The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTaste i

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:36 am

A Luce Woman - Widow Tells of 'Brando in My Bed’
by Mark Bulliet
New York Post
June 19, 2006 | 4:00am

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Socialite Leila Hadley Luce says she has a hidden past of S&M sex, drugs and high-profile bedmates – including Marlon Brando, according to depositions in a sex-abuse lawsuit lodged against her by her daughter and granddaughter.

The 81-year-old author, philanthropist and widow of Time magazine scion Henry Luce III said she spent 20 years hooked on Dexedrine and also used amyl nitrites or “poppers.”

During a love affair with the late cartoonist and “Addams Family” creator Charles Addams, she said they “once went through an entire box [of poppers]. It’s lucky we didn’t die,” according to her deposition.

“I never knew they were bad for you,” she said of the infamous inhalants later linked to the 1980s gay-sex scene.

Leila Hadley Luce also said she was prescribed Dexedrine at age 20 and spent the next two decades hooked on the amphetamine.

“[Dexedrine] was wonderful. I got so much work done,” she said.

The socialite also confides she got Brando into bed during the stage run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

But when she turned prude, he bizarrely swiped all the clocks from her home.

“I didn’t really have an affair with Marlon Brando, he was too kinky for me . . . we were in bed together, but then he wanted to be very kinky and I didn’t want to do anything with him,” she said in her deposition.

“He stole all my clocks, he stole a whole bunch of clocks and then . . . [his agent] set them on my doorstep all ticking at the right time and he said, ‘Oops, sorry, a thief,’ ” she added.

“And when I saw [Brando] later in Hollywood and I asked him about this, he said, ‘Nobody should have so many clocks,’ and I said, ‘Well, my mother gave them to me, you shouldn’t have stolen them all.’”

The socialite married the son of Time magazine’s co-founder in 1990. He died in 2005.

Leila Hadley Luce and Henry Luce III were sued in 2003 by her daughter, Caroline Nicholson, 47, and Nicholson’s 17-year-old daughter – but the Sutton Place staple adamantly denies the charges, calling Nicholson “money mad.”

Nicholson’s sex-abuse claim against her mom and stepdad’s estate was tossed by a judge because it exceeded the state’s statute of limitations, but the judge allowed her granddaughter’s claim to stand.

The 17-year-old is still within the age limit for this type of case, which would have expired when she turned 21.

The suit may go to trial in the fall, said Nicholson’s Manhattan attorney, John Aretakis.

Luce III has not been accused of abusing Nicholson’s daughter.

In a 1971 letter, which was entered into evidence, Leila Hadley Luce tells her other daughter, Victoria Barlow, 52, how she and Luce III had gone through “our SM bit,” and how he likes poppers and joints.

Aretakis said the graphic letters prove her children were actively a part of her sex life.

The Nicholsons’ lawsuit received a big boost in March, when Barlow claimed in a deposition that she was also molested by their mom as a child.


Meanwhile, Matthew Eliott, Nicholson and Barlow’s brother and the only one of Leila Hadley Luce’s four children who is not estranged from their millionaire mom, said his mother was no monster.

“Did she have some lapses in judgement? Yes. Was she this evil, awful monster? No,” said the North Salem, N.Y., veterinarian.
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Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed Jun 20, 2018 5:56 am

Love Becomes Her: Nicole Daedone thought she wanted a bicycle. What she really wanted was love.
by Nicole Daedone
Tricycle Magazine
Winter 2009

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©Michael S. Wertz

I grew up an only child in suburban Los Gatos, California. One of my closest friends, Maria, came from a large, warm, rambunctious Chilean family. I envied the love that seemed to surround her. Maria’s most cherished possession was her bicycle. She rode it everywhere and took very good care of it. She had such a passion for that bike that she learned everything about how it worked and what it needed, and eventually got a job repairing bikes for other people. The love she felt for her bike made it glow—made it seem like the most desirable object on earth.

