Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexually as

The impulse to believe the absurd when presented with the unknowable is called religion. Whether this is wise or unwise is the domain of doctrine. Once you understand someone's doctrine, you understand their rationale for believing the absurd. At that point, it may no longer seem absurd. You can get to both sides of this conondrum from here.

Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Sun Jun 30, 2019 11:41 pm

Kings of Shambhala
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 6/30/19

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Central figure is a yidam, a meditation deity. The 25 seated figures represent the 25 kings of Shambhala. The middle figure in the top row represents Tsongkhapa

In part of the Indo-Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhist tradition, thirty-two Kings of Shambhala reside in a mythical kingdom.

Legend

The first notable king, King Suchandra (sometimes wrongly Sanskritized as "Chandrabhadra," Tib. Dawa Sangpo), is reported to have requested teaching from the Buddha. In response to this request, it is said the Buddha gave him the first Kalachakra root tantra. By practicing the Kalachakra, the whole of Shambhala eventually became an enlightened society.

King Suchandra was followed by an additional six Dharmarajas (Truth Kings), with his eighth successor, Manjushri Yashas (sometimes wrongly Sanskritized as "Manjushrikirti"), the first of the 25 Kalki Kings (Tib. Rigden, wylie: rigs ldan).

The Seven Dharmarājas

The Seven Dharmarājas (Tib. Chögyal, Wylie chos rgyal) are:

1. Sucandra (Tib. Dawa Sangpo, Wylie zla ba bzang po) c. 900 to 876 BC. Note: the Kalachakra calculations put the life of Śākyamuni Buddha quite a bit earlier than what is generally accepted, and the Tibetans produced a number of divergent calculations of the dates listed here. Many of the named kings are often wrongly Sanskritized (i.e., back-translated from the Tibetan) in Western publications.
2. Devendra (Tib. Lhayi Wang) (876-776 BC) - Fond of Sentient Beings
3. Tejasvin (Tib. Ziji Chän) (776-676 BC) Bearer of the Dharma Wheel and the Auspicious Conch
4. Somadatta (Tib. Dawä Jin) (676-576) Lord of Speakers
5. Deveśvara/Sureśvara (Tib. Lhaji Wangchug) (576-476) Destroyer of the City of Delusion
6. Viśvamūrti (Tib. Natshog Zug) (476-376) Conqueror of False Leaders, Holding a Lotus
7. Sureśana (Tib. Lhayi Wangdän) (376-276) Cutter of Delusion, Uprooter of Karma and Klesha

The Twenty-Five Kalki

The most recent 25 of the 32 Kings of Shambhala are known as Kalki kings (Tib. Rigden, wylie: rigs ldan), meaning "Holder of the Castes." The Kalki King is said to reside upon a "Lion Throne" in Kalapa, the capital city of the Kingdom. The Kalki are holders of the Kalachakra (Wheel of Time), which are the teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni passed down from the original seven Dharmarajas of Shambhala.

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Rigden Trakpa or Manjushrí Yashas, King of Shambhala

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Jamyang Drag (´jam dbyangs grags)

As explained by Buddhist scholar John R. Newman, the Kalki are often erroneously termed "Kulika" by Tibetan Buddhist scholars unfamiliar with the original Sanskrit texts:

".. . so far no one seems to have examined the Sanskrit Kalachakra texts. The Buddhist myth of the Kalkis of Shambhala derives from the Hindu Kalki of Shambhala myths contained in the Mahabharata and the Puranas. The Vimalaprabha even refers to the Kalki Purana, probably the latest of the upapuranas. This relationship has been obscured by western scholars who have reconstructed the Tibetan translation term rigs ldan as "Kulika." Although Tibetan rigs ldan is used to translate the Sanskrit kulika in other contexts, here it always represents Sanskrit kalkin (possessive of kalkah; I have used the nominative kalki)."[1]


Kalki

1. Yashas (Tib. Jampal Dakpa; "Manjushri Yashas") King Yashas is said to have lived in the second century BCE. He formatted the Kalachakra teachings into a condensed and simplified structure termed the "Sri Kalachakra" or "Laghutantra." He also converted a group of non-Buddhist Brahman priests of Shambhala to Buddhism and gave them the Kalachakra initiation, thereby uniting all inhabitants into one "vajra caste," or family of tantric practitioners. Yashas is said to have predicted the coming of "Barbarian Dharma" after 800 years (about 600 CE), which indicates a form of Islam.
2. Pundarika (Tib. Pema Karpo) (176-76 BCE) White Lotus, cherished by the Lord of Potala. King Pundarika wrote a commentary called "Vimalaprabha" (Skt.) or "Stainless Light." This text, together with the Sri Kalachakra, is the source text of the Kalachakra system as it is now practiced. Other practice texts are commentaries on these two. The Dalai Lamas are said to be incarnations of Pundarika.
3. Bhadra (Tib. Zangpo) (76 BC -227 CE) One who Rules by the Thousand-spoked Wheel.
4. Vijaya (Tib. Nampar Gyäl) (227-327) Attractor of Wealth, Victorious in War.
5. Sumitra (Tib. Shenyen Zangpo) (327-427) Integrator of Method and Wisdom, Victorious over Samsara.
6. Raktapani (Tib. Rinchen Chag) (427-527) Holder of the Blissful Vajra and Bell.
7. Vishnugupta (Tib. Kyabjug Bäpa) (527-627) Smiling Holder of the Trident and Rosary.
8. Suryakirti (Tib. Nyima Drag) (627-727) Annihilator of Wild Demons.
9. Subhadra (Tib. Shintu Zangpo) (727-827) Holder of the Sword and Shield.
10. Samudra Vijaya (Tib. Gyatso Namgyäl) (827-927) Annihilator of all types of Devils.
11. Aja (Tib. Gyälka) (927-1027) Who binds with Unbreakable Iron Chains.
12. Surya/Suryapada, (Tib. (Wonang) Nyima) (1027-1127) All-Pervading, Radiant Jewel Light.
13. Vishvarupa (Tib. Natshog Zug(chän)) (1127-1227) Holder of the Vajra Prod and Noose.
14. Shashiprabha (Also Sasiprabha or Chandraprabha, Tib. Dawäi Ö) (1227-1327) Lord of Secret Mantras, Holder of the Wheel and Conch.
15. Ananta, Thayä (Tib. Nyen) (1327-1427) Holder of the Mallet that Crushes False Ideas.
16. Shripaala or Parthiva (Tib. Sakyong) (1427-1527) Holder of the Cleaver that Cuts the Bonds of Ignorance.
17. Shripala (Tib. Pälkyong) (1527-1627) Annihilator of the Host of Demons.
18. Singha (Tib. Senge) (1627 -1727) Who Stuns the Elephant with his Vajra.
19. Vikranta (Tib. Nampar Nön) (1727 - 1827) Subduer of the Mass of Foes, the Inner and Outer Classes of Devils.
20. Mahabala (Tib. Tobpo Che) (1827 - 1927) Tamer of all False Leaders by Means of the Sound of Mantra.
21. Aniruddha (Tib. Magakpa) (1927-2027) Who Draws and Binds the Entire Three Worlds. Aniruddha, the present Kalki king, was prophesied to rule during a time when Vajrayana Buddhism and the Kalachakra are nearly extinguished.
22. Narasingha (Tib. Miyi Senge) (2027-2127) Ruling by the Wheel, Holding the Conch.
23. Maheshvara (Tib. Wangchug Che) (2127-2227) Victorious over the Armies of Demons.
24. Anantavijaya (Tib. Thaye Namgyäl) (2227-2327) Holder of the vajra and Bell.
25. Raudra Chakrin (Tib. Dakpo Khorlocen) (2327 to ? ) Forceful Wheel Holder. The final king prophesied in the Kalachakra, Raudra Chakrin is further prophesied to appear to all humanity in 2424, and to establish a planet-wide Golden Age subsequent to his defeat of degenerate world rulers.

Dalai Lama

The Dalai Lamas are said to be incarnations of the second Kalki, Pundarika. In particular, the Second, Seventh and Fourteenth (present) Dalai Lamas are said to have strong affinity to the Kalki kings, with the present Dalai Lama having to date offered the Kalachakra initiation thirty times.

The Lineage of Sakyong Kings

Followers of the contemporary Tibetan Buddhist teachers Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche and his son Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche believe them to be intimately connected to the Kalki kings, and thus dedicated to propagating the wisdom of Shambhala to the world. The term "Sakyong" in Tibetan literally means "earth-protector," although it is colloquially understood to mean "King." The Sakyong King lineage is traditionally familial.[citation needed]

See also

• Dalai Lamas
• Kalachakra
• Kalki
• Kalki Purana
• Panchen Lamas
• Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche
• Shambhala
• Suchandra

Notes

1. Newman, John L. "A Brief History of the Kalachakra," Wheel of Time: The Kalachakra in Context. Snow Lion: 1985. ISBN 1559390018, pg 84

External links

• International Kalachakra Network
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:02 am

Shambhala Dzokchen
by Kalapa Publications
Accessed: 6/30/19

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

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Our Price: $22.00 USD/CAD

Description

"In the practice of dzokchen we are pointing to wisdom so unique that it can lead us back to our original mind, our original strength. In the Shambhala teachings, that manifests as the principle of Ashe. To lead us into seeing who we really are is the Dorje Dradül's very powerful inspiration. This is our path."

—The Sakyong


Available to Shambhala Vajrayana students.

This book is compiled from talks given by the Sakyong during eight retreats for vajrayana students from 2006 to 2008, known as Garchens, "Great Gatherings." Its main theme throughout is the deep connection between mahamudra and dzokchen—the highest vajrayana teachings—and the Shambhala terma received by the Dorje Dradül.

In presenting dzokchen, Rinpoche draws on two texts from Mipham Jamyang Gyatso: The Torch That Dispells Darkness, and a text on the four yogas of Mahamudra. Also offered are practice instructions and guided meditations, including a mahamudra instruction composed by the Vidyadhara in Tibet, taken from the teachings gathered by his nephew, Karma Senge Rinpoche.

To facilitate study, contemplation, and discussion, the book is structured in short chapters. The first three parts introduce the Shambhala dzokchen teachings, how to approach them, and the central role of transmission. The next four parts elaborate on the practices—mainly trekchö, mahamudra, and Ashe.

