Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parry

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 2:59 am

Al Gore v. the Media
by Robert Parry
February 1, 2000

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To read the major newspapers and to watch the TV pundit shows, one can't avoid the impression that many in the national press corps have decided that Vice President Al Gore is unfit to be elected the next president of the United States.

Across the board -- from The Washington Post to The Washington Times, from The New York Times to the New York Post, from NBC's cable networks to the traveling campaign press corps -- journalists don't even bother to disguise their contempt for Gore anymore.

At one early Democratic debate, a gathering of about 300 reporters in a nearby press room hissed and hooted at Gore's answers. Meanwhile, every perceived Gore misstep, including his choice of clothing, is treated as a new excuse to put him on a psychiatrist's couch and find him wanting.

Journalists freely call him "delusional," "a liar" and "Zelig." Yet, to back up these sweeping denunciations, the media has relied on a series of distorted quotes and tendentious interpretations of his words, at times following scripts written by the national Republican leadership.

In December, for instance, the news media generated dozens of stories about Gore's supposed claim that he discovered the Love Canal toxic waste dump. "I was the one that started it all," he was quoted as saying. This "gaffe" then was used to recycle other situations in which Gore allegedly exaggerated his role or, as some writers put it, told "bold-faced lies."

But behind these examples of Gore's "lies" was some very sloppy journalism. The Love Canal flap started when The Washington Post and The New York Times misquoted Gore on a key point and cropped out the context of another sentence to give readers a false impression of what he meant.

The error was then exploited by national Republicans and amplified endlessly by the rest of the news media, even after the Post and Times grudgingly filed corrections.

Almost as remarkable, though, is how the two newspapers finally agreed to run corrections. They were effectively shamed into doing so by high school students in New Hampshire and by an Internet site called The Daily Howler, edited by a stand-up comic named Bob Somerby. [http://www.dailyhowler.com/]

Though the major media often portrays the Internet as a bastion for crazed conspiracy theories, the nation's prestige newspapers appeared to have sunk into their own pattern of reckless journalism.

The Love Canal quote controversy began on Nov. 30 when Gore was speaking to a group of high school students in Concord, N.H. He was exhorting the students to reject cynicism and to recognize that individual citizens can effect important changes.

As an example, he cited a high school girl from Toone, Tenn., a town that had experienced problems with toxic waste. She brought the issue to the attention of Gore's congressional office in the late 1970s.

"I called for a congressional investigation and a hearing," Gore told the students. "I looked around the country for other sites like that. I found a little place in upstate New York called Love Canal. Had the first hearing on that issue, and Toone, Tennessee -- that was the one that you didn't hear of. But that was the one that started it all."

After the hearings, Gore said, "we passed a major national law to clean up hazardous dump sites. And we had new efforts to stop the practices that ended up poisoning water around the country. We've still got work to do. But we made a huge difference. And it all happened because one high school student got involved."

The context of Gore's comment was clear. What sparked his interest in the toxic-waste issue was the situation in Toone -- "that was the one that you didn't hear of. But that was the one that started it all."

After learning about the Toone situation, Gore looked for other examples and "found" a similar case at Love Canal. He was not claiming to have been the first one to discover Love Canal, which already had been evacuated. He simply needed other case studies for the hearings.

The next day, The Washington Post stripped Gore's comments of their context and gave them a negative twist. "Gore boasted about his efforts in Congress 20 years ago to publicize the dangers of toxic waste," the Post reported. "'I found a little place in upstate New York called Love Canal,' he said, referring to the Niagara homes evacuated in August 1978 because of chemical contamination. 'I had the first hearing on this issue.' … Gore said his efforts made a lasting impact. 'I was the one that started it all,' he said." [WP, Dec. 1, 1999]

The New York Times ran a slightly less contentious story with the same false quote: "I was the one that started it all."

The Republican National Committee spotted Gore's alleged boast and was quick to fax around its own take. "Al Gore is simply unbelievable -- in the most literal sense of that term," declared Republican National Committee Chairman Jim Nicholson. "It's a pattern of phoniness -- and it would be funny if it weren't also a little scary."

The GOP release then doctored Gore's quote a bit more. After all, it would be grammatically incorrect to have said, "I was the one that started it all." So, the Republican handout fixed Gore's grammar to say, "I was the one who started it all."

In just one day, the key quote had transformed from "that was the one that started it all" to "I was the one that started it all" to "I was the one who started it all."

Instead of taking the offensive against these misquotes, Gore tried to head off the controversy by clarifying his meaning and apologizing if anyone got the wrong impression. But the fun was just beginning.

The national pundit shows quickly picked up the story of Gore's new exaggeration.

"Let's talk about the 'love' factor here," chortled Chris Matthews of CNBC's Hardball. "Here's the guy who said he was the character Ryan O'Neal was based on in ‘Love Story.’ … It seems to me … he's now the guy who created the Love Canal [case]. I mean, isn't this getting ridiculous? … Isn't it getting to be delusionary?"

Matthews turned to his baffled guest, Lois Gibbs, the Love Canal resident who is widely credited with bringing the issue to public attention. She sounded confused about why Gore would claim credit for discovering Love Canal, but defended Gore's hard work on the issue.

"I actually think he's done a great job," Gibbs said. "I mean, he really did work, when nobody else was working, on trying to define what the hazards were in this country and how to clean it up and helping with the Superfund and other legislation." [CNBC's Hardball, Dec. 1, 1999]

The next morning, Post political writer Ceci Connolly highlighted Gore's boast and placed it in his alleged pattern of falsehoods. "Add Love Canal to the list of verbal missteps by Vice President Gore," she wrote. "The man who mistakenly claimed to have inspired the movie 'Love Story' and to have invented the Internet says he didn't quite mean to say he discovered a toxic waste site." [WP, Dec. 2, 1999]

That night, CNBC's Hardball returned to Gore's Love Canal quote by playing the actual clip but altering the context by starting Gore's comments with the words, "I found a little town…"

"It reminds me of Snoopy thinking he's the Red Baron," laughed Chris Matthews. "I mean how did he get this idea? Now you've seen Al Gore in action. I know you didn't know that he was the prototype for Ryan O'Neal's character in ‘Love Story’ or that he invented the Internet. He now is the guy who discovered Love Canal."

Matthews compared the vice president to "Zelig," the Woody Allen character whose face appeared at an unlikely procession of historic events. "What is it, the Zelig guy who keeps saying, 'I was the main character in ‘Love Story.’ I invented the Internet. I invented Love Canal."

Former secretary of labor Robert Reich, who favors Gore's rival, former Sen. Bill Bradley, added, "I don't know why he feels that he has to exaggerate and make some of this stuff up."

The following day, Rupert Murdoch's New York Post elaborated on Gore's pathology of deception. "Again, Al Gore has told a whopper," the Post wrote. "Again, he's been caught red-handed and again, he has been left sputtering and apologizing. This time, he falsely took credit for breaking the Love Canal story. … Yep, another Al Gore bold-faced lie."

The editorial continued: "Al Gore appears to have as much difficulty telling the truth as his boss, Bill Clinton. But Gore's lies are not just false, they're outrageously, stupidly false. It's so easy to determine that he's lying, you have to wonder if he wants to be found out.

"Does he enjoy the embarrassment? Is he hell-bent on destroying his own campaign? … Of course, if Al Gore is determined to turn himself into a national laughingstock, who are we to stand in his way?"

On ABC's "This Week" pundit show, there was head-shaking amazement about Gore's supposed Love Canal lie.

"Gore, again, revealed his Pinocchio problem," declared former Clinton adviser George Stephanopoulos. "Says he was the model for 'Love Story,' created the Internet. And this time, he sort of discovered Love Canal."

A bemused Cokie Roberts chimed in, "Isn't he saying that he really discovered Love Canal when he had hearings on it after people had been evacuated?"

"Yeah," added Bill Kristol, editor of Murdoch's Weekly Standard. Kristol then read Gore's supposed quote: "I found a little place in upstate New York called Love Canal. I was the one that started it all." [ABC’s This Week, Dec. 5, 1999]

The Love Canal controversy soon moved beyond the Washington-New York power axis.

On Dec. 6, The Buffalo News ran an editorial entitled, "Al Gore in Fantasyland," that echoed the words of RNC chief Nicholson. It stated, "Never mind that he didn't invent the Internet, serve as the model for 'Love Story' or blow the whistle on Love Canal. All of this would be funny if it weren't so disturbing."

The next day, the right-wing Washington Times judged Gore crazy. "The real question is how to react to Mr. Gore's increasingly bizarre utterings," the Times wrote. "Webster's New World Dictionary defines 'delusional' thusly: 'The apparent perception, in a nervous or mental disorder, of some thing external that is actually not present … a belief in something that is contrary to fact or reality, resulting from deception, misconception, or a mental disorder.'"

The editorial denounced Gore as "a politician who not only manufactures gross, obvious lies about himself and his achievements but appears to actually believe these confabulations."

But The Washington Times' own credibility was shaky. For its editorial attack on Gore, the newspaper not only printed the bogus quote, "I was the one that started it all," but attributed the quote to The Associated Press, which had actually quoted Gore correctly, ("That was the one...").

The Washington Times' challenge to Gore's sanity also was reminiscent of its 1988 publication of false rumors that Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis had undergone psychiatric treatment. [As for the Times' insinuations about Gore's "delusional" behavior, it might be noted that the newspaper's founder and financial backer, South Korean theocrat Sun Myung Moon, considers himself the Messiah.]

Yet, while the national media was excoriating Gore, the Concord students were learning more than they had expected about how media and politics work in modern America.

For days, the students pressed for a correction from The Washington Post and The New York Times. But the prestige papers balked, insisting that the error was insignificant.

"The part that bugs me is the way they nit pick," said Tara Baker, a Concord High junior. "[But] they should at least get it right." [AP, Dec. 14, 1999]

When the David Letterman show made Love Canal the jumping off point for a joke list: "Top 10 Achievements Claimed by Al Gore," the students responded with a press release entitled "Top 10 Reasons Why Many Concord High Students Feel Betrayed by Some of the Media Coverage of Al Gore's Visit to Their School." [Boston Globe, Dec. 26, 1999]

The Web site, The Daily Howler, also was hectoring what it termed a "grumbling editor" at the Post to correct the error.

Finally, on Dec. 7, a week after Gore's comment, the Post published a partial correction, tucked away as the last item in a corrections box. But the Post still misled readers about what Gore actually said.

The Post correction read: "In fact, Gore said, 'That was the one that started it all,' referring to the congressional hearings on the subject that he called."

The revision fit with the Post's insistence that the two quotes meant pretty much the same thing, but again, the newspaper was distorting Gore's clear intent by attaching "that" to the wrong antecedent. From the full quote, it's obvious the "that" refers to the Toone toxic waste case, not to Gore's hearings.

Three days later, The New York Times followed suit with a correction of its own, but again without fully explaining Gore's position. "They fixed how they misquoted him, but they didn't tell the whole story," commented Lindsey Roy, another Concord High junior.

While the students voiced disillusionment, the two reporters involved showed no remorse for their mistake. "I really do think that the whole thing has been blown out of proportion," said Katharine Seelye of the Times. "It was one word."

The Post's Ceci Connolly even defended her inaccurate rendition of Gore's quote as something of a journalistic duty. "We have an obligation to our readers to alert them [that] this [Gore's false boasting] continues to be something of a habit," she said. [AP, Dec. 14, 1999]

The half-hearted corrections also did not stop newspapers around the country from continuing to use the bogus quote.

A Dec. 9 editorial in the Lancaster [Pa.] New Era even published the polished misquote that the Republican National Committee had stuck in a press release: "I was the one who started it all."

The New Era then went on to psychoanalyze Gore. "Maybe the lying is a symptom of a more deeply-rooted problem: Al Gore doesn't know who he is," the editorial stated. "The vice president is a serial prevaricator."

In the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, writer Michael Ruby concluded that "the Gore of '99" was full of lies. He "suddenly discovers elastic properties in the truth," Ruby declared. "He invents the Internet, inspires the fictional hero of 'Love Story,' blows the whistle on Love Canal. Except he didn't really do any of those things." [Dec. 12, 1999]

The National Journal's Stuart Taylor Jr. cited the Love Canal case as proof that President Clinton was a kind of political toxic waste contaminant. The problem was "the Clintonization of Al Gore, who increasingly apes his boss in fictionalizing his life story and mangling the truth for political gain. Gore -- self-described inspiration for the novel Love Story, discoverer of Love Canal, co-creator of the Internet," Taylor wrote. [National Journal, Dec. 18, 1999]

On Dec. 19, GOP chairman Nicholson was back on the offensive. Far from apologizing for the RNC's misquotes, Nicholson was reprising the allegations of Gore's falsehoods that had been repeated so often that they had taken on the color of truth: "Remember, too, that this is the same guy who says he invented the Internet, inspired Love Story and discovered Love Canal."

More than two weeks after the Post correction, the bogus quote was still spreading. The Providence Journal lashed out at Gore in an editorial that reminded readers that Gore had said about Love Canal, "I was the one that started it all." The editorial then turned to the bigger picture:

"This is the third time in the last few months that Mr. Gore has made a categorical assertion that is -- well, untrue. … There is an audacity about Mr. Gore's howlers that is stunning. … Perhaps it is time to wonder what it is that impels Vice President Gore to make such preposterous claims, time and again." [Providence Journal, Dec. 23, 1999]

On New Year's Eve, a column in The Washington Times returned again to the theme of Gore's pathological lies.

Entitled "Liar, Liar; Gore's Pants on Fire," the column by Jackie Mason and Raoul Felder concluded that "when Al Gore lies, it's without any apparent reason. Mr. Gore had already established his credits on environmental issues, for better or worse, and had even been anointed 'Mr. Ozone.' So why did he have to tell students in Concord, New Hampshire, ‘I found a little place in upstate New York called Love Canal. I had the first hearing on the issue. I was the one that started it all.'" [WT, Dec. 31, 1999]

The characterization of Gore as a clumsy liar continued into the new year. Again in The Washington Times, R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. put Gore's falsehoods in the context of a sinister strategy:

"Deposit so many deceits and falsehoods on the public record that the public and the press simply lose interest in the truth. This, the Democrats thought, was the method behind Mr. Gore's many brilliantly conceived little lies. Except that Mr. Gore's lies are not brilliantly conceived. In fact, they are stupid. He gets caught every time … Just last month, Mr. Gore got caught claiming … to have been the whistle-blower for 'discovering Love Canal.'" [WT, Jan. 7, 2000]

It was unclear where Tyrrell got the quote, "discovering Love Canal," since not even the false quotes had put those words in Gore's mouth. But Tyrrell's description of what he perceived as Gore's strategy of flooding the public debate with "deceits and falsehoods" might fit better with what the news media and the Republicans had been doing to Gore.

Beyond Love Canal, the other prime examples of Gore's "lies" -- inspiring the male lead in Love Story and working to create the Internet -- also stemmed from a quarrelsome reading of his words, followed by exaggeration and ridicule rather than a fair assessment of how his comments and the truth matched up.

The earliest of these Gore "lies," dating back to 1997, was Gore's expressed belief that he and his wife Tipper had served as models for the lead characters in the sentimental bestseller and movie, Love Story.

When the author, Erich Segal, was asked about Gore's impression, he stated that the preppy hockey-playing male lead, Oliver Barrett IV, indeed was modeled after Gore and Gore's Harvard roommate, actor Tommy Lee Jones. But Segal said the female lead, Jenny, was not modeled after Tipper Gore. [NYT, Dec. 14, 1997]

Rather than treating this distinction as a minor point of legitimate confusion, the news media concluded that Gore had willfully lied. The media made the case an indictment against Gore’s honesty.

In doing so, however, the media repeatedly misstated the facts, insisting that Segal had denied that Gore was the model for the lead male character. In reality, Segal had confirmed that Gore was, at least partly, the inspiration for the character, Barrett, played by Ryan O'Neal.

Some journalists seemed to understand the nuance but still could not resist denigrating Gore's honesty.

For instance, in its attack on Gore over the Love Canal quote, the Boston Herald conceded that Gore "did provide material" for Segal's book, but the newspaper added that it was "for a minor character." [Boston Herald, Dec. 5, 1999] That, of course, was untrue, since the Barrett character was one of Love Story's two principal characters

The media's treatment of the Internet comment followed a similar course. Gore's statement may have been poorly phrased, but its intent was clear: he was trying to say that he worked in Congress to help develop the Internet. Gore wasn’t claiming to have "invented" the Internet or to have been the "father of the Internet," as many journalists have asserted.

Gore's actual comment, in an interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer that aired on March 9, 1999, was as follows: "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

Republicans quickly went to work on Gore's statement. In press releases, they noted that the precursor of the Internet, called ARPANET, existed in 1971, a half dozen years before Gore entered Congress. But ARPANET was a tiny networking of about 30 universities, a far cry from today's "information superhighway," ironically a phrase widely credited to Gore.

As the media clamor arose about Gore's supposed claim that he had invented the Internet, Gore's spokesman Chris Lehane tried to explain. He noted that Gore "was the leader in Congress on the connections between data transmission and computing power, what we call information technology. And those efforts helped to create the Internet that we know today." [AP, March 11, 1999]

There was no disputing Lehane's description of Gore's lead congressional role in developing today's Internet. But the media was off and running.

Routinely, the reporters lopped off the introductory clause "during my service in the United States Congress" or simply jumped to word substitutions, asserting that Gore claimed that he "invented" the Internet which carried the notion of a hands-on computer engineer.

Whatever imprecision may have existed in Gore's original comment, it paled beside the distortions of what Gore clearly meant. While excoriating Gore's phrasing as an exaggeration, the media engaged in its own exaggeration.

Yet, faced with the national media putting a hostile cast on his Internet statement -- that he was willfully lying -- Gore chose again to express his regret at his choice of words.

Now, with the Love Canal controversy, this media pattern of distortion has returned with a vengeance. The national news media has put a false quote into Gore's mouth and then extrapolated from it to the point of questioning his sanity. Even after the quote was acknowledged to be wrong, the words continued to be repeated, again becoming part of Gore's record.

From the media’s hostile tone, one might conclude that reporters have reached a collective decision that Gore should be disqualified from the campaign.

At times, the media has jettisoned any pretext of objectivity. According to various accounts of the first Democratic debate in Hanover, N.H., reporters openly mocked Gore as they sat in a nearby press room and watched the debate on television.

Several journalists later described the incident, but without overt criticism of their colleagues. As The Daily Howler observed, Time's Eric Pooley cited the reporters' reaction only to underscore how Gore was failing in his "frenzied attempt to connect."

"The ache was unmistakable -- and even touching -- but the 300 media types watching in the press room at Dartmouth were, to use the appropriate technical term, totally grossed out by it," Pooley wrote. "Whenever Gore came on too strong, the room erupted in a collective jeer, like a gang of 15-year-old Heathers cutting down some hapless nerd."

Hotline's Howard Mortman described the same behavior as the reporters "groaned, laughed and howled" at Gore's comments.