I wanted that same feeling. In fact, I wanted to feel even more of it than she did. I figured that if I bought a better bike than hers, my bike would glow even more. So I begged my mom to buy me one that was top-of-the line. But somehow the glow eluded me. I rarely rode it, and its presence in my garage began to feel vaguely reproachful, a thorn in my side. I almost came to hate it. In my mind, this was definitely the bike’s fault.

One day, Maria’s beloved bike was stolen. She borrowed mine and rode it everywhere. To my amazement, it began to have the same magical glow I had so envied in her old bike. Naturally, I wanted it back. But once I got it, I still didn’t really feel like riding it, and it soon resumed its accusatory sulk in my garage. It refused to glow for me.

A lot of people approach looking for love as I approached bike shopping. We want a top-of-the-line model. We have a list of desirable qualities and imagine that the glow of desire will arise when we find someone who possesses those qualities. If love is absent from our lives, we may believe it is because we have not yet encountered someone sufficiently lovable. We are expecting our love to be activated by the object of desire.

My bike didn’t satisfy me because a bike was not what I truly wanted. It was a symbol of what I found so enviable in my friend: the way she was so rich in love that even inanimate objects were animated by it. She had a power to connect to her world that I seemed to lack. I imagined I could attain that inner state by imitating its outward form. A burgeoning spiritual materialism was at play: I tried to make a physical possession the source of my love, rather than finding the source in the love itself.

Our knee-jerk reaction to desire is to focus all our efforts on obtaining whatever it is we think we want. While that is happening, we experience the feeling of desire and the object of desire as inseparable. Had you asked me, “What is the true nature of your desire?” I would have responded, “I want a bike.” So long as we are in hot pursuit of the object, it appears as simple as that. Rather than feeling the pure burn of desire, we get caught in what the Buddha called tanha, in craving the object of our desire, believing we must have it to be happy. Tanha translates roughly to “thirst.” We think we are thirsting for an object—for the person or the bike. But what we actually desire is intimacy—the hydration of direct experience saturating our cells.

We believe that love is to be found within another person. But, in truth, love is found in the animating quality of our attention. In Buddhist practice, we discover that mindful attention can reveal a deeper truth in whatever object we are paying attention to. The same is true in romantic love. When we use our attention to touch and open the deeper truth in a person, we not only catalyze the experience of love, we become love. The source of love is revealed to be within us; we no longer have to go looking for it somewhere outside.

What made any bike that Maria possessed seem so desirable was the very love she lavished on it. The glow was not in the bike itself, but in her relationship to it. Like bicycles, people become more desirable when we are attentive to them. Their most lovable qualities reveal themselves to us only after we have begun to love them. Loving is the polish. Loving draws out their Buddha-nature. Anything and anyone we cherish and care for comes alive with the glow of our attention.


Nicole Daedone is the founder of OneTaste, a company that offers training in man-woman intimate relationships. She is the author of Slow Sex: The Art and Craft of the Female Orgasm.

Brand New Key
by Melanie

Image



I rode my bicycle past your window last night
I roller skated to your door at daylight
It almost seems like you're avoiding me
I'm okay alone but you've got something I need

Well, I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key
I think that we should get together
And try them out to see
I've been looking around awhile
You've got something for me
Oh I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key

I ride my bike I rollerskate don't drive no car
Don't go too fast but I go pretty far
For somebody who don't drive
I've been all around the world
Some people say I've done alright for a girl
Oh, yeah yeah
Oh yeah yeah
Oh yeah yeah yeah yeah

I asked your mother if you were at home
She said yes, but you weren't alone
Oh, sometimes I think that you're avoiding me
I'm okay alone but you've got something I need

Well, I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key
I think that we should get together
And try them out to see
La la la la la la la la
La la la la la
Oh I've got a brand new pair of roller skates
You've got a brand new key


