Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

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Hans Günter Brauch Download Section
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PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, FU Berlin (Ret.), UNU-EHS, Bonn; AFES-PRESS chairman; Editor, Hexagon Book Series (HESP), Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice (PSP) and SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP), Springer Publishers

Since 1987 chairman of Peace Re¬search and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS), since 2005 fellow at the Institute on Environment and Human Security of the United Nations University (UNU-EHS), he was Adj. Prof. (Privatdozent) at the Faculty of Political Science and Social Sciences, Free University of Berlin (Ret. since 2012). He was guest professor of international relations at the universities of Frankfurt on Main, Leipzig and Greifswald and at the teachers training college in Erfurt and since 2012 visiting professor at the National University of Malaysia (2010, 2012) and at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (2012, 2013-2014). From 1976-1989 he was research associate at Heidelberg and Stuttgart universities, a research fellow at Harvard and Stanford University and he was also teaching at the universities of Darmstadt, Tübingen, Stuttgart and Heidelberg. He also taught at SciencePo, Paris (2010-2012), at the European Peace University(EPU) in Austria (1999-2001, 2009-2012) and at the University of Arhus (2012)
He is coeditor of: Security and Environment in the Mediterranean (2003); Globa­lization and Environmental Challenges (2008); Facing Global Environmental C Change (2009); Coping with Global Environmental Change, Disasters and Security (2010); Climate Change,Human Security and Violent Conflict: Challenges for Societal Stability (2012), Expanding Peace Ecology: Security, Sustainability, Equity and Peace: Perspectives of IPRA’s Ecology and Peace Commission and of Handbook on Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace (2015).

Topical Comments on International Issues

Reports

Keynote Addresses and Presentations

2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017

Publications

New publications during 2016 as the Editor of

Hexagon Book Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace (HESP)

Vol. 10: Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, John Grin, Jürgen Scheffran (Eds.): Handbook on Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2016).

Vol. 12: Charlène Cabot: Climate Change, Security Risks, and Conflict Reduction in Africa: A Case Study of Farmer-Herder Conflicts over Natural Resources in Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, and Burkina Faso (Berlin – Heidelberg – New York: Springer, 2016).

Vol. 13: Jeroen Kool: Sustainable Development in the Jordan River Valley: Final Report of the Regional NGO Master Plan (Berlin – Heidelberg – New York: Springer, 2016).

Springer Briefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP)

Vol. 5: Mansoureh Ebrahimi: The British Role in Iranian Domestic Politics (1951-1953) (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2016).

Vol. 22: Cecilia Ng (Ed.): Gender Responsive and Participatory Budgeting: Imperatives for Equitable Public Expenditure (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 23: Rosario H. Pérez-Espejo, Roberto M. Constantino-Toto, Hilda R. Dávila-Ibáñez (Eds.): Water, Food and Welfare: Water Footprint as a Complementary Approach to Water (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 24: Thanh-Dam Truong, Karim Knio: The South China Sea and Asian Regionalism - A Critical Realist Perspective (Cham – New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol: 25: Hayashi, Y., Yasunari, T., Kanzawa, H., Katoh, H. (Eds.): Climate Change, Energy Use, and Sustainability Diagnosis and Prescription after the Great East Japan Earthquake (Cham – Tokyo - Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2016).

Vol: 26: Liana Ricci: Reinterpreting Sub-Saharan Cities through the Concept of Adaptive Capacity: An Analysis of Autonomous Adaptation in Response to Environmental Changes in Peri-Urban Areas (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol: 27: Ana Elizabeth Jardón Hernández: International Migration and Crisis: Transition toward a New Migratory Phase (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol: 28: Supang Chantavanich, Aungkana Kamonpech (Eds.): Refugee and Return: Displacement along the Thai-Myanmar Border (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol: 30: Su Bin, Elspeth Thomson (Eds.): Opportunities and Challenges in China’s Energy Development (Cham – New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol: 31: Su Bin, Elspeth Thomson (Eds.): China's Energy Efficiency and Conservation: Household Behaviour, Legislation, Regional Analysis and Impacts (Cham – New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice (PSP)

Vol. 29: Nils Petter Gleditsch: Nils Petter Gleditsch: Pioneer in the Analysis of War and Peace (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer, 2016).

