangdruk.org/history/history 12.html, accessed December 28, 2004.

3. Dawa Norbu, Tibet: The Road Ahead, 266.

4. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 20-21.

5. Namgyal Shastri, "Situ Rinpoche: Fully Satisfied," Dharamsala Tibetan Review, August 1992.

6. Chodrak told me that his source for the story was a book published by Topga Rinpoche in Tibetan in New Delhi in 1994, Tam natshok kun tog ge rimo or Assorted Tales on the Art of Thinking. Topga's book in turn was based on records kept by the general secretary at the Karmapa's Tsurphu monastery in the 1920s.

7. This chart of Karmapas is taken from information submitted by Professor Geoffrey Samuel of the University of Newcastle in Australia in a 2004 court case in neighboring New Zealand: "Affirmation of Geoffrey Brian Samuel," Lama vs. Hope and Ors, CIV- 2004-404-001363, High Court of New Zealand Auckland Registry, November 11, 2004.

6 EXILE, DEATH, AND DISSENT

I. Melvyn Goldstein, A History of Modern Tibet 1913-1951, 34.

2. Nik Douglas in Karmapa: The Black Hat Lama of Tibet lists fifty-two major objects along with sixteen manuscripts, some in multiple volumes, preserved at Rumtek monastery as of the early 1970s.

3. There were seven other lamas in Shamar's hotel room at the time that Shamar agreed to Situ's request. Three of them are still alive as witnesses -- Shamar's brother Jigme Rinpoche, Lama Karma Thinley, and Jamgon Kongtrul's attendant Trinley Ngodrup.

4. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 80.

7 THE TRADITIONALIST

1. Drukchen Rinpoche later told the story of his discussion with the Karmapa to Shamar when the two met at the Ashoka Hotel in New Delhi in 1985. Later, Drukchen retold the story to a group of Western devotees at the Dhagpo Kagyu Ling center in Dordogne. France in 1994.

2. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 260-261.

3. This prediction came from the fifth Shamarpa Konchok Yenlak (1525-1583) and was quoted by Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries', 206.

4. Yeshe Dronma, The Kunzig Shamarpas of Tibet, 19. Interestingly, Shamar received his physical red crown fifty years or more before the Ming emperor Chengzu would present Rolpe Dorje's successor, the fifth Karmapa Deshin Shegpa, with his own physical crown during his stay in Nanjing.

5. Tim McGirk, London Independent, March 18, 1994.

6. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 147.

7. Tsepon W.D. Shakabpa, Tibet: A Political History, 157.

8. There are four primary Tibetan sources for the life of the tenth Shamarpa and the Tibet-Gorkha War of the eighteenth century: The Golden Lineage by the Great Eighth Tai Situ Chokyi Jungne (early reincarnations); another text by the eighth Situ, his autobiography entitled The Crystal Mirror (the first half of the tenth Shamar's life); the autobiography of Kathog Rig Dzin Chenmo (the end of the Shamarpa's life); and the family history of Tibetan government minister Dhoring Tenzin Paljor (extensive detail about the Gorkha War and the role of the Shamarpa). Aside from the slimmed down English version of Shakabpa's book, an English-language source for dle history of the war and the role of the tenth Shamarpa is an article by Ramesh K. Dhungel, "Nepal-Tibet Cultural Relations and the Zhva-Dmar-Pa (Shyamarpa) Lamas of Tibet" in Contributions in Nepalese Studies, vol. 26, no. 2, July 1999.

9. There is no historical basis for the oft-told story that Shamarpa's Red Crown was buried beneath the floor of this courthouse. This tale is a confusion of Shamarpa's story with that of the great Sakya master Gorampa Sonam Sengye, whose book Clearing Away Wrong Views challenged the Gelugpa view of the Madhyamaka and incurred the wrath of the Dalai lama's administration. The government banned both Gorampa's text and his future incarnations and buried the original of the text along with Gorampa's crown under the entranceway to the Jokhang temple in Lhasa.

10. Yeshe Dronma, The Kunzig Shamarpas of Tibet, 42-44.

11. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 22-23.

8 THE MODERNIZER

1. Raveena Aulakh, "Holy Hum," Hindustan Times Sunday Magazine, May 2, 2004.

2. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 7.

3. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 90.

4. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 115.

5. K. Sreedhar Rao, Report to Shri T.S.R. Subramaniam, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India, 5.

6. Government of India Ministry of Home Affairs, Lookout Circular 10/98, August 5, 1998.

7. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 96.

8. Rumtek Sangha Duche, The Siege of Karmapa, viii.

9. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 112.

10. Julian Gearing, "Struggle for Tibet's Soul," Asiaweek, October 20, 2000.

11. "H.H. XVII Gyalwa Karmapa Found," Song of Fulfillment, newsletter of Kagyu Droden Kunchab Buddhist Center (San Francisco), Summer/Fall 1992.

12. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 131.

13. The full text of this exchange is reproduced from an audio recording made of the meeting in Michel Nestorenko, et al., The Karmapa Papers, 159. Five European devotees of Shamar Rinpoche, Alexander Draszczyk, Martina Draszczyk, Anne Ekselius, Michel Nestorcnko, and Hannah Nydahl, put out this publication at Shamar's request in October 1992. Compiled in Paris. written in English, and distributed from Hong Kong, the publication brought together original documents relating to the Karmapa controversy, with analysis by the editors. The book's highlight is a detailed analysis of Tai Situ's prediction letter, reprinted in appendix B of this book. After its publication, The Karmapa Papers was sent to government officials and opinion leaders in the state of Sikkim, where it helped sway opinion towards Shamar's position.