Later, during an appearance on C-SPAN's Washington Journal, Salon's Jake Tapper cited the Hanover incident, too. "I can tell you that the only media bias I have detected in terms of a group media bias was, at the first debate between Bill Bradley and Al Gore, there was hissing for Gore in the media room up at Dartmouth College. The reporters were hissing Gore, and that's the only time I've ever heard the press room boo or hiss any candidate of any party at any event." [See The Daily Howler, http://www.dailyhowler.com/, Dec. 14, 1999]

Traditionally, journalists pride themselves in maintaining deadpan expressions in such public settings, at most chuckling at a comment or raising an eyebrow, but never demonstrating derision for a public figure.

Reasons for this widespread media contempt for Gore vary. Conservative outlets, such as Rev. Moon's Washington Times and Murdoch's media empire, clearly want to ensure the election of a Republican conservative to the White House. They are always eager to advance that cause.

In the mainstream press, many reporters may feel that savaging Gore protects them from the "liberal" label that can so damage a reporter's career. Others simply might be venting residual anger over President Clinton's survival of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. They might believe that Gore's political destruction would be a fitting end to the Clinton administration.

Reporters apparently sense, too, that there is no career danger in showing open hostility toward Clinton's vice president.

Yet, the national media's prejudice against Gore -- now including fabrication of damaging quotes and misrepresentation of his meaning -- raises a troubling question about this year's election and the future health of American democracy:

How can voters have any hope of expressing an informed judgment when the media intervenes to transform one of the principal candidates -- an individual who, by all accounts, is a well-qualified public official and a decent family man -- into a national laughingstock?

What hope does American democracy have when the media can misrepresent a candidate’s words so thoroughly that they become an argument for his mental instability -- and all the candidate feels he can do about the misquotes is to apologize?

As The Daily Howler's Somerby observes, the concern about deception and its corrosive effect on democracy dates back to the ancient Greeks.

"Democracy won't work, the great Socrates cried, because sophists will create mass confusion," Somerby recalled at his Web site. "Here in our exciting, much-hyped new millennium, the Great Greek's vision remains crystal clear." [The Daily Howler, Jan. 13, 2000]
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:01 am

Moon's Billions & Washington's Blind Eye
by Robert Parry
(c) Copyright 1997

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Somewhere, some political Einstein must have figured out a mathematical equation for computing how much money it takes to gain "respectability" in Washington. It would read something like "perceived respectability equals genuine decency or depravity (expressed in plus or minus numbers), plus money spent on favorable image-building minus money spent by detractors to boost the negatives, times some factor for the quality of the pro and con spinmasters."

Over the past quarter century, Rev. Sun Myung Moon is someone who has practiced the limits of this "theory of perceived respectability." He has spent billions of dollars in the United States to gain a political standing that would seem unthinkable without counting the money.

In Korea during his early years as a "messiah," Moon lustily took on the job of "blessing the wombs" of Korean women supposedly corrupted by Satan's seduction of Eve eons ago. Because of these "purification" rituals, he spent some time in jail on morals charges.

Since then, Moon has declared his goal of ruling the world through a Korea-based theocracy that would "digest" those foolish enough to try to retain their individuality. During Moon's first forays into the United States, hundreds of anguished parents charged that he was "brainwashing" their children into becoming robotic followers who hawked flowers and cheap toys.

Next, a congressional investigation in the late 1970s exposed Moon as an intelligence agent for the South Korean government which was engaged in a clandestine operation to penetrate the U.S. Congress, Executive Branch, news media and academia. U.S. intelligence files of the time showed that Moon had close connections, too, with leading Asian organized crime figures.

Expanding his unsavory connections in 1980, Moon's operatives rushed to congratulate right-wing military thugs who seized power along with drug lords in Bolivia, an event that became known as the Cocaine Coup and gave rise to the modern cocaine cartels.

But Moon must have understood the "respectability" equation well. With the election of Ronald Reagan, Moon began pouring hundreds of millions of dollars a year into conservative causes. He launched The Washington Times daily newspaper in 1982. He funded dozens of front groups. He bought political allies by the score with fat speaking fees and side business deals. His costly operations blasted anyone who crossed the Reagan-Bush administrations.

Justice Protection

Despite a brief stint in federal prison for tax fraud -- a prosecution which Reagan's Justice Department tried unsuccessfully to halt -- Moon saw his "respectability" climb through the 1980s. According to Justice Department documents recently released under the Freedom of Information Act, Moon also won protection from the Reagan-Bush administrations from any new criminal investigation.

Federal authorities rebuffed hundreds of requests -- many from common citizens -- for examination of Moon's foreign ties and money sources. Typical of the responses was a May 18, 1989, letter from assistant attorney general Carol T. Crawford rejecting the possibility that Moon's organization be required to divulge its foreign-funded propaganda under the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA).

"With respect to FARA, the Department is faced with First Amendment considerations involving the free exercise of religion," Crawford stated. "As you know, the First Amendment's protection of religious freedom is not limited to the traditional, well-established religions."


A 1992 PBS documentary about Moon's political empire and its free-spending habits started another flurry of citizen demands for an investigation, according to the Justice Department files.

One letter stated, "I write in consternation and disgust at the apparent support, or at least the sheltering, of the Reverend Sun Myung Moon, a foreign agent ... who has subverted the American political system for the past 20 years. ... Did Reagan and/or Bush receive financial support from Moon or his agents during any of their election campaigns in violation of federal law?" The names of letter writers were withheld for privacy reasons.

Another letter complained that "apparently Moon gave the Bush and Reagan campaigns millions of dollars in support and helped fund the [Nicaraguan] contras as well as sponsoring rallys [sic] in 50 states to support the Persian Gulf war. No wonder the Justice Department turns a blind eye?"

"I feel it is necessary to find out who is financing the operation and why other countries are trying to direct the policies of the United States," wrote another citizen. "If even one-half of the allegations are true, Moon and his assistants belong in jail rather than being welcomed and supported at the highest level of Washington."

The 'Green Card' Defense

As demands mounted for Moon and his front groups to register as foreign agents, the Justice Department added a new argument to its reasons to say no. In an Aug. 19, 1992, letter, assistant attorney general Robert S. Mueller dismissed a suggestion that the Moon-backed American Freedom Council should register under FARA because Moon, a South Korean citizen, had obtained U.S. resident-alien status -- or a "green card."

"In the absence of a foreign principal, there is no requirement for registration," Mueller wrote. "The Reverend Sun Myung Moon enjoys the status of permanent resident alien in the United States and therefore does not fall within FARA's definition of foreign principal. It follows that the Act is not applicable to the [American Freedom] Council because of its association with Reverend Moon."

The rote denials continued with little change into the Clinton years. But the legal situation with Moon may be in flux. As immigration laws were being toughened in 1996 to permit easier deportation of aliens convicted of past crimes, Moon -- a felon from his tax-evasion conviction -- relocated his base of operation from New York to Uruguay.

Citing privacy laws, U.S. officials declined to tell me if Moon has renounced his "green card." Moon's spokesmen also have not responded to questions about Moon's immigration status. A consular official at Uruguay's embassy in Washington told me that Moon does not now have residency status in Uruguay and still travels to Uruguay with a multiple-entry visa on his South Korean passport. But if Moon does shift his permanent residency to Uruguay, that could eliminate some obstacles to investigation of his political operations here.

Still, the Reagan-Bush administrations went beyond just blocking criminal investigations of Moon. Despite evidence of Moon's collaboration with South Korean intelligence in the 1970s and his high-profile support of the Bolivian Cocaine Coup regime in 1980, the Republicans seem to have shut down any significant intelligence collection about Moon's activities after taking power in 1981.

Responses to recent FOIA requests indicate that only scattered newspaper clips about Moon found their way into U.S. intelligence files during the Reagan-Bush years. In a recent interview, a senior U.S. official confirmed that there is little fresh intelligence about the secret sources of Moon's money or his possible collaboration in the foreign penetration of U.S. institutions.

Spying on Americans

Perhaps even more remarkable, the Reagan administration showed greater respect for Moon's constitutional rights than those of some U.S. citizens. Starting in 1981, the FBI cooperated with one of Moon's front groups during a five-year nationwide investigation of the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES), a domestic organization critical of Reagan's policies in Central America, according to FBI documents cited by The Boston Globe. [April 20, 1988]

In 1981, the FBI began collecting reports from Moon's Collegiate Association for the Research of Principles (CARP) which was spying on CISPES supporters. Those reports came from CARP members at 10 university campuses around the United States and included the purported political beliefs of Reagan's critics. One CARP report called a CISPES supporter "well-educated in Marxism" while other CARP reports attached "clippings culled from communist-inspired front groups."

The Globe reported that Frank Varelli, who worked for the FBI from 1981-84 coordinating the CISPES probe, said an FBI agent paid members of the Moon organization at Southern Methodist University while the Moon activists were raiding and disrupting CISPES rallies. "Every week, an agent I worked with used to go to SMU to pay the Moonies," Varelli said in an interview. Because of the CARP harassment, CISPES closed its SMU chapter.


Moon did not lose his inside track at the White House until Bill Clinton's election in 1992. But Moon continues to ride high in Washington. Moon sustains The Washington Times despite a never-ending hemorrhage of red ink and he keeps up close political ties with prominent Republicans. Moon's Washington Times Foundation flashed the cash again recently, with a $1 million-plus donation to George Bush's presidential library in Texas. [WP, Nov. 24, 1997]

'Cemetery-Gate'

Moon's news outlets also continue to pay dividends by keeping the Democrats on the defensive. In late November, Insight magazine and The Washington Times trumpeted charges that the Clinton administration had traded plots at Arlington National Cemetery for campaign donations. Though citing no named sources, the explosive charge reverberated through the conservative talk-radio echo chamber and bounced into the mainstream press.
The Clinton administration was forced to disclose the names of 69 people who had been granted burial in Arlington but who didn't meet the strict criteria. Some turned out to be Republicans (such as the wife of Chief Justice Warren Burger). Others were national luminaries (such as Justice Thurgood Marshall). Another was an ex-Marine-turned-policeman who died in a shootout.

Still, Republicans in Congress kept digging until they found one major Democratic contributor -- Larry Lawrence -- who was buried at Arlington after dying in office as U.S. ambassador to Switzerland. GOP congressmen found records suggesting that Lawrence had fabricated a claim that he suffered a wound aboard a World War II cargo ship.

Insight's managing editor Paul Rodriguez acknowledged that the cemetery-plots-for-cash story was only "allegations and suggestions." But the story was justified, he said, by "this horrible perception, rightly or wrongly, that this guy [Clinton] will sell anything." [WP, Nov. 25, 1997]

Inside Moon's church, however, other troubles have mounted. Hyo Jin, Moon's eldest son from his current marriage, was treated for a cocaine addiction, saw his wife flee claiming physical abuse and filed for bankruptcy to avoid court-ordered support payments. The Hyo Jin situation and other family crises strained the faith of longtime followers who were taught that Moon and his family were examples of human perfection. By most accounts, the number of U.S. church members has dropped to around 3,000.

The dwindling church membership could raise another legal question, if it becomes apparent that Moon's business-media-political empire is a giant tail wagging a smaller-smaller-and-smaller dog. In a two-part investigative series on Nov. 23-24, The Washington Post reported that even Moon acknowledges this disappearing church.

"Moon has declared that 'the period of religion is passing away' and his Unification Church must be dissolved," one article stated. It quoted Moon as telling his followers to "cut down" their church and work through the Moon-sponsored Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, a non-profit corporation. But non-profits do not carry the First Amendment protections that churches do.

'Dung-Eating Dogs'

The Post also quoted some new anti-American declarations by Moon. "Satan created this kind of Hell on Earth," Moon said about the United States. Moon also lambasted American women. They "have inherited the line of prostitutes," he declared. "American women are even worse because they practice free sex just because they enjoy it."

Lashing out again last May, Moon denounced America for tolerating homosexuals, whom he likened to "dirty dung-eating dogs." For Americans who "truly love such dogs," Moon said, "they also become like dung-eating dogs and produce that quality of life."

The Post series clearly touched a raw nerve. Dong Moon Joo, president of Moon's Washington Times, took out a full-page ad in the Post on Nov. 28 complaining that the criticism was inappropriate during "the Thanksgiving season." In a press release, the Unification Church said it was "exploring the possibility of legal action against The Washington Post and its writers for malicious persecution of a minority religion with intent to incite bodily injury."

But on Nov. 29, Moon's church weaknesses were on display again, with "Blessing '97" which Moon had touted as a mass wedding where he would pair up 3.6 million followers worldwide. Yet, at the main event at RFK Stadium in Washington only 1,300 brides and grooms could be rounded up for the ceremony. Moon's organizers padded the numbers with already married couples and non-church members who were lured to a music concert with free or discounted tickets.

The next day, The Washington Times led the paper with a glowing front-page story about the ceremony. The article accepted the 3.6-million-couple figure as fact. The story also quoted one participant declaring that the RFK event was "bigger than I thought it would be." Clearly, Moon still has the bucks to make his employees spin the stories the way he likes.


Over the past quarter century, Moon has been the master at spending billions of dollars to make the "respectability" equation work for him.
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:04 am

One Mother's Tale: Moon & An Nyu Freshman
by Robert Parry
(c) Copyright 1997

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Like many parents, Debbie Diglio was nervous when her only son, John Stacey, went off to college. But John was a stable, high-achieving, all-American young man who seemed the sort who might succeed in staying out of trouble.

So when John left their home in central New Jersey and registered at New York University in 1992, Debbie Diglio, a nurse by profession, hoped for the best. But, then, shortly into his first semester, she said, "he went away one weekend and vanished."

She first got a sense of trouble when she called his NYU room with happy family news. "My sister had a baby and I called to tell John," she recalled, still with a quaver in her voice. "His roommate said he had gone away with a few new friends he had met."

The roommate remembered that the "new friends" were from a group, known by the acronym, CARP, standing for the innocuous title, Collegiate Association for the Research of Principles. After learning that CARP was "a front group" for the Rev. Sun Myung Moon and the Unification Church, Diglio and her husband, John's step-father, began a frantic search.

"I tried to call the church and they said they had no idea who he was."

The Diglios feared the worst, that John would be drawn into the controversial religious sect that has been accused by critics of "brainwashing" impressionable young people into becoming robotic followers of Moon as a new messiah. "When John did call," Debbie Diglio said, "I knew immediately that he was in trouble."

So began a four-year nightmare for Debbie Diglio. Like thousands of other parents in the past quarter century, she lost a child to the charismatic South Korean who teaches that his movement is building a theocracy that will rule the world. During those four years, Stacey almost completely severed ties to his family and nearly drove his mother to a nervous breakdown.

Though the number of young Americans drawn to Moon appears to be in sharp decline -- his total U.S. church membership is estimated at less than 3,000 although church officials insist the figure is around 50,000 -- the story of John Stacey is a reminder that Moon's controversial recruiting techniques continue.

When I interviewed John Stacey recently at a pizza restaurant near his hometown of Piscataway, N.J., the thin, blonde, young man had an edgy way about him, a look that was both vulnerable and cagey. He'd hold my gaze for a minute and then quickly glance away.

But amid the clatter of plates and piped-in rock music, Stacey seemed relaxed talking about his growing-up years as a prototypical Middle American who came from a Baptist background and was close to his family. He was a high school honor student, and when he left for NYU, he said, "my mother was still making me peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches."

Stacey's life detoured when he encountered CARP members on the street near NYU, at the edge of Manhattan's Greenwich Village. "They gave me a survey and it turned out everything that I was interested in they were interested in," he chuckled. The recruiters invited him to a lecture which stressed positive themes: God, peace, patriotism.

Upset over a fight with his roommate, Stacey agreed to attend a week-long CARP seminar supposedly on "youth decision-making" at a compound located in Queens, N.Y. "They said it was not a religion," he recalled. "They invited me under false pretenses, away from my reference points to another world, it seemed. ... I went there with the impression that all the people there were students like me."

The "students" who surrounded him reinforced the messages from the speakers, while leaders of the group flattered Stacey and attended to his every need. "The seminar is completely rigged," Stacey told me. The other "students" turned out to be Unification Church members who Stacey later learned were "very well trained" in these recruitment methods.

"They gained my trust before I realized they were not worthy of it," Stacey complained. "They used the same tactics that the Chinese communists used. People don't recognize how dangerous it is because they're using mind-control techniques without prior consent. I didn't suspect that they had designs on me. ... It's like a Moonie factory. They sort of clone people there."

Stacey was not held at the Queens compound by force. Rather, he explained, the recruiters employed more subtle techniques of peer-group pressure and isolation. "When I was at that seven-day seminar, I had no idea my parents were trying to find me," he said. "For three months, I never left that property. ... I had five people patrolling me."

A Very Delicate Time

When Stacey did contact his mother, she had received some counseling herself in the methods of cults and knew that it was "a very delicate time in the first few days of recruitment." Her choices were to "scare him or go along with it. So I tried to scare him with [a story that] my husband had a heart attack."

But Diglio said the Unification Church was savvy to the reactions of desperate parents, too. "They called every hospital," she remembered, and found out that Stacey's step-father had not been admitted for treatment. Diglio saw her son slip farther from her reach.

"It was horrifying," Diglio told me. "I didn't sleep. We didn't eat. I had people come out and speak to our extended family [who wanted to know], how can John be so stupid?"

A year after John joined the church, Diglio said she was allowed to visit him "in a Moonie house. It was horrible. I never had a moment to speak to John alone. It was very creepy, very sad, because there are so many young people there, all under Moon's influence."

She was shocked by the changes in her son. "John was very different, very glazed over, trance-like. Did you ever see 'The Stepford Wives'? It was so emotional to watch your only son to be taken and transformed. I kept praying that he would come to his senses."

Inside the church, after his recruitment, Stacey took part in the exhausting and humiliating routine of the "mobile fund-raising teams" that travel by van from town to town selling flowers and other cheap items. Under pressure to meet quotas and fearing harsh criticism if they come up short, members would work feverishly for long hours, seven days a week. They would live on McDonald hamburgers and other fast food. Tired van drivers rushing the fundraising teams to new locations experienced far more accidents than normal.

Some church members went to extremes, even going out in snow storms, in sub-zero temperatures. "I know people who lived in a van for 15 years," Stacey said. "They're very burnt out, these people. ... Fear and guilt are the driving force."

Hiding the Moon Connection


Stacey asserted that the key to the church's fund-raising -- like its recruitment -- is deception. But church members justify the lies because they are serving a larger good, the ascendance of Moon to a position of world dominance. Stacey said, "there's no such thing as truth," outside of Moon's religious teachings, known as The Divine Principle.

"The Divine Principle justifies murder," Stacey stated matter-of-factly. "If you do it for Reverend Moon, it's good. Good and evil are decided by motivation."

When out selling, the fund-raisers hid their links to Moon and presented themselves as students raising money for some worthy cause. Stacey said he broke that rule only once, when going door to door selling wind chimes on an island off the coast of Alaska.

"I told everyone that I was doing this for Reverend Sun Myung Moon," Stacey said. "I didn't make a penny. It was the only time in four years that I was honest."

But with his intelligence, hard work and clean looks, Stacey rose quickly through the church's ranks. He opened a CARP office in Portland, Ore., and became a Pacific Northwest CARP leader based in Seattle. In his capacity as a leader, it was his turn to become the recruiter, targeting vulnerable young people and applying the same deceptive techniques that had been employed on him.

