The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTaste i

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:25 am

Leila Hadley Luce: The Last of the Great Luces?
by Jim Luce
04/25/2009 05:12 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

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I met Leila Hadley Luce with Hank — known to outsiders as Henry Luce III of Time-Life — in their Sutton Place residence, at a reception they threw for my first national organization, Fundamentalists Anonymous. It was late fall in 1986. They had just married and I did not know what to expect.

She was the unexpected. “Darling, your life is so interesting!” I mused, in comparison to hers, it was nothing. But I had caught her interest.

In 1985 I had co-founded Fundamentalists Anonymous, an organization that immediately placed me on Phil Donahue. We were tackling the controversial subject of ‘religious addiction,’ at that time never mentioned on national television. I was 26.

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Portrait of Leila Hadley Luce from the New York Times.

Hank was the son of Harry Luce, who founded Time-Life in the 1920’s. The Luce family, however conservative on the Time-Life side, had always embraced Asia, a favorite part of the world for me. I had majored in East Asian Studies and studied at Waseda University in Tokyo. Leila approved.

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Portrait of Leila by Al Hirschfeld (memorial booklet).

Hank and Leila were enthusiastic for ecumenical and Interfaith ideas. They abhorred religious extremism. We were on the same page.

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Leila Luce with Henry Luce III, known as Hank (memorial booklet).

Hank steered the Advisory Board for my Fundamentalists Anonymous. He wanted to help me help those burned by their Fundamentalist experiences. We raised over a million dollars to sustain it, partially from the Henry Luce Foundation.

The Time-Life side of the Luce family were Mainline Presbyterian, although the second wide of Hank’s father Harry’ — Clare Boothe Luce — was deeply Catholic. I remember well her packed funeral at St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue.

Leila had Anglican roots. She ended her journey in the Episcopal Church where she had been baptized, like myself. St. Thomas Episcopal where she was recently memorialized is just a few blocks up Fifth Avenue from St. Patrick’s.

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Leila Luce author of countless books (memorial booklet).

Leila was raised in Old Westbury on Long Island where her childhood playmates were the Vanderbilt sisters. They remained life-long friends. A stunning debutante, she was introduced to society at the Ritz-Carlton in 1943.

At 25, already married and divorced from Arthur T. Hadley II, she sailed around the world. From those travels, she wrote Give Me The World, a New York Times bestseller. The book was published by Simon & Shuster in 1958 (reprinted in 1999). She then set off for South Africa, the West Indies, Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, Central America, and the Caribbean.

For several years she worked for the now-defunct Diplomat Magazine, as well as the Saturday Evening Post, Newsday, and the New York Times. In the 1970’s she was inspired by the Dalai Lama, and went on to publish Tibet 20 Years After the Chinese Takeover, a reprint of her lectures to the Society of Women Geographers.

In 1990, she married her third husband, my global adviser, mentor, and rather distant cousin Hank Luce III.


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Leila with the Dali Lama (memorial booklet).

The Luce Family she married into broke the mold in many ways. Descendants of ship captains off Martha’s Vineyard, Luces have always been captains of their own ships.

Roughly 1/3 of the Martha’s Vineyard Navy just before the Revolution were Luces. We remarry, endlessly
. And our family scandals exist more publicly than in other proper families.

Rear Admiral Stephen Bleecker Luce founded the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis. He led a naval expedition into Edo (Tokyo) Bay several years before Admiral Perry opened up Japan, but was chased away. The Academy knows this well, but most history books omit it.

Harry Luce’s Empire is perhaps the vision Rupert Murdoch has pursued so relentlessly. Hank introduced me to Rupert once at the Waldorf Astoria and I was surprised how unpleasant he seemed to be. So much power, so little grace.

I attended the once-Presbyterian College of Wooster. In 1980, the president informed me that Hank would be visiting the campus and, as a Luce, could I pitch him to build a dormitory in honor of the family?

“Hank,” I said, ushering up all my college-aged courage at a reception in President’s Copeland’s home, “It sure would be great to have a Luce Hall here at Wooster.” “Yes it would be,” he responded, “Go for it!” I was speechless.

Today, that dorm stands at Wooster in testament to the Luces, as do buildings at Yale and Princeton. The Henry R. Luce Hall is the home of Yale’s Center for International and Area Studies. Other notable structures include:

The Luce Memorial Chapel at Tunghai University in Taichung, Taiwan, designed I.M. Pei and named in honor of Harry’s father, Rev. Henry Winters Luce, an American missionary in China in the late 19th century.