9 A PRETENDER TO THE THRONE

1. In rare cases, a tulku could be recognized before the death of a particular Buddhist master as a ma-dey tulku. For many Tibetans, such tulkus carried little credibility.

2. Nestorenko, et el., The Karmapa Papers, 50.

3. All quotes from monks at Rumtek concerning the events of the takeover of the monastery come from Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference, March 1996, unless otherwise indicated.

4. This letter is reproduced in appendix B of this book.

5. The Karmapa Papers, 34.

6. Michelle Martin, Music in the Sky, 18-19.

7. Topga Rinpoche, Tam natshok kun tog ge rimo or Assorted Tales on the Art of Thinking, New Delhi, 1994.

8. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 164.

9. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 113.

10. Alexander Berzin, Relating to a Spiritual Teacher, 42.

11. "Affirmation of Geoffrey Brian Samuel," Lama vs. Hope and Ors, CIV-2004404-001363, High Court of New Zealand Auckland Registry, November 11, 2004. Samuel went on to write that even once the Dalai Lamas came along, the Karmapa's labrang at Tsurphu never asked for permission from the Dalai Lama to choose a Karmapa, except in the one exceptional case of the recognition of the sixteenth Karmapa in the late twenties. In that case, as we have seen, the thirteenth Dalai Lama originally supported the son of his council minister Lungshar as a candidate, but the Tibetan leader later backed down and was forced to concede that the Karma Kagyu could recognize its own choice, who became the sixteenth Karmapa Rangjung Rigpe Dorje.

12. The Politics of Reincarnation. Directed by Yoichi Shimatsu. Hong Kong: Nachtvision, 2001.

13. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 172.

14. Department of Information and International Relations, Central Tibetan Administration, "H.H. Dalai Lama Recognizes Karmapa's Reincarnation," July 3, 1992.

15. Since this time, some of Shamar's supporters have claimed that the Dalai Lama simply misunderstood the situation, and did not realize that Shamar had not agreed with Situ and Gyaltsab. Once the Tibetan leader discovered his error, it was too late for him to withdraw his support for Ogyen Trinley without losing face. "This point seemed quite important at the time," Shamar told me. "But now it is clear that the Dalai Lama's office had already determined to support Ogyen Trinley, and that it would have found one way or another to do so."

16. K. Sreedhar Rao, Report to Shri T.S.R. Subramaniam, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India, 4-5.

10 ABORTIVE SKIRMISHES

1. LeaTerhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 192.

2. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 166.

3. In his book on the Karmapa controversy, Mick Brown quoted a layman who held a low- level post at Rumtek with a version of the argument that Situ's followers have often made against testing the prediction letter: '''Why did Shamar say the prediction letter should be analyzed?' says Ngodrup Burkhar. 'This is a point in his favor to the modern Western audience, who will think, why not? There's no harm. It's an appeal to rationalism; not blind faith. But the second thing is he knew this test could never he done, and that would again be in his favor. He could say "Look, I am asking for something very straight, very plain, something the whole world acknowledges, and they're not going to do it!" But he knew that nobody would plunge themselves into hell by desecrating the letter.''' See Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 171.

4. Tomek Lehnert, Rogues in Robes, 166.

5. The day after Shamar put out his letter in Tibetan, Situ had one of his American devotees, Michelle Martin (who would later write the 2003 biography of Ogyen Trinley Music in the Sky) release a translation that was much more affirmative than Shamar intended. This translation interpreted him as saying "now I have attained complete confidence in Situ Rinpoche, and the contents of this letter, according to which the reincarnation has definitely been discovered and further confirmed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama as the incarnation of His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa. I offer my willing acceptance and henceforth, I will no longer pursue the matter of examining the sacred testament, etc."

The next day, July 18, Shamar issued his own translation, worded more tentatively:

On March 19th, 1992, at a meeting with Jamgon Rinpoche, Gyaltsab Rinpoche and myself, Situ Rinpoche presented a handwritten prediction letter from his protection pouch, claiming it was the written instructions of H.H. the 16th Karmapa (indicating his reincarnation). I had some doubts (about the letter's authenticity). At this point, I rely on Situ Rinpoche (giving me correct information about H.H. the Dalai Lama's decision). Relying on our confidential discussion, I go along with the decision made by H.H. Dalai Lama that a reincarnation has certainly been found as reincarnation of H.H. the Gyalwa Karmapa. Hence, I suspend my demands such as having the handwritten prediction letter being subjected to a (forensic) test.

6. By the early nineties, the Karmapa Charitable Trust board consisted of J.D. Densapa and T.S. Gyaltshen, former officials of the Sikkim state government; Ashok Burman, a New Delhi businessman; Gyan Jyoti Kansakar, a Kathmandu businessman; and Rumtek general secretary Topga Rinpoche. These board members were all appointed in 1962 when Shamar was a child of seven years old, so he could have had no influence over their selection. The only new members were Shamar, Situ, and Jamgon Rinpoches, all appointed by the other trustees in 1984.

7. Rumtek Sangha Duche, Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference, 60.

8. K. Sreedhar Rao, Report to Shri T.S.R. Subramaniam, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India, 9.

9. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 193.

10. Article 26. Freedom to Manage Religious Affairs, declares that "every religious denomination or any section thereof shall have the right (a) to establish and maintain institutions for religious and charitable purposes; (b) to manage its own affairs in matters of religion; (c) to own and acquire movable and immovable property; and (d) to administer such property in accordance with law." See http://indiacode.nic.in/coiweb/coifiles/p03.htm, accessed May 2, 2005.

11. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 212.