Vol. 50: Paul J. Crutzen, Hans Günter Brauch (Eds.): Paul J. Crutzen: A Pioneer on Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Change in the Anthropocene (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 52 Richard D. Knowles, Céline Rozenblat (Eds.): Sir Peter Hall: Pioneer in Regional Planning, Transport and Urban Geography (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Two New Book Series Launched in 2016

The Anthropocene Politik – Economics – Society – Science (APESS)

Vol. 2: Maja Göpel: The Great Mindshift: How a New Economic Paradigm and Sustainability Transformations go Hand in Hand (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 3: Audley Genus (Editor): Sustainable Consumption: Design, Innovation and Practice (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 4: Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, Juliet Bennett, Serena Eréndira Serrano Oswald (Eds.): Addressing Global Environmental Challenges from a Peace Ecology Perspective (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 5: Úrsula Oswald Spring, Hans Günter Brauch, Serena Eréndira Serrano Oswald, Juliet Bennett (Eds.): Regional Ecological Challenges for Peace in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia Pacific (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 8: David Curran: More than Fighting for Peace? The Role of Conflict Resolution in Training Programmes for Military Peacekeepers (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 9: Heather Devere - Kelli Te Maihāroa - John Synott (Eds.): Peacebuilding and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Experiences and Strategies for the 21st Century (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice (PAHSEP)

Vol. 1: Louis Kriesberg: Louis Kriesberg: Pioneer in Peace and Constructive Conflict Resolution Studies (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 2: Richard Ned Lebow (Ed.): Richard Ned Lebow: A Pioneer in International Relations Theory, History, Political Philosophy and Psychology (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 3: Richard Ned Lebow (Ed.): Richard Ned Lebow: Major Texts on Methods and Philosophy of Science (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 4: Richard Ned Lebow (Ed.): Richard Ned Lebow: Key Texts in Political Psychology and International Relations Theory (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016). Richard Ned Lebow: Essential Texts on Classics and History and Ethics and International Relations

Vol. 5: Richard Ned Lebow (Ed.): Richard Ned Lebow: Essential Texts on Classics and History and Ethics and International Relations (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 8: J. Russell Boulding (Ed.): Elise Boulding: Writings on Feminism, the Family and Quakerism (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 13: Herbert C. Kelman and Ronald J. Fisher (Eds.): Herbert C. Kelman: Pioneer in the Social Psychology of Conflict Analysis and Resolution (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

Vol. 14: Ronald J. Fisher: Ronald J. Fisher: A North American Pioneer in Interactive Conflict Resolution (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2016).

New Books by Hans Günter Brauch published with several co-editors in 2016

HEXA-GON Series Vol 10: Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, John Grin, Jürgen Scheffran (Eds.): Handbook on Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace. Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace 10 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2016).

ISBN: 978-3-319-43882-5 (Print)
ISBN: 978-3-319-43884-9 (Online)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-43884-9

APESS Vol 4 " Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, Juliet Bennett, Serena Eréndira Serrano Oswald (Eds.): Addressing Global Environmental Challenges from a Peace Ecology Perspective (Cham–Heidelberg– New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2017).

ISBN: 978-319- (Softcover)
ISBN: 978-319- (EBook)
Doi: 10.1007/978-319-_ (add chapter no.)

APESS Vol 5: Úrsula Oswald Spring, Hans Günter Brauch, Serena Eréndira Serrano Oswald, Juliet Bennett (Eds.): Regional Ecological Challenges for Peace in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia Pacific (Cham– New York – Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London: Springer International Publishing, 2017).

ISBN: 978-319- (Softcover)
ISBN: 978-319- (EBook)
Doi: 10.1007/978-319-_ (add chapter no.)

