Be Here Now, by Ram Dass

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: Be Here Now, by Ram Dass

Postby admin » Fri Sep 25, 2015 7:54 pm

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FAMILY SADHANA

The course of family sadhana in the West in the 1970's is a difficult one to practice. Whereas in the past in both East and West there have been precise models these have been built around a culture and tradition which was supportive of this practice. In Western culture the support system has been destroyed by the industrial revolution and the money economy which has caused the virtual destruction of the family as a spiritual and psychic union by compelling at least one and often both principal members to become money earners. This necessitates daily absence from the home and reliance on day-care centers, nursery schools or regular schools to provide a spiritual foundation which one cannot expect them to provide as they essentially are educating and directing children to become "good members" of the same society which is in essence profane and in extension looking only to continue its existence at the present level of consciousness. Consequently the family is dispersed, its members isolated from each other and effectively only together as an economic and sleeping unit. The family thus has no center to radiate from and no spiritual-psychic support system. It is dead. The outlook is bleak from this vantage point.

However, in the last decade there has been a resurgence of spiritual life brought about by lysergic acid, the bomb, rock 'n' roll, visiting teachers from the East and the incredible vacuum and death that is the rot at the core. And as life will not permit a vacuum, the times they are a-changing.

SO
HOW?
TO BEGIN?

To begin we must begin at the beginning. At the beginning is the spirit. Spirit is a Latin word meaning breath. It's like breathing out and breathing in, NO THING -- yup, no thing. And this no thing is basic for our life. Breathe spirit, this spirit which sustains and maintains, without which we die to this form. This no thing is the foundation upon which all must be based. Life must be dedicated to the spirit alone for as it has been laid out ... seek you first the kingdom of heaven and all else shall be added to you ... so ... with the family sadhana as with all sadhana this is where we begin. The family and all it is thru /by / in extension must be dedicated solely to the spirit.

Next:

An earth-real consideration of physical plane realities. Food, shelter, and clothing. An examination in truth of real needs. Not desires, not fantasies, but you know: how many pairs of pants? what kind of food? what type of shelter? how big? who for? where? and then?

HOW NOW

Can you afford to take a cut? Can you afford not to? Can you and will you let go of all the things and values and trips that you have gotten caught in? If you can adapt your present means of livelihood to your spiritual work then you're cool. (See section on "Money and Right Livelihood.") If you can't then you'll probably have to make a radical change in your life. Try getting into subsistence economy. Just making it. Not too much not too little but just enough to make it. Buy an old farm (there're lots -- cheap) or set up a craft scene. Use the system to teach yourself how to operate these well and efficiently. Keep it all together. Run a good ship. This is our second base. Apply consciousness clearly. Understand values. Don't be afraid to make mistakes but don't court disaster.

Why a farm, why a small craft scene? Just this. The family can "be" together. There are functions in these situations for all the members from the children to the adults. The work is clear and definite. Jesus was a carpenter. Ghandi spun. This daily concern with the vehicle of sustenance on the gross plane must be clear, straight and simple. As work / time / space is shared (based all ways on the spirit) a family grows together. Here exists mutuality, trust, openness, a psychic organism develops -- this is what a family is. The possibilities on this level are endless: farm, crafts, natural food store, general store, restaurant, creamery, small paper, bookstore. Drop into reality.

Now we have an environment and a basis for practice.

First turn the environment into a shrine, a temple. If the family is primarily bhakti, plaster the walls with holy pictures, light incense, radiate love; if it's Christian make it a home for Christ; if it's more austere, moving toward Zen, reflect nothingness. Whatever your trip make the whole environment support it.

Next set up a clear movement thru time. Rise daily at the same time, meditate together, pray together, offer all actions to the spirit, offer all food to the spirit, cook in love for love, keep the home clean, calm and clear so if Lord Buddha walked in he'd feel right at home. Maintain the body as a temple, clean it, feed it, take good care of it, have compassion for it; love it. The discipline of a daily schedule is a drag at first, after a while you will feel the results. It all runs on automatic. Don't think. Fill your whole mind with the spirit. BE! And in being together in the spirit be in love together. It's all making love. Make love in beauty, in joy, in seeing each other in truth, choose your marriage model. The Sun and the Moon, Heaven and Earth, Yab-Yum, Shiva-Shakti, Siva and Parvati, the Eternal Companions, the Alchemical Marriage, Mohammed and his Wives, Adam and Eve, Christ and his Bride.

Let the man worship woman as God, the Holy Mother, the Divine Shakti, the Mana, the Food of Life, the Sustainer of Being, Isis, Astarte, the Good Earth, Terrible Kali, and Herself -- All Of It. She is all of it.

Let the woman worship man as God, the Son, the Sun, the Father, the Lite of Her Life, the Creator, the Provider, as Jesus, as Ram, as Shiva, as Krishna, as all of them and Himself.

Surrender and die to one another. Become one. The glorious Mystic Rose in the garden of the Heavenly Father. Permeate the universe, fill it, become it for this is the union beyond duality.

O Holy Family


This is the seat of the practice.

And as the children who are the fruit of the union appear, see them as divine avatars, holy beings who have come recently from our true HOME to teach. Nourish and feed them as they feed you. Listen for their tone, see their ray so as to help them fulfill their spiritual destiny, provide a matrix for their consciousness. Great care must be taken to guide the entity on this plane. Choose carefully the initial impressions which they will be registering as you would the food they eat. They are the hope and destiny of the universe. Respect and honor them. Guide them clearly. Keep the home calm and free of chaotic inputs. Let love burn in all the lamps. Thru all of this face and cope out the difficulties. For the woman there will be the heavy pull of the earth element. The children will feel any psychic withdrawal on her part. She must find a place a little removed for deep meditation. When they wake up during meditation explain clearly what you are doing. Read them holy stories to acquaint them with spirit life so that they may remember. Keep your practice regular and the children will stay in tune. Don't trip too far too fast or psychic disequilibrium will upset months of work. Do not sacrifice relationships with the children for what you may think is spiritual necessity. The whole thing is sadhana. Chant mantras together. The first word of one infant here was Allah (God). Children really love bhajan. They go around singing Bhaja Shri Krishna Chaitanya or Om Sri Ram Jai Ram Jai Jai Ram. Bring them in. Sing together.

For men it's most often astral tripping. Far out trips in far out worlds that get so far out they become disconnected and then have to find someone to understand and then its Drama Drama Drama instead of Rama Rama Rama. Men struggle with death and rebirth and fear it's a tough trip alone and being together makes it both easier and harder. The key to it all is absolute and total surrender to the spirit. With this it is all possible.

The real difficulty in family sadhana seems to be in the maintenance over a long period of time of the discipline. In most other sadhana there is either overt or covert reliance on a sangha. In any given area there are just not that many people who will gravitate towards family sadhana. Most people are on their own spiritual paths. While it is true that these people constitute a sangha of sorts the uniqueness of family sadhana makes it difficult to tie all of this together. A very good alternative is to join together with others and form a spiritual community. That is, a community constituted solely for spiritual purposes. We who are writing this chapter have done this. The results seem rewarding (see the chapter "Setting: The Spiritual Community"). We have been involved, at Lama over a four-year period in practicing family sadhana in the context of spiritual community and the practice is flowering, deepening and continuing. By comparison many couples who were similarly involved but chose the individual family model have broken or drifted apart to pursue their own paths, lapsed into profane or secular life paths or merely pay a form of lip service to the practice like well-kept churches in nice locations with all the promise latent but devoid of the total and complete submission to the spirit and the effort necessary to maintain it.

In the end this is the nut. It's all or nothing.
Constantly revised schedules to squeeze the Spirit in for 10 or 20 minutes a day won't make it. This is not criticism but observation. The practice is fierce because it is so easy to forget and fall asleep. The families we have seen who are practicing in communal context (using as a vehicle disciplines ranging from Sufi ecstatic practice thru Christian fellowship and Hindu bhakti to deep Soto Zen practice) seem to be getting on with it.

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SADHANA IF YOU LIVE ALONE

You naturally have more flexibility and more life time to work on your sadhana when you live alone. You can get up very early in the morning, chant you mantras out loud, light candles, burn incense, ring a bell, or do whatever brings you into the Spirit without disturbing anybody else. If you are fasting, nobody feels disturbed about it, or if you want to eat some special diet which makes you feel light and in the Spirit (but which tastes like a horsehair mattress) you can feast on it whenever you feel hungry.