Lion's Roar
Softcover, 6" x 9"
194 pp.
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:09 am

Great Eastern Sun: The Wisdom of Shambhala
by Chogyam Trungpa
Edited by Carolyn Rose Gimian
$29.95 - Paperback

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


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SHAMBHALA DRAGON EDITIONS
07/17/2001
PAGES: 296
SIZE: 6 X 9
ISBN: 9781570628184

Details

In Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior Chögyam Trungpa offers an inspiring and practical guide to enlightened living based on the Shambhala journey of warriorship, a secular path taught internationally through the Shambhala Training program.

Great Eastern Sun: The Wisdom of Shambhala is a continuation of that path. Shambhala was an exploration of human goodness and its potential to create an enlightened society—a state that the author calls "nowness." And in that spirit of nowness, Great Eastern Sun—which is accessible to meditators and nonmeditators alike—centers on the question, "Since we're here, how are we going to live from now on?"

News & Reviews

"As a loving and grateful student of Chögyam Trungpa, the Dorje Dradul of Mukpo, I am delighted that these wonderful teachings—which have so profoundly influenced and shaped my life—are now available to benefit others. May countless people have the good fortune to read this book."

—Pema Chödrön, author of When Things Fall Apart


"With brilliance and good will, Chögyam Trungpa illuminates the dharma of wise society. He invites all of good heart to find a dignity in their human experience that joins together heaven and earth."

—Jack Kornfield, author of After the Ecstasy, the Laundry


THAT'S THE BODHISATTVA PART OF IT:
YOU HAVE GONE & YOU HAVE GOTTEN THE LIBERATION
&
THEN
YOU
ARE
RIGHT
HERE
CHOPPING WOOD
& CARRYING WATER

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MAKING IT SACRED

-- Be Here Now, by Ram Dass


The Sun is the ancient symbol of the life-giving and generative power of the Deity. To the ancients, light was the cause of life; and God was the source from which all light flowed; the essence of Light, the Invisible Fire, developed as flame manifested as light and splendor. The Sun was His manifestation and visible image; and the Sabæans' worshipping the Light -- God -- seemed to worship the Sun, in whom they saw the manifestation of the Deity.

The Moon was the symbol of the passive capacity of nature to produce, the female, of which the life-giving power and energy was the male. It was the symbol of Isis, Astarte, and Artemis, or Diana. The "Master of Life" was the Supreme Deity, above both, and manifested through both; Zeus, the Son of Saturn, become King of the Gods; Horus, son of Osiris and Isis, become the Master of Life; Dionusos or Bacchus, like Mithras, become the author of Light and Life and Truth.

The Master of Light and Life, the Sun and the Moon, are symbolized in every Lodge by the Master and Wardens: and this makes it the duty of the Master to dispense light to the Brethren, by himself, and through the Wardens, who are his ministers.

-- Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, by Albert Pike

***

Hail! Hail! Unto thee Jove supernal!
Light of the Sun! Of the Sun of the Suns!
Giver of the corn, the wine, and the oil!
Bread of the heart, ecstasy of soul, light that rays the face.
Bountiful Jove! Former of form!
Hail unto Thee! Hail unto Thee!
Essence of ecstasy! Return I unto Thee in rhapsody!
Hail unto Thee, Hail! Hail!

-- The Fire Regained, by Sidney M. Hirsch

***

The Sun's resplendent deity I sing,
The beauteous offspring of almighty Jove,
Who, thro' the vivifying solar fount
Within his fabricative mind conceal'd,
A triad form'd of splendid solar gods;
From whence the world's all-various forms emerg'd
From mystic darkness into beauteous light,
Perfect, and full of intellectual goods.
Hail! Supermundane king of light divine, ...
O best of gods, blest dæmon crown'd with fire,
My soul's sure refuge in the hour of woe, ...
And oft with thee in blissful union join'd
Thro' energy ineffable, may soar
Beyond the highest super-mundane forms

-- Two Orations of the Emperor Julian, One to the Sovereign Sun and the Other to the Mother of the Gods, by Flavius Claudius Julianus

***

We people are the children of the sun, the bright source of life; we are born of the sun and will vanquish the murky fear of death.

-- Children of the Sun, by Maxim Gorky

***

The mystic, as he sees the light of the morning dawn, looks upon it as the daily coming into his soul of the primordial Creative Fiat, "Let there be Light," and as the Light of day progresses and gradually wanes in the western sky, he sees in the glorious tapestry of the sunset a something beyond description by human tongue, a something that can be felt by the soul. If we let those five verses live within us, in the way they do in the mystic, we too, shall know the light, know the truth, as we know nothing else in the world.

-- The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception, by Max Heindel

***

The life of the solitary would be cold were it not for the immense sun, which makes the air and rocks glow. The sun and its eternal splendor replace for the solitary his own life warmth. His heart longs for the sun. He wanders to the lands of the sun. He dreams of the flickering splendor of the sun, of the hot red stones spread out at midday, of the golden hot rays of dry sand. The solitary seeks the sun and no one else is so ready to open his heart as he is. Therefore he loves the desert above all, since he loves its deep stillness. He needs little food since the sun and its glow nourish him. Consequently the solitary loves the desert above all since it is a mother to him, giving him food and invigorating warmth at regular hours. In the desert the solitary is relieved of care and therefore turns his whole life to the sprouting garden of his soul, which can flourish only under a hot sun. In his garden the delicious red fruit grows that bears swelling sweetness under a tight skin. You think that the solitary is poor. You do not see that he strolls under laden fruit trees and that his hand touches grain a hundredfold. Under dark leaves the overfull reddish blossoms swell toward him from abundant buds, and the fruit almost bursts with thronging juices. Fragrant resins drip from his trees and under his feet thrusting seed breaks open. If the sun sinks onto the plane of the sea like an exhausted bird, the solitary envelops himself and holds his breath. He does not move and is pure expectancy until the miracle of the renewal of light rises in the East....

He gives you a small insignificant fruit, which has just fallen at his feet. It appears worthless to you, but if you consider it, you will see that this fruit tastes like a sun which you could not have dreamt of. It gives off a perfume which confuses your senses and makes you dream of rose gardens and sweet wine and whispering palm trees. And you hold this one fruit in your hands dreaming, and you would like the tree in which it grows, the garden in which this tree stands, and the sun which brought forth this garden. And you yourself want to be that solitary who strolls with the sun in his garden, his gaze resting on pendant flowers and his hand brushing a hundredfold of grain and his breath drinking the perfume from a thousand roses. Dull from the sun and drunk from fermenting wines, you lie down in ancient graves, whose walls resound with many voices and many colors of a thousand solar years....

You sleep down through the thousand solar years, and you wake up through the thousand solar years, and your dreams full of ancient lore adorn the walls of your bedchamber.

-- The Red Book: Liber Novus, by C.G. Jung
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:24 am

Bravery: The Vision of the Great Eastern Sun
by Sakyong Mipham
Shambhala Times
July 13, 2011 – 8:08 am

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Bravery is a highlight of the Shambhala teachings, which were introduced to the West by my father, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. In an an earlier teaching I describe the first form of bravery, freedom from deception. I’ve also introduced the second bravery, abruptness — the willingness to leap beyond our habitual patterns.

Now I will focus on the third category of bravery, which is vision. To live life with bravery, we need a game plan, which cannot be based in shallow inspiration or lukewarm conviction. It must have genuineness that stems from deep internal wisdom that is constantly radiating forth.

The Shambhala teachings call such vision the Great Eastern Sun. It is the mental conviction and prowess to engage in life with precision and purpose. When we remove deception and cultivate the willingness to leap into our own inherent brilliance, the forthright, clear intention of the Great Eastern Sun shines through.
This form of bravery keeps us always moving forward.

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According to Jan van Helsing (Geheimgesellschaften und ihre Macht ... [“Secret Societies and their Power”], 1993), Tibetan monks worked together with Templar Knights who were organized in the highest lodge of the “black sun” on the establishment of the Third Reich. The secret order had (and still has) an important base underground in the Himalayas. The ruler of the underground kingdom is said to be “Rigden Iyepo”, the king of the world, with his representative on the surface, the Dalai Lama. In Die schwarze Sonne von Tashi Lhunpo [The Black Sun of Tashi Lhunpo] (1996), [Russell] McCloud reports on the survival of the national socialist Thule group in Tibet. They are the followers of a “sun oracle” there. For Wilhelm Landig (Götzen gegen Thule ... [Idols against Thule], n.d.), Tibet is also “the realm of the black sun!"

-- The Shadow of the Dalai Lama, by Victor & Victoria Trimondi


The word forward is conventionally understood to mean “onward, so as to make progress toward a successful conclusion.” In Shambhala, our conclusion is to practice living life with enlightened attitude and conduct in every activity. Forward can also mean “toward the future.” Thus it is linked with the word continuous, meaning that when we have this kind of vision, the continuity of our intention is not severed.

Forward can also mean, “at or to a different time, earlier or later.” An interesting twist in Shambhala logic is that in order to have the Great Eastern Sun shining in our life—and thus to be always journeying forward—we must first turn back to our origin: the primeval ground of basic goodness, the unconditional purity and confidence of all. That reverse journey happens through the relaxation we cultivate in meditation. As we continue to practice, awareness of our nature arises. Intellectually and intuitively, we know we are not wrong or bad; rather, we are good. Such awareness gives rise to doubtless precision about our basic goodness, which simultaneously illuminates the basic goodness of the world, allowing us to perceive the multitude of individual experiences within our sense fields, bringing incredible precision to our warrior’s mind.

Great is the discovery of our basic goodness. Eastern is realizing that our goodness was always there. Sun is the illumination that occurs once that discovery has been made.

The illumination of the Great Eastern Sun inherently shows us what is directly in front, and thus forward. It might feel threatening because it does not allow the wiggle-room to put on the brakes. On any journey there is the assumption that we should be allowed to avoid danger along the way — at the minimum, to be a little careful. But if we think there is a reverse gear in Shambhala vision, we are misunderstanding a basic reality: life is perpetual motion. We cannot suddenly apply the slow-motion feature, or push the “Save” button and deal with it later.