"I convinced people to quit school and leave their families," he acknowledged. "Look, I was a con artist."

The fund-raising schemes also grew more sophisticated as the church phased out the "mobile fund-raising teams" because of bad publicity. Instead of roaming from city to city, local chapters sold gift items at mall kiosks before Christmas. But always, Stacey said, there was the deception and the certainty that the end -- advancing the cause of Moon's church -- justified the means. Stacey's chapter made $80,000 last holiday season, he said, by working a bait-and-switch tactic: the kiosk would display a decorative light which looked stunning with a powerful halogen bulb. But after the purchase, the customer was given a boxed lamp which contained a "much cheaper" and dimmer bulb.

Growing Disenchantment

Eventually, according to Stacey, the deception and the deification of Moon ate away at his commitment to the church. He also grew disturbed watching the painful lives of longtime church members who joined in the 1970s. Then there were gaudy promises of the church's worldwide ascendance and the evolution of church members into perfect beings. Instead, the church has shrunk and none of the members has attained the promised perfection.

"Twenty years later the church is getting smaller, it seems," Stacey told me. "I see the church as very miserable people. ... There's a lot of suffering among the older members."

The rewards, both spiritual and worldly, have gone disproportionately to Moon and his family, Stacey observed. "Reverend Moon is perfect and his wife is perfect, his family is supposed to be perfect. But according to church records, no one [else] had reached perfection."

Through the four years, Stacey had periodic contact with his family. But he hid signs of his doubts. In September 1996, he flew to New Jersey for his mother's birthday and stayed the weekend. Some family members went out to lunch together. Stacey found himself defending Moon.

"When he got back [to the Pacific Northwest]," Debbie Diglio recalled, "he wrote a nasty letter. He was visibly upset that we were laughing at Moon."

Yet privately, Stacey's faith in Moon was breaking down. "When I looked at the leaders, they were all con artists," Stacey concluded. "Reverend Moon is training a race of very charming manipulators. ... He's creating almost an elite force of people who are very charming but very dangerous."

Stacey also was offended by Moon's pretensions that he was superior to Jesus and by Moon's attacks on Americans as "Satanic" because of their belief in individualism.
"I left because it was wrong," Stacey told me. "I was causing my family way too much pain. ... My mother was about institutionalized. They'd cry and cry and cry and beg me to come home."

Then, last January, Stacey called his mother and announced that he was flying to New York. They met in Newark where she works. Only then did he tell her that he was quitting the Unification Church.

"I almost died," Diglio said, "I could not believe it. I thanked God. I was so happy and so frightened at the same time. We just huddled as a family and cried our eyes out. It was so emotional. For four years, it was an all-time low. The distress was so much. I wasn't dealing at all with life. I thought I was losing my mind. I'd wake up at night and cry hysterically."

When I spoke with Diglio several months after Stacey's return home, his mother spoke with none of that passion. Her voice sounded drained, the tone of a parent who is relieved that an ordeal with a child is over but is sorry that the ordeal ever happened. Though glad that her son had returned, Diglio no longer sees Stacey as the same bright-eyed young man who left for college.

The four-year stint with the Unification Church had changed his mannerisms. Though she was hopeful that he would get his life back together -- he has decided to attend Rutgers -- she was often reminded of the four lost years. His behavior is still a "little Moonie," Diglio said. "He can't directly look you in the eye."
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:06 am

Rev. Moon, The Bushes & Donald Rumsfeld
by Robert Parry
January 3, 2001

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George W. Bush’s choice of Donald Rumsfeld to be U.S. defense secretary could put an unintended spotlight on the role of the Rev. Sun Myung Moon – a Bush family benefactor – in funneling millions of dollars to communist North Korea in the 1990s as it was developing a missile and nuclear weapons program.

In 1998, Rumsfeld headed a special commission, appointed by the Republican-controlled Congress, that warned that North Korea had made substantial progress during the decade in building missiles that could pose a potential nuclear threat to Japan and parts of the United States.

"The extraordinary level of resources North Korea and Iran are now devoting to developing their own ballistic missile capabilities poses a substantial and immediate danger to the U.S., its vital interests and its allies," said the report by Rumsfeld's Commission to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States.

"North Korea maintains an active WMD [weapons of mass destruction] program, including a nuclear weapon program. It is known that North Korea diverted material in the late 1980s for at least one or possibly two weapons," the report said.

Rumsfeld’s alarming assessment of North Korea’s war-making capabilities now is being cited by Republicans as a justification for investing billions of taxpayer dollars in an anti-missile defense system favored by Bush and Rumsfeld.

Yet, during the early-to-mid 1990s, the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency was monitoring a series of clandestine payments from Sun Myung Moon's organization to the North Korean communist leaders who were overseeing the country's military strategies.


According to DIA documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, Moon’s payments to North Korean leaders included a $3 million “birthday present” to current communist leader Kim Jong Il and offshore payments amounting to “several tens of million dollars” to the previous communist dictator, Kim Il Sung.

The alleged payments – and broader Moon-North Korean business deals reported by the DIA – came at a time of a strict U.S. government ban on financial transactions between North Korea and any U.S. person or entity, to keep hard currency out of North Korea's hands.

Legal experts say that ban would have applied to Moon given his status as a permanent U.S. resident, even though he maintains South Korean citizenship.

Bush Speeches

While negotiating those business deals with North Korea in the 1990s, Moon’s organization also hired former President George H.W. Bush and former First Lady Barbara Bush to give speeches at Moon-sponsored events.

During one speech inaugurating a new Moon-sponsored newspaper in Argentina in November 1996, former President Bush declared, “I want to salute Reverend Moon,” whom Bush praised as “the man with the vision.”

The father of the incoming U.S. president has refused to divulge how much Moon’s organization paid for these speeches which were delivered in the United States, Asia and South America.

Some press estimates have put the fees in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, though one former leader of Moon’s Unification Church told me that the organization had earmarked $10 million for the former president. [For more on the Bush-Moon relationship, see the story in our Archives, "Hooking George Bush."]

Ex-President Bush’s pro-Moon speeches came at a time, too, when Moon – now 80 – was expressing intensely anti-American views. In the mid-1990s, Moon denounced the United States as “Satan’s harvest” and condemned American women as having descended from a “line of prostitutes.”

In a speech to his followers on Aug. 4, 1996, Moon vowed to liquidate American individuality, declaring that his movement would “swallow entire America.” Moon said Americans who insisted on “their privacy and extreme individualism … will be digested.”

Beyond these anti-Americanism diatribes, other questions have arisen about how Moon finances his religious-business-political empire. Evidence has existed back to the 1970s indicating that Moon’s organization has engaged in money-laundering operations and has associated with right-wing organized-crime figures in Asia and Latin America.

One of Moon's key early backers was Ryoichi Sasakawa, a leader of Japan's Yakuza organized crime family, according to the authoritative book, Yakuza, by David E. Kaplan & Alec Dubro.

In 1998, Moon’s ex-daughter-in-law, Nansook Hong, added first-hand testimony about one of Moon's money-laundering methods when she described how cash was smuggled illegally through U.S. Customs. Moon “demonstrated contempt for U.S. law every time he accepted a paper bag full of untraceable, undeclared cash” carried into the United States from overseas, she wrote in her book, In the Shadows of the Moons.

Checkered Past

To many Americans, Moon is perhaps best known as a 1970s cult leader who allegedly brainwashed young recruits into joining his Unification Church and then paired up his followers in mass marriages where Moon would preside wearing lavish costumes and crowns.

But Moon also understood the importance of political clout. In 1978, a congressional investigation identified Moon as a part of a covert influence-buying scheme aimed at American institutions and run by the South Korean Central Intelligence Agency, a charge that Moon denied.

In 1982, Moon was convicted of tax fraud and served an 18-month sentence in federal prison. Nevertheless, his political influence grew when he launched The Washington Times, also in 1982.

In the years that followed, Moon developed a reputation for financing all-expense-paid international conferences for conservative politicians, prominent journalists and influential academics.

Moon’s conservative newspaper grew in importance in Washington through the 1980s and early 1990s, as it staunchly supported Republican presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.

In 1991, President Bush expressed his gratitude to Moon’s newspaper by inviting its editor, Wesley Pruden, to a private White House lunch “just to tell you how valuable the Times has become in Washington, where we read it every day.” [Washington Times, May 17, 1992]

Moving North

At about the same time as that lunch, Moon was beginning another initiative – establishing a business foothold in North Korea. The DIA, the Pentagon agency responsible for monitoring possible military threats to the United States, started keeping tabs on these developments.

Though historically an ardent anticommunist, Moon negotiated a sweeping business deal with Kim Il Sung, the longtime communist leader, the DIA documents said. The two men met face-to-face in North Korea from Nov. 30 to Dec. 8, 1991.

“These talks took place secretly, without the knowledge of the South Korean government,” the DIA wrote on Feb. 2, 1994. “In the original deal with Kim [Il Sung], Moon paid several tens of million dollars as a down-payment into an overseas account,” the DIA said in another cable dated Aug. 14, 1994.

The DIA said Moon's organization also delivered money to Kim Il Sung's son and successor, Kim Jong Il.

“In 1993, the Unification Church sold a piece of property located in Pennsylvania,” the DIA reported on Sept. 9, 1994. “The profit on the sale, approximately $3 million was sent through a bank in China to the Hong Kong branch of the KS [South Korean] company ‘Samsung Group.’ The money was later presented to Kim Jung Il [Kim Jong Il] as a birthday present.”

After Kim Il Sung's death in 1994 and his succession by his son, Kim Jong Il, Moon dispatched his longtime aide, Bo Hi Pak, to ensure that the business deals were still on track with Kim Jong Il “and his coterie,” the DIA reported.

“If necessary, Moon authorized Pak to deposit a second payment for Kim Jong Il,” the DIA wrote.

As described by the DIA, Moon's deal with North Korea called for construction of a hotel complex in Pyongyang as well as a new Holy Land at the site of Moon’s birth in North Korea.

“There was an agreement regarding economic cooperation for the reconstruction of KN's [North Korea's] economy which included establishment of a joint venture to develop tourism at Kimkangsan, KN [North Korea]; investment in the Tumangang River Development; and investment to construct the light industry base at Wonsan, KN. It is believed that during their meeting Mun [Moon] donated 450 billion yen to KN,” one DIA report said.

In late 1991, the Japanese yen traded at about 130 yen to the U.S. dollar, meaning Moon's investment would have been about $3.5 billion, if the DIA information is correct.

Pak's Response

Contacted in Seoul, South Korea, Bo Hi Pak, a former publisher of The Washington Times, acknowledged that Moon met with North Korean officials and negotiated business deals with them in the early 1990s.

But Bo Hi Pak denied that payments were made to individual North Korean leaders and called “absolutely untrue” the DIA's description of the $3 million land sale benefiting Kim Jong Il. Bo Hi Pak also said the North Korean business investments were structured through South Korean entities.

“Rev. Moon is not doing this in his own name,” said Pak.

Pak said he did go to North Korea in 1994, after Kim Il Sung’s death, but only to express “condolences” to Kim Jong Il on behalf of Moon and his wife. Pak denied that another purpose of the trip was to pass money to Kim Jong Il or to his associates.

In the phone interview, Bo Hi Pak also denied that Moon’s investments ever approached $3.5 billion. Pak did not give a total figure for the investments, but said the initial phase of an automobile factory was in the range of $3 million to $6 million.

The DIA depicted Moon's business plans in North Korea as much grander, however. The DIA valued the agreement for hotels in Pyongyang and the resort in Kumgang-san, alone, at $500 million. The plans also called for creation of a kind of Vatican City covering Moon's birthplace.

“In consideration of Mun's [Moon's] economic cooperation, Kim [Il Sung] granted Mun a 99-year lease on a 9 square kilometer parcel of land located in Chongchu, Pyonganpukto, KN. Chongchu is Mun's birthplace and the property will be used as a center for the Unification Church. It is being referred to as the Holy Land by Unification Church believers and Mun [h]as been granted extraterritoriality during the life of the lease.”

North Korean officials clearly valued their relationship with Moon, granting him small but symbolic favors. Four months after Moon's 1991 meeting with Kim Il Sung, the communist dictator granted a rare interview to editors from Moon's Washington Times.

In February 2000, on Moon's 80th birthday, Kim Jong Il sent Moon a gift of rare wild ginseng, an aromatic root used medicinally, Reuters reported.

Legal Issues

Because of the long-term U.S. embargo against North Korea – eased only last year – Moon’s alleged payments to the communist leaders raise potential legal issues for Moon, a South Korean citizen who is a U.S. permanent resident alien.

“Nobody in the United States was supposed to be providing funding to anybody in North Korea, period, under the Treasury (Department's) sanction regime,” said Jonathan Winer, former deputy assistant secretary of state handling international crime.

The U.S. embargo of North Korea dates back to the Korean War. With a few exceptions for humanitarian goods, the embargo barred trade and financial dealings between North Korea and “all U.S. citizens and permanent residents wherever they are located, … and all branches, subsidiaries and controlled affiliates of U.S. organizations throughout the world.”

Moon became a permanent resident of the United States in 1973, according to Justice Department records. Bo Hi Pak said Moon has kept his “green card” status. Moon maintains a residence near Tarrytown, north of New York City, and controls dozens of affiliated U.S. companies.

Direct payments to foreign leaders in connection with business deals also could prompt questions about possible violations of the U.S. Corrupt Practices Act, a prohibition against overseas bribery.

Political Fallout

Today, however, the potential political fallout might be a greater concern than any legal action, especially once George W. Bush assumes the presidency.

For the past two years, Republicans have used Rumsfeld's report to club President Clinton and Vice President Gore for alleged softness toward a recalcitrant communist enemy.

In 1999, a House Republican task force followed up the work of Rumsfeld's commission and declared that North Korea and its missile program had emerged as a nuclear threat to Japan and possibly the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

"This threat has advanced considerably over the past five years, particularly with the enhancement of North Korea's missile capabilities," said the Republican task force. "Unlike five years ago, North Korea can now strike the United States with a missile that could deliver high explosive, chemical, biological, or possibly nuclear weapons."

Ironically, Moon's newspaper joined in laying the blame for North Korea's progress at the feet of the Clinton-Gore administration.

"To its list of missed opportunities, the Clinton-Gore administration can now add the abdication of responsibility for national security," a Washington Times editorial stated on Sept. 5, 2000.

Not surprisingly the Times did not mention that its founder and financial backer, Sun Myung Moon, had lent a hand to North Korea by agreeing to multi-million-dollar business deals and allegedly putting millions of dollars in the personal accounts of the leaders masterminding the strategic weapons development.

Equally unsurprising, former President George H.W. Bush and his about-to-be-president son have never explained the family's financial involvement with Rev. Moon, a messianic leader who has vowed to build a movement powerful enough to eliminate all individuality and freedom in the United States.

Those questions also aren't likely to come up at the confirmation hearings for Donald Rumsfeld, who believes that the United States must now pursue an expensive missile shield to counter the threat posed by North Korea.

Robert Parry is a veteran investigative reporter, who broke many of the Iran-contra stories in the 1980s for The Associated Press and Newsweek.
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:08 am

Kerry Attacker Protected Rev. Moon
by Robert Parry
October 15, 2004

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Carlton Sherwood, who has produced an anti-John Kerry video that will be aired across the United States before the Nov. 2 elections, wrote a book in the 1980s denouncing federal investigators who tried to crack down on Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s illicit financial operations.

In retrospect, Sherwood’s book, Inquisition: The Prosecution and Persecution of the Reverend Sun Myung Moon, appears to have been part of a right-wing counter-offensive aimed at discouraging scrutiny of Moon and his mysterious money flows. The strategy largely succeeded, enabling Moon to continue funneling hundreds of millions of dollars into the U.S. political process, most notably to publish the ultra-conservative Washington Times but also to make payments to prominent politicians, including former President George H.W. Bush.

New evidence also makes clear that Moon resumed his practice of laundering money into the United States after serving a 13-month prison sentence for a 1982 conviction for tax law violations. Former Moon associates, including his ex-daughter-in-law, have disclosed that Moon’s organization smuggled cash across U.S. borders, but those admissions have not led to renewed federal investigations. [For details, see Robert Parry, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.]

Indeed, the pummeling of federal investigators who examined Moon’s financial schemes in the 1970s and early 1980s – and Moon’s enormous clout among conservatives in Washington – have made the South Korean theocrat something of a political untouchable. The congressional investigators, who first uncovered Moon’s financial irregularities, and the federal prosecutor, who narrowed that evidence into a successful prosecution for tax evasion, were made into cautionary tales for others thinking about challenging Moon.

Accused Investigators

Government investigators, including former Rep. Donald Fraser and ex-federal prosecutor Martin Flumenbaum, were accused by Moon defenders of offenses ranging from a lack of patriotism to racial and religious bigotry. Sherwood, a former Washington Times reporter, was among the Moon defenders who lashed out at Fraser and Flumenbaum, portraying them as unscrupulous witch hunters who abused their investigative authority.

In Inquisition, Sherwood claimed he had examined the financial records of Moon’s organization and found nothing improper, concluding that Moon and his associates “were and continued to be the victims of the worst kind of religious prejudice and racial bigotry this country has witnessed in over a century.” Sherwood portrayed Moon as a religious martyr.


But there was a back story to Sherwood’s book. Inquisition was originally put out by a little-known publisher called Andromeda, which apparently operated out of the house of Roger Fontaine, a former member of Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff who later worked as a reporter for Moon’s Washington Times. In 1991, the book was republished by Regnery-Gateway, which was run by conservative operative Alfred Regnery, who worked in Ronald Reagan’s Justice Department.

Beyond the conservative allegiances of Sherwood’s backers, there also was evidence that Moon himself subsidized the book. A PBS Frontline documentary in 1992 reported that former Washington Times editor James Whelan said Sherwood told Regnery that Moon’s organization would buy 100,000 copies of Inquisition, which would assure Regnery a handsome profit. Frontline reported that Regnery denied Whelan’s statement, as has Sherwood.

However, a week after interviewing Regnery, Frontline said it obtained a copy of a letter that corroborated claims of a secret Moon role in the production of Sherwood’s book. The letter, addressed to Moon from his aide James Gavin, stated that Gavin had reviewed the “overall tone and factual contents” of Inquisition before publication and had suggested revisions.

“Mr. Sherwood has assured me that all this will be done when the manuscript is sent to the publisher,” Gavin wrote. “When all of our suggestions have been incorporated, the book will be complete and in my opinion will make a significant impact. … In addition to silencing our critics now, the book should be invaluable in persuading others of our legitimacy for many years to come.” Frontline said Gavin refused to be interviewed about the letter.

Sherwood’s book did contribute to a successful campaign that silenced many of Moon’s critics. The self-proclaimed Messiah helped his cause, too, by becoming a major benefactor to the U.S. conservative movement, sponsoring lavish conferences as well as financing right-wing media outlets.