Look What They've Done to My Song, Ma
by Melanie Safka



Look what they've done to my song, Ma
Look what they've done to my song, Ma
It was the only thing I could do half right,
And it's turning out all wrong, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Look what they've done to my brain, Ma
Look what they've done to my brain
Well they picked it like a chicken bone
And I think that I'm half insane, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Well, I wish that I could find a good book to live in
Wish I could find a good book
Well, if I could find a real good book
I'd never have to come out and look at
What they done to my song

Everybody sing: [French]

Ils ont changé ma chanson, Ma
Ils ont changé ma chanson, Ma
C'est la seule chose que je peux faire
Et çe n'est pas bon, Ma
Ils ont changé ma chanson

Maybe, maybe it'll all be all right, Ma
Maybe it'll all be OK
Well, if the people are buying tears
I'm gonna be a rich girl some day, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

Look what they've done to my song, Ma
Look what they've done to my song, Ma
It was the only thing I could do half right,
And it's turning out all wrong, Ma
Look what they've done to my song

La la la la la la la la
La la la la la la la la
Well they tied it up in a plastic bag
And they turned it upside down, Oh, Ma Ma
Look at what they've done to my song

Wer hat mein Lied so zerstört, Ma?
Wer hat mein Lied so zerstört, Ma?
Everybody sing in Austrian!
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Re: The Dark Side of the Orgasmic Meditation Company: OneTas

Postby admin » Wed May 06, 2020 4:01 am

Henry Luce
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 5/5/20

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Image
Henry Luce
Born: Henry Robinson Luce, April 3, 1898, Tengchow, Qing Dynasty
Died: February 28, 1967 (aged 68), Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.
Alma mater: Yale University
Occupation: Publisher; Journalist
Political party: Republican
Spouse(s): Lila Ross Hotz (m. 1923; div. 1935); Clare Boothe Luce (m. 1935)
Children: 3
Parent(s): Henry W. Luce; Elizabeth Middleton Root

Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 – February 28, 1967) was an American magazine magnate who was called "the most influential private citizen in the America of his day".[1] He launched and closely supervised a stable of magazines that transformed journalism and the reading habits of millions of Americans. Time summarized and interpreted the week's news; Life was a picture magazine of politics, culture, and society that dominated American visual perceptions in the era before television; Fortune reported on national and international business; and Sports Illustrated explored the world of sports. Counting his radio projects and newsreels, Luce created the first multimedia corporation. He envisaged that the United States would achieve world hegemony, and, in 1941, he declared the 20th century would be the "American Century".[2][3]

Early life

Luce was born in Tengchow (now Penglai), Shandong, China, on April 3, 1898, the son of Elizabeth Root Luce and Henry Winters Luce, who was a Presbyterian missionary.[3] He received his education in various Chinese and English boarding schools, including the China Inland Mission Chefoo School.

Career

At 15, he was sent to the US to attend the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut, where he edited the Hotchkiss Literary Monthly. There, he first met Briton Hadden,[3] who would become a lifelong partner. At the time, Hadden served as editor-in-chief of the school newspaper, and Luce worked as an assistant managing editor. Both went on to Yale College, where Hadden served as chairman and Luce as managing editor of The Yale Daily News. Luce was also a member of Alpha Delta Phi and Skull and Bones. After being voted "most brilliant" of his class and graduating in 1920, he parted ways with Hadden to embark for a year on historical studies at Oxford University, followed by a stint as a cub reporter for the Chicago Daily News.