Click here to continue reading July’s monthly dharma teaching on Sakyong.com.
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:36 am

Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun
by Nalanda Translation
Accessed: 6/30/19

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$65.00
69 pp., cloth cover

[Restricted to Scorpion Seal Assembly participants]


Scorpion Seal Authorization

This text is restricted to practition​ers who have attended a Scorpion Seal Assembly or have been a Shambhala Lodge member prior to 1990. Please state the date and location where you attended SSA1 or received Lodge transmission.
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:41 am

Shambhala
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 6/30/19

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Kalachakra thangka[1] from Sera Monastery

For the Buddhist practice community, see Shambhala Buddhism.

In Hinduism and Tibetan Buddhist tradition, (Sanskrit: शम्भलः Śambhalaḥ, also spelled Shambala or Shamballa; Tibetan: བདེ་འབྱུང, Wylie: Bde'byung; Chinese: 香巴拉; pinyin: Xiāngbālā) is a mythical kingdom. The kingdom is said to be laid out in precisely the same form as an eight-petalled lotus blossom surrounded by a chain of snow mountains. At the centre lies the palace of the King of Shambala who governed from the city called Kalapa.Shambhala is also often called Shangri-la in some texts. [2]

Shambhala is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalacakra Tantra[3] and the ancient Zhangzhung texts of western Tibet. The Bon scriptures speak of a closely related land called Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring.[4]

Hindu texts such as the Vishnu Purana (4.24) mention the village Shambhala as the birthplace of Kalki, the final incarnation of Vishnu, who will usher in a new Age (Satya Yuga).[5]

Whatever its historical basis, Shambhala (spelling derived from Buddhist transliterations) gradually came to be seen as a Buddhist pure land, a fabulous kingdom whose reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic. It was in this form that the Shambhala myth reached Western Europe and the Americas, where it influenced non-Buddhist as well as Buddhist spiritual seekers—and, to some extent, popular culture in general.

In the Buddhist Kalachakra teachings

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Manjuśrīkīrti, King of Shambhala

Main article: Kalachakra

Shambhala is ruled over by Maitreya, the future Buddha. The Kalacakra tantra prophesies that when the world declines into war and greed, and all is lost, the 25th Kalki king will emerge from Shambhala with a huge army to vanquish "Dark Forces" and usher in a worldwide Golden Age. Using calculations from the Kalachakra Tantra, Alex Berzin puts this date at 2424.[6]

Manjuśrīkīrti is said to have been born in 159 BC and ruled over a kingdom of 300,510 followers of the Mlechha religion, some of whom worshipped the sun. He is said to have expelled 20,000 people from his domain who clung to 'Surya Samadhi' (sun realization) rather than convert to Kalachakra (Wheel of Time) Buddhism.

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Portrait of an Alti Himalian Shaman. Detail from "A Sorceress from Tungusy" 1812–1813 by: E. Karnejeff

These expelled Rishis, seers, sages and saints, who had realized truth and eternal knowledge exclaimed, "We want to remain true to our Sun-Chariot. We do not wish to give up our belief system to change to another." This shows there may have been a fundamental difference between the 2 time-cycle-based doctrines. After realizing these were the wisest and best of his people and how much he was in need of them, he later asked them to return. Some did. Those who did not return were said to have set up another magical city elsewhere, the Shambhallah of mystic legend. Manjuśrīkīrti initiated the preaching of the Kalachakra teachings in order to try to convert those who returned and all still under his rule. In 59 BC he abdicated his throne to his son, Puṇḍārika, and died soon afterward, entering the sambhogakaya of buddhahood and was made a posthumous Buddhist saint.[7][8]

Western receptions and interpretations

Some westerners have been fascinated with the idea of Shambhala, often based on fragmentary accounts from the Kalachakra tradition. Tibet and its ancient traditions were largely unknown to westerners until the twentieth century; whatever little information westerners received was haphazard at best.[9]

The first information that reached western civilization about Shambhala came from the Portuguese Catholic missionary Estêvão Cacella, who had heard about Shambhala (which he transcribed as "Xembala"), and thought it was another name for Cathay or China. In 1627 they headed to Tashilhunpo, the seat of the Panchen Lama and, discovering their mistake, returned to India.[10]

In Altai Mountains folklore Mount Belukha is also believed to be a gateway to Shambhala.[11]

The Hungarian scholar Sándor Kőrösi Csoma, writing in 1833, provided the first geographic account of "a fabulous country in the north...situated between 45' and 50' north latitude". Due north from India to between these latitudes is eastern Kazakhstan, which is characterized by green hills, low mountains, rivers, and lakes. This is in contrast to the landscape of the provinces of Tibet and Xinjiang in western China, which are high mountains and arid.

Theosophy

During the late-19th century, Theosophical Society co-founder Helena Blavatsky alluded to the Shambhala myth, giving it currency for Western occult enthusiasts. Blavatsky, who claimed to be in contact with a Great White Lodge of Himalayan Adepts, mentions Shambhala in several places, but without giving it especially great emphasis.

Gradually, mankind went down in stature, for, even before the real advent of the Fourth or Atlantean race, the majority of mankind had fallen into iniquity and sin, save the hierarchy of the “Elect,” the followers and disciples of the “Sons of Will and Yoga” — called later the “Sons of the Fire Mist.”

Then came the Atlanteans; the giants whose physical beauty and strength reached their climax, in accordance with evolutionary law, toward the middle period of their fourth sub-race. But, as said in the Commentary: —

The last survivors of the fair child of the White Island (the primitive Sveta-dwipa) had perished ages before. Their (Lemuria’s) elect, had taken shelter on the sacred Island (now the “fabled” Shamballah, in the Gobi Desert), while some of their accursed races, separating from the main stock, now lived in the jungles and underground (“cave-men”), when the golden yellow race (the Fourth) became in its turn “black with sin.”...

The “Christian topography” of Cosmas Indicopleustes and its merits are well known; but here the good father repeats a universal tradition, now, moreover, corroborated by facts. Every arctic traveller suspects a continent or a “dry island” beyond the line of eternal ice. Perhaps now the meaning of the following passage from one of the Commentaries may become clearer.

“In the first beginnings of (human) life, the only dry land was on the Right end [482] of the sphere, where it (the globe) is motionless. [483] The whole earth was one vast watery desert, and the waters were tepid . . . . There man was born on the seven zones of the immortal, the indestructible of the Manvantara. [484] There was eternal spring in darkness. (But) that which is darkness to the man of today, was light to the man of his dawn. There, the gods rested, and Fohat [485] reigns ever since . . . . Thus the wise fathers say that man is born in the head of his mother (earth), and that her feet at the left end generated (begot) the evil winds that blow from the mouth of the lower Dragon . . . . Between the first and second (races) the eternal central (land) was divided by the water of life. [486]

“It flows around and animates her (mother earth’s) body. Its one end issues from her head; it becomes foul at her feet (the Southern Pole). It gets purified (on its return) to her heart — which beats under the foot of the sacred Shambalah, which then (in the beginnings) was not yet born.
For it is in the belt of man’s dwelling (the earth) that lies concealed the life and health of all that lives and breathes. [487] During the first and second (races) the belt was covered with the great waters. (But) the great mother travailed under the waves and a new land was joined to the first one which our wise men call the head-gear (the cap). She travailed harder for the third (race) and her waist and navel appeared above
the water. It was the belt, the sacred Himavat, which stretches around the world. [488] She broke toward the setting sun from her neck [489] downward (to the south west), into many lands and islands, but the eternal land (the cap) broke not asunder. Dry lands covered the face of the silent waters to the four sides of the world. All these perished (in their turn). Then appeared the abode of the wicked (the Atlantis). The eternal land was now hid, for the waters became solid (frozen) under the breath of her nostrils and the evil winds from the Dragon’s mouth,” etc., etc.

This shows that Northern Asia is as old as the Second Race. One may even say that Asia is contemporary with man, since from the very beginnings of human life its root-continent, so to speak, already existed; that part of the world now known as Asia being only cut off from it in a later age, and divided by the glacial waters.

--The Secret Doctrine: The Synthesis of Science, Religion, and Philosophy, by Helena P. Blavatsky


Later esoteric writers further emphasized and elaborated on the concept of a hidden land inhabited by a hidden mystic brotherhood whose members labor for the good of humanity. Alice A. Bailey claims Shamballa (her spelling) is an extra-dimensional or spiritual reality on the etheric plane, a spiritual centre where the governing deity of Earth, Sanat Kumara, dwells as the highest Avatar of the Planetary Logos of Earth, and is said to be an expression of the Will of God.[12]

Expeditions

Nicholas and Helena Roerich led a 1924–1928 expedition aimed at Shambhala.[13]

Inspired by Theosophical lore and several visiting Mongol lamas, Gleb Bokii, the chief Bolshevik cryptographer and one of the bosses of the Soviet secret police, along with his writer friend Alexander Barchenko, embarked on a quest for Shambhala, in an attempt to merge Kalachakra-tantra and ideas of Communism in the 1920s. Among other things, in a secret laboratory affiliated with the secret police, Bokii and Barchenko experimented with Buddhist spiritual techniques to try to find a key for engineering perfect communist human beings.[14] They contemplated a special expedition to Inner Asia to retrieve the wisdom of Shambhala – the project fell through as a result of intrigues within the Soviet intelligence service, as well as rival efforts of the Soviet Foreign Commissariat that sent its own expedition to Tibet in 1924.

Modern times

French Buddhist Alexandra David-Néel associated Shambhala with Balkh in present-day Afghanistan, also offering the Persian Sham-i-Bala, "elevated candle" as an etymology of its name.[15] In a similar vein, The Gurdjieffian J. G. Bennett published speculation that Shambalha was Shams-i-Balkh, a Bactrian sun temple.[16]

In Western culture

Shambhala may have been the inspiration for Shangri-La, a paradise on Earth hidden in a Tibetan valley, which features in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton.[17] There is also a Yu-Gi-Oh! trading card game deck called “subterror” that uses the lore of Shambala in cards such as “The Hidden City” and defenders that protect the city from dangerous “behemoths.”