Luce Chapel at the prestigious Yonsei University in South Korea.

Henry R. Luce Chapel, Payap University, Thailand, as well as buildings bearing the Luce name on the campuses of Satya Wacana University in Indonesia, Central Philippine University, and Silliman University in the Philippines.


The Luce Family’s affinity for Asia came from generations of sailing by Luce ship captains, whalers and traders, off Cape Cod. I have rubbed many-hundreds-of-years-old gravestones on the Vineyard, of this Captain Luce and that Captain Luce who died at sea.

Leila was active throughout the 1990’s as a member of several philanthropic boards, including Tibet House and The Rubin Museum of Art.

Over the years I would chat with Leila on the phone. I apologized that I had missed Hank’s funeral in 2005 as I was traveling in Indonesia, building orphanages in the wake of the Tsunami with the organization I founded, Orphans International Worldwide.

Leila was intrigued by my orphanages, but said, “Count me out on your travels, but my heart is with you.” Leila had emphysema in her later years and could not attend our receptions and dinners, even when they were held on Sutton Place — just down the street from her. “Darling, I am not well!”

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Leila was a lifelong supporter of Wings World Quest.

Leila has inspired me to live life to the fullest and achieve to the maximum. I hope to mirror Hank and Leila’s core values: altruism, internationalism, and ecumenicalism. The motto of Orphans International — Interfaith, Interracial, International, Inter-generational, and Internet-Connected — reflects and updates these values.

I can only hope that my own recently launched James Jay Dudley Luce Foundation may play a tiny role in maintaining these Luce traditions.

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Leila with the Betsy Gotbaum (copyright New York Social Journal).

My side of the family is as far away from Hank’s side as is possible. If I remember correctly, I am direct descendant of the first son of Henry Luce of England, who arrived on the Vineyard in the late 1600’s, eleven generations prior. Hank, in contrast, was direct descendants of the original Henry Luce’s tenth son.

And Leila was of course not a Luce, but the wife of one. And yet she personified the best of the Luces. She was brutally honest. She was stunningly beautiful. And she had enough money to do what she wished with her life.

Auld lang syne friends, including actress Tammy Grimes, Mrs. Arnold (Michelle) Dolan Ehrlich, and editor and publicist Gloria Starr Kins, all felt a loss for Leila - one of the lights of their world that had gone out. Michelle’s late husband Arnold was the former head of Curtis Publishing, publishers of Saturday Evening Post and Publisher’s Weekly.

Betsy von Furstenberg was an honorary pallbearer. Other honorary pallbearers included Marilyn Bridges, Gertrude Vanderbilt, Ira Gitler, Dr. Steven Soter, and Francine Douwes Whitney.

Leila’s dear friend, columnist Liz Smith, said in her memorial, “Do not rest in peace, dear Leila, just tear things up wherever you are!”

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Leila Luce with columnist Liz Smith (memorial booklet).
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Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:33 am

Luce Family's Secret Shame of 'Sex Abuse’
by Mark Bulliet
New York Post
June 13, 2006

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On the surface, the two sisters had everything: a glamorous globetrotting mother and a wealthy stepfather who was heir to a great publishing empire.

But they shared a dark secret about their Social Register mom, Leila Hadley Luce, and their stepfather, Henry Luce III, namesake son of Time magazine’s founder.

It was a secret that drove them apart – and then brought them together after three decades.

Both sisters allege they were repeatedly molested as children by their soused and sadistic stepfather, who “feasted and devoured upon children” while their mother failed to stop him.

They’re also saying their mother molested them.

Younger sister Caroline Nicholson, 47, was the first to make the bombshell accusations.

Three years ago, she filed a $15 million suit in Manhattan Supreme Court, charging that the pattern of sexual abuse she suffered as a girl was repeating itself: Her teenage daughter had become her 81-year-old multimillionaire mother’s latest victim.

In a deposition, Nicholson alleged, “By the age of 12 or 13, I would be called into their bedrooms to admire Hank’s naked body . . . On another occasion, I was asked to get into bed between them after they had just had sex. They were both naked.”

Nicholson’s 17-year-old daughter, in her deposition, said her grandmother “would massage my body in ways that made me feel uncomfortable.

“She would ask me to undress in front of her, she would undress in front of me. She would continuously make comments on my body and talk about my body and nudity and sex.”