Latest published Books

Chinese Edition of Selected Chapters published by Nanjing Press Company
With the financial support for the translation of the Nanjing Peace Museum in Nanjing

Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, Czeslaw Mesjasz, John Grin, Liu Cheng (Eds.): Globalization and
Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century

ISBN: 978-7-5533-0731-2
Nanjing Press Company,
Nanjing, China,
February 2015,
348 pages

Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, Czeslaw Mesjasz, John Grin, Liu Cheng (Eds.): Facing Global
Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts

ISBN: 978-7-5533-0652-0
Nanjing Press Company,
Nanjing, China,
February 2015,
364 pages

Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, Czeslaw Mesjasz, John Grin, Liu Cheng (Eds.): Coping with Global
Environmental Change, Disasters and Security Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks

ISBN: 978-7-5533-0656-8
Nanjing Press Company,
Nanjing, China,
February 2015,
406 pages

In Spanish

Úrsula,Oswald Spring, Serena Eréndira Serrano Oswald, Fátima Flores Palacios, Maribel Ríos Everado, Hans Günter Brauch, Teresita Ruiz Pantoja, Carlos Lemus Ramírez, Mónica Cruz Rivera (2013). Vulnerabilidad Social y Género entre Migrantes Ambientales, CRIM-DGAPA-UNAM Cuernavaca. ISBN: 978-607-02-5890-9.

Reseña: La migración inducida ambientalmente (MIA) es un proceso complejo que está influido por factores económicos, sociales, culturales, demográficos, políticos y ambientales. Este libro analiza teórica y empíricamente la MIA en el transecto desde el Popocatépetl, pasando por los valles centrales hasta la Sierra Madre del Sur, en la parte central de México. Generalmente, las teorías sobre la migración enfatizan en los aspectos económicos, sociales y demográficos en el lugar de origen o destino y pocas veces incluyen elementos ambientales.

El libro examina de manera multidisciplinaria los factores de expulsión, de atracción y de mediación que llevan a una persona, familia o comunidad a emprender el camino hacia otro destino y su punto nodal se centra en la interrelación entre los aspectos ambientales, agroproductivos, comunitarios y psicosociales.

La discusión teórica de la MIA se ordenó a partir de tres ejes centrales: migración y desarrollo; migración y ambiente; y migración y seguridad. La MIA está sujeta a componentes temporales de largo alcance, como los impactos del cambio ambiental global y del cambio climático, a situaciones y políticas de mediano plazo, en las que predominan las políticas económicas de apertura comercial mediante el Tratado de Libre Comercio con América del Norte, y a coyunturas, entre las que destacan los eventos hidrometeorológicos extremos, las cíclicas crisis económicas y los cambios en la política social y rural sexenal. Al conjuntar los factores interactuantes de la MIA, se encontró una doble vulnerabilidad: la ambiental y la social.

Este libro colectivo hace ver que una política compleja que integre factores estructurales de largo, mediano y corto plazo podría reducir la migración ambientalmente inducida y crear condiciones de seguridad humana, de género y ambiental en el medio rural, no sólo en Morelos, sino en México y más allá.

In English


Hans Günter Brauch – Teri Grimwood: Jonathan Dean: Pioneer in Détente in Europe, Global Cooperative Security Arms Control and Disarmament – Presented by Hans Günter Brauch. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 19 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2015).

ISBN (Print): 978-3-642
ISBN (Online/eBook): 978-3-642
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-

Republication of a book chapter as chapter 1 in the following Handbook

Úrsula Oswald Spring and Hans Günter Brauch: “Securitizing Water”, in: H. G. Brauch, Ú. Oswald Spring, J. Grin, C. Mesjasz, P. Kameri-Mbote, N. Chadha Behera, B. Chourou, H.Krummenacher (Eds.): Facing Global Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts (Berlin – Heidelberg – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2009): 175-202

Úrsula Oswald Spring and Hans Günter Brauch: “Securitizing Water”, in: Anders Jägerskog, Ashok Swain, Joakim Öjendal (Eds.): Water Security (4 vol. set), vol. 1: Water Security - Origin and Foundations (London: SAGE Publications, November 2014): 1-44