In Don Rosa's Treasure of the ten Avatars(Uncle Scrooge Adventures#51) the protagonists lead an expedition to Shambhala. The inhabitants made sophisticated Hydraulic traps that scared troops of Alexander the Great.

See also

• Agharta
• Atlantis
• Avalon
• Beyul
• El Dorado
• Ys
• Hyperborea
• Ile-Ife
• Iram of the Pillars
• Hapta Hindu
• Zhetysu
• Kitezh
• "Shambala" (song)
• Shangri-La
• Sagala
• Thule
• Tír na nÓg
• Utopia

Footnotes

1. Crossman, Sylvie and Jean-Pierre Barou, eds. Tibetan Mandala, Art and Practice (The Wheel of Time). New York: Konecky & Konecky, 2004. ISBN 1-56852-473-0. pp.20-26
2. Leepage, V (1996) Shambhala: The Fascinating Truth Behind the Myth of Shangri-la. Theosophical Publishing House, Illinois.pp 23-4
3. The Tantra by Victor M. Fic, Abhinav Publications, 2003, p.49.
4. The Bon Religion of Tibet by Per Kavǣrne, Shambhala, 1996
5. LePage, Victoria (1996). Shambhala: The Fascinating Truth Behind the Myth of Shangri-La. Quest Books. pp. 125–126. ISBN 9780835607506.
6. Berzin, Alexander (1997). "Taking the Kalachakra Initiation". Retrieved 2016-06-20.
7. Das, Sarat Chandra (1882). Contributions to the Religion and History of Tibet, in Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, Vol. LI. Reprint: Manjushri Publishing House, Delhi. 1970, pp. 81–2.
8. Edwin Bernbaum "The Way to Shambhala: A Search for the Mythical Kingdom Beyond the Himalayas" 1980 & Albert Grünwedel "Der Weg nach Shambhala" 1915
9. Lopez, Donald S. Jr. Prisoners of Shangri~La, Tibetan Buddhism and the West, The University of Chicago Press, 1998
10. Bernbaum, Edwin. (1980). The Way to Shambhala, pp. 18-19. Reprint: (1989). Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc., Los Angeles. ISBN 0-87477-518-3.
11. aprilholloway. "Mysteries of the Kingdom of Shambhala".
12. Bailey, Alice A, A Treatise on Cosmic Fire 1932 Lucis Trust. 1925, p 753
13. Archer, Kenneth. Roerich East & West. Parkstone Press 1999, p.94
14. Znamenski (2011)
15. David-Néel, A. Les Nouvelles littéraires ;1954, p.1
16. Bennett, J.G: "Gurdjieff: Making a New World". Bennett notes Idries Shah as the source of the suggestion.
17. Wood, Michael (17 February 2011). "BBC - History - Ancient History in depth: Shangri-La". BBC. Retrieved 28 February 2018.

References

• Rock Opera "Szambalia" ("Shambhala") (2014). Official premiere in Poland, Warsaw (24.06.2014)
• Rock song "Halls of Shambala" by B. W. Stevenson, covered and popularized by the rock band Three Dog Night Shambala (song)
• Berzin, Alexander (2003). Study Buddhism. Mistaken Foreign Myths about Shambhala.
• Martin, Dean. (1999). "'Ol-mo-lung-ring, the Original Holy Place." In: Sacred Spaces and Powerful Places In Tibetan Culture: A Collection of Essays. (1999) Edited by Toni Huber, pp. 125–153. The Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, Dharamsala, H.P., India. ISBN 81-86470-22-0.
• Meyer, Karl Ernest and Brysac, Shareen Blair (2006) Tournament of Shadows: The Great Game And the Race for Empire in Central Asia ISBN 0-465-04576-6
• Bernbaum, Edwin. (1980). The Way to Shambhala: A Search for the Mythical Kingdom Beyond the Himalayas. Reprint: (1989) St. Martin's Press, New York. ISBN 0-87477-518-3.
• Jeffrey, Jason. Mystery of Shambhala in New Dawn, No. 72 (May–June 2002).
• Trungpa, Chogyam. Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior. Shambhala Publications. ISBN 0-87773-264-7
• Znamenski, Andrei. (2011). Red Shambhala: Magic, Prophecy, and Geopolitics in the Heart of Asia. Quest Books, Wheaton, IL (2011) ISBN 978-0-8356-0891-6.
• "Tibetan Buddhist Atrocities and Propaganda." Dr. S. D'Montford. "Tibetan Buddhist Atrocities and Propaganda." Happy Medium Publishing. Sydney. 2004
• Allen, Charles. (1999). The Search for Shangri-La: A Journey into Tibetan History. Little, Brown and Company. Reprint: Abacus, London. 2000. ISBN 0-349-11142-1.
• Znamenski, Andrei. Red Shambhala: Magic, Prophecy, and Geopolitics in the Heart of Asia. Wheaton, IL: Quest Books, 2011. ISBN 978-0-8356-0891-6
• Martin, Dan. (1999). "'Ol-mo-lung-ring, the Original Holy Place." In: Sacred Spaces and Powerful Places In Tibetan Culture: A Collection of Essays. (1999) Edited by Toni Huber, pp. 125–153. The Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, Dharamsala, H.P., India. ISBN 81-86470-22-0.
• Symmes, Patrick. (2007). "The Kingdom of the Lotus" in Outside, 30th Anniversary Special Edition, pp. 148–187. Mariah Media, Inc., Red Oak, Iowa.
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

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Great White Brotherhood
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 6/30/19

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The Great White Brotherhood, in belief systems akin to Theosophy and New Age, are said to be perfected beings of great power who spread spiritual teachings through selected humans.[1] The members of the Brotherhood may be known as the Masters of the Ancient Wisdom or the Ascended Masters.[1] The first person to talk about them in the West was Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (Theosophy), after she and other people claimed to have received messages from them. These included Helena Roerich, Aleister Crowley, Alice A. Bailey, Guy Ballard, Geraldine Innocente (The Bridge to Freedom), Elizabeth Clare Prophet, Bob Sanders, and Benjamin Creme.[1]

History

Image
Karl von Eckartshausen

The idea of a secret organization of enlightened mystics, guiding the spiritual development of the human race, was pioneered in the late eighteenth century by Karl von Eckartshausen (1752-1803) in his book The Cloud upon the Sanctuary; Eckartshausen called this body of mystics, who remained active after their physical deaths on earth, the Council of Light.[2][3] Eckartshausen's proposed communion of living and dead mystics, in turn, drew partially on Christian ideas such as the Communion of the Saints, and partially on previously circulating European ideas about secret societies of enlightened, mystical, or magic adepts typified by the Rosicrucians and the Illuminati.[4]

The Mahatma Letters began publication in 1881 with information purportedly revealed by "Koot Hoomi" to Alfred Percy Sinnett, and were also influential on the early development of the tradition. Koot Hoomi, through Sinnett, revealed that high-ranking members of mystic organizations in India and Tibet were able to maintain regular telepathic contact with one another, and thus were able to communicate to each other, and also to Sinnett, without the need for either written or oral communications, and in a manner similar to the way that spirit mediums claimed to communicate with the spirits of the dead. The letters published by Sinnett, which proposed the controversial doctrine of reincarnation, were said to have been revealed through this means.[5]

Image
Helena P. Blavatsky

Eckartshausen's idea was expanded in the teachings of Helena P. Blavatsky as developed by Charles W. Leadbeater, Alice Bailey and Helena Roerich. Blavatsky, founder of the Theosophical Society, attributed her teachings to just such a body of adepts; in her 1877 book Isis Unveiled, she called the revealers of her teachings the "Masters of the Hidden Brotherhood" or the "Mahatmas". Blavatsky claimed that she had made physical contact with these adepts' earthly representatives in Tibet; but also, that she continued to receive teachings from them through psychic channels, through her abilities of spirit mediumship.[6]

Ideas about this secret council of sages, under several names, were a widely shared feature of late nineteenth century and early twentieth century esotericism. Arthur Edward Waite, in his 1898 Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, hinted at the existence of a secret group of initiates who dispense truth and wisdom to the worthy.[7] A young Aleister Crowley, reading this, wrote Waite and was directed to read von Eckartshausen's book. Crowley's search for this secret wisdom eventually led him to become a neophyte in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, which represented itself to be the visible and earthly outer order of the Great White Brotherhood.[8] Within the Golden Dawn itself, its teachings claimed to be derived from a similar body of initiates which in that tradition were called the Secret Chiefs.[9]

The actual phrase "Great White Brotherhood" was used extensively in Leadbeater's 1925 book The Masters and the Path.[10] Alice A. Bailey also claimed to have received numerous revelations from the Great White Brotherhood between 1920 and 1949, which are compiled in her books known collectively by her followers as the Alice A. Bailey Material. Since the introduction of the phrase, the term "Great White Brotherhood" is in some circles used generically to refer to any concept of an enlightened community of adepts, on earth or in the hereafter, with benevolent aims toward the spiritual development of the human race, and without strict regard to the names used within the tradition.[11] Dion Fortune adopts the name to refer to the community of living and dead adepts.[12]

The ritual magicians of the Western mystery tradition sometimes refer to the Great White Brotherhood as the "Great White Lodge", a name that appears to indicate that they imagine it constitutes an initiatory hierarchy similar to Freemasonry. Gareth Knight describes its members as the "Masters" or "Inner Plane Adepti", who have "gained all the experience, and all the wisdom resulting from experience, necessary for their spiritual evolution in the worlds of form." While some go on to "higher evolution in other spheres", others become teaching Masters who stay behind to help younger initiates in their "cyclic evolution on this planet". Only a few of this community are known to the human race; these initiates are the "teaching Masters."[13] The AMORC Rosicrucian order maintains a difference between the "Great White Brotherhood" and the "Great White Lodge", saying that the Great White Brotherhood is the "school or fraternity" of the Great White Lodge, and that "every true student on the Path" aspires to membership in this Brotherhood.[14] Some of Aleister Crowley's remarks appear to indicate that Crowley identified the Great White Brotherhood with the A∴A∴, his magical secret society.[15]

Bulgarian Gnostic master Peter Deunov referred to his organization of followers as the Universal White Brotherhood, and it is clear that he too was referring to the Western esoteric community-at-large. When ex-communicated as a heretic on 7 July 1922, he defended the Brotherhood as follows:

‘Let the Orthodox Church resolve this issue, whether Christ has risen, whether Love is accepted in the Orthodox Church. There is one church in the world. But the Universal White Brotherhood is outside the church - it is higher than the church. But even higher than the Universal White Brotherhood is the Kingdom of Heaven. Hence the Church is the first step, the Universal White Brotherhood is the second step, and the Kingdom of Heaven is the third step - the greatest one that is to be manifested.’ (24 June 1923).