One of Nicholson’s molestation accusations against her mother was thrown out by the judge in the civil case because the statute of limitations had expired. But the judge allowed an accusation that Leila Hadley Luce had molested the teenage granddaughter to go forward.

Nicholson’s charges have now received chilling and surprising reinforcement.

Her long-estranged sister, Victoria Barlow, 52, has stepped out of the shadows after nearly 30 years to say that her sister is telling the truth. She said in a legal deposition that she, too, was molested by their mother and now-deceased stepfather, who together made their childhood “a daily hell.”

Barlow, who ran away from home at age 15, said she will gladly testify on her niece’s behalf if the case goes to trial.

“When the lawsuit came out, and I realized that [my sister] had finally broken with our mother, that’s when, I think, the beginning of our friendship started,” Barlow said in the deposition.

She has given her younger sister reams of letters their mother wrote in the 1970s for use as evidence. In one, which Nicholson’s lawyer, John Aretakis, called “a smoking gun,” their mother told Barlow how a drunken Henry Luce climbed into bed with Nicholson when she was 13.

“I did point out to him that climbing into bed with Caroline when he was stark naked wasn’t exactly the best thing to do,” Leila Hadley Luce wrote in an undated letter circa 1974.

Leila Hadley Luce, asked about the letter during her deposition, said, “Well, if I wrote it, I wrote it . . . I never saw him do that.”

She claimed Henry’s sex-assault attempt took place when she had left young Nicholson in his care, and she admitted she never confronted him about it.

She explained, “When I got back from Spain or Portugal, whatever it was, Caroline said, ‘Oh, Mummy, it was terrible, Hank got drunk and he tried to get into bed with me naked.’

“I said, ‘Oh, my God! What did you do?’

“She said, ‘I pushed him away.’ I said, ‘That’s fine.’”

Leila Hadley Luce noted, “Hank was my darling friend, he was my lover. I adored him and I wasn’t going to cause problems with him. I didn’t know if it was true or not . . . I was not going to go attacking Hank about it because I really didn’t know what was true.”


Luce, who married Leila Hadley in 1990 after a love affair in the early ’70s, died on Sept. 8, 2005, at the age of 80. He denied the sex-abuse charges and passed away before he could be deposed in the case.

Nicholson said she had no idea her sister shared her childhood nightmare until they reconnected.

“Victoria’s abuse was at a stage when I was very, very young, and I didn’t know it was going on,” she said.

“And then Victoria left home and then I suffered similar abuses . . .

“Then, all of a sudden, I began to see the patterns of her behavior repeating themselves on my daughter,” Nicholson, who now lives in England, told The Post.

The sisters’ charges are “balderdash,” said their mother, author of the 1997 book “A Journey With Elsa Cloud,” about her daughter Barlow, and namesake of a professorship in Tibetan studies at Columbia University endowed by the $1 billion Luce Foundation.

In Leila Hadley Luce’s deposition, she said Nicholson is “cuckoo . . . and lazy and doesn’t want to work” and Barlow is “like her father, who was paranoid schizophrenic.” She also claimed Nicholson is “money mad.”

Through her lawyer, she declined to comment for this story.

Aretakis, who made his name representing hundreds of alleged victims of Catholic priests, said, “They’re both highly intelligent and both telling the truth, and their stories add up.”

In another letter, novelist Tom Hyman, who was Leila Hadley Luce’s colleague at The Saturday Evening Post in the 1970s, wrote Barlow about her mother’s low-key reaction to an attempt to rape her when she was 14. The alleged attacker was supposedly a colleague at the magazine.

“Leila mentioned to me that [he] . . . had been a guest one weekend and tried to get in bed with you,” Hyman wrote. “Instead of being outraged by his behavior and throwing him out, Leila seemed to think it amusing.”

Hyman also wrote that he once stumbled upon Leila Hadley Luce sleeping naked with both of her daughters, then ages 8 and 13, sprawled on her chest.


“Leila also once mentioned in an offhand way having fooled around with [a male relative] in what sounded suspiciously like inappropriate behavior,” Hyman noted.

In an affidavit, David Arnold, the assistant director of Manhattan’s tony Dalton School in the mid-’70s, recounted how a teenage Nicholson showed up at the school alone and asked to be admitted as a junior. Despite a spotty academic record, he enrolled her and became her adviser.

He recalled “a boyfriend of her mother’s who loomed much larger in Caroline’s life than what she had bargained for.”