And then there is the silence. If you prefer to live in a quiet world, free of radio, TV, or records, you can spend a lot of time, if you live alone, in a warm cocoon of silence.

And then there is noise. If you are developing the witness and want to carry on a dramatic monologue to help you remember, you can play the star role aloud:

"He's heading toward the refrigerator now. He's thinking about eating some ice cream. He's decided to do some pranayam instead ..." A running commentary like this helps to keep you in the witness but it doesn't help you fill the role of the ideal roommate.

Although you may have more chance to work on your sadhana when you live alone, you have less chance to practice that most difficult of all paths, karma yoga. In solitude you don't have many demands made upon you, nor do you develop the elasticity which comes with the give-and-take of living with others. If your work is also solitary, you may want to preserve a balance by seeking opportunities to interact with others. You may look for continuing situations where the interaction will be on a deep rather than a superficial, social level, such as teaching at a community center, taking on a group of scouts, etc. Situations which are totally engrossing are most apt to capture you and therefore provide the best practice in keeping your witness an d your center. (Working with others will also enable you to see how losing and regaining your center affects those around you.)

However, if you live alone, you probably spend a large part of your time in solitude. Solitude does not mean that you are really living alone, even if you seem to be living alone. You know that when you shut the door and darken the room and look within that the door is open, the light is on, and "Someone is in your room ... darkness like a dark bird, flies away ... flies away.

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The vibration sweeps along, touching with its swift wing the whole universe and the germ that dwelleth in darkness.

-- The Secret Doctrine -- The Synthesis of Science, Religion, and Philosophy, by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky


DYING

You must live before you can die. But you must die before you can live.

Live consciously ! Die consciously !

Gandhi, the Indian Politician-Saint, was assassinated as he walked out of his home by an assassin who fired four bullets directly into his body. In the moment Gandhi fell, he was heard to utter the name, "RAM." The rishis (the men of India who know) say that to die uttering the name of God takes you immediately "beyond the beyond" with no further effort.

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[Priest] Listen to his epitaph:

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"Here lies Gaius Pompeius Trimalchio. A pious, strong, and faithful patron who came from nothing ... he left 30 million sesterces and never listened to a philosopher. And the same be for you!

[Trimalchio] Act like you're guests at my funeral banquet.

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Eat, drink, and remember me. Call the musicians, and have them play something pretty. Farewell ... farewell ... There ...

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I'm dead.

-- Satyricon, directed by Federico Fellini


Practice Dying

1. Experience your own death:


Ritual death has been practiced throughout the world for centuries. Many Buddhist meditation exercises are designed to take you through your own death. Christian ascetics experience their death through contemplation for a vision of life sub specie aeternitatis (as Eternal Present). See, for example, St. Ignatius Loyola's recommendations in his Spiritual Exercises.)

Laura Huxley has members of her seminars experience their own death psychologically. For example:

"Have the room comfortably dark or dimly lighted.

Lie down on your bed or sofa or on the floor.

Let your body go. Imagine that the life is out of it. Do not speak or move.

Imagine that you have died: Your body is passive, lifeless, useless. Your body is discarded. Your funeral is about to take place.

Let go of your body. Let it be there as something which is no longer yours. Follow to the limit this feeling of being completely alone, abandoned, not loved -- not in life, not in death. Cry, scream, curse, if this is what you feel. Go to the limit of your feeling. And after you have cried and screamed and cursed, when you are empty and exhausted, stop and listen.

This is your last party. Speak to everyone there, tell them all about yourself, about your mistakes and your suffering, about your love and your longings. No longer do you need to protect yourself, no longer do you need to hide behind a wall or a suit of armor. It is your last party: you can explode, you can be miserable or pitiful, insignificant or despicable. At your funeral you can be yourself.

This is your chance: do what others have failed to do. Look at the unloved one, the miserable one. This is your chance to do an act of love toward one who has had no love. This is your chance to do justice where intentional or unintentional injustice has been committed. This is your chance to give warmth and courage to one who feels only coldness, loneliness and death.

Let your tears flow from the very depth of you. Let your bitterness flow out with them. And when the bitterness is out, your tears will be gentle and sweet. Then take the hand of this lifeless body of yours, take it in your hands and with respect and love bring it to your lips and kiss it.

Now gently come back to your living body.

With this feeling of respect and love, come back to your living body, and let this feeling remain with you, inside of you. Let it spread to each nerve, to each muscle, along every vein and artery. Let this feeling of respect and love spread inside you, throughout your entire organism, and then let it spread out around you in everything, object or animal or human, that is part of your life. Feel this feeling of love and respect circulating inside you with the force of life itself; let it be in your blood, in the air you breathe. Feel it -- accept it -- give it." (A "recipe" from You are Not the Target, Laura Huxley.)

The Tibetan Book of the Dead is a manual of practices for dying, and being re-born. There have been many ancient manuals for dying, e.g., the Egyptian Book of the Dead. Their purpose is to take a dying person through the various steps in this energy transformation dance called dying.

The psychedelics have been used with these manuals and exercises as sets or programs to experience death / rebirth. (See The Psychedelic Experience.)

Each time we can "let go" -- of goals, of our ego-image compulsions, of controlling, of driving ourselves -- and BE instead of DO, we die (as ego) and are reborn (as Self, as Buddha). Use a signal (the name Ram, a mantra word or phrase, a mandala image) to trigger that death whenever you are aware of your body being up-tight in the shape it's desire-tension holds it in; then feel your breathing distribute itself throughout your body diffusing and lightening it as you die to desire, to ego, and then "not I but He lives in me."

Suicide, we might be reminded here, is a different type of death in which one remains attached to his ego. Rather than liberation it brings perpetual bondage ... which is why it has been condemned at all times by enlightened men.

2. Experience death with someone else:

To be with a person who is dying, to share consciousness with him, and to help him die consciously is one of the most exquisite manifestations of the bodhisattva role. It should be sought out.

A few suggestions for practicing this yoga:

Meditate together or separately, whichever feels right. Meditation helps you remain in the Eternal Present where no-thing is happening ... and it helps you serve lovingly with total involvement and with no attachment.

Don't teach by other than your being. If you remain centered, your calm presence helps to free all those about you who are ready.

Speak the truth as you see it ... but only if asked! Speak nothing untrue.

See in the dying person only that which is eternal. You are merely seeing the Divine Mother doing it again. All forms you see in another person are, after all, but the manifestations of your own desire. A realized being wherever he looks sees no-thing or all things simultaneously, and knows them to be the same.

Read silently or aloud from the words of Those Who Know.

Perhaps one day we will have in this country Centers for dying and for being born ... places located near mountains or the ocean where anyone who wishes might go to be in the presence of conscious beings during these crucial events. There would be healers and helpers as well as guides to assist along the way of any path -- religious-metaphoric, yogic, or psychedelic -- anyone might choose.

We all die in each moment ... and we are all born in each moment ... in truth, whether this death / rebirth is called physical or psychological. We can apply all of the above suggestions ever day and in every interaction with people so as to be aware of this and conscious in it.

"Lightly, my darling, lightly. Even when it comes to dying. Nothing ponderous, or portentious, or emphatic. No rhetoric, no tremelos, no self-conscious persona putting on its celebrated imitation of Christ or Goethe or Little Nell. And, of course, no theology, no metaphysics. Just the fact of dying and the fact of the Clear Light. So throw away all your baggage and go forward. There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet, trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That's why you must walk so lightly ..."

"The Light," came the hoarse whisper, "the Clear Light. It's here -- along with the pain, in spite of the pain."

"And where are you?"

"Over there, in the corner. I can see myself there. And she can see my body on the bed."

"Brighter," came the barely audible whisper, "brighter." And a smile of happiness intense almost to the point of elation transfigured her face.

Through his tears Dr. Robert smiled back at her. "So now you can let go, my darling." He stroked her gray hair. "Now you can let go. Let go," he insisted. "Let go of this poor old body. You don't need it anymore. Let it fall away from you. Leave it lying there like a pile of worn-out clothes ... Go on, go on into the Light, into the peace, into the living peace of the Clear Light." -- Aldous Huxley, Island.