Koreagate

The Right’s "defend Moon campaign" dated back to the late 1970s when an investigation by a House subcommittee headed by Rep. Fraser, a Minnesota Democrat, discovered that Moon had participated in the “Koreagate” influence-buying scheme. In that operation, the South Korean intelligence agency was caught secretly trying to manipulate U.S. policy and politics by spreading money around Washington. One of South Korea’s conduits was Moon, then best known as a religious cult leader who presided over mass weddings of his followers and was accused of “brainwashing” young recruits.

Fraser’s investigators found that Moon’s organization was funneling large sums of money into the United States from Japan, but the investigators couldn’t trace the money all the way back to its source.

Moon, who was already investing in Washington’s conservative political infrastructure, turned to American right-wing operatives for help. In pro-Moon publications, Fraser and his staff were pilloried as leftists. Anti-Moon witnesses were assailed as unstable liars. Minor bookkeeping problems inside Fraser’s investigation, such as Fraser's salary advances to some staff members, prompted letters demanding an ethics probe of the congressman.

One of those letters, dated June 30, 1978, was written by John T. "Terry" Dolan of the National Conservative Political Action Committee (NCPAC). At the time, Dolan's group was pioneering the strategy of "independent" TV attack ads. In turn, Moon's CAUSA International helped Dolan by contributing $500,000 to another Dolan group, known as the Conservative Alliance or CALL. [Washington Post, Sept. 17, 1984]

With support from Dolan and other conservatives, Moon weathered the Koreagate political storm. Facing questions about his patriotism, Fraser lost a Senate bid in 1978 and left Congress.

Another early Moon defender was Grover Norquist, who interrupted a 1983 press conference by the moderate Republican Ripon Society as it was warning that the New Right had entered into “an alliance of expediency” with Moon’s organization. Ripon’s chairman, Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, had released a study which alleged that the College Republican National Committee “solicited and received” money from Moon’s Unification Church in 1981. The study also accused Reed Irvine’s Accuracy in Media of benefiting from low-cost or volunteer workers supplied by Moon.

Leach said the Unification Church has “infiltrated the New Right and the party it wants to control, the Republican Party, and infiltrated the media as well.” Then-college GOP leader Norquist disrupted Ripon’s news conference with accusations that Leach was lying. (Norquist is now a prominent conservative leader in Washington with close ties to the highest levels of George W. Bush’s administration.)

Over the next two decades, despite Moon’s controversial goals that include replacing democracy and individuality with his own personal theocratic rule, Moon lured into his circle prominent political figures. One of those leaders was George H.W. Bush, who accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars from Moon’s organization for giving speeches.

Crime Connections

Another concern about Moon was his longstanding ties to organized crime figures in Asia and South America, including Japanese rightists Ryoichi Sasakawa and Yoshio Kodama, reputed leaders of the yakuza organized-crime syndicate that profited off drug smuggling, gambling and prostitution in Japan and Korea.

Though briefly jailed as war criminals after World War II, Sasakawa and Kodama rebounded to become power-brokers in Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party. They also collaborated with Moon in organizing far-right anti-communist organizations, such as the World Anti-Communist League (WACL). According to David E. Kaplan and Alec Dubro in their book, Yakuza, "Sasakawa became an advisor to Reverend Sun Myung Moon's Japanese branch of the Unification Church" and helped recruit many of its original members.

Moon also associated with right-wing South American leaders implicated in cocaine trafficking. In 1980, Moon’s organization made friends with Bolivia’s “Cocaine Coup” conspirators who had overthrown a left-of-center government and seized dictatorial power. The violent coup installed drug-tainted military officers at the head of Bolivia’s government, giving the putsch the nickname the “Cocaine Coup.”


One of the first well-wishers arriving in La Paz to congratulate the new government was Moon’s top lieutenant, Bo Hi Pak. The Moon organization published a photo of Pak meeting with the new strongman, Gen. Garcia Meza. After the visit to the mountainous capital, Pak declared, “I have erected a throne for Father Moon in the world’s highest city.”

According to later Bolivian government and newspaper reports, a Moon representative invested about $4 million in preparations for the coup. Bolivia’s WACL representatives also played key roles, and CAUSA, another of Moon’s anti-communist organizations, listed as members nearly all the leading Bolivian coup-makers.

By late 1981, however, the cocaine taint of Bolivia’s military junta was so deep and the corruption so staggering that U.S.-Bolivian relations were stretched to the breaking point. “The Moon sect disappeared overnight from Bolivia as clandestinely as they had arrived,” reported German journalist Kai Hermann. [An English translation of Hermann’s report on the Moon organization’s role in the Cocaine Coup was published in Covert Action Information Bulletin, Winter 1986]


The Cocaine Coup leaders soon found themselves on the run, too. Interior Minister Luis Arce-Gomez was eventually extradited to Miami and was sentenced to 30 years in prison for drug trafficking. Drug lord Roberto Suarez, who was Arce-Gomez’s cousin and had helped finance the coup, got a 15-year prison term. Gen. Garcia Meza became a fugitive from a 30-year sentence imposed on him in Bolivia for abuse of power, corruption and murder.

But Moon’s organization suffered few negative repercussions from its coziness with the Cocaine Coup plotters. By the early 1980s, flush with seemingly unlimited funds, Moon had moved on to promoting himself with the new Republican administration in Washington. There, Moon made his organization useful to President Reagan, Vice President Bush and other leading Republicans. [For more on Moon and the Cocaine Coup, see Parry’s Secrecy & Privilege.]

Contra Cocaine

Moon cemented his relationship with the U.S. conservative movement by creating the Washington Times in 1982 and making it a reliable propaganda organ for the Republican Party. Moon’s newspaper also promoted conservative causes dear to Ronald Reagan’s heart, such as the contra rebels who were fighting to overthrow Nicaragua’s leftist Sandinista government. In the 1980s, Moon’s organization and the Reagan-Bush administration found common cause, too, in covering up evidence of contra-connected drug smuggling.


Ironically, in 1986, the leading U.S. senator who challenged the contra cocaine cover-up was John Kerry. Soon, the freshman senator from Massachusetts found himself under attack from Moon’s Washington Times. The newspaper published articles depicting Kerry’s contra drug probe as a wasteful political witch hunt. “Kerry’s anti-contra efforts extensive, expensive, in vain,” announced the headline of one Times article. [Washington Times, Aug. 13, 1986]

But when the evidence continued to build, the Washington Times shifted tactics. In 1987 in front-page articles, it began accusing Kerry’s staff of obstructing justice because their investigation supposedly interfered with Reagan-Bush administration efforts to get at the truth. “Congressional investigators for Sen. John Kerry severely damaged a federal drug investigation last summer by interfering with a witness while pursuing allegations of drug smuggling by the Nicaraguan resistance, federal law enforcement officials said,” according to one of the articles. [Washington Times, Jan. 21, 1987]

Despite the newspaper’s attacks and pressure from the Reagan-Bush administration, Kerry’s contra-drug investigation eventually concluded that contra units – both in Costa Rica and Honduras – were implicated in the cocaine trade. “It is clear that individuals who provided support for the contras were involved in drug trafficking, the supply network of the contras was used by drug trafficking organizations, and elements of the contras themselves knowingly received financial and material assistance from drug traffickers,” Kerry’s investigation said in a report issued April 13, 1989. “In each case, one or another agency of the U.S. government had information regarding the involvement either while it was occurring or immediately thereafter.”

Kerry’s investigation also found that Honduras had become an important way station for cocaine shipments heading north during the contra war. “Elements of the Honduran military were involved ... in the protection of drug traffickers from 1980 on,” the report said. “These activities were reported to appropriate U.S. government officials throughout the period. Instead of moving decisively to close down the drug trafficking by stepping up the DEA presence in the country and using the foreign assistance the United States was extending to the Hondurans as a lever, the United States closed the DEA office in Tegucigalpa and appears to have ignored the issue.”

In the late 1980s, Kerry’s dramatic findings weren’t taken seriously by the New York Times, the Washington Post and other major news media. The Reagan-Bush attacks on Kerry as an irresponsible investigator had stuck. In a Conventional Wisdom Watch item, Newsweek summed up this dominant view, calling Kerry a “randy conspiracy buff.”

It took another decade for the inspectors general of the CIA and the Justice Department to conduct their own investigations that corroborated Kerry’s findings of both contra trafficking and Reagan-Bush neglect of the evidence. In a two-volume report issued in 1998, CIA inspector general Frederick Hitz disclosed that more than 50 contras and contra-related entities had become involved in the cocaine trade during the 1980s and that incriminating information – which was known to the Reagan-Bush administration – was withheld from Congress.


Hitz said the chief reason for the CIA’s protective handling of the contra drug information was Langley’s “one overriding priority: to oust the Sandinista government. … [CIA officers] were determined that the various difficulties they encountered not be allowed to prevent effective implementation of the contra program.” [For details, see Robert Parry's Lost History.]

Moon’s Washington Times also had played an important role in the cover-up of the contra cocaine trafficking, although the motives of Moon’s organization – including its longstanding relationship with drug-tainted leaders in South America – may have added extra incentives to frustrate Kerry’s investigation.

More Kerry Bashing

Now, nearly two decades after Kerry’s contra cocaine investigation, Moon’s organization is trying to keep its old adversary out of the White House and away from control of the Justice Department.

On a number of topics, the Washington Times has led the way in battering Kerry. For instance, as Kerry emerged as the Democratic frontrunner this year, the newspaper promoted an investigative report questioning whether Kerry was lying when he said some foreign leaders favored him over George W. Bush. [Washington Times, March 12, 2004] Though clearly many foreign leaders did favor a change in the White House, the Times opened up a line of attack against Kerry’s honesty and internationalism that has continued to this day. [See Consortiumnews.com’s “Bush and the L-Word.”]

Also popping up again is Carlton Sherwood, who has produced a video that virtually calls Kerry a traitor for his anti-Vietnam War activities. The video, “Stolen Honor: Wounds That Never Heal,” will be broadcast before the Nov. 2 election on Sinclair Broadcast Group’s 62 stations, the largest chain of television stations in the United States.

The Sinclair chain is headed by David Smith and his three brothers whose collection of TV stations have promoted right-wing causes before, even barring its ABC affiliates from airing Nightline on April 30 when Ted Koppel paid tribute to U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq by reading their names and showing their photographs. Sinclair's thinking apparently was that listing the names of the dead would undermine the war effort.

“The Smith brothers and their executives have made 97 percent of their political donations during the 2004 election cycle to Bush and the Republicans,” according to Washington Post reporters Howard Kurtz and Frank Ahrens. [Washington Post, Oct. 12, 2004]

Democratic leaders have cited these Republican political ties in complaining that the Sinclair chain is simply broadcasting “Stolen Honor” as anti-Kerry propaganda to benefit the Bush campaign.

But Sherwood’s longstanding ties to Moon’s organization raise other troubling questions: Do inside-the-Beltway conservatives have a financial incentive to make sure a Moon-friendly politician like Bush stays in charge of the Executive Branch? Would a Kerry victory potentially mean more trouble for Moon getting his mysterious money into the United States?
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

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Sun Myung Moon & The Council for National Policy
Sun Myung Moon/Unification Church Front Groups and Christian Right Political Leadership
by EFF Baker Program
September 4, 1997

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Guest Host Kelleigh Nelson Interviewing Chey Simonton
Caller: Angie Carlson of Amerinet/Baker Network

KELLEIGH: Good evening, America. This is Kelleigh Nelson and I'm sitting in this evening for Jeff Baker. The station called the afternoon, Jeff had some emergency situations he had take care of, and asked me if I would sit in. So, I called a good friend of mine. Her name is Chey Simonton. Chey will be joining us about 15 or 20 minutes after the hour. Chey has done hours and hours of research into Sun Myung Moon and his affiliations along with his connections which are very strong to the religious right, the conservative right, all of those people that you know and hear everyday on the radio and in politics. So, we'll be having Chey join us in a little bit.

Tonight, we're going to talk about Sun Myung Moon with Chey Simonton… I want Chey to give a quote from Mother Jones Magazine called, "Unholy Alliance" written by Carolyn Weaver what Sun Myung Moon said if we don't join what Sun Myung Moon wants to do with the world. Chey, welcome.

CHEY: Hi, Kelleigh, how are you?

KELLEIGH: I'm fine, glad you could make it! I hope everyone will stick their tape recorders on because this will be some really juicy information.

CHEY: Well, this is as you said, from the article "Unholy Alliance" by Carolyn Weaver that was published in the January, 1986 Mother Jones Magazine. I'll give you some quick background. It details the letter written by, dictated by Tim LaHaye, a thank you letter to Colonel Bo Hi Pak of the Washington Times, 2nd in command to Rev. Moon, for a sizable contribution to American Coalition for Traditional Values.

KELLEIGH: Which is Tim LaHaye's organization.

CHEY: Yes. It also mentions Concerned Women for America. The author, Carolyn Weaver, gives a direct quote from one of Moon's books at the end of the article. This is from Rev. Sun Myung Moon's book, "The Master Speaks",

"My dream is to organize a Christian political party including the Protestant denominations, Catholics and all the religious sects. Then the communist power will be helpless before ours. We have to purge the corrupted politicians and the sons of God must rule the world. The separation between religion and politics is what Satan likes most. ...Upon my command to the Europeans and others throughout the world to come live in the U.S., wouldn't they obey me? Then what would happen? We can embrace the religious world in one arm and the political world in the other. With this great ideology, if you are not confident to do this, you had better die!"


KELLEIGH: Yeah... and if he gains total control which he's doing very quickly....I know the guy's got to die, he's not going to live forever. But, if he does continue with this control, isn't he part and parcel of the New World Order?

CHEY: Well, he is because he plays to the conservative, the politically conservative Christians and provides the Washington Times newspaper and networks very strongly with Christian activists and Christian pastors through all these front groups, and on the other hand, he also funded and networked with all the eastern religions and the very liberal.... On the Internet you can find one of his web sites promoting the U.N. Habitat II Conference that was held in Istanbul last year. So he is working both sides very avidly.

KELLEIGH: He wants to join them together.

CHEY: Umhum. That's what "unification" is all about. Unify everything under a big world religion. He financed the World Parliament of Religions that included the Covenant of Isis and all of these Theosophical Society groups and Christian Groups. Some of the Baptist churches participated in that. So, it's a very, very dangerous thing.

KELLEIGH: I'm not surprised with the Baptist churches because of there are so many Freemasons within the Baptist church and the core of Sun Myung Moon and freemasonry is very similar.

CHEY: That's true, although freemasonry is broader than just being confined to the Baptist church. But, I know that the Southern Baptist Convention identified over half a million freemasons and there was a big issue within their church on whether they should allow freemasonry, members of freemasonry to be church members. They do have this "great architect of the universe" mentality and recognize plurality of religions that spans from Christianity through all the eastern religions and Buddhism and Hindus and Shintos and many, many different religious organizations that, Biblically, Christians are told not to fellowship with. It's a matter of being unequally yoked with unbelievers.

KELLEIGH: Right. We're to be separate because those are pagan gods that they're worshipping.

CHEY: It's not surprising that Moon espouses that. He is into self-glorification and his followers are involved in things to glorify their True Father, Moon. However, Christians have other loyalties and glorifying Moon is not to be thought of. We are to glorify God and Jesus Christ, our Savior.

KELLEIGH: Then why is it that all of the Christian Right, who claim to be Christian, have gotten sucked in by Sun Myung Moon? Is it strictly because of the money or is it because of his rhetoric or is it both?

CHEY: I would say he adapts his rhetoric. He's very good at marketing and you adapt your rhetoric to whatever target group you are targeting. He does make very large amounts of money available and people whose political goals have superceded their Christian beliefs are very tempted by that money. I think they're willing to compromise. They put their Bible in their pocket when they stick their hand out to Rev. Moon. Of course, the love of money is the root of all evil. So, it is a very serious thing. I think the most indicative thing is the fact that if they were comfortable with being associated with Moon, they would be publicly, they would be having him as a guest on their radio shows and promoting him as they do all the other people in the conservative movement.

KELLEIGH: Right. But, they don't, do they?

CHEY: No, publicly they are not trumpeting that alliance they have with him. However, they are quietly cooperating and they do participate in his events. I think that they prefer that they don't get any media recognition for that. But, you know, in railing against media all of the time, you know the buzzword is "the liberal media bias". But, liberal journalists whether they're Christian or not, understand what the Bible says and what Christians are supposed to stand for. And, they understand what Moon says and what Moon is supposed to stand for. They can see the blatant hypocrisy in Christian political figures working with Moon. Those Christian people have destroyed their testimony, their Christian testimony, with the media. Possibly their political testimony is okay. But, the liberal media is perfectly right to judge them as hypocrites.

KELLEIGH: And they have.

CHEY: Yes, they have.

KELLEIGH: When somebody today says to me they are Christian, I don't mean to sneer; but, I have to ask them where they stand because a lot of people that aren't Christians call themselves Christian. There are a lot of people that say, "Well, all you have to do is just love Jesus." Well, the Buddhists and the Hindus and all the rest of them consider Jesus a prophet and they love him, too. But that doesn't mean that he is their savior. And there's a big different there, don't you think.

CHEY: Yes, there is. Moon claims that Jesus appeared to him in 1935 at Easter time and explained in a vision that Jesus had failed in his mission and asked Moon to assume the position as the True Father and lead the world to salvation because Jesus' death on the cross and resurrection did not accomplish any kind of a salvation for the world. So, Moon graciously took on that mantle from poor failed Jesus.

So, when you look at.... well, Tim LaHaye is a pastor, I believe he's a Baptist pastor. Robert Grant is a pastor. Jerry Falwell upheld him in the 80s. I don't know what his position is right now; but, when Moon first came to this country he was widely recognized as a cult. People were trying to rescue their children from the Unification Cult.

KELLEIGH: I remember that in the 60s there were several children of my mother's friends and my mother would tell me, "Oh, they've gotten into the Moonies and the parents are having them rescued out." There was a neighbor across the street, there were cars, Moonie cars, trying to get the child back for weeks on end. It was really considered bad, bad news.

CHEY: Walter Martin identified them in his book, THE KINGDOM OF THE CULTS. Bob Larson wrote about the Unification Church in his book on the cults. It is on the Internet now. If you go into the anti-cult sites.....

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: I'm Kelleigh Nelson. I'm sitting in for Jeff Baker tonight. Our guest is Chey Simonton. We're discussing Sun Myung Moon and his affiliation with the Christian Right and his desire for his own New World Order. Chey, continue and please us folks who have computers where they can find these spots on the Internet.

CHEY: They're very widely spread across the Internet. There is a Unification Church official web page. It's www.unification.net. As a search, you can use, "Sun Myung Moon" and there are many, many sites that come up on that search word. "Unification Church".

It's widely spread across the Internet and you can put in any of those search words or go to the official Unification web page. It's very interesting. It has a compilation of all Moon's speeches going back to the 1950s. He's not hiding anything. He's wide, upfront and open. You read his speeches and you understand what he is about. The one that to me was the most shocking, he delivered at the Family Federation for Peace, a big 3 day seminar a year ago at the end of July, 1996 for three days, finishing on August 1, 1996. He delivered a speech about his theology on sexual organs. He feels that Jesus should have married and because Jesus did not marry, Jesus failed; that in order to enter the Kingdom of God, the Kingdom of Heaven, you must be married under the blessing of Rev. Sun Myung Moon. The offspring of a marriage that he has blessed will be sinless. There will be no original sin in children born under marriages that he has blessed. He invites everyone to join, so they can register in the Kingdom of Heaven, in the big marriage blessing ceremony coming up in November of this year. He's anticipating 3.6 million couples via satellite. He's going to hold this mass marriage blessing in RFK Stadium.