Similarly, Bulgarian teacher Omraam Mikhaël Aïvanhov (Deunov's principal disciple) formally established Fraternité Blanche Universelle as an "exoteric" esoteric organization still operating today in Switzerland, Canada, the USA, the UK and parts of Scandinavia.[16]

The term Great White Brotherhood was further developed and popularized in 1934 with the publication of "Unveiled Mysteries"[17] by Guy Ballard's "I AM" Activity.[18] This Brotherhood of "Immortal Saints and Sages"[19] who have gone through the Initiations of the Transfiguration, Resurrection, and the Ascension[20] was further popularized by Ascended Master Teachings developed by The Bridge to Freedom, The Summit Lighthouse and the Church Universal and Triumphant, and The Temple of The Presence.

Benjamin Creme has published books—he claims the information within them has been telepathically transmitted to him from the Great White Brotherhood.

Founding of the Great White Brotherhood

In 1952, Geraldine Innocente, messenger for The Bridge to Freedom, delivered this address purported to be from Sanat Kumara describing the founding of the "Great White Brotherhood":

" . . . I had nothing to work with but Light and Love, and many centuries passed before even two lifestreams applied for membership - One, later became Buddha (now, Lord of the World, the Planetary Logos Gautama Buddha) and the Other, became the Cosmic Christ (Lord Maitreya, now the Planetary Buddha). The Brotherhood has grown through these ages and centuries until almost all the offices are held now by those belonging to the evolution of Earth and those who have volunteered to remain among her evolution. . .."[21]


Members of The Bridge to Freedom believe that on July 4, 1954 Sanat Kumara stated through Geraldine Innocente:

" . . . Thus We took Our abode upon the sweet Earth. Through the same power of centripetal and centrifugal force of which I spoke (cohesion and expansion of the magnetic power of Divine Love), We then began to magnetize the Flame in the hearts of some of the Guardian Spirits who were not sleeping so soundly and who were not too enthusiastically engaged in using primal life for the satisfaction of the personal self.

"In this way, the Great White Brotherhood began. The Three-fold Flame within the heart of Shamballa, within the Hearts of the Kumaras and Myself, formed the magnetic Heart of the Great White Brotherhood by Whom you have all been blessed and of which Brotherhood you all aspire to become conscious members. . . . "[22]


Great Brotherhood of Light

The Great White Brotherhood, also known as Great Brotherhood of Light or the Spiritual Hierarchy of Earth, is perceived as a spiritual organization composed of those Ascended Masters who have risen from the Earth into immortality, but still maintain an active watch over the world.[23][24] C.W. Leadbeater said "The Great White Brotherhood also includes members of the Heavenly Host (the Spiritual Hierarchy directly concerned with the evolution of our world), Beneficent Members from other planets that are interested in our welfare, as well as certain unascended chelas".[25]

The Masters of the Ancient Wisdom are believed by Theosophists to be joined together in service to the Earth under the name of the Great White Brotherhood. The use of the term "white" refers to their use of white magic, as opposed to black, and is unrelated to race besides common psychological relation and its implications. The later versions of Blavatsky described the masters as[26] ethnically Tibetan or Indian (Hindu), not European. Recent skeptical research indicates, however, that this description was used by Blavatsky to hide the real identity of her teachers, some of whom are said to have really been well known Indian rulers or personalities of her time.[27]

Most occult groups assign a high level of importance to the Great White Brotherhood, but some make interaction with the Ascended Masters of the Brotherhood a major focus of their existence. Of these several, the most prominent are the "I Am" Activity, founded in the 1930s, The Bridge to Freedom, the Church Universal and Triumphant, and The Temple of The Presence.[28] Belief in the Brotherhood and the Masters is an essential part of the syncretistic teachings of various organizations that have continued and expanded the Theosophical philosophical concepts.[29][30][31][32][33] Information given by the Summit Lighthouse and the I AM movement is suspect, since none of the writers of these groups are Masters of any Brotherhood. Examples of those believed to be Ascended Masters would be, according to different unconfirmed sources are the Master Jesus, Confucius, Gautama Buddha, Mary the Mother of Jesus, Hilarion, Enoch, Paul the Venetian, Kwan Yin, Saint Germain, and Kuthumi. These sources say that all these peoples put aside any differences they might have had in their Earthly careers, and unite instead to advance the spiritual well-being of humanity.[34]

Agni Yoga

The Great White Brotherhood is the name given in some metaphysical/occult circles to adepts of wisdom in or out of earthly incarnation who have assumed responsibility for the cosmic destiny of the human race, both individually and collectively. Nicholas Roerich and his wife, Helena Roerich, inspired by the Theosophical writings of H.P. Blavatsky, published the "Agni Yoga" series of books. Their contents, claimed to be inspired by the Master Morya, described the work of the White Brotherhood and the Spiritual Hierarchy.

See also

• Ascended masters
• Bodhisattva
• Communion of Saints
• Masters of the Ancient Wisdom
• Secret Chiefs
• Marina Tsvigun (Maria Devi Khristos) of the Ukrainian White Brotherhood

Notes

1. Barrett, David (1996). Sects, 'Cults', and Alternative Religions: A World Survey and Sourcebook. London: Blandford. ISBN 0-7137-2567-2.
2. von Eckartshausen, K., The Cloud upon the Sanctuary (Isabelle de Steiger, translator). (Weiser: 2003. ISBN 0-89254-084-2)
3. The Cloud on the Sanctuary (PDF etext; accessed Dec. 14, 2007)
4. Godwin, J. The Theosophical Enlightenment (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994), ch. 1.
5. Godwin, J. The Theosophical Enlightenment (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994), ch. 15.
6. Hutton, R. The Triumph of the Moon: A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft(Oxford, 2000; ISBN 0-19-820744-1), p. 19
7. Arthur Edward Waite, The Book of Ceremonial Magic (first edition title: The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts), conclusion. (London, 1913)
8. Aleister Crowley (Symonds, John and Grant, Kenneth, eds.), The Confessions of Aleister Crowley (Bantam, 1971), pp. xiv-xv (Symonds introduction)
9. Crowley, supra, p. 347 et passim.
10. Leadbeater, C. W., The Masters and the Path (Theosophical Publishing House, 1925; expanded, 1927)
11. Crowley, supra.
12. See generally, Fortune, Dion, The Training and Work of an Initiate (1930; rev. ed. Weiser, 2000; ISBN 1-57863-183-1) and The Esoteric Orders and their Work(1928).
13. Knight, G, A Practical Guide to Qabalistic Symbolism (1965; repr. Weiser, 1978; ISBN 0-87728-397-4), v. 1 ch. X "Chesed", ss. 14-16.
14. Lewis, H. S., Rosicrucian Manual (AMORC, 1938), pp. 139-140.
15. Crowley, A. Liber ABA, book 4. part 3, appendix II; a/k/a Magick in Theory and Practice (Sangreal, 1969).
16. "Omraam Mikhaël Aïvanhov". Fbu.org. Retrieved 2009-11-22.
17. King, Godfre Ray. Unveiled Mysteries. Chicago, Illinois: Saint Germain Press 1934
18. Saint Germain Foundation. The History of the "I AM" Activity and Saint Germain Foundation. Schaumburg, Illinois: Saint Germain Press 2003
19. Vyasa, Krishna-Dwaipayana. Mahabharata. Chapter 23 - Arjuna's Quest: Indra addresses Arjuna saying: "This area is the abode of Immortal Saints and Sages. War and war-weapons are just unknown here."
20. Besant, Annie. London: Theosophical Publishing House 1912
21. The Bridge to Freedom Journal November 1953 (Reprinted by Ascended Master Teaching Foundation).
22. The Bridge to Freedom Journal November 1955 (Reprinted by Ascended Master Teaching Foundation).
23. Blavatsky, H. P. Isis Unveiled Volume 2 page 100: ". . . the Secret Association is still alive and as active as ever"
24. Roerich, Nicholas and Helena Hierarchy Agni Yoga Society, Inc. 1931 (reprinted 1977): "Certainly, when the black lodge directs its arrows against the White Brotherhood, the consequences are self-destructive, and the manifestation of a rebounding blow is unavoidable. What you heard is a consequence of self-destruction, because the aimed arrow returned to the sender."
25. Leadbeater, C.W. The Masters and the Path. Adyar, India: Theosophical Publishing House 1925 (Reprint: Kessinger Publishing 1997).
26. Sinnett, Alfred Percy. The Occult World. Boston: Colby & Rich, 1882.
27. K. Paul Johnson: The Masters Revealed. Madame Blavatsky and the myth of the Great White Lodge. Albany, NY 1994: SUNY press
28. White Paper - Wesak World Congress 2002. Acropolis Sophia Books & Works 2003.
29. I AM Ascended Master Dictation List Saint Germain Press Inc., 1995, Listing of those who are claimed to be Ascended Masters by The I AM Activity
30. Schroeder, Werner Ascended Masters and Their Retreats Ascended Master Teaching Foundation 2004, Listing of those who are believed to be Ascended Masters by The I AM Activity and The Bridge to Freedom
31. Luk, A.D.K.. Law of Life - Book II. Pueblo, Colorado: A.D.K. Luk Publications 1989, Listing of those who are claimed to be Ascended Masters by The I AM Activity and The Bridge to Freedom
32. Booth, Annice The Masters and Their Retreats Summit Lighthouse Library June 2003, Listing of those who are believed to be Ascended Masters by The I AM Activity, The Bridge to Freedom, and The Summit Lighthouse
33. Shearer, Monroe & Carolyn I AM Adorations, Affirmations & Rhythmic DecreesAcropolis Sophia Books and Works 1998, Listing of those who are claimed to be Ascended Masters by The I AM Activity, The Bridge to Freedom, The Summit Lighthouse, and The Temple of The Presence
34. Sinnett, Alfred Percy. The Occult World. Boston: Colby & Rich, 1882.