GLOSSARY

A

ajna - the point between the eyebrows; third eye; sixth of the seven chakras; actually located in the midbrain, related to the thalamus.

akasha - ether; subtlest, all-pervading material manifestation.

asana - comfortable posture; seat; third of the eight parts of yoga.

ashram - monastic retreat, usually directed by a guru.

Atman - Soul-Spirit; individualized Brahman.

avatar - (lit. to come from without) an incarnation of the Supreme Lord in human form, e.g., Christ, Krishna, Rama, Zoroastor, Buddha.

avidya - ignorance.

B

ban marg - the left-handed path.

bardo - the state between death and rebirth.

Bhakti Yoga - the yoga of devotion.

bhajan - singing of holy songs; devotional music

bindu - a lower form of pran.

brahmacharya - (lit. to live in Brahma) sexual continence (a frequent meaning).

Brahman - the absolute one from which all else emanates; Ultimate Reality.

C

chakras - (lit. wheels) psychic energy vortices in the body, associated with the plexuses.

chela - disciple.

chillum - an earthen pipe cylinder used for smoking ganga or chars.

D

Dharma - Universal Law; the Way.

dhyana - meditation; identification with the Divine One.

G

gasho - a bow in reverence to another being with the understanding of the essential Buddha nature in all sentient beings.

gopis - the dancing milkmaids charmed by the cowboy flute player, Lord Krishna.

guru - spiritual guide, or preceptor.

H
Hatha Yoga - (ha-sun; tha-moon) work with the body.

hridayam - spiritual heart.

I

ida - subtle nerve on the left side of the shushumna (the kundalini channel within the spine); the lunar nadi. See pingala.

Ista Devata -- a personal God (Ishvara) who receives prayers and protects the chela on the path

J

japa - repetition of the Name of God, usually with a mala.

Jnana Yoga - the path of knowledge arrived at through reasoning and discrimination.

K

Kargyupa - an ascetic Tibetan Buddhist sect.

karma -- (lit. action) the law of cause and effect; the apparent spread of energy through thoughts, words and deeds

Karma Yoga - realization through action; selfless service (Sat Sewa).

kinhin - walking meditation practiced in Zen Buddhism.

kirtan - repetition in song of the Names of God.

koan - meditation exercise in question or paradox form used in Rinzai Zen practice.

kundalini - energy channeled from the base of the spine; aroused like a serpent by various yoga exercises to light the chakra lamps of consciousness.

L

Love - say the Word and you will be FREE; we do not HAVE love when we ARE love.

lama - teacher

M

Mahamudra - the union union of opposites; the Middle Path; the Great Gesture; the Great Symbol.

Mayana - the Great Vehicle or High Way of northern Buddhism, Tibetan, Chinese and Japanese.

maithuna - the practice of yab-yum (sexual intercourse in which the woman sits astride the man facing him).

mala - a string of 108 beads and a guru (Meru) bead, used for japa; rosary.

mandala - (lit. a circle) a geometric and psychometric arrangement of lines, forms and colors. used as a vehicle for meditation.

mantra - words, syllables or phrases manifested to effect psychic states by sounding the chakras.

maya - the phenomenal world.

Meru - the mountain in the Center.

mouni - a sadhu who uses silence as an upaya.

moxa - liberation.

mudra - a gesture of the fingers or hands or limbs, used to affect prana.

muhlbandh - the closing of the anal sphincter.

N

Nad Yoga - the yoga of inner sound (from nadi, nerve channel).

nadi - nerve channel.

nirvakalpa samadhi - the highest superconscious, formless state, in which there is no distinction between subject and object.

nirvana - at-one-ment with the all and everything, the everything and no-thing; beyond karma.

Nyingmapa - a Tantric Tibetan Buddhist sect which does not require its members to be monks.

O

ojas - the highest form of pran.

OM(AUM) - the sum total of all energy; the first cause; all-pervading sound.

P

padmasan - the full lotus asana in which the legs are crossed and the feet rest on the thighs.

pandit - a learned man.

pingala - subtle nerve channel on the right side; solar nadi. See ida.

prajna - supreme intuitive wisdom.

pran(a) - life energy.

pranayama - control of prana through control of breathing.

prasad - consecrated food.

R

Ram(a) - solar avatar incarnated in Satya Yuga.

Rimpoche - (lit. Precious One) title accorded high lamas and tulkus.

roshi - a zen guide.

S

sadhak - a spiritual aspirant doing sadhana.

sadhana - a spiritual way, work, or exercise.

sadhu - a full-time worker; a holy man.

samadhi - oneness of mind; undistracted union of subject and object.

samsara - the repetitious cycle of birth-death-rebirth.

sanyasi - a renunciate; a mendicant monk in achre robe.

Sat Chit Ananda - complete Being-Knowledge-Bliss; our true nature; reality.

Satipatthana Vipassana - application of mindfulness.

Satsang (Sangha) - communion or community of Workers on the Way. (Sat Guru - Sat Sang - Sat Seva: pure guide - pure companion - pure service)

Sattvic - pure.

Satya Yuga - the Golden Age of Truth-Purity.

siddhi - occult (hidden) power

Siva - the dancing destroyer (of ego); e.g., incarnated as Shankara, Bhagavan Ramana Maharishi.

T

Tao - the way and The Way.

Tantra Yoga - the yoga of using the senses to go beyond the senses; often called the Rapid Path.

tapasya - austerity; penance; purification by fire.

tratak - the discipline of gazing at and "grokking" a seed object such as a candle flame, a flower, the Sun.

U

udyanahandh - closing of the upper intestinal door.

upaya - method.

V

vairag - the failing away of worldly desires.

Vajrayana - the Adamantine Way.

Vichara Atma - "Who Am I?'

Vishnu - the Preserver; incarnated as Rama, Krishna, Buddha, Jesus.

Y

yoga - a yoke; union; making straight the Path through which God realizes Himself.

Z

zazen - being in the natural state; ceasing conceptual activity.

zendo - the place where zazen is practiced.

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Re: Be Here Now, by Ram Dass

Postby admin » Fri Sep 25, 2015 8:32 pm

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PAINTED CAKES

BOOKS TO HANG OUT WITH


BHAGAVAD GITA, Translations of:

Arnold, Sir Edwin, THE SONG CELESTIAL. Dial.
Besant, Annie. Theosophical Publ. House, India.
Mascaro, Juan. Penguin Class 1962 (pap).
Prabhavananda & Isherwood. Mentor. (pap).

THE HOLY BIBLE, King James Version

Blavatsky, Helen Petrovna. THE VOICE OF THE SILENCE. India. Theosophical Publishing House.

Blofeld, John (tr.) THE ZEN TEACHINGS OF HUANG PO. NY: Grove Press, 1959 (pap).

BUDDHA, THE LIFE AND SAYINGS OF
Moore, J.H. (tr) SAYINGS OF BUDDHA. AMS Press.
Woodward, F.L. (tr.) SOME SAYINGS OF BUDDHA: ACCORDING TO THE PALI CANON, Oxford Press.
Allen, G.F. (Ed.) WORDS OF WISDOM. Hillary, 1959.

Chang, Garma (tr.) THE HUNDRED THOUSAND SONGS OF MILAREPA. University Books
TEACHINGS OF TIBETAN YOGA, NY: 1963.

Conze, Edward. SELECTED SAYINGS FROM THE PERFECTION OF WISDOM. London: Buddhist Society, 58 Eccleston Square.
BUDDHIST MEDITATION, NY: Torch (pap).

DHAMMAPADA, Translations of:
Babbitt, Irvin, NY: New Directions, (pap).
Lal, P. NY: Noonday.

Doresse, THE SECRET BOOKS OF THE EGYPTIAN GNOSTICS. Viking Press (The Gospel of Saint Thomas is included. This is an important work.)

Evans-Wentz, W.Y. THE JEWEL OF LIBERATION.
TIBET'S GREAT YOGI MILAREPA.
TIBETAN YOGA & SECRET DOCTRINES.
THE TIBETAN BOOK OF THE DEAD.
THE TIBETAN BOOK OF THE GREAT LIBERATION.
NY: Oxford University Press.

French, Reginald M. THE WAY OF A PILGRIM. NY: Seabury Press, (pap.).

Govinda, Lama. FOUNDATIONS OF TIBETAN MYSTICISM. London: Rider & Co.