Other participants who were paid speakers at that event included Beverly LaHaye of Concerned Women for America, Gary Bauer of the Family Research Council, Rev. Robert Schuller of the Crystal Cathedral. Pat Boone provided the entertainment. Bill Cosby, when he found out that it was a Unification Church function, tried to decline to appear. They threatened him with a lawsuit. This function was sponsored by The Washington Times Foundation which is an adjunct to The Washington Times Newspaper that is always promoted by Christian political activists as the "conservative" Washington Times, never as the Unification Church-owned Washington Times.

Also, Ralph Reed of the Christian Coalition was a paid speaker at that event.

KELLEIGH: We know Ralph Reed is an adherent to Moon because in his book that came out, don't ask me the name of it because I don't know what it is, but it came out last October or November. He gave glowing reports in that book about Dr. Robert Grant and American Freedom Coalition. Dr. Robert Grant is a member of the Council For National Policy and American Freedom Coalition is a Moon front-organization within the Christian Right circles and the members of the Council For National Policy are widely known; James Dobson, Gary Bauer, Phyllis Schlafly, Don Wildmon. Jerry Falwell was a member at one time. I don't believe he is anymore. But, Pat Robertson, Nelson Bunker Hunt, all the names that you would know in the Christian Right that most uninformed Americans out there consider conservative. Isn't that right?

CHEY: Yes. You know, when Dr. Robert Grant... his official stand on it. This is an article that he wrote to the Washington Post on October 29, 1989 rebutting an article that identified him, the American Freedom Coalition as a Moon front-group said,

"I am not now nor have I ever been a follower of Reverend Moon or a member of the Unification Church. I am an evangelical Christian trained at the Fuller Theological Seminary who belongs to Christ and to no one else.... of course, those few individuals who I knew to be Unificationists, I have found them to be decent hardworking and talented men and women who agree with my and the AFC traditional values platform and political philosophy..."


So, he found common ground on traditional values and political philosophy and denies being a follower of Rev. Moon; but, does admit in the article that he had received $5,252,473.00 from Unification Church business interests.

KELLEIGH: Yes, and this was printed in October 1989 and that was only in two years. He was stating that he'd received those funds since April of 1987. So in two years he had received over 5 million dollars from Moon.

CHEY: ...and had no problem with it and denied that he was allied with Moon. He is a pastor.

KELLEIGH: It was clear in David Racer's book, NOT FOR SALE, because Racer was involved in this. There are many statements in that book that tell the truth about AFC. Hang on, we'll be right back.

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: We're talking about Sun Myung Moon and his affiliation with the Christian Right. Chey, I want you to go on and tell about Moon's speech that appeared in the Denver Post in January of this year. I know it's really filthy and, I know it's difficult to repeat this stuff over the radio. We don't even like saying what the man said. Yet, the man said it in front of countless of the Christian Right hierarchy.

CHEY: Yes, there were 1,500 people in that audience. Before I do that though, Kelleigh, I thought it would be interesting to go through and quote some more from that article by Pastor Robert Grant, the head of the American Freedom Coalition because in admitting that he had obtained over 5 million dollars from Unification business interests he says,

"To gain their support, I have occasionally gone to those interests and presented my proposals. No one has ever come to me and offered to support the American Freedom Coalition on a quid pro quo basis. Furthermore, any future support solicited by me from any source whatever, will never be conditional."


Then he also says in this article.

"The balance of our revenues have been derived from television programming, direct mail, subscriptions and other literature sales. Our tax returns are a matter of public record. Of the more than 900,000 people on our mailing list and more than 300,000 individuals who are financial contributors to the AFC, no more than 75 or 80 are known to me to be members of the Unification Church."


Now, what I would like to say is looking at vast amount of funding that he has received from, admitted that he's received from Moon affiliated organizations, when he was sending his mailings out to these 900,000 people, if he was indicating that in joining his group they would be joining a group with someone who was comfortable presenting proposals to Col. Bo Hi Pak of The Washington Times and The Washington Times Foundation for financial support. I have a feeling that the Unification Church tie with the American Freedom Coalition was not something that he chose to disclose to people he was soliciting for membership in the American Freedom Coalition. When people join those organizations, very often they think of those contributions as tithes. Co-mingling money that you think of as a tithe to an organization headed by a pastor, and to think that this pastor was also going to worshipers of Rev. Sun Myung Moon is blasphemous to most Christians.

KELLEIGH: That's right. As a matter of fact, talking about his fundraising, we might mention the Colonel North Letter that was sent out by Dr. Robert Grant of American Freedom Coalition. It was regarding, actually let me read a few paragraphs of this. It says,

"Dear Fellow American:

Colonel North indicted, to be tried and jailed? What do you think? Is Colonel Oliver North a hero or a criminal? Here's your chance to give your views. First, fill out your enclosed national opinion poll and return it to me for tabulation today. Frankly, if you feel Colonel North is a criminal and should be jailed, we'll just have to disagree. But, if you agree with President Reagan that he's a TRUE AMERICAN HERO (emphasis added) you can also sign the enclosed letter of support for Colonel North during his dark hour."


And, of course, you can send in money to help support him. That was the whole gist of the letter. But, along the side of the front page of the letter are listed board members and National Advisory board members. I think it would be pertinent to the conversation here to go through some of those if you would, Chey.

CHEY: On the board of the American Freedom Coalition mailing that has received over 5 million dollars of Unification Church, Sun Myung Moon affiliated money is Richard Ichord, a congressman from Missouri; Bob Wilson, a congressman from California; Robert Grant who was the president; Dr. Ralph Abernathy; Mr. Richard Viguerie was the Secretary of the American Freedom Coalition. He is the direct mail guru who very likely composed and put this letter out.

KELLEIGH: Wasn't it Sun Myung Moon who bailed him out when he was about to go bankrupt?

CHEY: Yes. The Unification Church affiliate.....

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: Chey, I want you to continue with this Colonel North letter, but, I do want to tell the audience that at some point, you will put together a little booklet on Moon and all of these documents that you've collected. When that happens, we'll make sure the listeners know where they can get a copy of it.

CHEY: Well, now you've put me under the gun. I'll have to get that booklet put together.

Now, what people need to remember is that the American Freedom Coalition was funded with over 5 million dollars of Sun Myung Moon money. Most of the members that are listed here also belong to something that is always referred to as a "conservative educational group promoting Judeo-Christian values" called the Council for National Policy. Included on this Moon-funded group are Dr. Ben Armstrong of the National Religious Broadcasters Association; Rev. James Bevel who now, or was a few years ago, associated with the LaRouche organization; Brent Bozell III; Dr. Joseph Churuba; Don DeFore, the actor from Hazel, and on his resume with the Council for National Policy he had listed himself as a 33rd degree mason; Colonel Doner who originated Christian Voice, a Moon-controlled precursor to.... it was after the Moral Majority but before the Christian Coalition, there was an organization called Christian Voice that was under the domination of Unification Church members and they had Christians going out being the public relations speakers but they were controlled and financed by Unification Church organizations. Colonel Doner, in an article I have here somewhere, laughingly explained to the report that he coined the term "traditional values" that the Christian Right loves and that "traditional values" means absolutely nothing. It means whatever anybody thinks it means. And that has been the battle cry of the Christian Right, that we must have "traditional values". He laughed about that.

KELLEIGH: Actually, somewhere I read that the actual person who coined that phrase goes all the way back to Nietzsche.

CHEY: That's possible. Colonel Doner does take credit for it though.

KELLEIGH: Well, there's a picture in the book about homosexuality in the Nazi Party and there's Boehm and Hitler standing in front of a statue of Nietzsche who they really loved.

CHEY: Was that THE PINK SWASTIKA?

KELLEIGH: Right, that's it! Thank you very much.

CHEY: Do you want me to go on with this?

KELLEIGH: I think we're at the top of the hour and it will be just a couple of minutes.

(Commercial)

Chey, I really did want to go through a few more of these because the majority of them are Council For National Policy members which was started in 1981 to be a counter for the Council On Foreign Relations yet in the 1988 membership list there were four CFR members in the CNP, the Christian Right group. So it says to me that they were mixing and mingling back at the very beginning.

(Referring to the Oliver North letter) Down here on the bottom there are a few more that I think you ought to run through. This honorable H.L. Richardson, Bill Richardson, California State Senate. He's a member of the Council for National Policy, too. What I wanted to say about him is that he is, he's right on this letter as a National Advisory Board member of American Freedom Coalition. H.L. Richardson is the foundation head for Gun Owners of America. H.L. Richardson actually started G.O.A. and Larry Pratt works for H.L. Richardson. Now, H.L. Richardson made a statement that it didn't matter if they had an organization that supported all the blonde women.....

(Commercial)

Chey, I'm sorry I forget that at the top of the hour are two real close together commercials. I forgot, my fault.

I want to finish up with H.L. Richardson. He made the statement that it didn't matter what they got a group together for, for the grassroots to come together and support, as long as they felt that they were doing something. That tells me an awful lot. Not only that but, H. L. Richardson, Bill Richardson, backed Robert O. Anderson for head of the NRA's Whittington Center. Robert O. Anderson happens to be not only Club of Rome, CFR and Trilateralists, but, very involved with the Aspen Institute. He is not a nice boy! So, I have to wonder what the real cause of Bill Richardson, now this is H.L. Richardson, he is different from the other Bill Richardson, he was a California State Senator. This fella is still the foundation head of Gun Owners of America and is still Larry Pratt's boss. That tells me an awful lot right there, don't you think?

CHEY: Oh, I think so.

KELLEIGH: And both of them are CNP members!

CHEY: Now just below him (on Ollie North letter) we have the one very openly Unification Church affiliated man, Phillip Sanchez who was the president of CAUSA, an openly Unification Church group in the 1980s. They did all expenses paid junkets for journalists and politicians and political activists, anybody they could get to go on various various junkets. They provided all transportation and every expense was paid for by the Unification Church.

Then we have an interesting one down here. Dr. Donald Sills with the Coalition for Religious Freedom which is another Moon-backed front group. He is a Presbyterian pastor from California who sat on the board of another Unification Church front group.

Then, of course, there's General John Singlaub. Everyone remembers him from the Iran/Contra affair who was closely affiliated with Ollie North. Obviously, Oliver North was a member of the Council for National Policy and John Singlaub is a member of the Council for National Policy.

Then below that we have Dr. Cleon Skousen, a former FBI agent, was a speaker nationally for CAUSA, the Moon affiliated group. He spoke all over the country. He also was a member of the Council For National Policy.

KELLEIGH: Not only that, he still runs with all of these people, so does his son. Plus, he is pro-Constitutional Convention which many of these people within the Council For National Policy are.

CHEY: That's true.

KELLEIGH: Including Michael Farris. This whole Advisory Board and board members reads like a Who's Who of the Christian Right supporting Ollie North. We've heard on countless radio shows exposed by a number of men who were insiders and have come out and told us the truth about what Ollie North was really doing, and Mena and the whole situation. Here is a Moon front organization asking for money for a fellow CNPer, Ollie North.

CHEY: And Oliver North is now on Christian radio as a talk radio political host. So, what we call that is "strange bedfellows." These men are participating in political movements supposedly based on their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior and affiliating with Moon. Reading his theology he would have to be identified as an antichrist, not THE ANTICHRIST, but "an antichrist" which I can verify by reading this speech that he gave.

I need to explain, he is very proud of this speech. He gave it first of all August 1, 1996 in Washington D.C. as the final speech of a 3 day seminar for the Family Federation for World Peace. The participants were Beverly LaHaye, Pat Boone, Robert Schuller, Ralph Reed, Gary Bauer of the Family Research Council. This was the final speech. It was reprinted in the Denver Post on January 6, 1997 as a paid advertisement of the Unification Church.

KELLEIGH: And you can get if off the Internet, too.

CHEY: It's on the Unification Church web site. August 1, 1996 the web site location is http://www.unification.net

KELLEIGH: You should all go look at it because it's really unbelievable!

CHEY: I'll read some excerpts. It's a very long speech. I have to preface, this is the most disgusting abomination of blasphemy to a Christian, to anyone who believes that the Bible is the truth, is the word of God. He says:

"God wants a love partner. Thus, centering on the place where husband and wife become one through their sexual organs, God wants to appear and meet us."


KELLEIGH: Hang on, Chey, we'll start it over when we get back.

(Commercial)

This is Kelleigh Nelson sitting in for the Jeff Baker Show this evening. My guest is Chey Simonton and she is about to read a speech that Moon is very, very proud of that was attended many of the Christian Right. If any of you have any questions about anyone in particular or anything we've discussed, call in on 1-888-544-8255 or 888-37-RADIO.

Chey, go ahead with this. I think it's really important for people to understand where Moon's theology really lies.

CHEY: Moon, in another speech he gave to The Washington Times, urged all of the employees of The Washington Times to read this speech once for each year of their life. If they're 80 years old, they should read it 80 times!

"God wants a love partner, centering on the place where husband and wife become one through their sexual organs, God wants to appear and meet us...I wish you would center on the absolute sexual organ, unique sexual organ, unchanging sexual organ and eternal sexual organ and use this as your foundation to pursue God...We have to realize that the Kingdom of God on earth and in heaven will begin on this foundation."


KELLEIGH: Blasphemy!

CHEY: And he ends with an invitation, "I sincerely hope that each of you will participate in the next marriage blessing of 3,600,000 couples. By doing so, you will form a true family that can register in the Kingdom of God on earth."

KELLEIGH: See, we can't even tell them what else is in this. They'll have to go into the Internet and read it themselves because it's personal bodily habits that he discusses in front of all of these people that you don't even discuss with your closest friend! It's disgusting!

CHEY: He also says, "Christians entrap us, crying heresy because our doctrines differ and they try to destroy us, but in this case, the so-called heretical cult is on the side of truth." Then he goes on to say:

"Rev. Moon is the first person to provide the answers because Rev. Moon is the only one who knows all the secrets of God. You have to realize that Rev. Moon overcame death hundreds of times in order to find this path. Rev. Moon is the person who brought God to tears hundreds of times. No one in history has loved God more than the Rev. Moon has. That is why even if the world tries to destroy me, the Rev. Moon will never perish. It is because God protects me. If you step into the realm of truth Rev. Moon teaches, you will also gain God's protection."


KELLEIGH: Sick and twisted. How old is Moon, do you know?

CHEY: I believe he's about 76. He's on his fourth marriage.

KELLEIGH: Yeah, and he channels to his dead son. We ought to talk about that!

CHEY: He portrays himself and his wife as the True Parents of everyone on planet Earth. In order to have salvation, you must be married under his marriage blessing. That is, to him, salvation.

Now, they use words and terms that sound comfortable to Christians. They talk about the marriage feast but they're not speaking of the bride of Christ and that marriage feast, they're talking about this mass marriage blessing that Rev. Moon bestows on everyone who seeks his approval of their marriage. Then if you do that, you will have sinless offspring.

KELLEIGH: That word twisting is an age old Marxist-Communist tactic. Everybody out there that's listened to talk radio knows that!

I was just looking for my Masculine Journey, by Robert Hicks. This book was given out by Promise Keepers, 50,000 copies. The backing of this book has never been rescinded by the people behind Promise Keepers. It has a chapter called "The Phallic Man". It's very similar to this Moon theology and it fits right into the whole core of many of the secret societies. They're based on the phallic symbol and that includes freemasonry.

CHEY: The identify Jesus Christ as a "phallic male" and I believe in that book, urge men to worship Christ, Jesus Christ, as "phallic males".

KELLEIGH: That's right. I picked up a copy in a used bookstore because I had heard this was such a blasphemous book and it contained all this filth. Sure enough, there it was! So, I ordered two more copies so I could give it to other friends to prove that what has been said about it is absolutely true. Unfortunately, we have to keep a lot of these books from what we classify as the enemy in our libraries, simply to prove and document that what we're saying is absolutely the truth.

CHEY: I understand Promise Keepers tried to back off that book when they realized how offensive it was and they were getting criticized for it. I think that Promise Keepers, as a ecumenical shepherding movement, puts discernment on the back burner. I think the best news I've heard is that attendance is down at these big, mass rallies that they have. But, enough of Promise Keepers, do you want to talk about more stuff that was on the Moon Internet thing?

KELLEIGH: Sure, go ahead!

CHEY: Well, I found it interesting... if you put in a search word, "Marriage Rededication Blessing" is a search you can go on any of the search engines on the Internet and you put that in, it will pull you to a web site run by a Unification family called the Belfort family. They're promoting the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, a Moon organization. On their web site they offer to come personally to your home to perform a marriage rededication blessing for you in the privacy of your living room. They also invite you to participate in the big mass marriage blessing that will be performed this November by Rev. and Mrs. Moon.

Then going on down, it gives some other items you can pull up linked to their web page. There is a True Family Values series and "family values" is a Unification theology term and we just read to you what "family values" meant in that sexual organ speech that Rev. Moon gave. It's feature article spells it out, it's from the Family Research Council which is Gary Bauer. Gary was a speaker at the Family Federation for World Peace Seminar. He very likely sat through the sexual organ speech that Moon gave. He's featured now, a year later, on a Unification Church web page and he is the lobbying arm for Focus on the Family, Dr. James Dobson's group. Dr. Dobson's son works for Gary Bauer at the Family Research Council in Washington D.C. Dr. Dobson's son is a speaker to Youth groups and Gary Bauer, who was in the Reagan administration, is featured on a Unification Church web page. I've heard Gary Bauer use the "family values" rhetoric and heard him use the "traditional values" rhetoric and I have heard him use a lot of the buzzwords that Christian conservatives have become comfortable listening to. I have never heard his Christian testimony. I do not know if he believes that Jesus Christ is his Lord and Savior.

KELLEIGH: Well, he may be a Moonie.

CHEY: That's very difficult to determine. They mention The Washington Times weekly newspaper which is owned by Rev. Sun Myung Moon. It is staffed by Christians who are aware that their boss is the Unification Church. It is promoted as "the conservative" newspaper that everyone should subscribe to. Dr. Dobson has made references to the "conservative" Washington Times. Don McAlvany references the "conservative" Washington Times.

Just recently in August, the highest ranking Unification Church member staffer resigned from The Washington Times because she had a new position. She is now the president and CEO of Empower America. Obviously, that is Bill Bennett who is also with the Heritage Foundation and Jack Kemp who is also a fellow at the Heritage Foundation.

KELLEIGH: And a member of the CNP and a 33rd degree mason.

CHEY: Lamar Alexander and Jean Kirkpatrick. It will be interesting. This is a new change. Empower America is now controlled at the top by a Unification Church member whose purpose in life is to glorify Rev. Sun Myung Moon.