Arnold also said Nicholson told him about Luce “repeatedly ‘coming on’” to her “at any hour, day or night.”
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Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:36 am

A Luce Woman - Widow Tells of 'Brando in My Bed’
by Mark Bulliet
New York Post
June 19, 2006 | 4:00am

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Socialite Leila Hadley Luce says she has a hidden past of S&M sex, drugs and high-profile bedmates – including Marlon Brando, according to depositions in a sex-abuse lawsuit lodged against her by her daughter and granddaughter.

The 81-year-old author, philanthropist and widow of Time magazine scion Henry Luce III said she spent 20 years hooked on Dexedrine and also used amyl nitrites or “poppers.”

During a love affair with the late cartoonist and “Addams Family” creator Charles Addams, she said they “once went through an entire box [of poppers]. It’s lucky we didn’t die,” according to her deposition.

“I never knew they were bad for you,” she said of the infamous inhalants later linked to the 1980s gay-sex scene.

Leila Hadley Luce also said she was prescribed Dexedrine at age 20 and spent the next two decades hooked on the amphetamine.

“[Dexedrine] was wonderful. I got so much work done,” she said.

The socialite also confides she got Brando into bed during the stage run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

But when she turned prude, he bizarrely swiped all the clocks from her home.

“I didn’t really have an affair with Marlon Brando, he was too kinky for me . . . we were in bed together, but then he wanted to be very kinky and I didn’t want to do anything with him,” she said in her deposition.

“He stole all my clocks, he stole a whole bunch of clocks and then . . . [his agent] set them on my doorstep all ticking at the right time and he said, ‘Oops, sorry, a thief,’ ” she added.

“And when I saw [Brando] later in Hollywood and I asked him about this, he said, ‘Nobody should have so many clocks,’ and I said, ‘Well, my mother gave them to me, you shouldn’t have stolen them all.’”

The socialite married the son of Time magazine’s co-founder in 1990. He died in 2005.

Leila Hadley Luce and Henry Luce III were sued in 2003 by her daughter, Caroline Nicholson, 47, and Nicholson’s 17-year-old daughter – but the Sutton Place staple adamantly denies the charges, calling Nicholson “money mad.”

Nicholson’s sex-abuse claim against her mom and stepdad’s estate was tossed by a judge because it exceeded the state’s statute of limitations, but the judge allowed her granddaughter’s claim to stand.

The 17-year-old is still within the age limit for this type of case, which would have expired when she turned 21.

The suit may go to trial in the fall, said Nicholson’s Manhattan attorney, John Aretakis.

Luce III has not been accused of abusing Nicholson’s daughter.

In a 1971 letter, which was entered into evidence, Leila Hadley Luce tells her other daughter, Victoria Barlow, 52, how she and Luce III had gone through “our SM bit,” and how he likes poppers and joints.

Aretakis said the graphic letters prove her children were actively a part of her sex life.

The Nicholsons’ lawsuit received a big boost in March, when Barlow claimed in a deposition that she was also molested by their mom as a child.


Meanwhile, Matthew Eliott, Nicholson and Barlow’s brother and the only one of Leila Hadley Luce’s four children who is not estranged from their millionaire mom, said his mother was no monster.

“Did she have some lapses in judgement? Yes. Was she this evil, awful monster? No,” said the North Salem, N.Y., veterinarian.
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Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:56 am

Love Becomes Her: Nicole Daedone thought she wanted a bicycle. What she really wanted was love.
by Nicole Daedone
Tricycle Magazine
Winter 2009

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©Michael S. Wertz

I grew up an only child in suburban Los Gatos, California. One of my closest friends, Maria, came from a large, warm, rambunctious Chilean family. I envied the love that seemed to surround her. Maria’s most cherished possession was her bicycle. She rode it everywhere and took very good care of it. She had such a passion for that bike that she learned everything about how it worked and what it needed, and eventually got a job repairing bikes for other people. The love she felt for her bike made it glow—made it seem like the most desirable object on earth.

I wanted that same feeling. In fact, I wanted to feel even more of it than she did. I figured that if I bought a better bike than hers, my bike would glow even more. So I begged my mom to buy me one that was top-of-the line. But somehow the glow eluded me. I rarely rode it, and its presence in my garage began to feel vaguely reproachful, a thorn in my side. I almost came to hate it. In my mind, this was definitely the bike’s fault.