Latest own Book

Ursula Oswald Spring; Hans Günter Brauch; Keith G. Tidball (Eds.): Expanding Peace Ecology: Security, Sustainability, Equity and Peace: Perspectives of IPRA’s Ecology and Peace Commission 1. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 12. Peace and Security Studies No. 2 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

ISBN (Print): 978-3-319-00728-1
ISBN (Online/eBook): 978-3-319-00729-8
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-00729-8

Topical Comments on International Issues

Topical Interviews


Hans Guenter Brauch: Interview with Washington Profile, 2 April 2004, Center for Defense Information, Washington, D.C., on Climate Change and Conflicts, in English and in Russian (distributed to major media in the Russia)

Hans Günter Brauch: Interview with Thüringer Allgemeine, Erfurt, 20 March 2003 on the U.S. debate on the costs of the Iraq war (pdf-file, 97 KB)

Reports

European Institute of the Mediterranean, Barcelona, April 2010


Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring
UNCCD, May 2009
Securitizing the Ground-Grounding Security

Download English version (United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification: 404 Page not found)

Úrsula Oswald Spring , Hans Günter Brauch
UNCCD, May 2009
Seguritizar la Tierra Aterrizar la Seguridad

World in Transition – Climate Change as a Security Risk
German Advisory Council on Global Change, Earthscan, London 2008

Summary:

Commissioned Expert's Studies . For this Report, the Council has commissioned expert's studies, which are available for download (in German only): Expert Study by AFES-PRESS written by: Hans Günter Brauch: Regional expert study: Destabilising and Conflict Potential of projected Environmental Changes in the Region of Southern Europe and North Africa [In German: Regionalexpertise: Destabilisierungs- und Konfliktpotential prognostizierter Umweltveränderungen in der Region Südeuropa und Nordafrika bis 2020/2050.

Ben Wisner, Maureen Fordham, Ilan Kelman, Barbara Rose Johnston, David Simon, Allan Lavell, Hans Günter Brauch, Ursula Oswald Spring, Gustavo Wilches-Chaux, Marcus Moench, and Daniel Weiner: Policy Memorandum by Scientists regarding the UN Security Council’s first discussion on Climate Change : Climate Change and Human Security]

The first issue of "Studies Of University: Research, Counsel, Education" (SOURCE) of UNU-EHS: "Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilites and Risks in Environmental and Human Security" by Hans Günter Brauch is available for download here (United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security: Latvia. ProSUM: Prospecting secondary raw materials in the urban mine and mining waste) Orders and inquires of the printed version, please address to Roberts@ehs.unu.edu

Second issue of "InterSecTions. Interdisciplinary Security Connections" is now available. No. 2/ 2005: Environment and Human Security.. Towards Freedom from Hazard Impacts. Hans Günter Brauch. February 2005. ISBN: 3-9810200-3-0 (PDF version) Download (United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security: Pakistan. PMCII: Developing a Disaster Risk Insurance Framework for Pakistan) Intersections are distributed free of charge. For a printed version (ISBN: 3-9810200-2-2), please contact: Ilona Roberts, Information Assistant, United Nations University, Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS), Görresstr. 15 Phone: (0049)(0) (228) 422855-02, D-53113 Bonn Fax: (0049)(0) (228) 422855-99, E-mail: roberts@ehs.unu.edu

Hans Günter Brauch: "Climate Change, Environmental Stress and Conflict - AFES-PRESS Report for the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety", in: Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (Ed.): Climate Change and Conflict. Can climate change impacts increase conflict potentials? What is the relevance of this issue for the international process on climate change? (Berlin: Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, 2002): 9-112.

Keynote Addresses and Presentations
2017
31 May 2017
Mittwoch, den 31.5.2017,
Empfang ab 19:00 und Vorträge ab 19:30-21:00
Rathaussaal der Stadt Mosbach
Buchvorstellung und Buchübergabe
Handbuch zum Übergang zur Nachhaltigkeit
und zum nachhaltigen Frieden