KELLEIGH: And the connections are so many because Jeannie Kirkpatrick of Empower America formerly had Madeleine Albright's job at the U.N. She trained Alan Keyes who is a member of the Council For National Policy. She is a CFR member. It's all interconnected. It just flows, they flow together. It's one big basket of snakes!

CHEY: Well, it will be interesting to see, now that they have a Unification Church member as their top official, who opts to leave Empower America. Who will speak out against this or will Jack Kemp and Lamar Alexander and Bill Bennett remain the "christian" talking heads?

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: We have a caller on the line who I know will be very interesting. It's Angie Carlson from California. I had another call while we were on break on my other line asking a couple questions so don't let me forget to ask you those. We'll take Angie now if she's on the line.

ANGIE: Hi, Kelleigh! This is an excellent, most informative broadcast. I thank you so very, very much for bringing Chey on. Chey, bless you for divulging all this information. It's amazing that even those of us who work so deeply in divulging and informing to know so little of certain things. What I would like to again repeat, did you say that the Center for National Policy and the Christian Freedom Coalition are Moon fronts?

CHEY: American Freedom Coalition. The Christian Coalition's Ralph Reed did participate in that Family Federation for World Peace event that was...

ANGIE: World Parliament, right.

KELLEIGH: Joanie Veon.

CHEY: Rev. Moon's group, let's see what is it called, Interreligious something...

ANGIE: Chey, I sure hope you'll write something about this and get it out to us.

CHEY: Yeah, I'm working on it. Actually, I first came across that in a Moon-published book from Paragon House which is a Unification Church-owned publishing company, that through his Interreligious foundation, he had sponsored the Chicago 1993 World Parliament of Religions.

ANGIE: That speech you're talking about, I just went in the Net, it's called IN SEARCH OF THE ORIGIN OF THE UNIVERSE, August 1, right? I just read part of it. It is absolutely disgusting, in fact, its nauseating! And I want to send it out with some of my messages because I have many hundreds of people on my list that I forward information to.

What about Eagle Forum? You didn't mention Phyllis Schlafly. I can't remember what organization you said she was involved in, receiving money or she went to a meeting. What about the Eagle Forum?

KELLEIGH: Do you want me to answer that, Chey? Well, I will tell you this, Phyllis Schlafly is a Catholic. I know that she's done what a lot of people consider a lot of good work. However, I know for a fact Phyllis is Phi Beta Kappa and all you have to do is go into the old book, SECRET AND OTHER SOCIETIES, and find out that Phi Beta Kappa was started in the 1700s and patterned of the Bavarian Illuminati. On the back of the Phi Beta Kappa key are seven stars and a crescent moon which also appears on the floors of the old freemasonry halls. So, there is a heavy connection there to. Now, it is alleged, and I say alleged very carefully, that Phyllis is a Dame of the Sovereign Order of the Military Knights of Malta. And it is also a fact that she did get a $500,000 federal grant to study Child Abuse in the Classroom. Child Abuse in the Classroom was actually not written by Phyllis. It was written by a woman named Charlotte Iserbyt and it was only a year ago that Phyllis finally gave Charlotte credit for having written it.

Now, I have a letter in my file that I will be happy to send you. It's from Elizabeth Clare Prophet and it's thanking Phyllis Schlafly for having appeared at one of her conferences as a guest speaker. It also connects a man named Balsiger who is another Council For National Policy member who apparently worked for Elizabeth Clare Prophet and was involved with both Phyllis and Elizabeth Prophet. So, its questionable, you know?

ANGIE: Yes, absolutely. It's so important to inform people of these things because I get tons and tons of mail a day and I remember seeing things from the Center For National Policy and not really knowing what it is. But, another thing is the way Sun Myung Moon is seriously penetrating the hearts and souls of those even not involved with the Center For National Policy or American Freedom, but just people and Christians on the Internet such as myself, is by the media and putting out articles that you think are very good and telling the truth. Now, I've known and been very skeptical about Insight and also Washington Times. I have seen some disinformation in there. In fact, someone told me not too long ago, from Korea, I asked why do you think Moon is divulging so much about China and what's going on over there? He said, "Not for any good reason but because he hates the Chinese. He does not want the competition with the Chinese and that's one main reason other than impressing other people (so-called conservatives who want the other side of the news)." This is very, very dangerous.

KELLEIGH: Angie, I think you need to stay on the line and have Chey tell you the CIA connections.

ANGIE: Oh, I would love to know! Would you prefer that I get off and listen off the air?

KELLEIGH: No, you can stay on if you want. You may have another question because that was one of the questions that I got on my other line. Chey, could you go into that? Are you prepared for it?

CHEY: Well, I'll try to make that connection for you. I have to get out another notebook.

KELLEIGH: There was also another question regarding Jerry Falafel's involvement.

CHEY: I know that Jerry Falwell defended Moon when Moon went to jail over income tax evasion. Also, when Jerry Falwell had the Moral Majority, his Senior Vice President was a man named Ron Godwin. Ron Godwin, who professes Christianity and was very high in Moral Majority, subsequently took a job as the editor of Insight Magazine, a Unification publication that is marketed as a "conservative" magazine. Now he is, and has been for a number of years, the Senior Vice President of The Washington Times newspaper. He works directly under Colonel Bo Hi Pak who is Moon's highest in command in the United States.

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: And we're back with Chey Simonton. We have Angie Carlson on the line. Chey, I hope that gave you time to get your file out.

CHEY: It did, yes. Basically, I'm taking information from Bob Woodward's book, VEIL: THE SECRET WARS OF THE CIA 1981-1987. He identifies on page 426 that, "Casey had greatly increased the covert budget for propaganda operations. There were now about 2 dozen providing money abroad for newspapers, think tanks and institutes." Now money abroad is sanctioned, but, with "propaganda" what you have to focus on is newspapers, think tanks and institutes regardless of whether they are abroad or not.

On page 429 it states, "The Washington Times started by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon of the Unification Church was plugged into Reagan's conservative Washington. Several of its staff writers had worked at the National Security Council." Now, that was Oliver North and John Poindexter and McFarland's thing was the National Security Council, that's where they served President Reagan. The Washington Times, when it started, had National Security Council personnel working as writers.

There is a gentleman named Max Hugel who served briefly on the CIA as friend of Casey's. He had to resign when some stock trading came to light. He made a threat to his stock broker who had accused him of insider trading, "I'll get my Korean gang after you and don't look so good when your (expletive deleted) ". Max Hugel served on the Council For National Policy. In a 1990 article from the Washington Post, in the financial section, it goes into the fact that Max Hugel and Jonathan Park, the son of Bo Hi Pak who is the President of The Washington Times Foundation and who as a colonel was an attache to the Korean embassy, Max Hugel and Col. Bo Hi Pak's son using Unification money were pursuing forming a conglomerate of all the independent broadcasting facilities in the whole Washington D.C. region. As of 1990, they had purchased and controlled all but one including the satellite and the independent broadcasting facility in the National Press Building. They were providing news footage to CNN and anyone who understands editing can understand how that could be used for propaganda. In editing you can do all kinds of fancy things.

ANGIE: Chey, if I could say one thing very quickly, it's interesting that you mentioned Bevel. Two questions, Bevel was in some organization and secondly, in fact the LaRouche paper, Federalist, has been exposing a tremendous amount. They seem to have a very special disdain for Sun Myung Moon and divulged the fact several months ago that Moon and Bush were on a speaking tour of South and Central America. I have the article somewhere. Moon went there supposedly to be involved in one of these ghastly collective weddings, 3.5 million poor South Americans were getting married and he and Bush bought several major papers in South and Central America. So they are really moving all over the world through the media!

CHEY: You have to remember that Bush, before he was president and before he was vice president, was the Director of the CIA back in the 70s. They've been working together for the last several years. They're very close.

KELLEIGH: And the fact that The Washington Times has lost 35 million a year for how many years?

CHEY: 15 years. If you're going into the Unification web site, read Moon's speech, the Founder's Speech for The Washington Times.

ANGIE: Do you have any idea of the year?

CHEY: It's fairly recent. I don't have it written down, but, in that he said he had received nothing good from America but that he had bestowed his blessing on America. It's the Founder's Speech for The Washington Times 15th Anniversary. It's maybe this year or maybe last year.

KELLEIGH: The other thing about Lyndon LaRouche is the fact the man spent time in prison just like Mandela did to prove his allegiance to his masters. Lyndon LaRouche at one time changed his name to Len Marcus to honor Lenin and Marx who are his heroes.

ANGIE: Well, he was a stated communist who moved to democratic, then conservative and then back to so-called democratic.

KELLEIGH: And yet, here is Rev. James Bevel on the National Advisory Board of the American Freedom Coalition which is headed by Dr. Robert Grant, CNP member, and a Moon organization! So, see it's all connected!

ANGIE: This is such valuable information. I appreciate this so very, very much! If you would just repeat where the $5,000,000 was given one time so I could write that down. Thank you so much. Bye, bye.

(Commercial)

KELLEIGH: My guest has been Chey Simonton for the last two hours. I wanted to tell you, Chey, that it's been my pleasure to be on the air with you for a couple hours discussing this very involved Moon and all the tentacles along with it. I want to give just two short Bible verses that really speak to the whole situation.

"But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare and into many foolish and hurtful lusts which drown men in destruction and perdition for the love of money is the root of all evil which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith and pierced themselves through with many sorrows." Timothy I 6:9-10

Doesn't that just tell what's happened?

CHEY: It sure does, it really does.

KELLEIGH: So, tell Angie where it states that they lose $35,000,000 every year.

CHEY: Well, I've seen it in various things. Mine is in a New York Times article about reorganizing and brushing up the conservative image of The Washington Times. I'd be happy to e-mail that to her. I don't have it on disk.

KELLEIGH: Anything you want to finish up on while we have a few minutes left here?

CHEY: Your Christian testimony is the most precious thing you have. We have a Savior. Our job is glorify Him. Politics and political goals come second. Our Savior, Lord Jesus Christ comes first.

KELLEIGH: That's right. That's absolutely true!

CHEY: And glorifying Moon does not honor God.

KELLEIGH: Unfortunately, many of these get into worshipping politics as their god. I think that's where Rev. Moon and all those Christian Right that he's leading down this path are going and have been for many years. Don't you?

CHEY: Yes, I do! It's a worldly system and all the compromise and coalition building in politics is very, very dangerous.

KELLEIGH: And where has it gotten us? We've been fighting this mess, with the Christian Right supposedly helping. For the last 25 years they've told us, "Give us your money, your time, your blood and we'll save the country from what's coming." Now we're on the brink of a precipice ready to fall in!

CHEY: Umhum, with all these leaders! They live very lavish lives, don't they?

KELLEIGH: Yes, they do. A lot more lavish than you and I!

CHEY: Sacrificial giving on the part of the grassroots makes for a comfortable life style.

KELLEIGH: And I think what people don't realize is that as long as they get their grassroots support, they can show the foundations that they have the ear of the grassroots and then the foundations fund them with great deals of money. So, if we stop funding them our $25.00 a month, then their foundation money will also drop off because the foundations will realize that we are no longer being affected by their rhetoric.

CHEY: Amen!

KELLEIGH: God bless you, Chey! Good night, folks!
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:20 am

The Bush-Kim-Moon Triangle of Money
by Robert Parry
Common Dreams
March 10, 2001

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At this past week’s summit, George W. Bush and South Korean President Kim Dae Jung disagreed publicly on how to deal with communist North Korea – Bush advocated a harder line. But the two leaders have a little-known bond in common: the political largesse of the Rev. Sun Myung Moon.

For more than three decades, Moon, the founder of the South Korea-based Unification Church, has spun a worldwide spider's web of influence, connecting to hundreds of powerful leaders through the silken threads of his mysterious money.

Moon’s beneficiaries include the Bush family and, according to U.S. intelligence reports, Kim Dae Jung.

Though seldom discussed publicly, the Moon-Bush connection has been reported before – and detailed in this publication. But Moon’s financial links to Kim Dae Jung – a longtime dissident who opposed the authoritarian governments that ruled South Korea during the Cold War – have remained secret.

U.S. intelligence stumbled onto the Moon-Kim connection while monitoring South Korean political developments in 1987.

By that time, Moon’s Unification Church already had built close ties to the Reagan-Bush administration, especially through Moon's funding of conservative causes and his $100-million-a-year subsidy of the right-wing Washington Times, hailed by Ronald Reagan as his “favorite” newspaper.

Back in South Korea, however, Moon's longtime coziness with his home nation's autocratic rulers was strained. Moon was on the outs with the ruling Democratic Justice Party (DJP), the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency noted in a cable dated Sept. 10, 1987.

“The UC (Unification Church) … has not been happy with the somewhat cold treatment it has received under the current DJP government,” the DIA cable reported.

In response to this chilliness, Moon secretly began financing several opposition figures, the DIA reported. One was a longtime Moon ally, Kim Jong Pil, not to be confused with North Korea's current leader Kim Jong Il.

By the late 1980s, Kim Jong Pil had a long record of association with Moon. A 1978 U.S. congressional investigation into the so-called “Koreagate” influence-buying scandal reported that Kim Jong Pil founded the South Korean CIA in the 1960s and assisted Moon's Unification Church in building its influence in Japan and the United States.

The congressional investigation concluded that Kim Jong Pil and the South Korean CIA helped Moon expand his church into a well-financed international organization. They then used Moon's organization to buy influence inside the U.S. government, the congressional investigation found.

Kim Jong Pil also had served as South Korean prime minister in the early 1970s. In 1987, however, Kim Jong Pil was out of power and considering a run for the South Korean presidency.

The DIA Reports

According to the Defense Intelligence Agency, Kim Jong Pil was one of the candidates who benefited from Moon’s estrangement from the ruling Democratic Justice Party.

“Kim Jong-Pil is reportedly receiving financial and organizational support for his KS (South Korean) presidential bid from the controversial Unification Church,” the DIA reported in its Sept. 10, 1987, cable.

But Moon’s organization did not stop with its old ally. The DIA discovered that Moon was hedging his bets by putting money into the hands of Kim Dae Jung and other leaders of the Reunification Democratic Party.

“Cult trying to win influence with the next KS government while defeating the current ruling party's candidate,” read the title of another DIA report dated Sept. 22, 1987.

“The controversial Unification Church (UC) is actively funneling large amounts of political funds to opposition Reunification Democratic Party (RDP) advisor Kim Dae-Jung, … RDP president Kim Young-Sam, … and former KS prime minister Kim Jong-Pil for their campaigns for KS president, leaving out only the ruling party candidate, Democratic Justice Party (DJP) president Roh Tae-Woo,” the DIA report said.

“The UC wants to see Roh defeated and is funneling large amounts of political funds to Roh's three opponents with the expectation that it will have influence with whomever of the three should end up as the next president.” [I obtained these DIA reports under a Freedom of Information Act request.]

Eventually, the race boiled down to a contest between Roh Tae Woo, Kim Dae Jung and Kim Young Sam. On Dec. 16, 1987, Roh won with 36 percent of the vote. Kim Young Sam got 28 percent and Kim Dae Jung received 27 percent. Kim Jong Pil garnered only 8 percent. [For details on the election, see The Two Koreas by Don Oberdorfer.]

Discreet Relationships

Though losing that round, Moon’s beneficiaries did better in the years that followed. Kim Jong Pil again became prime minister, a post he held from 1998 to early 1999. Kim Dae Jung became president in 1998 and also won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Through the years, Kim Dae Jung did not advertise his ties to Moon. Kim's association with the theocrat who considers himself the new Messiah has remained discreet, with the two men generally avoiding contact in public.

One exception came on Feb. 1, 1999, when Moon and his wife – known to their followers as the “True Parents” – were holding a celebration at the Lotte Hotel in Seoul. To the surprise of Moon’s followers, Kim Dae Jung arrived and enthusiastically joined the couple in their ceremony.

According to the Unification News, the church's internal newsletter, the Lotte Hotel event was “the first time President Kim appeared in public with our True Parents.”

Though less secret, Moon’s relationship with the Bush family also remains little known to most Americans. Moon's organization has paid the Bush family directly – for speeches in the 1990s – but the alliance appears to have grown primarily through Moon’s extravagant financial support for The Washington Times, which has consistently backed the Bushes politically.

After its founding in 1982, The Washington Times staunchly supported some of the Reagan-Bush administration’s most controversial policies, such as the contra war in Nicaragua.

When the contra operation was embarrassed by initial public disclosures of contra drug trafficking in 1985-86, The Washington Times led the counterattack, criticizing journalists and congressional investigators who uncovered the first evidence of the problem.

Those attacks helped cement a conventional wisdom in the Washington political community that the contra-drug allegations were bogus, a belief that persisted until 1998 when the CIA's inspector general admitted that dozens of contra units were implicated in cocaine trafficking and that the Reagan-Bush administration had hidden much of the evidence. [See Robert Parry’s Lost History.]

The Washington Times also led the charge against Iran-contra special prosecutor Lawrence Walsh in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The newspaper's rear-guard defense of its allies proved important when Walsh's investigation threatened to break through the long-running White House cover-up that was protecting Bush’s assertion that he was “out of the loop” on the scandal. [For details on The Washington Times' role, see Walsh’s book, Firewall.]

During national political campaigns, Moon’s Washington Times was especially influential, mounting harsh – and often inaccurate – attacks on the Bush family's adversaries.

In 1988, when George H.W. Bush was running for president, The Washington Times publicized false rumors about the mental health of Democratic candidate Michael Dukakis, an important first step in raising doubts about the Massachusetts governor.

President George H.W. Bush grew so appreciative of The Washington Times that in 1991, he invited its editor-in-chief, Wesley Pruden, to the White House for a private lunch. Bush explained that the purpose of the lunch was “just to tell you how valuable the Times has become in Washington, where we read it everyday.” [WT, May 17, 1992]

In Bush’s 1992 reelection campaign, The Washington Times was helping again, spreading new false rumors that Bill Clinton might have betrayed his country during a college trip to Moscow, possibly being recruited by the KGB as a spy.

Lining Pocket

After George H.W. Bush lost in 1992, The Washington Times shifted from defense to offense. The newspaper became a leading conservative weapon in mounting attacks on the Clinton administration.

During the Bush family’s years out of power, Moon put money directly into their pockets, too. Moon-affiliated organizations paid for speeches by former President Bush in the United States, Asia and South America. Sometimes, Barbara Bush joined her husband in these appearances.

The price tag for the speeches has been estimated at from hundreds of thousands of dollars to $10 million, a figure cited to me by a senior Unification Church official in the mid-1990s. The elder Bush has refused to divulge how much money he received from Moon-affiliated organizations.

During one 1996 appearance in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the senior Bush went beyond a mere speech to act as a kind of international lobbyist for the Moon organization.

At the time, Moon was planning to launch a new newspaper, Tiempos del Mundo, and his supporters were upset over critical coverage in South American newspapers. The South American press was pointing out Moon’s close association with right-wing “death-squad” governments of the 1970s and the so-called “Cocaine Coup” regime in Bolivia in the early 1980s.

Moon's defenders were forced to issue public denials that Moon's mysterious source of wealth came from drug trafficking and other organized-crime activities.

These allegations were threatening the Tiempos del Mundo launch, Moon's followers feared. But Moon had a special weapon to prove his respectability: the endorsement of the 41st president of the United States.