One day, Maria’s beloved bike was stolen. She borrowed mine and rode it everywhere. To my amazement, it began to have the same magical glow I had so envied in her old bike. Naturally, I wanted it back. But once I got it, I still didn’t really feel like riding it, and it soon resumed its accusatory sulk in my garage. It refused to glow for me.

A lot of people approach looking for love as I approached bike shopping. We want a top-of-the-line model. We have a list of desirable qualities and imagine that the glow of desire will arise when we find someone who possesses those qualities. If love is absent from our lives, we may believe it is because we have not yet encountered someone sufficiently lovable. We are expecting our love to be activated by the object of desire.

My bike didn’t satisfy me because a bike was not what I truly wanted. It was a symbol of what I found so enviable in my friend: the way she was so rich in love that even inanimate objects were animated by it. She had a power to connect to her world that I seemed to lack. I imagined I could attain that inner state by imitating its outward form. A burgeoning spiritual materialism was at play: I tried to make a physical possession the source of my love, rather than finding the source in the love itself.

Our knee-jerk reaction to desire is to focus all our efforts on obtaining whatever it is we think we want. While that is happening, we experience the feeling of desire and the object of desire as inseparable. Had you asked me, “What is the true nature of your desire?” I would have responded, “I want a bike.” So long as we are in hot pursuit of the object, it appears as simple as that. Rather than feeling the pure burn of desire, we get caught in what the Buddha called tanha, in craving the object of our desire, believing we must have it to be happy. Tanha translates roughly to “thirst.” We think we are thirsting for an object—for the person or the bike. But what we actually desire is intimacy—the hydration of direct experience saturating our cells.

We believe that love is to be found within another person. But, in truth, love is found in the animating quality of our attention. In Buddhist practice, we discover that mindful attention can reveal a deeper truth in whatever object we are paying attention to. The same is true in romantic love. When we use our attention to touch and open the deeper truth in a person, we not only catalyze the experience of love, we become love. The source of love is revealed to be within us; we no longer have to go looking for it somewhere outside.

What made any bike that Maria possessed seem so desirable was the very love she lavished on it. The glow was not in the bike itself, but in her relationship to it. Like bicycles, people become more desirable when we are attentive to them. Their most lovable qualities reveal themselves to us only after we have begun to love them. Loving is the polish. Loving draws out their Buddha-nature. Anything and anyone we cherish and care for comes alive with the glow of our attention.


Nicole Daedone is the founder of OneTaste, a company that offers training in man-woman intimate relationships. She is the author of Slow Sex: The Art and Craft of the Female Orgasm.

Brand New Key
by Melanie

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I rode my bicycle past your window last night
I roller skated to your door at daylight
It almost seems like you're avoiding me
I'm okay alone but you've got something I need

Well, I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key
I think that we should get together
And try them out to see
I've been looking around awhile
You've got something for me
Oh I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key

I ride my bike I rollerskate don't drive no car
Don't go too fast but I go pretty far
For somebody who don't drive
I've been all around the world
Some people say I've done alright for a girl
Oh, yeah yeah
Oh yeah yeah
Oh yeah yeah yeah yeah

I asked your mother if you were at home
She said yes, but you weren't alone
Oh, sometimes I think that you're avoiding me
I'm okay alone but you've got something I need

Well, I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key
I think that we should get together
And try them out to see
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la
Oh I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key


Look What They've Done to My Song, Ma
by Melanie Safka



Look what they've done to my song, Ma
Look what they've done to my song, Ma
It was the only thing I could do half right,
And it's turning out all wrong, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Look what they've done to my brain, Ma
Look what they've done to my brain
Well they picked it like a chicken bone
And I think that I'm half insane, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Well, I wish that I could find a good book to live in
Wish I could find a good book
Well, if I could find a real good book
I'd never have to come out and look at
What they done to my song

Everybody sing: [French]

Ils ont changé ma chanson, Ma
Ils ont changé ma chanson, Ma
C'est la seule chose que je peux faire
Et çe n'est pas bon, Ma
Ils ont changé ma chanson

Maybe, maybe it'll all be all right, Ma
Maybe it'll all be OK
Well, if the people are buying tears
I'm gonna be a rich girl some day, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Look what they've done to my song, Ma
Look what they've done to my song, Ma
It was the only thing I could do half right,
And it's turning out all wrong, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Well they tied it up in a plastic bag
And they turned it upside down, Oh, Ma Ma
Look at what they've done to my song

Wer hat mein Lied so zerstört, Ma?
Wer hat mein Lied so zerstört, Ma?
Everybody sing in Austrian!
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