Gunther, H.V. (tr.) THE JEWEL ORNAMENT OF LIBERATION. London: Rider.

Hafiz. FIFTY POEMS WITH TRANSLATION *Arberry, Ed.) Cambridge University Press. 1947.

Humphreys, Christmas. THE SUTRA OF WEI LANG. London: The Buddhist Society. (The Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch.)

Huxley, Aldous. THE PERENNIAL PHILOSOPHY. NY: Harper 1945, Meridian-World.

Kirpal Singh. THE JAPJI: THE MESSAGE OF GURU NANAK.
THE CROWN OF LIFE (A Study in Yoga)
MORNING TALKS.
Delhi: Ruhani Satsang.
(Available from Sant Bani Ashram, Franklin, New Hampshire 03235).

Lao Tzu. TAO TE CHING (Blackney, tr.) NY: Mentor (pap.).
Ch'u Ta-Kao (tr.) NY: Macmillan.
Witter Bynner (tr.) Capricorn Press
Many other translations available.

Lewis, Samuel, L.
TOWARD SPIRITUAL BROTHERHOOD
INTRODUCTION TO SPIRITUAL DANCE
THE REJECTED AVATAR.
All by Prophecy Pressworks.

M. (Swami Nikhilananda, tr.) THE GOSPEL OF SRI RAMAKRISHNA. NY: Ramakrishna Center, 1942. (Very high bhakti book.)

Meher Baba, DISCOURSES: VOLS. 1-4 (Adi K. Irani, Ed.) India: Meher Pub., Kings Road, Ahmednagar, Deccan, Bombay, 1954.
Books on the works & life of Meher aba include:
GOD SPEAKS! THE THEME OF CREATION & ITS PURPOSE. NY: Dodd, Mead & Co.

Osborne, G. TEACHINGS OF RAMANA MAHARSHI, NY: Weiser.

PHILOKALIA - WORK OF THE EARLY CHURCH FATHERS.

Ramana Maharshi, TALKS WITH SRI RAMANA MAHARSHI.
DAY BY DAY WITH BHAGAVAN.
GURU RAMANA (S.S. Cohen).
MAHARSHI'S GOSPEL.
RAMANA MAHARSHI & HIS PHILOSOPHY OF EXISTENCE.
REFLECTIONS ON "TALKS".
SADDHU'S REMINSCENCES OF RAMANA MAHARSHI (Maj. S. W. Chadwick).
SELF-INQUIRY: WHO AM I?
(These books available at various bookstores, but can be ordered directly from Arunachala Ashram, 342 E. 6th Set, NYC. "The Mountain Path," an excellent magazine, is also available.)

Shastri. ASHTAVAKRA GITA
THE RAYAYANA OF VALMIKI. London: Shantisadam.
PRAKASHA BHRAMACHARI.

SATYA SAI BABA, BRINDAVAN, and other pamphlets. New Delhi. (C. Ramachandran tr.).

THE SRIMAD BHAGAVATAM (THE WISDOM OF GOD). NY: Putnam (pap.).
Swami Prabhavananda (tr.) Capricorn, NY: (pap.).

St. John of the Cross. DARK NIGHT OF THE SOUL. NY: Doubleday, Image (pap.)

Since these proficients are still at a very low stage of progress, and follow their own nature closely in the intercourse and dealings which they have with God, because the gold of their spirit is not yet purified and refined, they still think of God as little children, and speak of God as little children, and feel and experience God as little children, even as Saint Paul says, because they have not reached perfection, which is the union of the soul with God. In the state of union, however, they will work great things in the spirit, even as grown men, and their works and faculties will then be Divine rather than human, as will afterwards be said. To this end God is pleased to strip them of this old man and clothe them with the new man, who is created according to God, as the Apostle says, in the newness of sense. He strips their faculties, affections and feelings, both spiritual and sensual, both outward and inward, leaving the understanding dark, the will dry, the memory empty and the affections in the deepest affliction, bitterness and constraint, taking from the soul the pleasure and experience of spiritual blessings which it had aforetime, in order to make of this privation one of the principles which are requisite in the spirit so that there may be introduced into it and united with it the spiritual form of the spirit, which is the union of love. All this the Lord works in the soul by means of a pure and dark contemplation, as the soul explains in the first stanza.

As a result of this, the soul feels itself to be perishing and melting away, in the presence and sight of its miseries, in a cruel spiritual death, even as if it had been swallowed by a beast and felt itself being devoured in the darkness of its belly, suffering such anguish as was endured by Jonas in the belly of that beast of the sea. For in this sepulchre of dark death it must needs abide until the spiritual resurrection which it hopes for.

This was also described by Job, who had had experience and, in these words: 'I, who was wont to be wealthy and rich, am suddenly undone and broken to pieces; He hath taken me by my neck; He hath broken me and set me up for His mark to wound me; He hath compassed me round about with His lances; He hath wounded all my loins; He hath not spared; He hath poured out my bowels on the earth; He hath broken me with wound upon wound; He hath assailed me as a strong giant; I have sewed sackcloth upon my skin and have covered my flesh with ashes; my face is become swollen with weeping and mine eyes are blinded.'

But there is another thing here that afflicts and distresses the soul greatly, which is that, as this dark night has hindered its faculties and affections in this way, it is unable to raise its affection or its mind to God, neither can it pray to Him, thinking, as Jeremias thought concerning himself, that God has set a cloud before it through which its prayer cannot pass. For it is this that is meant by that which is said in the passage referred to, namely: 'He hath shut and enclosed my paths with square stones.' And if it sometimes prays it does so with such lack of strength and of sweetness that it thinks that God neither hears it nor pays heed to it, as this Prophet likewise declares in the same passage, saying: 'When I cry and entreat, He hath shut out my prayer.' In truth this is no time for the soul to speak with God; it should rather put its mouth in the dust, as Jeremias says, so that perchance there may come to it some present hope, and it may endure its purgation with patience. It is God who is passively working here in the soul; wherefore the soul can do nothing.

Until the Lord shall have completely purged it after the manner that He wills, no means or remedy is of any service or profit for the relief of its affliction; the more so because the soul is as powerless in this case as one who has been imprisoned in a dark dungeon, and is bound hand and foot, and can neither move nor see, nor feel any favour whether from above or from below, until the spirit is humbled, softened and purified, and grows so keen and delicate and pure that it can become one with the Spirit of God, according to the degree of union of love which His mercy is pleased to grant it; in proportion to this the purgation is of greater or less severity and of greater or less duration.

Inasmuch as not only is the understanding here purged of its light, and the will of its affections, but the memory is also purged of meditation and knowledge, it is well that it be likewise annihilated with respect to all these things, so that that which David says of himself in this purgation may by fulfilled, namely: 'I was annihilated and I knew not.' For, in order that the soul may be divinely prepared and tempered with its faculties for the Divine union of love, it would be well for it to be first of all absorbed, with all its faculties, in this Divine and dark spiritual light of contemplation, and thus to be withdrawn from all the affections and apprehensions of the creatures, which condition ordinarily continues in proportion to its intensity. And thus, the simpler and the purer is this Divine light in its assault upon the soul, the more does it darken it, void it and annihilate it according to its particular apprehensions and affections, with regard both to things above and to things below.

And this is the characteristic of the spirit that is purged and annihilated with respect to all particular affections and objects of the understanding, that in this state wherein it has pleasure in nothing and understands nothing in particular, but dwells in its emptiness, darkness and obscurity, it is fully prepared to embrace everything to the end that those words of Saint Paul may be fulfilled in it: Nihil habentes, et omnia possidentes. For such poverty of spirit as this would deserve such happiness.

-- Dark Night of the Soul, by St. John of the Cross


Man is not an end, but a bridge between the animal kingdom and the Super-man. He may attain the condition of Super-man by a process of "self-upraising" (Selbstaufhebung); by an intensity of suffering so great that it leads at last to optimism. The first step is that which his disciples had already taken: intense disgust of themselves, leading them to pessimism or asceticism. Zarathustra tells them that they have not suffered enough. "For ye suffer on account of what ye are; ye have not yet suffered on account of what Man is." Only by attaining this supreme degree of pain and disgust can they develop sufficient energy to cross the last gulf which separates them from the state of Super-man.