In December 1921, Luce rejoined Hadden to work at The Baltimore News. Recalling his relationship with Hadden, Luce later said, "Somehow, despite the greatest differences in temperaments and even in interests, we had to work together. We were an organization. At the center of our lives — our job, our function — at that point everything we had belonged to each other."
Magazines

Nightly discussions of the concept of a news magazine led Luce and Hadden, both age 23, to quit their jobs in 1922. Later that same year, they partnered with Robert Livingston Johnson and another Yale classmate to form Time Inc.[4] Having raised $86,000 of a $100,000 goal, they published the first issue of Time on March 3, 1923. Luce served as business manager while Hadden was editor-in-chief. Luce and Hadden annually alternated year-to-year the titles of president and secretary-treasurer while Johnson served as vice president and advertising director. In 1925, Luce decided to move headquarters to Cleveland, while Hadden was on a trip to Europe. Cleveland was cheaper, and Luce’s first wife, Lila, wanted to leave New York. When Hadden returned, he was horrified and moved Time back to New York. Upon Hadden's sudden death in 1929, Luce assumed Hadden's position.

Luce launched the business magazine, Fortune, in February 1930 and acquired Life in order to relaunch it as a weekly magazine of photojournalism in November 1936; he went on to launch House & Home in 1952 and Sports Illustrated in 1954. He also produced The March of Time weekly newsreel. By the mid-1960s, Time Inc. was the largest and most prestigious magazine publisher in the world. (Dwight Macdonald, a Fortune staffer during the 1930s, referred to him as "Il Luce", a play on the Italian Dictator Mussolini, who was called "Il Duce".)

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, aware that most publishers were opposed to him, issued a decree in 1943 that blocked all publishers and media executives from visits to combat areas; he put General George Marshall in charge of enforcement. The main target was Luce, who had long opposed Roosevelt. Historian Alan Brinkley argued the move was "badly mistaken" and said had Luce been allowed to travel, he would have been an enthusiastic cheerleader for American forces around the globe. However, stranded in New York City, Luce's frustration and anger expressed themselves in blatant partisanship.[5]

Luce, supported by Editor-in-Chief T. S. Matthews, appointed Whittaker Chambers as acting Foreign News editor in 1944, despite the feuds that Chambers had with reporters in the field.[6]

Luce, who remained editor-in-chief of all his publications until 1964, maintained a position as an influential member of the Republican Party.[7] An instrumental figure behind the so-called "China Lobby", he played a large role in steering American foreign policy and popular sentiment in favor of Kuomintang leader Chiang Kai-shek and his wife, Soong Mei-ling, in their war against the Japanese. (The Chiangs appeared in the cover of Time eleven times between 1927 and 1955.[8])

It has been reported that Luce, during the 1960s, tried LSD and reported that he had talked to God under its influence.[9]

Once ambitious to become Secretary of State in a Republican administration, Luce penned a famous article in Life magazine in 1941, called "The American Century", which defined the role of American foreign policy for the remainder of the 20th century (and perhaps beyond).[7]

An ardent anti-Soviet, he once demanded John Kennedy invade Cuba, later to remark to his editors that if he did not, his corporation would act like Hearst during the Spanish–American War. The publisher would advance his concepts of US dominance of the "American Century" through his periodicals with the ideals shared and guided by members of his social circle, John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State and his brother, director of the CIA, Allen Dulles.

Family

Image
Luce Memorial Chapel, Tunghai University, Taiwan.

Luce met his first wife, Lila Hotz, while he was studying at Yale in 1919.[10] They married in 1923 and had two children, Peter Paul and Henry Luce III, before divorcing in 1935.[10] In 1935 he married his second wife, Clare Boothe Luce, who had an 11-year-old daughter, Ann Clare Brokaw, whom he raised as his own. He died in Phoenix, Arizona in 1967. At his death, he was said to be worth $100 million in Time Inc. stock.[11] Most of his fortune went to the Henry Luce Foundation, where his son Henry III served as chairman and chief executive for many years.[10] During his life, Luce supported many philanthropies such as Save the Children Federation, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and United Service to China, Inc. He is interred at Mepkin Plantation in South Carolina.