External links

• The Great White Brotherhood - website for books and messages from The Great White Brotherhood
• The Stairway To Freedom - website for The Stairway To Freedom book dictated by The Great White Brotherhood
• The Stronghold of Shambhala - An article by Nicholas Roerich
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 2:57 am

Shambhala Buddhism
by WikiMili
Last updated May 10, 2019
Accessed: 6/30/19

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The term Shambhala Buddhism was introduced by Sakyong Mipham in the year 2000 to describe his presentation of the Shambhala teachings originally conceived by Chögyam Trungpa as secular practices for achieving enlightened society, in concert with the Kagyu and Nyingma schools of Tibetan Buddhism. [1] The Shambhala Buddhist sangha considers Sakyong Mipham to be its head and the second in a lineage of Sakyongs; with his father, Chögyam Trungpa, being the first.

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Sakyong Mipham tibetan lama

Sakyong Jamgon Mipham Rinpoche, Jampal Trinley Dradul is the head of the Shambhala lineage and Shambhala, a worldwide network of urban Buddhist meditation centers, retreat centers, monasteries, a university, and other enterprises, founded by his father, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. In July 2018, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche stated that he is stepping back from his duties due to an investigation into his alleged sexual misconduct.

Shambhala Training is a secular approach to meditation developed by Tibetan Buddhist teacher Chogyam Trungpa and his students. It is based on what Trungpa calls Shambhala Vision, which sees enlightened society as not purely mythical, but as realizable by people of all faiths through practices of mindfulness/awareness, non-aggression, and sacred outlook. He writes:

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Chögyam Trungpa Tibetan Buddhist lama and writer

Chögyam Trungpa was a Buddhist meditation master and holder of both the Kagyu and Nyingma lineages, the eleventh Trungpa tülku, a tertön, supreme abbot of the Surmang monasteries, scholar, teacher, poet, artist, and originator of a radical re-presentation of Shambhala vision.

Distinguishing characteristics

Shambhala Buddhism partly derives from the teachings of Shambhala, as originally proclaimed by Chögyam Trungpa, which state that "there is a natural source of radiance and brilliance in the world, which is the innate wakefulness of human beings. This is the basis, in myth and inspiration, of the Kingdom of Shambhala, an enlightened society of fearlessness, dignity and compassion." Furthermore, "Shambhala vision applies to people of any faith, not just people who believe in Buddhism. The Shambhala vision does not distinguish a Buddhist from a Catholic, a Protestant, a Jew, a Moslem, a Hindu. That's why we call it the Shambhala kingdom. A kingdom should have lots of spiritual disciplines in it." [2]

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The Great Eastern Sun

Shambhala and Shambhala Training

Main article: Shambhala Training

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Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

At the 1976 Seminary in Land O'Lakes, Wisconsin [3] , Trungpa Rinpoche began giving teachings, some of which were gathered and presented as Shambhala Training, [4] inspired by his vision (see terma) of the legendary Kingdom of Shambhala. Shambhalian practices focus on using mindfulness/awareness meditation as a means of connecting with one's basic sanity and using that insight as inspiration for one's encounter with the world. The Shambhala of Chögyam Trungpa is essentially a secular approach to meditation, with roots in Buddhism as well as in other traditions, but accessible to individuals of any, or no religion. The greater social vision of Shambhala is that it is possible, moment by moment, for individuals to establish enlightened society. Trungpa's book Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior provides a concise collection of the Shambhala views.

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Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior book by Chögyam Trungpa

Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior is a book concerning the Shambhala Buddhist vision of founder Chögyam Trungpa. The book discusses addressing personal and societal problems through the application of secular concepts such as basic goodness, warriorship, bravery, and egolessness as a means toward the creation of what he calls "enlightened society". Shambhala vision is described as a nonreligious approach rooted in meditation and accessible to individuals of any, or no, religion. In Shambhala terms, it is possible, moment by moment, for individuals to establish enlightened society.

Shambhala Training is administered worldwide by Shambhala International. Shambhala Training is presented in a series of weekend programs, the first five of which are called "The Heart of Warriorship", and the subsequent seven "The Sacred Path". The Warrior Assembly is the fruition of the Shambhala Training Sacred Path program. During Warrior Assembly, students study the Shambhala terma text, The Golden Sun of the Great East, and receive the ashé practices of stroke and lungta.

Shambhala within Shambhala Buddhism

After the year 2000, with the merging of the secular teachings of Shambhala and the Buddhist teachings of Vajradhatu into Shambhala Buddhism, completion of Shambhala Vajrayana Seminary (which itself requires taking Buddhist refuge and bodhisattva vows, as well as Buddhist vajrayana samaya vows) became a condition for receiving the highest Shambhala teachings, such as those of Werma and the Scorpion Seal Retreat. In turn, Warrior Assembly became a prerequisite for attending the Vajrayana Seminary.

Vajradhatu was the name of the umbrella organization of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, one of the first Tibetan Buddhist lamas to visit and teach in the West. It served as the vehicle for the promulgation of his Buddhist teachings, and was also the name by which his community was known from 1973 until 1990. Starting in 1976 it was paralleled by a governmental structure for establishing the non-denominational enlightened society of Shambhala Kingdom, which included Shambhala Training among many other activities. Eventually, the Vajradhatu organization was renamed Shambhala International by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche.


Vajrayāna (वज्रयान), Mantrayāna, Tantrayāna, Tantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism are terms referring to the various Buddhist traditions of Tantra and "Secret Mantra", which developed in medieval India and spread to Tibet, Bhutan, and East Asia. In Tibet, Buddhist Tantra is termed Vajrayāna, while in China it is generally known as Tángmì Hanmi 漢密 or Mìzōng (密宗, "Esoteric Sect"), in Pali it is known as Pyitsayãna (ပစ္စယာန), and in Japan it is known as Mikkyō.


The samaya, is a set of vows or precepts given to initiates of an esoteric Vajrayana Buddhist order as part of the abhiṣeka ceremony that creates a bond between the guru and disciple.


The Rigden Abhisheka enters the student into the practice of the Werma Sadhana. It is open to graduates of Shambhala Vajrayana Seminary who have completed their Shambhala ngöndro and to students who have already received the Werma Sadhana and completed their Kagyü Ngöndro.

Shambhala Terma

Certain Shambhala practices derive from specific terma texts of Trungpa Rinpoche's such as Letter of the Black Ashe, Letter of the Golden Key that Fulfills Desire, Golden Sun of the Great East, and the Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun, in long and short versions. Trungpa Rinpoche is believed by his students to have received these teachings directly from Gesar of Ling, an emanation of Padmasambhava, and the Rigden kings. [5] Their terma status was confirmed by the Nyingma master Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche.

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Padmasambhava Tibetan Lama

Padmasambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, was an 8th-century Buddhist master from the Indian subcontinent. Although there was a historical Padmasambhava, little is known of him apart from helping the construction of the first Buddhist monastery in Tibet at Samye, at the behest of Trisong Detsen, and shortly thereafter leaving Tibet due to court intrigues.


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Kings of Shambhala

The thirty-two Kings of Shambhala reside in a mythical kingdom. They are part of the Indo-Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhist tradition.

The Shambhala dharma practices derived entirely or in part from these texts include those of werma , drala , Wind Horse (Tib. lungta), and meditations on four "dignities of Shambhala": tiger (Tib. tak), lion (Tib. seng), garuda (Tib. kyung) and dragon (Tib. druk). Jamgon Ju Mipham Gyatso, a great 19th century Nyingma lama and the predecessor of Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, wrote about many of these practices and concepts as well. Some, such as the "stroke of Ashé", have no known precedents.

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Wind Horse

The wind horse is a symbol of the human soul in the shamanistic tradition of East Asia and Central Asia. In Tibetan Buddhism, it was included as the pivotal element in the center of the four animals symbolizing the cardinal directions and a symbol of the idea of well-being or good fortune. It has also given the name to a type of prayer flag that has the five animals printed on it.


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Jamgon Ju Mipham Gyatso master of the Nyingma lineage of Tibetan Buddhism and leader of Ri-me movement

Jamgön Ju Mipham, or Mipham Jamyang Namgyal Gyamtso (1846–1912) was a very influential philosopher and polymath of the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism. He wrote over 32 volumes on topics such as painting, poetics, sculpture, alchemy, medicine, logic, philosophy and tantra. Mipham's works are still central to the scholastic curriculum in Nyingma monasteries today. Mipham is also considered one of the leading figures in the Ri-me (non-sectarian) movement in Tibet.


Zen Influence

Trungpa Rinpoche was deeply influenced by his friend Shunryu Suzuki Roshi, a Japanese Zen master who was one of the first accomplished teachers to present dharma to Westerners.[ citation needed ] As a result of this influence, certain attributes of form in Shambhala Buddhism are derived from Zen, rather than Tibetan Buddhism. The shrine rooms in Shambhala Buddhism, reflecting the Zen aesthetic of Kanso (簡素) or simplicity, tend to be sparsely furnished and decorated, whereas traditional Tibetan Buddhist shrine rooms are elaborate, ornate, and colorful. As in Zen but unlike Tibetan Buddhist practice, meditators engage in group practice of shamatha-vipashyana.

In addition, Shambhala Buddhists have adopted the practices of kyūdō, ikebana (kado), tea ceremony, oryoki, calligraphy, and other traditional Japanese arts as a means of extending the mind of calm-abiding and awareness to more active practices.

Elements of Bön, Taoism, and Confucianism

To a lesser extent, Trungpa Rinpoche incorporated other elements into Shambhala tradition that he thought would be beneficial to practitioners. From the Bön religion, the lhasang ceremony is performed; other elements of shamanism play a role. From Confucianism comes a framework of heaven, earth, and man for understanding the proper relationship between different elements of compositions of all kinds. From Taoism comes the use of feng shui and other incorporations.