Bush arrived on Nov. 22, 1996, and stayed with Argentine President Carlos Menem at his official residence. The next day, Bush gave the keynote address at the newspaper’s inaugural dinner.

“Mr. Bush’s presence as keynote speaker gave the event invaluable prestige,” wrote the Unification News. “Father [Moon] and Mother [Mrs. Moon] sat with several of the True Children [Moon’s offspring] just a few feet from the podium.”

Bush lavished praise on Moon and his journalistic enterprises. “I want to salute Reverend Moon,” Bush said. “A lot of my friends in South America don’t know about The Washington Times, but it is an independent voice. The editors of The Washington Times tell me that never once has the man with the vision interfered with the running of the paper, a paper that in my view brings sanity to Washington, D.C.”

Bush's endorsement wasn't exactly accurate. A stream of editors and correspondents have left The Washington Times, complaining about the interference of Moon's operatives. But Moon's followers believed Bush's intervention stanched the flow of negative press stories and saved the day.

'Satanic' America

In those eight years of the Bush family's hiatus from power, Moon also grew increasingly anti-American, often telling his followers that the United States was “Satanic.” He vowed to build a movement powerful enough to absorb America and eliminate what Moon saw as America's destructive tendencies toward individualism.

“Americans who continue to maintain their privacy and extreme individualism are foolish people,” Moon told his followers during one speech on Aug. 4, 1996. He then said, “Once you have this great power of love, which is big enough to swallow entire America, there may be some individuals who complain inside your stomach. However, they will be digested.”

During the 2000 campaign, The Washington Times was back helping the Bush family achieve its political restoration. Day after day, the newspaper published articles undercutting Democrat Al Gore – even questioning his sanity – while boosting the candidacy of George W. Bush.

In late 1999, The New York Times and The Washington Post created a controversy by misquoting Gore as claiming credit for starting the Love Canal toxic-waste cleanup. The two newspapers quoted Gore as saying "I was the one that started it all" when in fact he was referring to a similar Tennessee toxic-waste case and said, "that was the one that started it all."

Yet, with the bogus quote touching off a wave of media ridicule about Gore's supposed lack of credibility, The Washington Times eagerly joined the pack and returned to its old game of questioning the sanity of its political enemies.

A Washington Times editorial termed Gore “delusional” and stated, “The real question is how to react to Mr. Gore’s increasingly bizarre utterings.” The editorial went on to call Gore “a politician who not only manufactures gross, obvious lies about himself and his achievements but appears to actually believe these confabulations.” [WT, Dec. 7, 1999]

Even after The New York Times and The Washington Post corrected their misquote, The Washington Times continued to use the bogus quote.

On Dec. 31, 1999, Moon's newspaper published a column entitled "Liar, Liar; Gore's Pants on Fire." The column repeated the false quote and concluded that "when Al Gore lies, it's without any apparent reason."

The media drumbeat about Gore’s supposed lies – often built on similar press exaggerations and outright errors – became a key element of the 2000 campaign. Many Republican strategists viewed the widespread perception of Gore as untrustworthy as crucial in holding down Gore's vote and clearing George W. Bush's route to the White House.

Payback

Now, with the Bush family back in charge, Moon’s organization appears in line for some financial payback. George W. Bush’s plan to funnel government money into religious charities is expected to be especially profitable for Moon's front groups that are organized as non-profit charities.

The Rev. Pat Robertson, the conservative televangelist, is among those who have raised the alarm about how Bush’s "faith-based" initiative could line Moon's pockets.

On the "700 Club" television program, Robertson warned that Moon’s Unification Church could become one of the financial “beneficiaries of the proposal to expand eligibility for government grants to religious charities.” [Washington Post, Feb. 22, 2000]

Besides the possibility of collecting U.S. taxpayers’ money, Moon also continues to benefit from a determined see-no-evil stance of the U.S. government toward Moon’s political-religious-business organization.

Widespread evidence exists of money-laundering by Moon’s operation – including first-hand statements by church insiders including his former daughter-in-law. But this evidence simply disappears into a black hole of federal indifference.

Moon’s business dealings with communist North Korea, dating back to 1991 and the first Bush administration, also have prompted no official U.S. reaction.

Based on what is known publicly, Moon would appear to be in violation of the long-standing U.S. trade embargo against North Korea. That embargo covered Moon because he is a legal U.S. resident – possessing a "green card" – and thus required to abide by U.S. sanction laws.

According to other DIA documentation that I obtained under FOIA, Moon delivered millions of dollars in secret payments to North Korea’s top officials – including current communist leader Kim Il Song.

Those payments, in the early-to-mid 1990s, came at a time when the communist regime was desperate for hard currency to support its development of nuclear weapons and long-range missiles.

Ironically, it is that arms buildup that George W. Bush now cites as a chief reason for postponing further negotiations with North Korea – and for spending tens of billions of dollars to build a U.S. nuclear "Star Wars" shield.

During this past week’s summit, South Korea’s president Kim Dae Jung disagreed with Bush over the cessation of talks with North Korea. Bush attacked the North Koreans as untrustworthy.

Yet, behind the scenes -- though perhaps not fully apparent to either man -- was this odd connection linking the Bush family, Kim Dae Jung and the communist leaders of North Korea.

It was the secret bond of Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s mysterious money.

Robert Parry is an investigative reporter who broke many of the Iran-contra stories in the 1980s for The Associated Press and Newsweek.
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

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The Moon-Bush Cash Conduit
by Robert Parry
June 14, 2006

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Over the past quarter century, South Korean theocrat Sun Myung Moon has been one of the Bush family’s major benefactors – both politically and financially – while enjoying what appears to be protection against federal investigations into evidence that his cult-like organization has functioned as a criminal enterprise.

Indeed, the newest disclosure about Moon funneling money to a Bush family entity bears many of the earmarks of Moon’s business strategy of laundering money through a complex maze of front companies and cut-outs so it can’t be easily followed. In this case, according to an article in the Houston Chronicle, Moon’s Washington Times Foundation gave $1 million to the Greater Houston Community Foundation, which in turn acted as a conduit for donations to the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library.

The Chronicle obtained indirect confirmation that Moon’s money was passing through the Houston foundation to the Bush library from Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath. Asked whether Moon’s $1 million had ended up there, McGrath responded, “We’re in an uncomfortable position. … If a donor doesn’t want to be identified we need to honor their privacy.”

But when asked whether the $1 million was intended to curry favor with the Bush family to get President George W. Bush to grant a pardon for Moon’s 1982 felony tax fraud conviction, McGrath answered, “If that’s why he gave the grant, he’s throwing his money away. … That’s not the way the Bushes operate.”

McGrath then added, “President Bush has been very grateful for the friendship shown to him by the Washington Times Foundation, and the Washington Times serves a vital role in Washington. But there can’t be any connection to any kind of a pardon.” [Houston Chronicle, June 8, 2006, citing the work of private researcher Larry Zilliox.]

But Moon has many other interests beyond clearing his criminal record with a presidential pardon.

While it’s true Moon has sought a pardon since the latter years of Ronald Reagan’s administration, Moon also has counted on powerful political connections to shield his business activities from renewed federal investigation that otherwise might have pried into criminal offenses ranging from money laundering to evading the U.S. embargo on the rogue state of North Korea.

Moon has achieved this remarkable insulation for his operations largely by spreading around hundreds of millions of dollars for political activities, charitable functions and the publication of one of Washington’s daily newspapers, the Washington Times.

The founder of the South Korean-based Unification Church has made himself particularly useful to the Bush family and other prominent Republicans who have returned the favor by speaking at his events, lavishing praise on his business operations and granting him Capitol Hill space for some of his ceremonies.

Bags of Cash

Faced with Moon’s political clout, federal authorities have looked the other way for more than two decades even when principals within Moon’s organization have made public declarations about its continuing criminal practices.


For instance, Moon’s former daughter-in-law, Nansook Hong, admitted to participating in money-laundering schemes by personally smuggling cash from South Korea into the United States. She also said she witnessed other cases in which bags of cash were carried into the United States and delivered to Moon’s businesses.

Moon “demonstrated contempt for U.S. law every time he accepted a paper bag full of untraceable, undeclared cash collected from true believers” who smuggled the money in from overseas, Nansook Hong wrote in her 1998 book, In the Shadows of the Moons.

Nansook Hong’s allegations were corroborated by other disaffected Moon disciples in press interviews and in civil court proceedings.

Maria Madelene Pretorious, a former Unification Church member who worked at Moon’s Manhattan Center, a New York City music venue and recording studio, testified at a court hearing in Massachusetts that in December of 1993 or January of 1994, one of Moon’s sons, Hyo Jin Moon, returned from a trip to Korea “with $600,000 in cash which he had received from his father. ... Myself along with three or four other members that worked at Manhattan Center saw the cash in bags, shopping bags.”

In an interview with me in the mid-1990s, Pretorious said Asian church members would bring cash into the United States where it would be circulated through Moon’s business empire as a way to launder it. At the center of this financial operation, Pretorious said, was One-Up Corp., a Delaware-registered holding company that owned many Moon enterprises including the Manhattan Center and New World Communications, the parent company of the Washington Times.

“Once that cash is at the Manhattan Center, it has to be accounted for,” Pretorious said. “The way that’s done is to launder the cash. Manhattan Center gives cash to a business called Happy World which owns restaurants. ... Happy World needs to pay illegal aliens. ... Happy World pays some back to the Manhattan Center for ‘services rendered.’ The rest goes to One-Up and then comes back to Manhattan Center as an investment.”

The lack of federal investigative interest in these admissions of guilt was especially curious because evidence of Moon’s money-laundering dated back to the late 1970s when Moon’s operations came under the scrutiny of a congressional probe into a South Korean influence-buying plot called “Koreagate.” Investigators discovered Moon’s pattern of money transfers emanating from mysterious sources in Asia and ending up funding media, political, educational and religious activities in the United States.

By the early 1980s, that federal money-laundering probe had led to the criminal charges against Moon for tax evasion, a prosecution that the new Reagan-Bush Justice Department tried to derail but couldn’t because it was being handled by career prosecutors in New York City. Moon was convicted in 1982 and imprisoned for 13 months.

Buying Influence

But Moon’s influence-buying operation was only just beginning.

He launched the Washington Times in 1982 and its staunch support for Reagan-Bush political interests quickly made it a favorite of Reagan, Bush and other influential Republicans. Moon also made sure that his steady flow of cash found its way into the pockets of key conservative operatives, especially when they were most in need, when they were facing financial crises.

For instance, when the New Right’s direct-mail whiz Richard Viguerie fell on hard times in the late 1980s, Moon had a corporation run by a chief lieutenant, Bo Hi Pak, buy one of Viguerie’s properties for $10 million. [See Orange County Register, Dec. 21, 1987; Washington Post, Oct. 15, 1989]

Moon also used the Washington Times and its affiliated publications to create seemingly legitimate conduits to funnel money to individuals and companies. In another example of Moon’s largesse, the Washington Times hired Viguerie to conduct a pricy direct-mail subscription drive, boosting his profit margin.

Another case of saving a right-wing icon occurred when the Rev. Jerry Falwell was facing financial ruin over the debts piling up at Liberty University.

But the fundamentalist Christian school in Lynchburg, Va., got a last-minute bail-out in the mid-1990s ostensibly from two Virginia businessmen, Dan Reber and Jimmy Thomas, who used their non-profit Christian Heritage Foundation to snap up a large chunk of Liberty’s debt for $2.5 million, a fraction of its face value.

Falwell rejoiced and called the moment “the greatest single day of financial advantage” in the school’s history, even though it was accomplished at the disadvantage of many small true-believing investors who had bought the church construction bonds through a Texas company.

But Falwell’s secret benefactor behind the debt purchase was Sun Myung Moon, who was kept in the background partly because of his controversial Biblical interpretations that hold Jesus to have been a failure and because of Moon’s alleged brainwashing of thousands of young Americans, often shattering their bonds with their biological families.

Moon had used his tax-exempt Women’s Federation for World Peace to funnel $3.5 million to the Reber-Thomas Christian Heritage Foundation, the non-profit that purchased the school’s debt. I stumbled onto this Moon-Falwell connection by examining the Internal Revenue Service filings of Moon’s front groups.


The Women Federation’s vice president Susan Fefferman confirmed that the $3.5 million grant had gone to “Mr. Falwell’s people” for the benefit of Liberty University. The indirect funneling of money to Falwell’s school paralleled the technique used a decade later to donate funds to George H.W. Bush’s presidential library. [For more on Moon’s funding of the Right, see Robert Parry’s Secrecy & Privilege.]

Bush Speeches

Moon also used the Women’s Federation to pay substantial speaking fees to George H.W. Bush, who gave talks at Moon-sponsored events. In September 1995, Bush and his wife, Barbara, gave six speeches in Asia for the Women’s Federation. In one speech on Sept. 14 to 50,000 Moon supporters in Tokyo, Bush said “what really counts is faith, family and friends.”


Moon’s wife, Hak Ja Han Moon, followed the ex-President and announced that “it has to be Reverend Moon to save the United States, which is in decline because of the destruction of the family and moral decay.” [Washington Post, Sept. 15, 1995]

In summer 1996, Bush was lending his prestige to Moon again. Bush addressed the Moon-connected Family Federation for World Peace in Washington, an event that gained notoriety when comedian Bill Cosby tried to back out of his contract after learning of Moon’s connection. Bush had no such qualms. [Washington Post, July 30, 1996]

In fall 1996, Moon needed the ex-President’s help again. Moon was trying to replicate his Washington Times influence in South America by opening a regional newspaper, Tiempos del Mundo. But South American journalists were recounting unsavory chapters of Moon’s history, including his links to South Korea’s feared intelligence service and various neo-fascist organizations.

In the early 1980s, Moon had used friendships with the military dictatorships in Argentina and Uruguay – which had been responsible for tens of thousands of political murders – to invest in those two countries. There also were allegations of Moon’s links to the region’s major drug traffickers. [For details on the drug ties, see Robert Parry’s Lost History.]

Heaven Sent

Moon’s disciples fumed about the critical stories and accused the Argentine news media of trying to sabotage Moon’s plans for an inaugural gala in Buenos Aires on Nov. 23, 1996. “The local press was trying to undermine the event,” complained the church’s internal newsletter, Unification News.

Given the controversy, Argentina’s elected president, Carlos Menem, decided to reject Moon’s invitation.

But Moon had a trump card: the endorsement of an ex-President of the United States, George H.W. Bush. Agreeing to speak at the newspaper’s launch, Bush flew aboard a private plane, arriving in Buenos Aires on Nov. 22. Bush stayed at Menem’s official residence, the Olivos.

As the headliner at the newspaper’s inaugural gala, Bush saved the day, Moon’s followers gushed. “Mr. Bush’s presence as keynote speaker gave the event invaluable prestige,” wrote the Unification News. “Father [Moon] and Mother [Mrs. Moon] sat with several of the True Children [Moon’s offspring] just a few feet from the podium” where Bush spoke.

“I want to salute Reverend Moon,” Bush declared. “A lot of my friends in South America don’t know about the Washington Times, but it is an independent voice. The editors of the Washington Times tell me that never once has the man with the vision [Moon] interfered with the running of the paper, a paper that in my view brings sanity to Washington, D.C.”


Bush’s speech was so effusive that it surprised even Moon’s followers. “Once again, heaven turned a disappointment into a victory,” the Unification News exulted. “Everyone was delighted to hear his compliments. We knew he would give an appropriate and ‘nice’ speech, but praise in Father’s presence was more than we expected. ... It was vindication. We could just hear a sigh of relief from Heaven.”

While Bush’s assertion about Moon’s Washington Times as a voice of “sanity” may be a matter of opinion, Bush’s vouching for its editorial independence simply wasn’t true. Almost since it opened in 1982, a string of senior editors and correspondents have resigned, citing the manipulation of the news by Moon and his subordinates. The first editor, James Whelan, resigned in 1984, confessing that “I have blood on my hands” for helping Moon’s church achieve greater legitimacy.

Ties That Bind


But Bush’s boosterism was just what Moon needed in South America. “The day after,” the Unification News observed, “the press did a 180-degree about-turn once they realized that the event had the support of a U.S. President.” With Bush’s help, Moon had gained another beachhead for his worldwide business-religious-political-media empire.

After the event, Menem told reporters from La Nacion that Bush had claimed privately to be only a mercenary who did not really know Moon. “Bush told me he came and charged money to do it,” Menem said. [La Nacion, Nov. 26, 1996]

But Bush was not telling Menem the whole story. By fall 1996, Bush and Moon had been working in political tandem for at least a decade and a half. The ex-President also had been earning huge speaking fees as a front man for Moon for more than a year.

Throughout these public appearances for Moon, Bush’s office refused to divulge how much Moon-affiliated organizations have paid the ex-President. But estimates of Bush’s fee for the Buenos Aires appearance alone ran between $100,000 and $500,000. Sources close to the Unification Church told me that the total spending on Bush ran into the millions, with one source telling me that Bush stood to make as much as $10 million from Moon’s organization.


The senior George Bush may have had a political motive, too. By 1996, sources close to Bush were saying the ex-President was working hard to enlist well-to-do conservatives and their money behind the presidential candidacy of his son, George W. Bush. Moon was one of the deepest pockets in right-wing circles.

North Korean Cash


Moon, who has the status of a U.S. permanent resident alien, has skirted other federal laws, including prohibitions on financial relations with the hard-line communist government of North Korea.

Despite Moon’s history of extreme anti-communism, Moon began spreading money around inside North Korea – much as he has in other countries – while seeking business advantages during the first Bush administration, according to U.S. intelligence documents.

U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency documents, which I obtained under a Freedom of Information Act request, showed Moon’s organization paying millions of dollars to North Korean leaders. The payments included a $3 million “birthday present” to current communist leader Kim Jong Il and offshore payments amounting to “several tens of million dollars” to the previous communist dictator, Kim Il Sung, the partially declassified documents said.

Yet, in the 1990s, while Moon was passing out money, North Korea was scrambling for the resources to develop missiles and other advanced weaponry, including a nuclear weapons capability. Moon’s activities attracted the attention of the Defense Intelligence Agency because it is responsible for monitoring potential military threats to the United States.

Moon negotiated one North Korean business deal in 1991, after face-to-face meetings with Kim Il Sung, the longtime communist leader, the DIA documents said.

“These talks took place secretly, without the knowledge of the South Korean government,” the DIA wrote on Feb. 2, 1994. “In the original deal with Kim [Il Sung], Moon paid several tens of million dollars as a down-payment into an overseas account,” the DIA said in a cable dated Aug. 14, 1994.

The DIA said Moon's organization also delivered money to Kim Il Sung's son and successor, Kim Jong Il.

“In 1993, the Unification Church sold a piece of property located in Pennsylvania,” the DIA reported on Sept. 9, 1994. “The profit on the sale, approximately $3 million was sent through a bank in China to the Hong Kong branch of the KS [South Korean] company ‘Samsung Group.’ The money was later presented to Kim Jung Il [Kim Jong Il] as a birthday present.”