-- Nietzsche and Madame Blavatsky: Their Doctrines Stated and Compared, by Theosophical Quarterly Magazine 1909-1912


Tyagisananda, Swami. NARADA BHAKTI SUTRAS. India: Bharati. Vijayam Press. Triplicare, Madras.

UPANISHADS, THE. Mascara (tr.) Penguin Classic (pap.).
Prabavananda & Manchester.

Vivekananda, Swami. RAJA YOGA. India: Advait Ashram. (Pantanjali's sutras with exposition.)

Watson, Burton (tr.) CHUANG TZU - BASIC WRITINGS. NY: Columbia University Press.

Wilhelm, Richard (tr.) I CHING - BOOK OF CHANGES. NY: Princeton University Press, Bollingen Series XIX. (Also Dutton (pap.), John Blofeld, tr.).

Willing, C.A. (publ.) THE IMPERSONAL LIFE. Sun Center Publication. New Canaan, Conn. (P.O. Box 54, San Gabriel, Calif.).

Yogananda, Paramahansa. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A YOGI. Los Angeles: Self-Realization Fellowing, 1959. (To get a great feeling for what it's really like in India. He tells it just like it is.)

BOOKS TO VISIT WITH NOW & THEN

Alexander, F.J. IN THE HOURS OF MEDITATION. Calcutta, India: Advaita Ashram.

Arberry, Arthur. DISCOURSES OF RUMI. University of Chicago Press, 1968.

Whoever says evil of the gnostic in reality says good of the gnostic; for the gnostic shies away from that quality, blame for which might settle on him. The gnostic is the enemy of that quality; hence, he who speaks evil of that quality speaks evil of the enemy of the gnostic and praises the gnostic; for the gnostic shies away from such a blameworthy thing, and he who shies away from the blameworthy is himself praiseworthy. Things become clear through their opposites.' Hence the gnostic knows that the critic is not really his enemy and his dispraiser.

-- Discourses of Rumi, translated by A. J. Arberry


Attar, Farid Ud-Din. THE CONFERENCE OF THE BIRDS. (Translation of Persian poem.) London: Routledge & Kegan.

Aurobindo, Sri. THOUGHTS & APHORISMS. Pondicherry, India.
[Aurobindo, Sri. LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF SRI AUROBINDO AND THE MOTHER. Pondicherry, India.]

Ayyangar. YOGA UPANISHADS. Adyar Library.

Avalon, Arthur (pseud. for Sir John Woodroffe). SERPENT POWER.
INTRODUCTION TO TANTRA SASTRA.
SHAKTI POWER.
GARLAND OF LETTERS.
Ganesh: Vedanta Press.

Bailey, Alice A. THE LIGHT OF THE SOUL. (Paraphrase of Patanjali.) Lucis

Blake, William. THE PENGUIN POETS, NY: Penguin Books (pap.).

Blavatsky, Helena Petrovna. ISIS UNVEILED, 2 VOLS.
THE SECRET DOCTRINE. India: Theosophical Publishing House.

With the Semite, that stooping man meant the fall of Spirit into matter, and that fall and degradation were apotheosized by him with the result of dragging Deity down to the level of man.... The Aryan views of the symbolism were those of the whole Pagan world; the Semite interpretations emanated from all were pre-eminently those of a small tribe, thus marking its national features and the idiosyncratic defects that characterize many of the Jews to this day -- gross realism, selfishness, and sensuality.

-- The Secret Doctrine -- The Synthesis of Science, Religion, and Philosophy, by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky


Bucke, Richard M. COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS. University Books, 1961 Dutton (pap).

Bunyan, John. PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.

Byles, Maria. JOURNEY INTO BURMESE SILENCE. Lond: Allen & Unwin. (Day by day adventures at various Burmese Buddhist Meditation Centers).
PATHWAYS TO INNER CALM. London: Allen & Unwin

Collin, Rodney. THEORY OF CELESTIAL INFLUENCE. London: Vincent Stuart.

Coomaraswamy, Anana. BUDDHA & THE GOSPEL OF BUDDHISM. NY: Torch (pap).

Danielou, Alain. YOGA: THE METHOD OF REINTEGRATION. London: C. Johnson. 1940.

Daumal, Rene. MOUNT ANALOGUE. NY: Pantheon, 1962. Cal: City Lights, 1968. (The ascent of the soul symbolized by a mountain climbing expedition.)

David-Neel, Alexandra. INITIATIONS & INITIATES IN TIBET
SECRET ORAL TEACHINGS IN TIBETAN BUDDHIST SECTS.
Maha Bodhi Society, India.

de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard. THE PHENOMENON OF MAN.
THE FUTURE OF MAN
THE DIVINE MILIEU.
HYMN OF THE UNIVERSE.
NY: Harper

De Cusa, Nicholas. THE VISION OF GOD. NY: Atlantic (pap).

de Lubicz, Isha Schwaller. HER-BAK: CHICK-PEA, EGYPTIAN INITIATE, Vols. I & II. London: Hodder & Stoughten, 1967.

Duncan, Ronald. SELECTED WRITINGS OF MAHATMA GANDHI. Boston, Beacon Press.

Dutt, R.C., the RAMAYANA and the MAHABHARATA, Everyman's Library, Dutton, NY.

Eliade, Mircea. YOGA, IMMORTALITY & FREEDOM. NY: Pantheon, 1954.

Guillaumont, A. et. al. (tr.) THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THOMAS. (Coptic Text). NY: Harper Row, 1959

Gurdjieff, George. MEETINGS WITH REMARKABLE MEN. NY: Dutton (pap). 1963.
ALL AND EVERYTHING - BEELZEBUB's TALES TO HIS GRANDSON. NY: Dutton.

Herrigel, Eugen. ZEN IN THE ART OF ARCHERY. NY: McGraw Hill (pap).

Hesse, Herman. JOURNEY TO THE EAST. NY: Noonday (pap).
SIDDHARTHA. NY: New Directions (pap).
STEPPENWOLF. NY: Holt Rhinehart (pap).
MAGISTER LUDI (THE GLASS BEAD GAME). NY: Unger, 1964.

Hoffman. THE RELIGIONS OF TIBET. NY: MacMillan, 1961.

Humphreys, Christmas. THE WISDOM OF BUDDHISM. NY: Random House.

Huxley, Aldous. ISLAND.

Huxley, Laura. THIS TIMELESS MOMENT.

Isherwood, Christopher. RAMAKRISHNA & HIS DISCIPLES. NY: Simon & Schuster.

Jack, Homer A. THE GANDHI READER. NY: Evergreen, 1961 (pap).

Kapleau, Philip. THE THREE PILLARS OF ZEN. NY: Harper & Row. Beacon (pap).

Kirpal Singh. BABA JAIMAL SINGH: HIS LIFE AND TEACHINGS.
Delhi Ruhani Satsang.
(Available from Sant Bani Ashrma, Franklin, New Hampshire 03235)

Krishna Prem. THE YOGA OF BHAGAVAD GITA.
THE YOGA OF THE KATHUPANISHAD. Lond: J.W. Watkins

Lefort, Rafael. THE TEACHERS OF GURDJIEFF. London: Victor Gollancz, 1960.

Legge, James C. (tr.) THE TEXTS OF TAOISM (in 2 parts) NY: Dover

Marsh, John. SAINT JOHN. NY: Pelican, Penguin (pap).

Meher Baba. LISTEN HUMANITY (Narr. & ed. by D.E. Stevens)
NY: Dodd, Mead, 1957
THE EVERYTHING AND THE NOTHING. (pap).
THE PERFECT MASTER. C. B. Purdom.
AVATAR. John Adriel. Calif. J.R. Rowny Press, Santa Barbara, 1947.
THE WAYFARERS. Dr. Wm. Donkin.
WHAT AM I DOING HERE? Ivy O. Duce (pap).
(May be purchased directly from Sufism Reoriented, 1290 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif.)

Merton, Thomas. THE WAY OF CHUANG TZU. NY: New Directions (pap).
THE SEVEN STORY MOUNTAIN. (Autobiography) NY: Signet.
SILENCE IN HEAVEN. (Book of the Monastic Life) Signet.
THE SIGN OF JONAS. (Day by day account of life in Trappist monastery) NY: Image.
THOUGHTS IN SOLITUDE. NY: Image.
NEW SEEDS OF CONTEMPLATION. New Directions.