11 THE YARNEY PUTSCH

1. Dalai Lama, Human Rights and Universal Responsibility. Address to the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, Vienna, Austria. June 15, 1992, http://www.tibet.com/DL/vienna.html. accessed September 12, 2005.

2. The meeting was reportedly held at a farmhouse in the Matang Valley, according to numerous Indian newspaper accounts. Without obtaining prior permission to enter the neighboring state of West Bengal, a car from the Sikkim state government picked up Chen at Bagdogra airport beforehand and brought him to Sikkim. At the meeting, Chen allegedly gave Bhandari a suitcase containing $1.5 million.

3. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries', 122.

4. "Pro-China Coup in Gangtok Monastery," Hindustan Times, August 6, 1993.

5. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 103.

12 UNDER OCCUPATION

1. Anil Maheshwari. The Buddha Cries!, 99.

2. Rumtek Sangha Duche, Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference, 56-57.

3. "I will rule like Hitler: Bhandari," Siliguri Telegraph, November 24, 1994.

4. K. Sreedhar Rao, Report to Shri T.S.R. Subramaniam, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India, 13.

5. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 223-224.

6. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 120-121.

7. Rumtek Sangha Duche, The Siege of Karmapa, 73-74.

8. Topga Rinpoche, Letter to Gyaltsab Rinpoche, September 15, 1995.

9. K. Sreedhar Rao, Report to Shri T.S.R. Subramaniam, Cabinet Secretary, Government of India, 9.

13 LAMAS ON TRIAL

1. "Shamar Rinpoche Files Defamation Suit against Controversial Karmapa Book," http://www.karmapa-issue.org/politics/l ... erhune.htm, accessed July 27, 2005.

2. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 231.

3. Judge S.W. Lephcha, Order in Civil Suit No. 40 of 1998, the Court of the District Judge, East and North Sikkim at Gangtok, date of decision October 17, 2001.

4. Rezaul Lascar, "Pro-China Monk Let Into India," Asian Age, September 6, 1998.

5. Government of India Ministry of Home Affairs, Lookout Circular 10/98, August 5, 1998.

6. David Rennie, "Boy Lama Flees Across Himalayas to Escape Chinese," London Telegraph, January 7, 2000.

7. Arthur Max, "Young Monk May Emerge As Leader," San Francisco Examiner, January 15, 2000.

8. Brahma Chellaney, "Chinese piece in Karmapa jigsaw remains a puzzle," Hindustan Times, January 17, 2000.

9. Flight of A Karmapa, directed by Yoichi Shimatsu, Hong Kong: Nachtvision, 2001.

10. Mick Brown, The Dance of 17 Lives, 223.

11. Gaby Naher, Wrestling the Dragon, 262.

12. Martin Brauen, Dreamworld Tibet, 79.

13. Ibid., 67.

14. Dhiman Chattopadhyay and Amalendu Kundu. "Court Order on Rumtek Treasure Opens Pandora's Box," Times of India, March 25, 2002.

15. "Missing Dorje with Ugyen Trinley," Gangtok Weekend Review, July 12-18, 2002.

16. Julian Gearing, "India, Sikkim, China and a vexing Tibetan lama," Asia Times Online, www.atimes.com/atimes/China/FG21Ad06.html, accessed July 21, 2004.

17. Jefferson Penberthy, "Battle of the Future Buddhas," Time, April 4, 1994.

14 THE SECRET BOY

1. The entire letter was reproduced and interpreted by Topga Rinpoche, Tam natshok kun tog ge rimo or Assorted Tales on the Art of Thinking, New Delhi, 1994.

15 THE RETURN OF THE KING

1. Anil Maheshwari, The Buddha Cries!, 112.

2. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 222.

3. The Attack, Directed by Thule Jug. Vienna: Vienna Dharma Projects, 1994.

4. Lea Terhune, Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation, 222.

5. Tim McGirk, "Buddhist Factions Come to Blows," London Independent, March 18, 1994.

6. "Rumtek Chief Crowned Amid Violence," Indian Express, March 18, 1994.

7. "Karmapa Controversy 'Unfortunate'," The Hindu, April 5, 1994.

8. Vijay Kranti, "Newsmaker: Tenzin Khyentde," India Today, April 15, 1994.

9. Interview with Lama Dorje Drolma, January 5, 2000, unpublished.

10. Tina Draszczyk, "An Interview with Trinley Thaye Dorje, the 17th Gyalwa Karmapa," Buddhism Today, Vol. 8, 2000.

11. Gosia Pellarin, et al., "Buddha in Silicon Valley," Buddhism Today, Vol. 13, Fall/Winter 2003.

12. Interview with Lama Dorje Drolma, January 5, 2000, unpublished.

16 CONCLUSION

1. In this section, many quotes from Thaye Dorje come from two articles: Tina Draszczyk, "An Interview with Trinley Thaye Dorje, the 17th Gyalwa Karmapa," Buddhism Today, Vol. 8, Summer 2000: and Gosia Pellarin, et al., "Buddha in Silicon Valley," Buddhism Today, Vol. 13, Fall/Winter 2003.

2. Gosia Pellarin, et al., "Buddha in Silicon Valley," Buddhism Today, Vol. 13, Fall/Winter 2003.

3. Dhammapada, "Desire," verse 21.

4. E. Gene Smith, Among Tibetan Texts, 268-269.
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Re: Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption at the Heart

Postby admin » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:47 pm

Bibliography

During my research, certain books proved particularly informative and useful. I have placed a star by these works in the list below. I have not listed the numerous newspaper and magazine articles that I have cited in this book or that I have consulted as background since they are not widely available to the general reader.