He was honored by the United States Postal Service with a 32¢ Great Americans series (1980–2000) postage stamp.[12] Luce was inducted into the Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame[13] in 1977.[citation needed]

Designed by I. M. Pei, the Luce Memorial Chapel, on the campus of Tunghai University, Taiwan, was constructed in memoriam of Henry Luce's father.

Henry R. Luce Hall at Yale University, home to the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, was erected by the Henry R. Luce foundation in his honor.

References

1. Robert Edwin Herzstein (2005). Henry R. Luce, Time, and the American Crusade in Asia. Cambridge U.P. p. 1.
2. Editorial (1941-02-17) The American Century, Life Magazine
3. Baughman, James L. (April 28, 2004). "Henry R. Luce and the Rise of the American News Media". American Masters (PBS). Retrieved 19 June 2014.
4. Warburton, Albert (Winter 1962). "Robert L. Johnson Hall Dedicated at Temple University" (PDF). The Emerald of Sigma Pi. Vol. 48 no. 4. p. 111.
5. Alan Brinkley, The Publisher: Henry Luce and his American Century (2010) pp. 302–03
6. Brinkley, The Publisher: Henry Luce and his American Century(2010) pp. 322–93
7. "Henry R. Luce: End of a Pilgrimage". Time. March 10, 1967
8. "Time magazine historical search". Time magazine. Archived from the original on 30 June 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
9. Maisto, Stephen A., Galizio, Mark, & Connors, Gerald J. (2008). Drug Use and Abuse: Fifth Edition. Belmont: Thomson Higher Education. ISBN 0-495-09207-X
10. Ravo, Nick (April 3, 1999). "Lila Luce Tyng, 100, First Wife of Henry R. Luce". The New York Times. Retrieved January 16,2018.
11. Edwin Diamond (October 23, 1972). "Why the Power Vacuum at Time Inc. Continues". New York Magazine.
12. "Henry R. Luce". US Stamp Gallery. April 3, 1998.
13. "Appendix O- National Business Hall of Fame Laureates"(PDF). Junior Achievement Inc. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
John Foster Dulles and Clare Boothe Luce link (1947)- https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/data ... 1/0022.pdf

Further reading

• Baughman, James L. "Henry R. Luce and the Business of Journalism." Business & Economic History On-Line 9 (2011). online
• Baughman, James L. Henry R. Luce and the Rise of the American News Media (2001) excerpt and text search
• Brinkley, Alan. The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century, Alfred A. Knopf (2010) 531 pp.
o "A Magazine Master Builder" Book review by Janet Maslin, The New York Times, April 19, 2010
• Brinkley, Alan. What Would Henry Luce Make of the Digital Age?, Time (April 19, 2010) excerpt and text search
• Elson, Robert T. Time Inc: The Intimate History of a Publishing Enterprise, 1923–1941 (1968); vol. 2: The World of Time Inc.: The Intimate History, 1941–1960 (1973), official corporate history
• Garside, B. A. Within the Four Seas, Frederic C. Beil, New York, 1985.
• Herzstein, Robert E. Henry R. Luce, Time, and the American Crusade in Asia (2006) excerpt and text search
• Herzstein, Robert E. Henry R. Luce: A Political Portrait of the Man Who Created the American Century (1994).
• Morris, Sylvia Jukes. Rage for Fame: The Ascent of Clare Boothe Luce (1997).
• Swanberg, W. A., Luce and His Empire, Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1972.
• Wilner, Isaiah. The Man Time Forgot: A Tale of Genius, Betrayal, and the Creation of Time Magazine, HarperCollins, New York, 2006

External links

• TIME biography
• The Henry Luce Foundation
• Luce Center for American Art at the Brooklyn Museum – Visible Storage and Study Center
• Whitman, Alden. "Henry R. Luce, Creator of Time–Life Magazine Empire, Dies in Phoenix at 68", The New York Times, March 1, 1967.
• PBS American Masters
• Henry Luce at Find a Grave
• Henry R. Luce Papers at the New-York Historical Society
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