Book Launch of the

Handbook on Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace
Programme (access to podcasts)
Programm und Zugang zu den Podcasts
and Book Donation
on the Occasion of the
70th Birthday of Hans Günter Brauch
Heiko Schattauer, RNZ, 1 June 2017>
for the
Mediathek Mosbach
and Search
and Library of the
Nicolaus-Kistner Gymnasium in Mosbach (Germany)
Report in Frank Heuß, RNZ, 7 June 2017
31 May 2017
Nobel Laureate Prof. Dr. Paul Crutzen
Signing into the Golden Book of the town of Mosbach (in German)
Photos
Heiko Schattauer, RNZ, 1 June 2017

February, 2017
22-24 February, 2017, Strasbourg, France
European Science Foundation
Participation at a Reviewers’ Meeting in the Social Sciences

January, 2017
11-14 January, Mexico City, Mexico
10th International Congress of the Latin American Council of Peace Research
Website with Background documentation
Programme of the CLAIP Congress
Scientific Committee

[x]
Photo after the Opening Session (from left to right), Profesores Nielsen de Paula Pires (Brazil), Miguel Concha (Mexico), Luis Alberto Padilla (Guatemala), María Tresa Muñoz (Argentina), Margarita Veláquez (Mexico), Francisco Rojas (Chile), Diana de la Rúa (Argentina), Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico), Alberto Vital (Mexico), Hans Günter Brauch (Germany), Howard Richards (USA), S. Eréndira Serrano (Mexico), Azril Bacal (Peru/ Sweden).

[x]
Private Dinner of Key Conference Participants in Coyoacan, Mexico City, 15 January 2017 (showing from left to right): Luis Alberto Padilla (Guatemala), Hans Günter Brauch (Germany), Francisco Rojas (Chile), Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico), María Tresa Muñoz (Argentina), Nielsen de Paula Pires (Brazil), Daniel and Diana de la Rúa (Argentina), Luis Medina and S. Eréndira Serrano (Mexico), Laura Balbuena (Peru).

2-8 January, 2017
Archaeological visit to Maya sites in Campeche and Quintana Roo
(Campeche, Calakmul, Becan, Kohunlich, Muyil)

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Map of the Mexican states of Campeche and Quintana Roo

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7 January 2017, Visit of a Biospheric reservation south of the Playa del Carmen near Muyil and Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico.

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7 January 2017, Archaeological Site in Muyil, Quintana Roo, Mexico.

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5 January 2017, Archaeological site, Kohunlich, Quintana Ro, Mexico

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5 January 2017, Archaeological site, Becan, Quintana Roo, Mexico

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4 January 2017, Archaeological site, Calakmul, Campeche

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3 January 2017, Hans Günter Brauch climbing a temple at Edzna, Campeche, Mexico

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3 January 2017, Archaeological Site, Edzna, Campeche, Mexico

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Our travel group from Mexico, Argentina, Germany and Switzerland on 2 January 2017 which started the tour of archaeological sites in Campeche, Campeche, Mexico

2016
27 November - 3 December 2016
IPRA, Freetown, Sierra Leone
26th IPRA General Conference
On AGENDA FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT
Conflict Prevention, Post-Conflict Transformation, and
the Conflict, Disaster Risk and Sustainable Development Debate
Report on the conference in: IPRA Newsletter, 2016, vol 6, no. 4
27th November – 1st December 2016
Freetown, Sierra Leone
THERE IS SO MUCH IN US THAT UNITES US THAN DIVIDES US AS SIERRA LEONEANS. WE MUST RECOGNIZE THIS FACT AND LEARN TO LIVE WITH ONE ANOTHER. -- MAJOR GENERAL ALFRED NELSON-WILLIAMS
UNIVERSITY OF SIERRA LEONE

[X]
28 November 2016

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Opening session of the IPRA Conference, 28 November 2016 with the Vice President and high representatives of the University of Sierra Leone.

IPRA’s Ecology and Peace Commission

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View from the meeting room of the Ecology and Peace Commission on parts of Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Monday, 28 November 2016, Session 1: Opening Session: IPRA Book Launches

[X]
Photo from the IPRA conference dinner in Sierra Leone, 29 November 2016.

Session 2: Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace as Transformative Science:
A Peace Ecology Perspective


[X]
The two new Secretary Generals of IPRA, Prof. Dr. Katsuya Kodama (Japan) and Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico).