Niehardt, J.G. BLACK ELK SPEAKS. NY: Morrow & Co., 1932, University Nebraska (pap). 1961. (Life story of holy man of the Ogalala Sioux).

Nikhilananda, Swami. HOLY MOTHER (Life of Sri Sara Devi -- wife of Sri Ramakrishna). London: Allen & Unwin, 1962.
THE UPANISHADS. NY: Harper Torchbooks (pap).

Orage, A.R. ON LOVE. London. The Janus Press.

Ouspensky, P.D. IN SEARCH OF THE MIRACULOUS. NY: Harcourt Brace. Bantam.

Percival, H.W. THINKING & DESTINY. Word Foundation, Inc.

Prabhavananda, Swami & Isherwood, HOW TO KNOW GOD. Hollywood: Vedanta Press. (Best introduction to Patanjali Sutras).
VIVEKA CHUDAMANI (CREST JEWEL OF DISCRIMINATION). Hollywood: Vedanta Press.

Price, A.F. (tr.) THE DIAMOND SUTRA OF THE JEWEL OF TRANSCENDENTAL WISDOM. London: The Buddhist Society, 16 Gordon Square, 1947.

THE LIFE OF RAMAKRISHNA. Romain Rolland. Advaita Shram.
RAMAKRISHNA & THE VITALITY OF HINDUISM. (Solange Lamaitre) Funk & Wagnall's, 1969.

Ramdas, Swami. IN THE VISION OF GOD.
GITA SANDESH.
THE PATHLESS PATH.
WORLD IS GOD.
DIVINE LIFE.
By writer about Ramdas:
PASSAGE TO DIVINITY - A DEVOTEE'S DIARY.
SWAMI RAMDAS
Order from Anandashrama Kanhangad Rly, Stan Kerala, So. India.
Plus many booklets.

Reps, P. ZEN FLESH, ZEN BONES. A collection of Zen & Pre-Zen Writings. NY: Anchor Doubleday (pap).

Rilke, Rainier M. DUINO ELEGIES (MacIntyre, tr.) Cal: University of California (pap).

Saint Augustine. THE CONFESSIONS OF SAINT AUGUSTINE
THE CITY OF GOD. Modern Library.
Westminster: Library of Christian Classics. Vol. 7, 1955.

The construction of history sketched by Augustine of Hippo is a relevant model for understanding the framework of thought of Theology of History, if only for the historical reason that this model factually dominated the whole Catholic conception of history down to the late Middle Ages. His major work The City of God can be considered the elaboration par excellence, though in a rudimentary way, of a Christian theology of history....Augustine is considered a founding father of Christianity as a whole. He developed his thought around 400 AD, nearly 700 years before the definitive schism between the Western and the Eastern Church (1054), and thus his work goes beyond the later divergence between them....

The theological model of history elaborated by Augustine is determined by the ontological distinction between, on the one hand, the immanent level of the temporary, mutable, and incomplete human world, and, on the other, the transcendent level of God, who rests in eternity, immutability and plenitude. This dichotomy is articulated in Augustine's metaphor of the two Realms or Cities [civitates], the Earthly City and the Heavenly City. Only the Earthly City is subject to change, which is seen as a negative characteristic, as instability, fragility and imperfection. This is opposed to the perfection of the Heavenly City or City of God. The secular world as such and profane history do not have an immediate meaning, whereas the religious world of the Christian church occupies the foreground. More fundamentally, the emphasis does not lie on history as such but on the transcendent and thus extra-historical foundations of history, namely on its cause and goal in eternity....

The distinction between two realms is supported by the attribution of different characteristics to time.... The perception of the past is dominated by the figure of Christ, whose life and death is commemorated in the liturgy....The present is a decisive moment of choice in favour of God in the act of faith professed by Christians during the liturgy and prayer....It is the dimension of the future that is of central concern however, since salvation is at stake. This view of the future is eschatological in the sense that it refers to a set of views that has been revealed by God about the last events of history [from the Greek eskhaton]. A properly apocalyptic eschatology is more specific and refers to the belief that these last events are to some extent imminent. Apocalyptic eschatology, of which Augustine is a prominent example, contains a mainly catastrophic, deterministic, and dualistic view of history. It is catastrophic in the sense that it refers to radical events that are violent, cruel and punishing. It is deterministic because the future is already established. Finally, it is dualistic because the absolute god and absolute evil are depicted in the sense that there is no grey or neutral zone, no ambiguity. Apocalyptic eschatology is perhaps more current in Orthodox Russia than in Catholic Western Europe.

-- History, Sofia and the Russian Nation, A Reassessment of Vladimir Solov'ev's Views on History and His Social Committment, by Manon de Courten


If, therefore, the salamander lives in fire, as naturalists have recorded, and if certain famous mountains of Sicily have been continually on fire from the remotest antiquity until now, and yet remain entire, these are sufficiently convincing examples that everything which burns is not consumed. As the soul too, is a proof that not everything which can suffer pain can also die, why then do they yet demand that we produce real examples to prove that it is not incredible that the bodies of men condemned to everlasting punishment may retain their soul in the fire, may burn without being consumed, and may suffer without perishing? For suitable properties will be communicated to the substance of the flesh by Him who has endowed the things we see with so marvellous and diverse properties, that their very multitude prevents our wonder.

-- St. Augustin's City of God


In fashion then as of a snow-white rose
Displayed itself to me the saintly host,
Whom Christ in his own blood had made his bride...
I through the Rose go down from leaf to leaf. ...
... the great John,
Who, ever holy, desert and martyrdom
Endured, and afterwards two years in Hell.
And under him thus to divide were chosen
Francis, and Benedict, and Augustine.

-- The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


It was the year when they finally immanentized the Eschaton.

-- The Illuminatus! Trilogy, by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson


Shah, Idries. THE WAY OF THE SUFI. London: Jonathan Cape. 1968.

Sivananda, Swami. CONCENTRATION & MEDITATION.
KUNDALINI YOGA.
THE PRACTICE OF YOGA.
SADHANA.
BHAGAVAD GITA.

Snellgrove (tr.) THE JERDJRA TANTRA, 2 Vols. London: Rider & Co.

Sobhana, Dhammasudhi. INSIGHT MEDITATION. London: Buddhapadipa Temple.

Shankaracharya. THE CREST JEWEL OF WISDOM. (Charles Johnston. tr. Watkins Press).

Szekely, Edmond Bordeaux (tr.) THE ESSENE GOSPEL OF JOHN
FIRST CHRISTIAN (ESSENCE) CHURCH. 1968. (Trans. from 1st century Aramaic & Slavonic texts).

Taimni, I.K. GAYATRI - DAILY RELIGIOUS PRACTICE OF THE HINDUS. India: Ananda Publishing House.
THE SCIENCE OF YOGA. Wheaton, Ill: Quest (pap). Theosophical Publishing House

Thoreau. WALDEN.

Vishnudevanada, Swami. THE COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF YOGA. NY: Julian Press, 1960. (Excellent help with Hatha Yoga theory & practice).

THE URANTIA BOOK. Chicago: Urantia Foundation, 1967.

Vithaldas, Yogi: THE YOGA SYSTEMS OF HEALTH & RELIEF FROM TENSIONS. NY: Crown Publishers, 1957. (pap).

Waddell, Helen. THE DESERT FATHERS. NY: Constable & Co. 1946.

Waley, Arthur (tr.) MONKEY. NY: Grove Press.

Whitman, Walt. THE LEAVES OF GRASS. NY: Doubleday (pap).

I will make a song for these States that no one State may under any circumstances be subjected to another State,
And I will make a song that there shall be comity by day and by
night between all the States, and between any two of them,
And I will make a song for the ears of the President, full of weapons with menacing points,
And behind the weapons countless dissatisfied faces;
And a song make I of the One form'd out of all,
The fang'd and glittering One whose head is over all,
Resolute warlike One including and over all,
(However high the head of any else that head is over all.)

***

Omnes! omnes! let others ignore what they may,
I make the poem of evil also, I commemorate that part also,
I am myself just as much evil as good, and my nation is—and I say there is in fact no evil,
(Or if there is I say it is just as important to you, to the land or to me, as any thing else.)