After Kim Il Sung's death in 1994 and his succession by his son, Kim Jong Il, Moon dispatched his longtime aide, Bo Hi Pak, to ensure that the business deals were still on track with Kim Jong Il “and his coterie,” the DIA reported.

“If necessary, Moon authorized Pak to deposit a second payment for Kim Jong Il,” the DIA wrote.

The DIA declined to elaborate on the documents. “As for the documents you have, you have to draw your own conclusions,” said DIA spokesman, U.S. Navy Capt. Michael Stainbrook. [See two of the DIA documents below]

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SUMMARY: UNIFICATION CHURCH OFFICIAL ((PAK)) BO-HI'S PRIMARY PURPOSE IN GOING TO KN CAPITAL PYONGYANG IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING KN PRESIDENT ((KIM)) IL-SUNG'S DEATH WAS NOT TO EXPRESS CONDOLENCES BUT RATHER TO INSURE CONTINUITY OF THE BUSINESS AND REAL ESTATE ARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN THE UNIFICATION CHURCH AND THE KN GOVERNMENT.

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[DELETE] UNIFICATION CHURCH OFFICIAL ((PAK)) BO-HI'S PRIMARY PURPOSE IN GOING TO KN CAPITAL PYONGYANG IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING KN PRESIDENT ((KIM)) IL-SUNG'S DEATH WAS NOT TO EXPRESS CONDOLENCES BUT RATHER TO INSURE CONTINUITY OF THE BUSINESS AND REAL ESTATE ARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN THE UNIFICATION CHURCH AND THE KN GOVERNMENT. PRIOR TO HIS DEATH KIM HAD AGREED TO A DEAL WITH UNIFICATION CHURCH LEADER ((MOON)) SUNG-MYUNG THAT GAVE KN GOVERNMENT APPROVAL FOR THE UNIFICATION CHURCH TO CONSTRUCT FOUR (4) HOTELS IN PYONGYANG OVER TIME AND TO UNDERTAKE A MAJOR RESORT DEVELOPMENT IN KUMGANG-SAN. THE TOTAL VALUE OF THE DEAL IS ESTIMATED AT OVER 500 MILLION USD. IN THE ORIGINAL DEAL WITH KIM, MOON PAID SEVERAL TENS OF MILLION DOLLARS AS A DOWNPAYMENT INTO AN OVERSEAS ACCOUNT.

3. MOON ORDERED PAK TO MAKE THE VISIT TO PYONGYANG WITH THE PRINCIPAL MISSION OF CONFIRMING THAT THE PRIOR DEAL WAS STILL IN PLACE WITH KIM'S SON ((KIM)) JONG-IL AND HIS COTERIE. IF NECESSARY, MOON AUTHORIZED PAK TO DEPOSIT A SECOND PAYMENT FOR KIM JONG-IL. HOWEVER, SINCE PAK HAS NOT RETURNED TO KS, IT HAS NOT BEEN POSSIBLE TO CONFIRM WHETHER ANY FURTHER PAYMENT HAS BEEN MADE AT THIS TIME.

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SUMMARY: KN HAS ESTABLISHED RELATIONS WITH THE UNIFIED SPIRITUAL CHURCH FOR WORLD CHRISTIANS (UNIFICATION CHURCH) AFTER ITS FOUNDER ((MUN)) SUN MYUNG (STC. 2429/7639/0730) MADE DONATIONS TO KN OF 450 BILLION YEN IN 1991 AND 3 MILLION DOLLARS IN 1993.

TEXT: 1. SINCE MUN FORMED THE UNIFICATION CHURCH IN KS IN 1954, HE HAS BEEN STRONGLY CRITICIZED IN KN AS THE LEADER OF AN ANTI-COMMUNIST MOVEMENT, WHILE MUN HAS CRITICIZED THE STATE OF RELIGION IN KN, CLAIMING FORMER PRESIDENT KIM IL SUNG WAS A FALSE MESSIAH. IN NOVEMBER 1991, A KS CITIZEN RESIDING IN THE UNITED STATES, ((PAK)) KYONG YUN (STC. 2613/2417/0336), ACTED AS A INTERMEDIARY TO OBTAIN A KN ENTRY VISA FOR MUN AND TO ARRANGE FOR A MEETING BETWEEN MUN AND KIM IL SUNG. PAK IS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE KIMKANGSAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP KNOWN TO BE A PRO-KN COMPANY.

2. BETWEEN 30NOV91 AND 07DEC91, MUN VISITED KN AND WAS GRANTED A MEETING WITH PRESIDENT KIM. THEIR DISCUSSION INCLUDED THE REUNIFICATION OF KS AND KN, KN NUCLEAR FACILITIES INSPECTIONS AND MUN'S ASSURANCES TO ENCOURAGE KS AND KN CITIZENS RESIDING OVERSEAS TO BEGIN INVESTING IN KN. IN ADDITION, THERE WAS AN AGREEMENT REGARDING ECONOMIC COOPERATION FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF KN'S ECONOMY WHICH INCLUDED ESTABLISHMENT OF A JOINT VENTURE TO DEVELOP TOURISM AT KIMLANGSAN, KN; INVESTMENT IN THE TUMANGANG RIVER DEVELOPMENT; AND, INVESTMENT TO CONSTRUCT THE LIGHT INDUSTRY BASE AT WONSAN, KN. IT IS BELIEVED THAT DURING THEIR MEETING MUN DONATED 450 BILLION YEN TO KN.

3. IN CONSIDERATION OF MUN'S ECONOMIC COOPERATION, KIM GRANTED MUN A 99 YEAR LEASE ON A 9 SQUARE KILOMETER PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN CHONGCHU, PYONGANPUXTO, KN. CHONGCHU IS MUN'S BIRTH PLACE AND THE PROPERTY WILL BE USED AS A CENTER FOR THE UNIFICATION CHURCH. IT IS BEING REFERRED TO AS THE HOLY LAND BY UNIFICATION CHURCH BELIEVERS AND MUN AS BEEN GRANTED EXTRATERRITORIALITY DURING THE LIFE OF THE LEASE. SINCE 1992, THE UNIFICATION CHURCH AFFILIATED TOURIST COMPANY "THE SEIL TOURIST" AND "THE KIMKANGSAN INTERNATIONAL TOURIST, INC.", THE JAPAN BRANCH OF THE KIMKANGSAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP, HAVE CO-SPONSORED FOUR TOURS TO THE HOLY LAND. SO FAR, 534 BELIEVERS HAVE MADE THE TREK TO VISIT MUN'S BIRTH PLACE. CONSTRUCTION OF CHURCH FACILITIES ON THE SITE ARE SCHEDULED TO BEGIN IN SEP94 WITH ESTIMATED COMPLETION IN SEP99. MUN HAS AGREED TO GIVE HALF OF ALL CAPITAL AND PROPERTY BROUGHT INTO THE LEASED LAND TO KN.

4. IN 1993, THE UNIFICATION CHURCH SOLD A PIECE OF PROPERTY LOCATED IN PENNSYLVANIA. THE PROFIT ON THE SALE, APPROXIMATELY $3,000,000, WAS SENT THROUGH A BANK IN CHINA TO THE HONG KONG BRANCH OF THE KS COMPANY "SAMSUNG GROUP". THE MONEY WAS LATER PRESENTED TO ((KIM)) JUNG IL (STC. 6855/2973/2480) AS A BIRTHDAY PRESENT.

5. IN JAN94, A JAPANESE TRADING COMPANY "TOUEN SHOJI", IN SUGINAMI-KU, TOKYO, PURCHASED 12 F AND G CLASS SUBMARINES FROM THE RUSSIAN PACIFIC FLEET HEADQUARTERS. THESE SUBMARINES WERE THEN SOLD TO A KN TRADING COMPANY. ALTHOUGH THIS TRANSACTION GARNERED A GREAT DEAL OF COVERAGE IN THE JAPANESE PRESS, IT WAS NOT DISCLOSED AT THE TIME THAT TOUEN SHOJI IS AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIFICATION CHURCH.

6. [DELETE]

A. INASMUCH AS KN IS BECOMING MORE ISOLATED FROM THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY DUE TO ITS SUSPECTED NUCLEAR WEAPON DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, IT IS SPECULATED KN WILL TRY TO USE THE UNIFICATION CHURCH'S SIGNIFICANT WORLD WIDE NETWORK TO RESHAPE ITS IMAGE. USING THE UNIFICATION CHURCH'S PERCEIVED INFLUENCE IN SUCH NEWSPAPERS AS THE SEIL DAILY NEWS AND THE WASHINGTON TIMES, ALONG WITH CHURCH AFFILIATED LOBBYISTS AND OTHER PERSONNEL LINKAGE, KN WILL TRY TO DELIVER ITS OPINIONS TO THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE WEST. THE INTENTION IS TO CREATE A FAVORABLE PUBLIC OPINION OF KN WITH THE HOPE OF INFLUENCING WESTERN GOVERNMENTS' POLICY DECISIONS. IN ADDITION, KN WILL TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE UNIFICATION CHURCH'S INVESTMENT IN THE FREE TRADE ZONE, DEVELOPMENT OF THE KIMKANGSAN TOURISM AND THE UNIFICATION CHURCH BELIEVERS' PILGRIMAGE TO THE HOLY LAND, WITH THE HOPE OF RECONSTRUCTING ITS DOMESTIC ECONOMY AND OBTAINING WHAT HAS BECOME A CHRONIC SHORTAGE OF FOREIGN CURRENCY.

B. FOR YEARS MUN SUN MYUNG HAS WANTED TO ESTABLISH A RELIGIOUS STATE SIMILAR TO THE VATICAN CITY. HIS DECISION TO BUILD IT IN CHONGCHU, KN, HAS PREDICATED ON A NUMBER OF ISSUES. IT IS HIS PLACE OF BIRTH AND IN UNIFICATION CHURCH DOCTRINE, THE MESSIAH WILL BE BORN ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA. HIS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND SOUTH KOREA HAVE BECOME SUBJECT TO RESTRICTION AFTER HIS CONVICTION FOR TAX EVASION IN BOTH COUNTRIES. HIS ENTRY IN INTO JAPAN, WHERE UNIFICATION CHURCH ACTIVITIES HAVE BECOME THE MOST ACTIVE, HAS ALSO BEEN RESTRICTED. WITH THE CHURCH'S PROPOSED INVESTMENT IN KN, THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A HOLY LAND IN CHONGCHU, KN, COULD BE EASILY REALIZED.

C. [DELETE] IN THE FUTURE, THE UNIFICATION CHURCH WILL PROBABLY MANDATE A TRIP TO THE HOLY LAND FOR ITS BELIEVERS AND ASSETS HELD WORLDWIDE WILL LIKELY BE TRANSFERRED TO CHONGCHU.

[DELETE]
IPSP: PG 2500: PG 25417.
COMSOBJ: 171/.
ADMIN
PROJ:
INSTR: [DELETE]
PREP: [DELETE]
ACQ: [DELETE]
DISSEM: FIELD: NONE.
WARNING: REPORT CLASSIFIED CONFIDENTIAL. NOT RELEASABLE TO FOREIGN NATIONALS. WARNING NOTICE SENSITIVE INTELLIGENCE SOURCES AND METHODS INVOLVED.


Contacted in Seoul, South Korea, Bo Hi Pak, a former publisher of the Washington Times, denied that payments were made to individual North Korean leaders and called “absolutely untrue” the DIA’s description of the $3 million land sale benefiting Kim Jong Il. But Bo Hi Pak acknowledged that Moon met with North Korean officials and negotiated business deals with them in the early 1990s. Pak said the North Korean business investments were structured through South Korean entities.

“Reverend Moon is not doing this in his own name,” Pak said.

Pak said he went to North Korea in 1994, after Kim Il Sung’s death, only to express “condolences” to Kim Jong Il on behalf of Moon and his wife. Pak denied that another purpose of the trip was to pass money to Kim Jong Il or to his associates.

Asked about the seeming contradiction between Moon’s avowed anti-communism and his friendship with leaders of a communist state, Pak said, “This is time for reconciliation. We're not looking at ideological differences. We are trying to help them out” with food and other humanitarian needs.

Samsung officials said they could find no information in their files about the alleged $3 million payment.

Embargo Busting

North Korean officials clearly valued their relationship with Moon. In February 2000, on Moon’s 80th birthday, Kim Jong Il sent Moon a gift of rare wild ginseng, an aromatic root used medicinally, Reuters reported.

Because of the long-term U.S. embargo against North Korea – eased only in 2000 – Moon’s alleged payments to the communist leaders raised potential legal issues for Moon especially if some of the money stemmed from a land sale in Pennsylvania.

“Nobody in the United States was supposed to be providing funding to anybody in North Korea, period, under the Treasury (Department's) sanction regime,” said Jonathan Winer, former deputy assistant secretary of state handling international crime.

The U.S. embargo of North Korea dated back to the Korean War. With a few exceptions for humanitarian goods, the embargo barred trade and financial dealings between North Korea and “all U.S. citizens and permanent residents wherever they are located, … and all branches, subsidiaries and controlled affiliates of U.S. organizations throughout the world.”

Moon became a permanent resident of the United States in 1973, according to Justice Department records. When interviewed in 2000, Bo Hi Pak said Moon had kept his “green card” status. Though often in South Korea and South America, Moon maintained a residence near Tarrytown, north of New York City, and controlled dozens of affiliated U.S. companies.

Direct payments to foreign leaders in connection with business deals also could prompt questions about possible violations of the U.S. Corrupt Practices Act, a prohibition against overseas bribery.

Ironically, although Moon reportedly gave North Korea desperately needed foreign capital, Moon’s Washington Times attacked the Clinton administration for failing to take a more aggressive stand against North Korea’s missile program. The newspaper called the administration’s policy an “abdication of responsibility for national security.”

Moon also was consolidating his influence with American conservatives as he was growing increasingly anti-American. While former President Bush was hailing Moon in public in the mid-1990s, Moon was calling the United States “Satan’s harvest” and claiming that American women descended from a “line of prostitutes.”

But Moon understood one basic rule of politics that applied the world over: money talks. He knew he could get politicians to do his bidding if the bribes were big enough. In one sermon on Jan. 2, 1996, Moon was unusually blunt about how he expected his wealth to buy influence among the powerful in South America, just as it had in Washington.

“Father has been practicing the philosophy of fishing here,” Moon said, through an interpreter who spoke of Moon in the third person. “He [Moon] gave the bait to Uruguay and then the bigger fish of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay kept their mouths open, waiting for a bigger bait silently. The bigger the fish, the bigger the mouth. Therefore, Father is able to hook them more easily.”

For Moon, there has been no bigger fish than the powerful Bush family and its many friends in the U.S. government.


Robert Parry broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek. His latest book, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq, can be ordered at secrecyandprivilege.com. It's also available at Amazon.com, as is his 1999 book, Lost History: Contras, Cocaine, the Press & 'Project Truth.'
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Re: Dark Side of Rev. Moon: Buying the Right, by Robert Parr

Postby admin » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:33 am

$1 million Moonie mystery
by Rick Casey
June 8, 2006, 10:36PM
Copyright 2006 Houston Chronicle

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


IT was a dark night in a city that knows how to keep its secrets.

The phone rang on my desk, waking me from a reverie I don't remember.

"Casey," I said, hoping to sound like a private eye.

The guy on the other end really was a private eye. Not Garrison Keillor's "Guy Noir," but a Virginia electronic gumshoe named Larry Zilliox.

Maybe you have a hobby. Zilliox's is keeping tabs on the sprawling empire of the world's wealthiest self-described Messiah, the Rev. Sun Myung Moon.

In the course of his probing, Zilliox came across an odd entry in the most recent tax filing of the Washington Times Foundation, which is associated with the conservative newspaper founded in 1982 by Moon.

The document was dated mid-2004 and included a list of organizations to which grants had been made.

A million bucks to Houston?

Three received grants totaling $9,000.

The New York headquarters of Moon's Unification Church received $11,200.

Another of Moon's organizations, the American Family Coalition Inc., received a grant of $254,500.

Then came the grabber: a whopping $1 million to the Greater Houston Community Foundation.

Why would Moon's Washington Times Foundation give a million bucks to Houston?

Zilliox said he figured I'd have a better chance of finding out than he would.

Maybe he was right.

I decided to take the direct approach.

I called the Washington Times Foundation, but the number listed on its tax form was no longer working.

The Bush connection

I called the Washington Times and asked for the foundation. I reached the voice mail of a separate foundation, but my call was not returned.

I located two of the officers of the foundation at the Washington Times and another at UPI (also owned by the Moon organization), but my phone calls and e-mails went unanswered.

So I called Steve Maislin, president and CEO of the Greater Houston Community Foundation.

He wasn't in, but I left a message asking why the Washington Times Foundation would give $1 million to his foundation. He called and left a message in return.

He couldn't legally tell me, he said.

Later I reached Maislin and asked him if he could point me to the law that bound his lips. He said he misspoke.

"I meant that under the law it's not a public record," he said. "We're not required to disclose donations in or grants out in our tax returns. We don't as a matter of policy."

Actually, they do report the grants they give, as we will see below.

He said some people who give money want it kept private so they won't be badgered by fundraisers.

Zilliox had a theory. He figured Moon gave the money to the Houston foundation as a pass-through to the presidential library of the elder President Bush.

It wouldn't be the first connection between Moon and Bush. In 1995 Bush was handsomely paid to make six speeches to Moon-related groups in Japan.

The next year he would go to Buenos Aires, Argentina, to celebrate the opening of a new Moonie newspaper there.


Zilliox's notion turned out not to be an idle theory. The long list of grant recipients listed in the community foundation's tax return that year included the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation at Texas A&M.

The amount: $2,132,471.

So I called Rod Thornton at the Bush library foundation.

He hesitated for a moment, then explained that the donation from the Greater Houston Community Foundation came from proceeds from Bush's 80th birthday celebration in 2004, which included a huge party at Minute Maid Park and a fundraising extravaganza to benefit three of the former president's favorite causes: his library, the Points of Light Foundation he founded, and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

M.D. Anderson received $4.4 million from the Greater Houston Community Foundation that year, and the Points of Light Foundation received $1.8 million.

One call remained, to Jim McGrath, a former speechwriter for the former president who still serves as a family spokesman.

He explained that the money raised through Bush's birthday bash was funneled through the Greater Houston Community Foundation because of its tax-exempt status.

And did $1 million come from the Washington Times Foundation?

"We're in an uncomfortable position," he said. "If a donor doesn't want to be identified we need to honor their privacy."

I asked him about another part of Zilliox's theory: that the donation was made to help persuade Bush's son, the current president, to grant Moon a pardon for a 1982 felony tax evasion conviction that had put him in prison for 13 months.

Moon had applied for a pardon from the elder president Bush, but withdrew the request.

"If that's why he gave the grant, he's throwing his money away," said McGrath. "That's not the way the Bushes operate."

He added, "President Bush has been very grateful for the friendship shown to him by the Washington Times Foundation, and the Washington Times serves a vital role in Washington. But there can't be any connection to any kind of a pardon."

You can write to Rick Casey at P.O. Box 4260, Houston, TX 77210, or e-mail him at rick.casey@chron.com.
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