Dorje Kasung

The Dorje Kasung is a group that was formed by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche to support the transmission of the Shambhala teachings by helping create an appropriate environment for them to be taught in. The Dorje Kasung accomplish this by providing a gentle and uplifted presence at teaching events, providing security services, providing driving and personal assistance to the teachers, and working with any issues of conflict or health that may arise in the community.

The training and model of the Dorje Kasung is based on military forms, such as hierarchy, uniforms, and drills. The purpose of utilizing the military format is not to propagate war, but to take advantage of the discipline and energy of military forms to embody and communicate compassion.The practice of Dorje Kasungship is founded on the mahayana Buddhist principle of compassionate action, and inspired by the vajrayana Buddhist emphasis on working directly with the energy of neurosis and transforming it into wisdom. Thus, through engaging directly with military forms, they aspire to fulfill the vision expressed in their motto, "Victory Over War". [6]

The Dorje Kasung follow the orders of the Sakyong. Once, this involved breaking into a guest's room, forcibly bringing her to a party and then stripping her naked, while onlookers ignored her pleas for help and for someone to call the police. [7]

Maitri and Mudra

Maitri is a therapeutic program that works with different styles of neurosis using principles of the Five Buddha Families. Mudra practice, first explored by the Mudra Theater Group, is based on traditional Tibetan monastic dance training and the teachings on mahamudra.

Shambhala Art

Shambhala Art can be seen as a process, a product, and an art-education program. As a process, it brings wakefulness and awareness to the creative and viewing processes through the integration of contemplation and meditation. As a product, it is art that wakes us up. Shambhala Art is also an international nonprofit art-education program based on the Dharma Art teachings of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, the founder of Shambhala. Its purpose is to explore, from the viewpoint of a meditative discipline, the creative process and the product called art.[ citation needed ]

Traditional Buddhist Practices

Shambhala Buddhism holds various meditation techniques of traditional Tibetan Buddhist lineages, including shamatha/vipashyana, zazen, madhyamaka, mahamudra and Dzogchen, tonglen, Lojong, traditional yidam practices such as Vajrayogini, Chakrasamvara, Vajrakilaya, Jambhala, Gesar, Tara, Manjushri, and Vajrasattva.

History

Main article: Vajradhatu

The term "Shambhala Buddhism", as used to describe the lineage and community led by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, came into use around 2000.

• In 1970, the Shambhala community had its origins with the arrival of the 11th Trungpa tülku, Trungpa Rinpoche, in North America. The first established center of his teachings was "Tail of the Tiger" in Barnet, Vermont (now Karmê Chöling).
• In 1971, a second branch of the community began to form when Rinpoche began teaching at the University of Colorado. The Rocky Mountain Dharma Center was established, now known as Shambhala Mountain Center, near Fort Collins, Colorado. In the early 1970s the community grew rapidly and attracted the involvement of such notables as Allen Ginsberg, Anne Waldman, and many others
• In 1973, the Shambhala community was incorporated in Colorado as Vajradhatu. Vajradhatu hosted visits by the Sixteenth Karmapa (head of the Kagyu School) in 1974, Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (head of the Nyingma School) in 1976, and the Fourteenth Dalai Lama in 1981.
• In 1974, Naropa Institute was founded, a contemplative studies and liberal arts college, now fully accredited as Naropa University. [8]
• In 1975, Shambhala Lodge was founded, a group of students dedicated to fostering enlightened society.
• In 1975, at an October party at Snowmass Colorado Seminary, Trungpa Rinpoche ordered his Vajra guard (i.e., the Dorje Kasung) to forcibly break into the room of his guest, Dana Naone, who he then ordered to be brought before the crowd and stripped naked, with onlookers ignoring her pleas for help and for someone to call the police. [9]
• In 1976, Trungpa Rinpoche began his cycle of Shambhala teachings and, with his students, manifesting forms of Shambhala society. Kalapa Court was established in Boulder, Colorado, as Trungpa Rinpoche's residence and a cultural center for the Vajradhatu community. Thomas F. Rich was empowered as Vajra Regent Ösel Tendzin and lineage holder in the Karma Kagyü and Nyingma lineages.
• In 1977, Shambhala Training was founded to promote a secular approach to meditation practice and an appreciation of basic human goodness. [8] The Gyalwa Karmapa, the head of the Kagyü lineage, confirmed the Vajra Regent's appointment as a lineage holder. Ösel Tendzin was the first Western student to hold such a position in the Kagyü lineage. [10]
• In 1978, Trungpa Rinpoche conducted the first annual Kalapa Assembly, an intensive training program for advanced Shambhala teachings and practices. [8]
• In 1979, Trungpa Rinpoche empowered his eldest son, Ösel Rangdröl Mukpo, as his successor and heir to the Shambhala lineage. [8]
• In 1986, Trungpa moved the international headquarters of Vajradhatu to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he died the following year. A large number of his disciples emigrated from the United States to Nova Scotia along with him.
• In 1987, after Trungpa's death, Tendzin's role as spiritual head of Vajradhatu lasted until around 1989. Citing an AIDS-related infection, allegations arose that Tendzin had passed HIV to a male partner in the Colorado congregation, who in turn unknowingly infected his female partner. [11] Tendzin, who was HIV-positive, knowingly had sex with students for three years without disclosing his infection. He had a delusion that his enlightened status protected himself and others from AIDS. [12] It eventually came out that the Vajradhatu board of directors had known of the problem for more than two years and had done nothing about it. [13]
• After the death of Ösel Tendzin in 1990, Ösel Rangdröl Mukpo became spiritual head of what would become Shambhala International.
• In 1995, Ösel Rangdröl Mukpo was recognized by Penor Rinpoche as the reincarnation of Ju Mipham and enthroned as Sakyong. The Sakyong—literally "earth-protector"—is a chögyal—"dharma king"—who holds and propagates the teachings of Shambhala. [14]
• In 2000, at the Kalapa Assembly, [15] Sakyong Mipham made a proclamation [16] that started the process of enclosing the previously secular teachings of Shambhala within the container of a new buddhist lineage, Shambhala Buddhism.
• In 2001, on a visit to Tibet, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche met the 12th Trungpa tülku, Choseng Trungpa Rinpoche, an incarnation discovered by Tai Situ Rinpoche in 1991.
• In August 2007, The Sakyong married Khandro Tseyang Palmo with a ceremony conducted by Drupwang Penor Rinpoche during the Kalapa Festival in Halifax. Khandro Tseyang Palmo is currently the Sakyong Wangmo, a title held previously by Lady Diana Mukpo, now the Druk Sakyong Wangmo.
• In July 2018, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche stepped down from leadership after the release of a third-party investigative report extensively documenting numerous accounts of sexual misconduct involving his students.[17] [18]

The Shambhala Buddhist community today

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Shambhala Center, Boulder, Colorado

Today, there are over two hundred Shambhala Meditation Centers, Groups and Residential Retreat Centers around the world, mostly in the United States, Canada, Europe and South America, [19] [20] the largest communities being Halifax, Nova Scotia; Boulder, Colorado; northern Vermont; and New York City.

Shambhala-inspired schools

• Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado
• The Shambhala School in Halifax, Nova Scotia
• Alaya Preschool in Boulder, Colorado

Shambhala International

The umbrella organization that encompasses many of the distinct institutions of Shambhala Buddhism is called Shambhala International. Shambhala International, which is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia, links a worldwide mandala of urban Buddhist meditation centers, retreat centers, monasteries, a university, and other ventures, founded by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher the Trungpa Rinpoche under the name Vajradhatu. Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche is the present spiritual and executive head of the organization, which he renamed and reorganized in 1990.

Spiritual teachers

• Druk Sakyong Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche (deceased)
• Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche (stepped down due to sexual misconduct with students)
• Vajra Regent Ösel Tendzin (deceased, did not step down but was forced into retreat due to disagreements on how to handle his sexual misconduct with students)

The Shambhala Buddhist sangha has teaching faculty, supporting individual study and practice with mentorship, guidance, personal meditation instruction, junior and senior teachers, and western spiritual teachers (acharyas) who support and guide the Shambhala sangha, including:

• Acharya Dale Asrael
• Acharya Emily Bower
• Acharya Christie Cashman
• Acharya Orhun Cercel
• Acharya Pema Chödrön
• Acharya Dorje Loppon Lodro Dorje
• Acharya Gaylon Ferguson
• Acharya Moh Hardin
• Acharya Arawana Hayashi
• Acharya Jeremy Hayward
• Acharya Daniel Hessey
• Acharya Samten Kobelt
• Acharya Judy Lief
• Acharya Mitchell Levy
• Kalapa Acharya Adam Lobel
• Acharya Noel McLellan
• Acharya Larry Mermelstein
• Ashe Acharya John Rockwell
• Acharya Eve Rosenthal
• Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown
• Acharya Eric Spiegel
• Acharya Richard John

Land centers

The Shambhala "land centers" are retreat centers, generally located in more rural settings around the world.

• Gampo Abbey in Pleasant Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada
• Dorje Denma Ling in Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia, Canada
• Shambhala Mountain Center in Red Feather Lakes, Colorado
• Sky Lake Lodge in Rosendale, New York
• Dechen Chöling in Mas Marvent, France
• Karmê Chöling in Barnet, Vermont

Larger Shambhala Mandala

Many entities are considered part of the larger Shambhala mandala inspired by Chogyam Trungpa, although they may not be legally part of the Shambhala International organization.

• Shambhala Training
• Naropa University an accredited, private liberal arts university founded in 1974 by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche
• Shambhala Institute for Authentic Leadership
• Nalanda Translation Committee
• Ngedon School of Higher Learning
• Kalapa Ikebana a school of Japanese flower arranging founded by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche
• Miksang Photography based on the Dharma Art teachings of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche
• Maitri Space Awareness Maitri Five Wisdom Energies practice
• Konchok Foundation supporting communities in Tibet
• Shambhala Art

Choseng Trungpa, the Twelfth Trungpa Tulku, along with the other tulkus and leaders of Surmang, asked Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche to assume stewardship of Surmang Monastery and its people. Sakyong Mipham has also been asked to assume responsibility for Weyen monastery, the Gesar orphanage, and the Mipham Institute in Golok, and Khamput Monastery in Kham.