Avedon, John F. In Exile from the Land of Snows: the Definitive Account of the Dalai Lama and Tibet Since the Chinese Conquest. New York: HarperPerennial, 1997.

Bell, Sir Charles. The Religion of Tibet. New Delhi: Book Faith India, 1998.

Berzin, Alexander. Relating to a Spiritual Teacher: Building a Healthy Relationship. Ithaca: Snow Lion Publications, 2000. *

Brauen, Martin. Dreamworld Tibet: Western Illusions. Martin Willson, trans. Trumbull. CT: Weatherhill, 2004.

Brown, Mick. The Dance of 17 Lives; The Incredible True Story of Tibet's 17th Karmapa. London: Bloomsbury, 2004.

Crossette, Barbara. So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas. New York: Knopf, 1995.

Dalai Lama, Fourteenth, Tenzin Gyatso. Freedom in Exile: the Autobiography of the Dalai Lama. New York: HarperPerennial, 1991.

Dodin, Thierry and Heinz Rather. Imagining Tibet: Perceptions, Projections and Fantasies. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2001.

Dronma, Yeshe. The Kunzig Shamarpas of Tibet. Hong Kong: Dorje and Bell, 1992.

Douglas, Nik and Meryl White. Karmapa: The Black Hat Lama of Tibet. London: Luzac, 1976. *

French, Patrick. Tibet, Tibet: A Personal History of a Lost Land. New York: Knopf, 2003. *

Gampopa. The Jewel Ornament of Liberation: The Wish-fulfilling Gem of the Noble Teachings. Trans. Khenpo Konchog Gyaltsen Rinpoche. Ithaca: Snow Lion, 1998.

Goldstein, Melvyn C. A History of Modern Tibet, 1913-1951. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989.

_____ . The Snow Lion and the Dragon: China, Tibet, and the Dalai Lama. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

Grunfeld, A. Tom. The Making of Modern Tibet. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1987.

Harrer, Heinrich. Seven Years in Tibet. Trans. Richard Graves. New York: Putnam, 1996.

Hilton, Isabel. The Search for the Panchen Lama. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2000.

Hyde-Chambers, Frank and Audrey, trans. Tibetan Folk Tales. Boston: Shambhala, 2002.

Jamgon Kongtul Lodro Thaye. Enthronement: The Recognition of the Reincarnate Masters of Tibet and the Himalayas. Trans. with a foreword by Ngawang Zangpo. Ithaca: Snow Lion Publications, 1997.

Karma Thinley Rinpoche. The History of the Sixteen Karmapas of Tibet. Boulder: Prajna Press, 1980. *

Klieger, P. Christiaan. Tibetan Nationalism. Berkeley: Folklore Institute, 1992.

Lehnert, Tomek. Rogues in Robes. Nevada City, CA: Blue Dolphin, 1998.

Lhalungpa, Lobsang P. The Life of Milarepa. New York: Compass, 1979.

Lopez, Donald S. Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998. *

Maheshwari, Anil. The Buddha Cries!: Karmapa Conundrum. New Delhi: UBSPD, 2000.

Martin, Michele. Music in the Sky: The Life, Art & Teachings of the 17th Karmapa, Ogycn Trinley Dorje. Ithaca: Snow Lion Publications, 2003.

Naher, Gaby. Wrestling the Dragon: in Search of the Boy Lama Who Defied China. London: Rider, 2004.

Nestorenko, Michel, et al. The Karmapa Papers. Paris, 1992. *

Norbu, Dawa. Tibet: The Road Ahead. London: Rider, 1998.

Nydahl, Ole. Riding the Tiger: Twenty Years on the Road: The Risks and Joys of Bringing Tibetan Buddhism to the West. Nevada City, CA: Blue Dolphin, 1992.

___. Entering the Diamond Way: Tibetan Buddhism Meets the West. Nevada City, CA: Blue Dolphin, 1999.

Paine, Jeffery. Re-enchantment: Tibetan Buddhism Comes to the West. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004.

Penick, Douglas, trans. The Warrior Song of King Gesar. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 1996.

Powers, John. History as Propaganda: Tibetan Exiles versus the People's Republic of China. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. *

Ray, Reginald A. Indestructible Truth: The Living Spirituality of Tibetan Buddhism. Boston: Shambhala, 2000.

_____ . Secret of the Vajra World: the Tantric Buddhism of Tibet. Boston: Shambhala, 2001.

Richardson, Hugh. Tibet and its History. Boston: Shambhala, 1984. *

Rumtek Sangha Duche. Proceedings of the International Karma Kagyu Conference: A Gathering of the 16th Karmapa's Devotees Organized by the Rumtek Sangha Duche. New Delhi, 1996. *

_____ . The Siege of Karmapa. New Delhi, 1999.

Sakya Pandita. Ordinary Wisdom: Sakya Pandita's Treasury of Good Advice. Trans. John T. Davenport. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2000.

Schell, Orville. Virtual Tibet: Searching for Shangri-La from the Himalayas to Hollywood. New York: Metropolitan Books, 2000.

Shakabpa, Tsepon W.D. Tibet: A Political History. New York: Potala Publications, 1984. *

Shakya, Tsering. The Dragon in the Land of Snows: A History of Modern Tibet since 1947. New York: Columbia University Press. 1999.

Sherrill, Martha. The Buddha from Brooklyn: A Tale of Spiritual Seduction. New York: Vintage, 2001.

Smith. E. Gene. Among Tibetan Texts: History and Literature of the Himalayan Plateau. Boston: Wisdom Publications. 2001.