I too, following many and follow'd by many, inaugurate a religion, I descend into the arena,
(It may be I am destin'd to utter the loudest cries there, the winner's pealing shouts,
Who knows? they may rise from me yet, and soar above every thing.)

Each is not for its own sake,
I say the whole earth and all the stars in the sky are for religion's sake.

I say no man has ever yet been half devout enough,
None has ever yet adored or worship'd half enough,
None has begun to think how divine he himself is, and how certain the future is.

I say that the real and permanent grandeur of these States must be their religion,
Otherwise there is just no real and permanent grandeur;
(Nor character nor life worthy the name without religion,
Nor land nor man or woman without religion.)

***

I do not despise you priests, all time, the world over,
My faith is the greatest of faiths and the least of faiths,
Enclosing worship ancient and modern and all between ancient and modern,
Believing I shall come again upon the earth after five thousand years,
Waiting responses from oracles, honoring the gods, saluting the sun,
Making a fetich of the first rock or stump, powowing with sticks in the circle of obis,
Helping the llama or brahmin as he trims the lamps of the idols,
Dancing yet through the streets in a phallic procession, rapt and austere in the woods a gymnosophist,
Drinking mead from the skull-cap, to Shastas and Vedas admirant, minding the Koran,
Walking the teokallis, spotted with gore from the stone and knife, beating the serpent-skin drum,
Accepting the Gospels, accepting him that was crucified, knowing assuredly that he is divine,
To the mass kneeling or the puritan's prayer rising, or sitting patiently in a pew,
Ranting and frothing in my insane crisis, or waiting dead-like till my spirit arouses me,
Looking forth on pavement and land, or outside of pavement and land,
Belonging to the winders of the circuit of circuits.

***

From my own voice resonant, singing the phallus,
Singing the song of procreation,
Singing the need of superb children and therein superb grown people,
Singing the muscular urge and the blending.

***

O the orator's joys!
To inflate the chest, to roll the thunder of the voice out from the ribs and throat,
To make the people rage, weep, hate, desire, with yourself,
To lead America—to quell America with a great tongue.

-- Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman


Wilhelm, Richard. THE SECRET OF THE GOLDEN FLOWER. NY: Harcourt Brace.

BOOKS ITS USEFUL TO HAVE MET

A Kempis, Thomas, THE IMITATION OF CHRIST. NY: Image (pap).

Asimov, Isaac. THE FOUNDATION TRILOGY. NY: Doublday.

Bailey, Alice. THE REAPPEARANCE OF THE CHRIST.
THE SOUL AND ITS MECHANISM.
FROM INTELLECT TO INTUITION.
INITIATION HUMAN & SOLAR.
LETTERS ON OCCULT MEDITATION.
A TREATISE ON WHITE MAGIC.
A TREATISE ON COSMIC FIRE.
TELEPATHY AND THE ETHERIC VEHICLE.
GLAMOUR: A WORLD PROBLEM.
A TREATISE ON THE SEVEN RAYS, 5 vols.
NY: Lucis Publishing Co.

Beevers, John. STORM OF GLORY (About St. Theresa of Lisieux) NY: Image (pap).

Bernard, Theos. HATHA YOGA. NY: Columbia University Press, 1944.
LAND OF A THOUSAND BUDDHAS. London: Rider.

Besant, Annie. KARMA.
DEATH AND AFTER.
DHARMA
REINCARNATION.
ESOTERIC CHRISTIANITY.
India: Theosophical Publishing House. Adyar.

Blakney, Raymond B. MEISTER ECKHART, 14th CENTURY MYSTIC & SCHOLAR. Torch.

Boehme, Jacob. THE WAY TO CHRIST (4 Treatises) London, 1961.

Borges, Jorge. LABYRINTHS, SELECTED STORIES & OTHER WRITINGS. NY: New Directions (pap).

Bradbury, Ray. THE ILLUSTRATED MAN. NY: Doubleday, 1958.

Brother Lawrence (tr. from French) THE PRACTICE OF THE PRESENCE OF GOD. Revell Inspirational Classics.

Buber, Martin. HASIDISM & MODERN MAN. (Friedman, M. tr.) NY: Harper Row (pap).
I AND THOU. (R. Gregor Smith, tr.) NY: Scribner Lib. (pap).
TALES OF THE HASIDIM.

Bucke, R.M. "Memorial Society Newsletter Review" (An outstanding spiritual newsletter. $1/copy). R. M. Bucke Memorial Society, 1266 Pine Ave. W. Montreal.

Campbell, Joseph. MASKS OF GOD. NY: Viking (pap).

Castaneda, Carlos. THE TEACHINGS OF DON JUAN: A YAQUI WAY OF KNOWLEDGE. NY: Ballantine (pap).

Dante, A. THE DIVINE COMEDY. (Tr. Carlyle) NY: Modern Library

de Lubicz, R.A. Schwaller. LE TEMPLE de L'HOMME. Blackwell's, Broad Street, Oxford, England.

De Ropp, Robert. THE MASTER GAME. NY: Dell, 1969. (pap).

Descartes, Rene. MEDITATIONS (tr. Lafleur) NY: Bobbs, 1951. (pap).

Dridedi, M.J. THE YOGA SUTRAS OF PATANJALI.

Fischer, Louis. THE LIFE OF MAHATMA GANDHI. NY: MacMillan, 1962.

Fowles, John. THE MAGUS. NY: Dell. (pap).

Giles, Herbert A. CHUANG TZU - TAOIST PHILOSOPHER & CHINESE MYSTIC. London: Allen & Unwin, 1961.

Govinda, Lama. THE WAY OF THE WHITE CLOUD. London: Hutchinson.

Heinlein, Robert A. STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND. NY: Putnam, 1961. Avon.

Hills, Christopher. NUCLEAR EVOLUTION.

Jha, Gangautha. THE YOGA DARSANA.

Johnston, Charles. THE YOGA SUTRAS OF PATANJALI. London: Stuart & Watkin.

Jonas, Hans. THE GNOSTIC RELIGION. Boston, Beacon Press.

Judge, William Q. YOGA APHORISMS OF PATANJALI.

Kazantzakis. THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST. NY: Simon Schuster (pap).

Kesey, K. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST. NY: Signet (pap).

Kierkegaard, Soren. FEAR & TREMBLING: SICKNESS UNTO DEATH. tr. Lowrie. NJ: Princeton University Press (pap).
EITHER/OR. 2 Vols. NY: Anchor Doubleday.
AN ANTHOLOGY OF KIERKEGAARD. Modern Library, 1959.

King, C. Daly. THE STATES OF HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS. Llevellyn Pub. (Pages 137-146 are excellent help in understanding pharaonic mentality.)

Kirpal Singh. PRAYER: ITS NATURE & TECHNIQUE
THE WHEEL OF LIFE: THE LAW OF ACTION & REACTION.
NAAM OR WORD.
Delhi: Ruhani Satsang.
(Available from Sant Bani Ashram, Franklin, N.H. 03235).

KORAN. Everyman's Library.

Krishnamurti. EDUCATION & THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LIFE. NY: Harper & Row.

Laing, R.D. THE POLITICS OF EXPERIENCE. NY: Ballantine (pap).

Laski, Margharita. ECSTASY. London: Cresset Press, 1961. (A study of religious & secular experiences.)

Law, Willilam. A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT & HOLY LIFE. Fontana Library.

Leadbeater, D.W. THE CHAKRAS. India: Theos. Publ. House, 1966.

Leary, T. THE POLITICS OF ECSTASY.

Lewis, C.S. PERELANDRA. NY: Macmillan (pap).

Lu K'uan Yu (Charles Luk) THE SECRETS OF CHINESE MEDITATION. NY: S. Weiser.

Mahathera, P.W. BUDDHIST MEDITATION IN THEORY & PRACTICE, 1962.

Maynard, Theodore. SAINTS FOR OUR TIMES. (18 saints) NY: Image (pap).

Mayrink. THE GOLEM. NY: Ungar (pap).

Mead, G.R.S. (tr.) THRICE GREATEST HERMES, HERMES TRISMEGISTUS. London.

Merton, Thomas. MYSTICS & ZEN MASTERS. NY: Dell (pap). 1969.

Milton, John. PARADISE LOST: PARADISE REGAINED. NY: MacMillan, 1966. (pap).