Related publications

Shambhala International has inspired or sponsors a number of publications, and others exist in some degree of relationship to the larger Shambhala International/Shambhala Buddhism mandala.

• Shambhala Media, distributor of published works and recordings of Shambhala
• Shambhala Publications was founded and is published by Acharya Samuel Bercholz, a senior teacher in the Shambhala Buddhist lineage, but has no legal relationship to Shambhala International
• Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly , journal of Buddhist practice, published by the Shambhala Sun Foundation
• Lion's Roar , Buddhist-inspired bimonthly magazine of Buddhism, meditation, culture, and life, published by the Shambhala Sun Foundation
• The Shambhala Times, online community magazine

See also

• Index of Buddhism-related articles
• Secular Buddhism

Related Research Articles
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:53 am

Top-to-bottom checkup for the Boulder Shambhala Center building
by Shambhala.org
August 4, 2014

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image


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One of the distinctive features of the Boulder Shambhala Center building are the decorative roof soffits.

The Boulder Shambhala Center has received a $15,000 grant from the Colorado State Historical Fund to conduct a historical assessment of the building.

The assessment will yield a prioritized list of possible maintenance projects which then may be eligible for further grants from the State Historical Fund. The assessment itself is a year-long project that will be fully completed by March 2015.


This is something like a visit to the doctor for the building — a top-to-bottom checkup, with an eye to preserving its health and well-being. The community has done a good job of taking care of the building, but it is 109 years old and in need of more care. The Boulder Shambhala community bought the building in 1976 and renamed it Dorje Dzong, which means Indestructible Fortress in Tibetan.

We have hired an architectural firm and engineering consultants to do the assessment. The husband and wife architectural team of Kris and Tim Hoehn will coordinate; they have accomplished dozens of such historical assessments on buildings in Colorado. The full project team includes:

• Historic Architectural Assessment, Hoehn Architects PC
Project Team Coordination Tim & Kris Hoehn
• Structural Assessment JVA, Incorporated
Ian R. Glaser, P.E.
• Mechanical Assessment MKK Consulting Engineers, Inc.
Ken Urbanek, P.E.
• Electrical Assessment JCN Engineering, Inc.
Jeff Nielsen, P.E.
• Cost Estimating for Preservation Plan – Sandcreek Construction, LLC
Joel Sydlow
• Building Liaison Southward Contracting and Consulting, Inc.
Dennis Southward

The Building

The Physician’s Building was built in 1905 and is a contributing site in the Boulder Downtown Historic District, as well as being eligible for the National Register.

The building was designed by Boulder architects Wright and Saunders, and was constructed especially for the accommodation of physicians. It has housed dental offices, an insurance company, and there was once space for the Republican Party on the third floor.

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Walls and masonry at the Boulder Shambhala Center are offset and show cracks in some spots.

An initial review of the building showed that it is starting to show signs of distress in the exterior of the foundation and masonry walls. Cracks and displaced masonry have been noted, and previously repaired cracks are re-opening. A retaining wall on the front exterior stairs to the basement has an obvious bulge which has increased since the flooding of September 2013. The front stairs are in need of re-setting and re-pointing, as well as tread repairs.

Besides the visible signs of distress in the foundation and masonry walls, the original historic double-hung wood windows have deteriorated and are no longer air tight.

There are original stained glass windows that may require repair, including re-leading. Stains on the ceiling of the main shrine room on the third floor suggest roof leaks or moisture build-up in the attic.

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Some of the stained glass windows have medical iconography because the building originally was home to several doctors and medical practices.

ADA access to all floors of the building is very important to the community since programs are held on every floor of the building. The elevator we have now is old enough that it is very difficult to keep running properly.

This building has been host to the greatest Tibetan meditation masters of this era and contains the blessings of our lineage. It is indeed a precious resource and a center-pole of the entire Shambhala mandala. If not completely indestructible on the outside, it certainly represents and holds the indestructible energy of our community.

Eileen Malloy is the Operations Manager of the Boulder Shambhala Center. Contact Eileen at finance@boulder.shambhala.org, or 303-444-0190, ext. 102.
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Re: Former teacher at Boulder's Shambhala accused of sexuall

Postby admin » Mon Jul 01, 2019 4:09 am

Considering the Future of the Treasure of Shambhala
Judith Simmer-Brown
March 12, 2019 – 12:47 am

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YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


In these heartbreaking days, while we are committed to redesign the entire structure of our community and practice, I wanted to add an element that may provide some historical perspective for our considerations. This is not meant to in any way dictate what we decide to do; those directions will be shaped by the community input to the Process Team, and by auspicious coincidence. Certainly, I have no idea or recommendations for the future. But the Buddhist and Shambhala teachings are often predicated on the question of what we are to accept and what to reject.

As a student of my root guru, the Vidyadhara Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, I have tried in the decades since his passing to understand who he was and what he did. I have puzzled over the final ten years in which he continued teaching the profound Buddhadharma, but he obviously prioritized the Shambhala teachings as chief among his heart treasures. As a scholar-practitioner, I have witnessed how the Shambhala teachings became primary sometime after his passing, and I have increasingly understood this decision as core to the Tibetan tradition and lore of terma itself.

Terma are “discovered treasure” teachings, also known as “close transmissions,” especially associated with the Tibetan Vajrayana tradition. They are contrasted with the Kama teachings, that are the “long transmissions” through historical lineages of greatly realized adepts like Naropa, Milarepa, and the Karmapas. Terma teachings are called “new transmissions” because they arise without a long lineage of adepts and are destined to address the new conditions that arise throughout history in fresh and immediate ways. The Shambhala teachings are primary among the terma teachings discovered by the Vidyadhara, the Druk Sakyong, over a series of years.

Historically speaking, there have been many terma discovered over the centuries by “treasure discoverers” (tertons) like the Vidyadhara. Most of those terma have remained obscure, and have even disappeared, because there is more to a terma than its discovery. Scholars have identified the prevailing historical skepticism that terma have faced within Buddhist traditions over the centuries in Tibet; tertons have been accused of being charlatans, eccentrics, and frauds, even among the most traditional yogic practitioners. Even the great 18th century Jigme Lingpa, discoverer of the Longchen Nyingtig, was deeply concerned with providing legitimacy for his discovery, given the skepticism of his age. The dissemination of a new terma is scrutinized closely, and terma are eventually considered legitimate only in special circumstances, such as whether they lead to palpable realization of some kind or provide clear benefit to beings in the dark age.

Tertons have typically relied on a lineage-holder to propagate the terma, a terdak. That is, the terton discovers the treasure, and the terdak provides commentaries and support for practice for the principal discoverer, and so the terdak is a key figure in the destiny of the treasure teachings. Sakyong Mipham has committed his life to being the terdak of his father’s Shambhala terma. Another key element has been the practitioners who engage in the practice, and whether they develop realization of the teachings. In the case of societal teachings like Shambhala, a great deal depends upon the community of practitioners.

This suggests that for the first generation or two, the future of terma is most fragile and subject to scrutiny. If the teachings do not take root, traditionally the dakinis whisk them away to the lha realm where they may remain until a future, more auspicious moment. Certainly, the career of the terdak can influence the future of the terma, which we are witnessing in a major way in our community right now. But also the practice and realization of this first generation of practitioners has a tremendous impact on the future of the terma.

Among some members of the Shambhala community there has been enormous bitterness about the Sakyong’s decision to make the terma central in our community, sidelining the precious Buddhadharma teachings. I have at times felt that way myself, as I continue to hold the Buddhadharma transmissions of the Vidyadhara as central in my life. Could it be that at least some part of the Sakyong’s decision had to do with the commitment to sustain the terma? That is, would we as a community have explored the depth of the Shambhala terma if it had remained sidelined in our lineage?

And now, the conduct of the Sakyong that has surfaced is definitely threatening the future of the terma. He has devoted the last ten years of his teaching to deepening our realization of the power of basic goodness and creating enlightened society, and many of us have felt the transformative power of those teachings. The flourishing of Shambhala has been directly related to the power of the terma for individuals and the whole community. I like to think that current events are the way the protectors and dralas are cleaning out our lineage’s closets and basements so that the terma can deliver on its promise. There is no way we could or should continue with secrets that are in direct contradiction to confidence in basic goodness and enlightened society. There is deep health in the breakdown of our damaging structures and behaviors, but whether the overall outcome will be beneficial to our community and humanity depends in part upon what we decide to do.

As we make decisions and plans for our future as a community, it is important to recognize that we are the generation of practitioners who have received the precious Shambhala teachings in the introductory curriculum, the intermediary practices, and in the advanced retreats. The future of those teachings rests in part on how we respond to this crisis. In my devotion to my root teacher, I wonder about this essential part of his legacy. Can we embody the core teachings of basic goodness and enlightened society as we experience the heartbreak and make the necessary changes in our community? Can we continue to highlight the Shambhala terma in our practices and community life? Will the terma continue beyond this generation of Shambhala practitioners, or will it go the way of the obscure or irrelevant ones? The Vidyadhara, the dakinis and dralas, and the lineages of Tibetan Buddhism, are closely watching.

For further historical context, please consult:

Andreas Doctor, Tibetan Treasure Literature: Revelation, Tradition and Accomplishment in Visionary Buddhism (Ithaca: Snow Lion, 2005).

Janet B. Gyatso, Apparitions of the Self: The Secret Autobiographies of a Tibetan Visionary (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998).

Janet B. Gyatso, “Drawn from the Tibetan Treasury: The gTer ma Literature” in Cabezón and Jackson, ed., Tibetan Literature: Studies in Genre (Ithaca: Snow Lion, 1996).

Tulku Thondup, Hidden Teachings of Tibet: An Explanation of the Terma Tradition of the Nyingma School of Buddhism (London & Boston: Wisdom Publications, 1986, reprint edition 1997).

Judith Simmer-Brown is Distinguished Professor of Contemplative and Religious Studies at Naropa University, where she is a founding faculty member. She has been a Shambhala acharya for 19 years, and was previously Dean of the Teachers’ Academy. She is author of Dakini’s Warm Breath (Shambhala 2001) and Meditation and the Classroom (SUNY 2010), and numerous articles and book chapters.
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