Terhune, Lea. Karmapa: The Politics of Reincarnation. Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2004.

Thurman, Robert. Inner Revolution: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Real Happiness. New York: Riverhead Books. 1998.

Trungpa, Chogyam Rinpoche. Born in Tibet. Boston: Shambhala, 2000.

_____ . Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism. Boston: Shambhala, 2002.

Weatherford, Jack. Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. New York: Crown Publishers, 2004.

Tibetan Works

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Shakabpa, Tsepon W.D. An Advanced Political History of Tibet. 5th edition. Vol. 1. Kalimpong: W.D. Shakabpa House, 1976.

Yugyal, Topga. Assorted Tales on the Art of Thinking. New Delhi, 1994.
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Re: Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption at the Heart

Postby admin » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:48 pm

Index

Akong Rinpoche, 26-27, 80, 83, 121,
131-132, 133-134, 156
See also Rokpa Trust
Atran Khan, Mongol chief, 47
Ambans, Chinese, 95
Ambedkar, Dr. Bhimrao, 153
Amdo province, Tibet, 42, 68-69, 72,
226-227
Asia Times, 210
Asiaweek, 305
Avalokiteshwara, 32, 49, 68, 115, 255

Bachelor, Stephen, 299
Barkhor, Lhasa, 215
Bedi, Frieda, 26, 37, 300
Beijing, China, 14
Bell, Sir Charles, 53, 300-301
Berzin, Alexander, 306-307
Bhandari, Nar Bahadur, chief minister of
Sikkim, 191, 193, 205, 237, 285,
293, 294, 309-310
Bhutan, 254, 288
Black Crown, 20, 90, 99, 121, 145, 249,
266, 274, 101, 303, 308, 311
Bodh Gaya, India, 266
Bodhi Path centers, 89
bodhisattva, 90
Bokar Rinpoche, 262
Bon religion, 41, 43, 54
Britain, 94
Brown, Mick, 65-66, 83, 102, 106, 126,
137, 142, 158, 161, 194, 200-201,
307
Buddhism, 14, 16, 18-22, 34, 41, 43-46,
57, 60, 62, 64, 69, 71, 84, 88, 91,
94, 103-105, 109, 127, 135-136,
145, 153, 164, 167, 179, 197,
211-212, 217-221, 223, 227, 241,
247-248, 249, 251, 254, 257,
259-262, 265-266, 270-274, 291,
297-298, 311
Buddhism Today, 311
Buktham Rinpoche, 137

Chamling, Pawan Kumar, chief minister
of Sikkim, 182-183, 185-186,
188, 191, 205, 311
Chen Lu An, Taiwanese politician, 47,
109, 114-117, 168, 243-244, 309
Chengzu (Yongle) emperor, 61-65, 266,
273, 303
China, 14-15, 19, 21, 24-26, 28, 42,
44-47, 51, 61-64, 67, 70-71,
74-75, 93-94, 103, 131, 136,
138, 141, 144, 154, 165, 172, 178,
183-184, 194-199, 227, 230-232,
243, 251, 253, 258, 260, 266,
270-272, 285, 290-292, 297,
300-301, 309-310
Chodrak Tenphel Rinpoche, Khenpo, xiii,
33, 73, 75, 97-98, 107-108, 111,
117, 156, 161, 172, 211, 235, 237,
242, 262, 299, 301-302
CIA, 199
Cultural Revolution, 70, 80, 89, 218, 221
318

Dalai Luna, 14-22, 26, 29, 31, 33-34,
42, 47-55, 57, 64, 67-76, 92-95,
97-99, 105, 120, 122, 126-127,
134-138, 139-140, 144-147, 154,
159-160, 163-165, 178, 187, 192,
194-200, 202, 204, 206-207, 211,
221, 225-226, 229, 230, 233, 237,
241-243, 250-251, 253, 255-258,
266-267, 269-270, 272-273,
289-292, 295-296, 297-301,
306-307
Dalai Lama, fifth, 46-47, 49-53, 64, 92,
94, 135, 176, 221, 266, 270, 301
Dalai Lama, thirteenth, 52, 54, 73-76,
202, 306
Damchoe Yongdu, 28, 65, 106, 110,
112-114, 119, 180
Darjeeling, India, 82, 194, 287
Dechen Wangmo, 217, 219-220, 225
Dhagpo Kagyu Ling monastery, France,
85, 213, 244, 303
Dharamsala, India, 103, 109, 126, 134,
147, 165, 178, 195, 197, 206, 230,
242-243, 269-270, 302
Diamond Way, 34, 213
Dorje Shugden, 15-20, 299
Douglas, Nik, 301-302
Drepung monastery, Tibet, 33, 47, 48, 51,
74, 78, 270
Dronyer Ngodrup, 110
Drukchen Rinpoche, 87-88
Drupon Dechen, 80
Dudjom Rinpoche, 79, 218
Dugo Bhotia, 193

East India Company, 94
Eastern Tibet, 60, 68, 74, 94, 101, 104,
130, 134, 150, 216

Fourteen Settlements, 71- 73
See also United Party
France, 42, 83, 85, 115, 135, 213, 244,
247, 301, 303
French, Patrick, 69, 302