Mishra, Rammurti. FUNDAMENTALS OF YOGA. NY: Julian Press. Lancer (pap).

Narayananda, Swami. THE SECRETS OF PRANA, PRANAYAM AND YOGA ASANAS.

Nicholson. RUMI, POET & MYSTIC. London: Allen & Unwin.

Nicoll, Maurice. LIVING TIME - AND THE INTEGRATION OF LIFE. London: Vincent Stuarts, 1964.
THE NEW MAN. London: Stuart & Richards, 1950.

Nin, Anais. SEDUCTION OF THE MINOTAUR & OTHER STORIES. NY: Swallow (pap).

Ouspensky, P.D. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MAN'S POSSIBLE EVOLUTION.
A NEW MODEL OF THE UNIVERSE.
THE FOURTH WAY. NY: Knopf.

Owens, Clifford P. A STORY OF JESUS. NY: ARE, 34 W. 35th.

Pali Canon. JATAKA STORIES, Vols. 1-3. Pali Text Society.

Pascal, Blaise. PENSEES. NY: Modern Library (pap).

Plotinus. ENNEADS (tr. MacKenna Stephen) NY: Pantheon, 1957.
ON THE IMPASSIVITY OF THE INCORPOREAL (tr. MacKenna) Medici Society.

PLATO, THE WORKS OF. NY: Modern Library.

Prassad, Ram O. THE YOGA SUTRAS OF PATANJALI.

Rahula, Walpole. WHAT THE BUDDHA TAUGHT. NY: Grove, 1962.

Ramanar K. Venkata NARGARJUNA'S PHILOSOPHY. Tuttle.

Ram Tirtha. IN THE WOODS OF GOD REALIZATION.

Reich, William. THE FUNCTION OF THE ORGASM. NY: Noonday Press.
CHARACTER ANALYSIS.
COSMIC SUPERIMPOSITION.
THE SELECTED WRITINGS OF WILHELM REICH.
REICH SPEAKS OF FREUD.
(All Noonday Press)

Rice, Cyprian. THE PERSIAN SUFIS. London: Allen & Unwin, 1963.

ROSICRUCIAN. May be ordered from Rosicrucian Fellowship, Mt. Ecclesia, Oceanside, Calif.
THE MESSAGE OF THE STARS. Max Heindel.
ROSICRUCIAN COSMO CONCEPTION OR MYSTIC CHRISTIANITY. Max Heindel.
ETHERIC VISION & WHAT IT REVEALS.

Runes, D. Dagobert. THE WISDOM OF THE KABBALAH. NY: Citadel (pap).

Saint Exupery, Antoine. (tr. Woods) THE LITTLE PRINCE. H.B. & W. (pap).

Saint Francis de Sales. INTRODUCTION TO THE DEVOUT LIFE. (Ed. Ryan) NY: Image.

Salinger, J.D. NINE STORIES, NY: Little, 1953.
FRANNY & ZOOEY. Little.

Schopenhauer, Arthur. THE WORLD AS WILL & IDEA. (tr. Haldone) NY: Humanities.

Schrodinger, Erwin. MY VIEW OF THE WORLD. Cambridge University Press.

Shabistari Mahmud. THE SECRET GARDEN. (tr. Johnson Pasha) London: Octagon.

Shah, Idries. TALES OF THE DERVISHES. London: Octagon press.

Shattock, E. H. (Rear Admiral) AN EXPERIMENT IN MINDFULNESS. NY: Dutton (Satipatthana Method).

Singh, Jogendra (tr.) THE PERSIAN MYSTICS. London: Paragon.
THE INVOCATIONS OF SHEIKH ANSARI (Verses by 11th century Sufi mystic) London: John Murray.

Snyder, Gary. THE BACK COUNTRY. NY: New Directions (pap).

Steiger, Brad. IN MY SOUL I AM FREE. NY: Lancer (pap), 1968.

Suzuki, D.T. ZEN DOCTRINE & NO MIND. London: Rider & Co. (pap).
THE TRAINING OF THE ZEN BUDDHIST MONK, NY: University Books.

Swedenborg, Emmanuel. SWEDENBORG'S WORKS. NY: Houghton Mifflin.
AN INTRODUCTION TO SWEDENBORG'S RELIGIOUS THOUGHT. (J. H. Spalding) NY: Swedenborg Publishing Assoc.

Tagore, Rabindranath. THE RELIGION OF MAN. Boston: Beacon Press, (pap).
POEMS OF KABIR.

Tennyson, H. INDIA'S WALKING SAINT.

Tolkien, J.R. R. THE HOBBIT, AND THE RING CYCLE. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. NY: Ballantine (pap). 1965.

Tookaran, Rajararm. YOGA PHILOSOPHY.

Trungpa, Chogyam. BORN IN TIBET. NY: Harcourt Brace.
MEDITATION IN ACTION. London: Stuart Watkins. (pap).

Tucci, Guiseppe. THE THEORY& PRACTICE OF THE MANDALA. London: Rider (pap).

Underhill, Evelyn. THE ESSENTIALS OF MYSTICISM. NY: Dutton (pap).
THE CLOUD OF UNKNOWING. London. Watkins.

Virajananda, Swami. PARAMARTHA PRASANGA - TOWARD THE GOAL SUPREME. Hollywood: Vedanta Press.

Waley, Arthur. THE NO PLAYS OF JAPAN. NY: Grove Press.

Walker, Kenneth. THE CONSCIOUS MIND. NY: Wehman, 1962.

Warren, H.C. BUDDHISM. NY: Atheneum Press, 1963 (pap).

Waters, Frank. BOOK OF THE HOPI, NY: Viking Press, 1963.

Watts, Alan. PSYCHOTHERAPY EAST & WEST. NY: Ballantine (pap). 1969.
BEYOND THEOLOGY: THE ART OF GODMANSHIP. NY: Pantheon, 1964.

Whitehead, Alfred North. SCIENCE & THE MODERN WORLD. NY: Free Press (pap).
PROCESS & REALITY. NY: Free Press (pap).

Woods, J.H. YOGA SYSTEM OF PATANJALI. Harvard Oriental Series.

Workman, Herbert B. EVOLUTION OF THE MONASTIC IDEAL. NY: Beacon (pap).

Yesudian and Haich. YOGA AND HEALTH. NY: Harper & Bros., 1953.

Yukteswar, Swami Sri. KAWALYA DARSANAN or THE HOLY SCIENCE. India: Yogoda Satsanga Society, Ranchi, Bihar, 1963.

Zehner. MYSTICISM SACRED AND PROFANE. Oxford Press (pap).

Sat Prem, AUROBINDO OR ADVENTURES IN CONSCIOUSNESS
SRI AUROBINDO ASHRAM. Pindicherry, India.

Dane Rudhyar, PLANETARIZATION OF CONSCIOUSNESS (avail. from Shamballa Pub., Berkeley, Cal.)

Nicholson, Reynold, THE MATHNAWI OF RUMI. Luzak & Co., 1968.

Khan, Hazrat Innayat, THE SUFI MESSAGE. (8 vols.) Barrie & Rockliff, London, 1961.

Suzuki, Roshi, Shunyru, ZEN MIND BEGINNERS MIND. Walker/Weatherhill, 1970.

Where books may not be available at local bookstores, the following are book specialists of the oriental and occult, etc.

SAMUEL WEISER, 734 Broadway, New York, NY 10003 (GR 7-8453)

ORIENTALIA, INC. 61 Fourth Ave., New York, NY 10003 (473-6730)

MASON'S BOOKSHOP, 789 Lexington Ave. New York, NY (832-8958)

SHAMBALLA BOOKSTORES, Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, Calif.

BROTHERHOOD OF LIFE, 110 Dartmouth St., S.E., Albuquerque, N. Mex. 87166.

EAST-WEST BOOK SHOP, 1170 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, Calif. 94025.

THE PILGRIM'S WAY BOOKSTORE, P.O. Box 1044, Carmel, Calif. 93921.

PARAGON BOOK GALLERY, N.Y.C.

FIELDS, San Francisco, California

THE SPHINX, Cambridge, Mass.

Ram Dass Tapes available through

NOUMEDIA COMPANY, P.O. Box 750, Port Chester, N.Y. 10573

BIG SUR RECORDINGS, P.O. Box 303, Mill Valley, Calif. 94941

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