Gampopa, 302
Ganden monastery, Tibet, 33, 47, 74, 95,
270, 298
Ganden Phodrang, 50-51, 269
See also Tibetan Government-in-
Exile
Genghis Khan, 115
Gorampa Sonam Sengye, 304
Gorkhas, 92-95, 176, 236, 304
Gungthang Tsultrim, Tibetan exile leader,
71-73
See also Fourteen Settlements
Gushri Khan, Mongol chief, 49-53, 176,
266
Gyalo Thondup, Tibetan exile leader,
69-72, 267
See also United Party
Gyaltsab, 27-29, 36, 53, 65-66, 81,
89, 91, 97-99, 104-106, 112,
115-118, 119-121, 124, 129-131,
133-134, 136-137, 139-150, 153-
156, 158-161, 163-173, 175-178,
180-181, 184-189, 191-194, 197,
204-210, 212-213, 215, 222, 227,
229-230, 237, 241-243, 251,
258-259, 263, 267, 275, 278, 287,
292, 298, 306-307, 309
Gyaltsab, fifth, 53
Gyathon Tulku, 79-80, 105, 140, 151,
168

Hinayana, 271
HindustanTimes, 172, 178, 196, 304,
309-310
Hong Kong, 81-82, 84, 89, 196-199,
213, 227, 298, 305-306, 310
Human rights, 298, 309

India, 13-14, 16-20, 22, 24-28, 33, 41,
44, 49, 53, 59, 66, 68-72, 75, 79,
81, 87-89, 93-94, 97, 101, 103,
108, 112, 116, 122, 130, 132-133,
139, 141, 144, 148, 150-151, 153-
155, 159, 168, 171, 175, 177-178,
180, 182-184, 193-198, 200, 204,
206-208, 210, 212, 222-223,
225-226, 228, 231, 237, 242, 246,
249, 259, 262, 266, 268-272,
285-286, 288, 292-293, 296,
300, 304-305, 307-311
India, Ministry of Home Affairs, 104,
184, 200, 305, 310
India, Supreme Court, 206, 210, 255,
262, 268, 277-278
International Karma Kagyu Conference,
298-300, 305, 308-309

Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche, 28, 37,
81-84, 105-106, 112, 115- 116,
119, 123-124, 127, 129-131,
133-134, 145, 212, 218, 246, 267,
275, 287-289, 103, 307-308
Jigme Rinpoche, 115, 244, 303
Joint Action Committee, 122, 131, 140,
150, 152, 156, 160, 167-168, 177,
184-186, 189, 205-206, 237, 287,
292-294
Juchen Thubten Namgyal, Tibetan exile
official, 126, 138, 147

Kagyu International Assembly, 158-159,
161
Kagyupa school, 104-109, 112, 114-116,
119, 12l-122, 127, 134-138,
145-147, 156, 158-159, 161,
164, 166, 173, 175-177, 195, 206,
211-213, 218, 223, 226, 229, 236,
241, 244, 246-247, 249-251, 254,
257-260, 262-263, 266, 270-271,
274, 289, 293, 298-301, 303,
305-306, 308-309
Kalimpong, India, 88-90, 221, 245, 262,
287, 294
Kalu Rinpoche, 36, 110, 112, 213, 297
Kangyur, 23, 104
Karmapa, 14-15, 18-24, 26-38,
44-48, 51, 53, 57, 59-69, 71-99,
101-114, 116-117, 119-145,
147-150, 152-160, 163-167,
169-173, 175-185, 188-189,
191-197, 199-201, 203-213,
216-217, 220, 222-224, 226-211,
235-246, 248-252, 254-260,
262, 266-268, 270-275, 278, 281,
287-292, 294-304
Karmapa, fifth, 46, 60-62, 64, 77, 273,
303
Karmapa, second, 60, 90-91
Karmapa, seventeenth, candidates, 18,
20-21, 88, 92, 101, 109, 121-122,
126, 139, 145, 147, 155, 170-171,
319
176, 211, 213, 227, 229, 235-236,
242, 251, 257, 266-267, 271
Karmapa, tenth, 51, 176, 273
Karmapa, third, 20, 90
Kham province, Tibet, 57, 59, 68-69,
74-75, 77, 89, 104-105, 107, 122,
218-220, 210-211, 267, 270, 272,
289
Kublai Khan, Mongol chief, 44, 62
Kundun, 42, 253
Kyichod Apel, Duke of Lhasa, 48-49, 301

Lehnert, Tomek, 297, 307
Lhasa, Tibet, 1, 5, 8-9, 14, 27, 35, 42,
46-54, 59, 67, 69, 74-76, 78, 89,
92-97, 103-105, 133, 135, 159,
184, 192, 194-195, 203, 215-221,
223-228, 230-231, 258, 267, 270,
289, 298, 300-301, 304
London Independent, 216, 239, 303, 111
Lungtog Dawa, 155-156, 158, 160, 167,
171, 189-190
Lungshar, Tsepon, Tibetan official, 74-76,
306

Madhyamaka, 32, 223, 271, 304
Mahamudra, 59-60, 63, 271
Mahayana, 271, 273
Maheshwari, Anil, 98, 168, 172, 237,
302-104, 309, 31 J
Marpa, 44, 246, 247, 270
Martin, Michelle, 125, 297, 306-307, 309
Milarepa, 44, 58, 261-262
Mipham Rinpoche, 216-220, 222-228,
230-231
Mongols, Qoshot band, 49, 266
Monlam, 46-47, 223

Naher, Gaby, 23, 26, 88, 102-103, 108,
194, 200, 297, 299, 103-105,
309-310
Nationalism, 298
Nepal, 20, 25, 34, 69-71, 88, 91-96, 111,
115, 120, 123, 132, 150, 158-159,
176, 184, 195-197, 199, 228-229,
231, 266, 288, 294, 304
New Zealand, 10, 268, 274, 298, 302-303,
306
nirvana, 2
Nobel Peace Prize, xi, 15, 101, 301
Norbu, Dawa, 51
Nydahl, Ole and Hannah, xiii, 34-36, 38,
80, 212-213, 239, 247, 262, 300,
305, 309, 319
Nyingmapa school, 266

Ogyen Trinley, candidate for seventeenth
Karmapa, 14, 19-21, 23, 26-29,
31-32, 34, 66, 73, 80, 88, 91-92,
101, 103, 116, 125-126, 133-135,
137-141, 143-149, 154-156,
161, 163, 170-173, 175-177, 179,
187, 192, 194-205, 210-212, 217,
228-230, 233, 242, 244, 251-252,
254-255, 257-260, 262-263,
267-268, 278, 297, 306-307,
Omze Yeshey, 158, 165-166, 168-171,
178

Palpung monastery, Tibet, 89, 101,
104-106, 108-109, 122, 134, 148
See also Tai Situ
Panchen Lama, 54, 67, 92-95, 138, 218,
229, 270, 290-291, 301
Panchen Lama, tenth, 54
prediction letters, 164, 181, 203, 206,
232, 251-252, 257, 267, 305,
307-308

Qianlong (Ching Lu) emperor, 93-96,
266
Qing dynasty, 96, 135, 228
Qinghai province, China, 42, 226, 270

Ralang monastery, Sikkim, 29, 263, 287
See also Gyaltsab
Rao, K. Sreedhar, Indian official, 103,
138, 150, 184, 189, 277, 285, 304,
307-309
reincarnates, 189, 195, 206, 253-254,
260, 270-271, 273-274, 287-290,
292, 294-296
religious freedom, 6-7, 17, 19, 22, 62, 67,
165, 258
Reting Rinpoche, 226
Richardson, Hugh, 309
Rokpa Trust, xii, 26-27, 156
Rumtek monastery, Sikkim, India, 5,
9-11, 13-15, 18-20, 23-38, 53,
60, 63-66, 71-73, 78, 80-81, 83-
86, 88-89, 97-98, 102, 104-115,
117, 119-123, 126-134, 137-173,
175-189, 191-194, 198, 204-205,
207-210, 212-213, 215, 222-224,
228-230, 233, 215, 237, 240-241,
243-245, 250-252, 254-255,
257, 259, 262-263, 266-268,
271-272, 277-278, 281, 285-287,
289-296, 299-300, 303, 305,
307-308, 310-311
Rumtek Sangha Duche, 299

Sakya Pandita, 43-44
Sakyapa school, 41, 43-46, 53, 61-62, 73,
132, 159, 218, 224, 226, 246-247,
300, 304
samaya, 166-167, 179, 188, 256, 272
samsara, 3, 16, 59, 245, 260, 272
Samuel, Geoffrey, 135, 274, 298, 302, 306
Samye Ling Tibetan Center, Scotland,
26, 158
Sera monastery, Tibet, 33, 47, 48, 74, 270
Shakabpa, Tsepon W. D., 300-301,
303-304
Shakyamuni Buddha, 2, 8, 24, 59-60,
164, 242, 248, 256, 261, 266, 269
Shamarpa, xiii, 20-21, 27-29, 33-34, 36,
47, 48, 55, 63, 66, 81-84, 87-99,
102-109, 111-117, 119-121,
124-137, 139-150, 153-157,
159, 161, 163-166, 168, 172-173,
175-178, 180-182, 184-185,
187, 189, 191-194, 203-213, 215,
223, 226-233, 236-245, 247,
249-252, 254, 256, 258-260,
262, 266-267, 271, 275, 287-288,
292-295, 297, 299, 301-308, 310
Shamarpa, tenth, 92-93, 95-96, 176, 236,
303-304
Shangri-La, 41, 191, 202-203
Shigatse, Tibet, 42, 47, 54
Shimatsu, Yoichi, 136, 196-203, 252,
298, 306, 310
Sichuan province, China, 42, 227, 270
Sikkim state, India, xi-xii, 5, 9-10, 14,
19, 24-25, 28-29, 34, 37, 65,
69, 70, 72, 78-79, 87, 89, 92,
103-105, 108-109, 112, 117,
122-123, 127, 131-113, 118-141,
144-145, 150-154, 156-160,
162, 165-166, 168-169, 171-172,
175-176, 178, 180-185, 188-189,
191-194, 196-198, 204-210,
233, 237, 240-241, 246, 251, 257,
259-260, 262-263, 266-269,
272, 278, 280, 285-290, 292,
293-296, 298, 305, 308-310
Situ, see Tai Situ
Songsten Gampo, king of Tibet, 41, 49,
221
South China Morning Post, 199
Suren Pradhan, 169-171

Tai Situ, xi-xii, 10, 19, 26-29, 45, 51,
60, 65-66, 73, 79-84, 88-89,
91, 97-99, 101-117, 119-114,
136-181, 183-185, 188-189,
191-195, 197-198, 203-206,
209-213, 215, 227, 229-230,
232-233, 216-244, 251-252,
256-260, 263, 267-268, 274-275,
277, 281, 287-294, 302-308
Tai Situ, eighth, 104, 304
Tai Situ, eleventh, 105, 275
Taiwan, 84, 109, 114-117, 196-198, 213,
243-244
Tibet Autonomous Region, China (TAR),
54, 272
Tashilhunpo monastery, Tibet, 54, 92-91
Tashi Wangdi, Tibetan exile official, 137,
180, 206
Tengyur, 23
Tenzin Namgyal, xii, 108, 120-121, 126,
147, 159, 172-173, 178, 204-205,
207-209, 278
Terhune, Lea, 34, 65, 66, 81, 83, 92, 102,
110, 126, 142, 153, 184, 192, 194,
236, 238-239, 297, 300, 302-311
Thaye Dorje, candidate for seventeenth
Karmapa, 18, 19, 29, 89,
128, 169, 211-213, 215, 217,
219, 221-225, 229-233, 239,
242-252, 254-255, 259-260,
262, 267-268, 311
Thinley, Karma, 302-303, 308
Thrangu, Khenchen, 107-108, 267
321
Tibetan Government-in-Exile, 69, 138,
147, 178, 195, 207, 269-270
See also Dharamsala, India
Time magazine, 211, 110
Topden family, 140, 168, 292
Topga Yugyal Rinpoche, xiii, 28, 81, 112,
117, 121, 126- no, 119-140, 147,
153, 156, 158-160, 169, 173,
175-177, 181, 185, 187-188, 212,
237, 242-243, 267, 288, 299, 102,
108, 311
Tricycle magazine, 299
Trungpa, Chogyam Rinpoche, 26, 17, 81,
83, 120, 213, 297, 110
Tsang province, Tibet, 42-43, 49-54, 69,
75, 93
Tsangpa kings, Tibet, 46, 48-53, 64, 97,
135, 266, 301
Tsongkhapa, 45-47, 270
Tsurphu monastery, Tibet, 27-28, 45,
51, 51, 59-60, 62, 64-65, 68, 71,
71-76, 78, 80, 86, 105-106, 110,
133-134, 147-148, 154-155, 157,
161, 194-198, 200-201, 208-211,
217, 224, 226, 230, 258, 266-267,
270, 278, 287, 289, 302, 306
tulkus, 1-5, 57, 80, 86, 88, 91, 98, 103,
106-107, 116, 138, 140, 145, 147,
154, 183, 195-198, 203, 217, 220,
226, 241, 245, 253-255, 260,
270, 271, 305
Tulku Urgyen, 146-147

U province, Tibet, 42-43, 50
United Party, 69-72, 136, 267, 302
United States, 6, 9, 26, 38, 68, 81, 83, 89,
91, 120, 134-136, 139, 196-197,
199, 211, 246-247, 255, 262, 267,
298

Vajra Mukut, 45, 62, 64, 66, 197-198,
236, 273
See also Black Crown
Vajrayana, 3, 8, 11, 32, 41, 127, 154, 166,
179, 271-273

Washington Post, 20, 299

Yunnan province, China, 42, 51, 270, 290
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Re: Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption at the Heart

Postby admin » Sun Dec 04, 2016 10:49 pm

Photographs

Image
1. Rumtek monastery in Sikkim in 2004.
2. The sixteenth Karmapa in 1962.
3. The author in front of the main gate of Rumtek, with paint damage from humidity.
4. The building on the grounds of Shamar's house near Rumtek where the expelled monks have taken refuge and built a make-shift shrine room at the top.

Image
1. The sixteenth Karmapa performing the Black Crown ceremony.
2. The sixteenth Karmapa at the groundbreaking of the Karmapa Institute in New Delhi followed by Shamar Rinpoche in 1980. After the ceremony, the Karmapa collapsed from pain and Shamar rushed him to a hospital for immediate stomach surgery.
3. The sixteenth Karmapa meeting with the Dalai Lama
4. Ole Nydahl and others carrying the Karmapa's body (kudung) at his funeral at Rumtek in 1981.
5. The sixteenth Karmapa with Ole and Hannah Nydahl at their center in Copenhagen in the mid-seventies.

Image
1. Shamar Rinpoche in a simplified red crown
2. Tai Situ Rinpoche
3. Gyaltsab Rinpoche in Copenhagen in 1989
4. Shamar meets with the Dalai Lama at his residence in Dharamsala in December 1997 to request a meeting for Thaye Dorje and the Dalai Lama. Initially, the Tibetan leader agreed, but then changed his mind after protests from Tai Situ.

Image
1. Ogyen Trinley
2. Situ and Gyaltsab Rinpoches receive the Dalai Lama's confirmation (Buktham Rinpoche") that Ogyen Trinley is the seventeenth Karmapa.
3. Akong Rinpoche.
4. The leaders of the crowd of Tai Situ's supporters demand entrance to the main shrine room at Rumtek on August 2, 1993.

Image
1. Sikkim Home Secretary Sonam Wangdi prepares to open the main shrine room after compelling Rumtek monks to surrender the keys.
2. Rumtek monks try to reenter the monastery to perform the Yarney retreat on the third anniversary of their expulsion.
3. Sikkim elite security forces prevent expelled monks from re-entering Rumtek. In protest, the monks begin a hunger strike a few days later.
4. After he was voted out of office in 1994, former Sikkim Chief Minister Nar Bahadur Bhandari visits Shamar to apologize for his role at Rumtek.
5. Shamar meets with Rumtek monks and hears stories of their expulsion at the International Karma Kagyu Conference in New Delhi, 1996.

Image
1. Thaye Dorje at the Karmapa Institute in 1994.
2. Sakya Trizin, the leader of the Sakya school, with Thaye Dorje in Menlo Park, California, 2003.
3. Shamar and Thaye Dorje in Kalimpong, 1999.
4. Thaye Dorje's mother, Dechen Wangmo.
5. Thaye Dorje's father, Mipham Rinpoche.

Image
1. Thaye Dorje wearing the Gampopa Hat.
2. Shamar Rinpoche giving a blessing.

Image
1. Thaye Dorje sailing off of California
2. Shamar and Thaye Dorje at Shamar's house in Kalimpong.
3. Thaye Dorje traveling in Europe
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