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Members of the new Governing Council of IPRA for 2016-2018, 1 December 2016.

[X]
The new IPRA Secretary General Generals of IPRA, Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring talking with school girls on the streets of Freetown, Sierra Leone.

24 October – 15 November 2016
Lecture Tour to Malaysia and Bangkok (Thailand)
Bangkok, 12-15 November 2016
Monday, 14 November 2016,
Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)
Chulalongkorn University: Pillar of the Kingdom
Asian Research Center for Migration
Book Launch on
‘Refugee and Return: Displacement Along Thai-Myanmar Border’
Asian Research Center for Migration (ARCM),
Institute of Asian Studies, Chulalongkorn University
With support from Chula Cluster
Monday 14 November 2016
10.00 -12.00 a.m.
09:30 – 10:00 Registration, Moderator: Assistant Professor Dr. Naruemon Thapchumpon
10:00 – 10:15 Welcome Address: Associated Professor Dr. Nualnoi Trirat Director of Institute of Asian Studies, Chulalongkorn University
10:15 – 11:00 Invited Speaker on ‘Successful Approach to Publish the Research Work with an International Publishing House’. By PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Editor of the SprigerBriefs Series on Environmental, Security, Development and Peace - ESDP
11.00 – 11.30 Background and contexts of the book . Professor Emeritus Dr. Supang Chantavanich and Dr. Aungkana Kmonpetch (Editors)
11.30 – 12.00 Launch of the book and online purchase

Thailand’s Sustainability Transition Forum
Social Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University
4th Floor, Wisit Prachuabmoh building
14 November 2016, 13.00 – 16.00
13.15 Background of the Forum: Prapas Pintobtaeng, Director, Social Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University
13.30 Handbook on Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace: Perspectives of sustainability seen from outside the Euro-Atlantic mainstream [2017-19] H.G. Brauch, Series Editor, Springe
14.00 Sustainable Electricity Transition in Thailand and the Role of Civil Society
Carl Middleton, M.A in International Development Studies Program, Chulalongkorn Univ
14.15 Dilemmas or Myths in the Transition toward Sustainable Food and Agriculture
Chantana Banpasirichote, Social Research Institute
14.30 Discussion: Surichai Wungaeo with participants from GSEI, BioThai, School for Wellbeing, SDF, SEI, AIN, TERRA, CSDS
16.00 Conclusion: Plan for Actions

Lecture Tour to 7 Universities in Malaysia
(25 October – 12 November 2016)
Wednesday-Friday, 9-11 November 2016
Kuching, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia
UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA SARAWAK UNIMAS

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Meeting with a college from the Social Sciences at UMAS, and my former student (UKM, 2012) and friend, Dr. Mohd Daud (Kuala Lumpur) who were both born and raised in Sarawak.

Monday-Tuesday, 7-8 November 2016
University of Malaysia Sabah (UMS)
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia
UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA SABAH

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PROF. HANS

UMS: TOWARDS GLOBAL PUBLISHING. SPRING PUBLISHING WORKSHOP 2016. INVITED SPEAKER FROM SPRINGER: ADJ. PROF. PD DR. HANS GUNTER BRAUCH
DATE: 7-8 NOVEMBER 2016
VENUE: GALERI MAJLIS, BANGUNAN CANSELORI

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Monday 7 November, 1: 10:00-12:00 First session: Workshop on Scientific Publishing: Lecture and Discussion Part 1: 10.00-11.00: Context for Global Publishing: Global Trends: Research, University Ranking, The Global Book Market 11.00-12.00: My Publisher, Role and Global Mission

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A group photo participants at the publication workshop at UMS.

Monday 7 November, 14:00-17.00: Second Session: Workshop on Scientific Publishing: Lecture and Discussion
Part II: Getting published Globally: From a Book Idea to a Publication Agreement
14:00-15:15: Book Idea, Book Proposal Form, Decision-making Process on the Manuscript, Acceptance Text: Book Proposal Form (Exercise, homework for next morning),
15:45-17:00: Language Editing, Style and Formal Editing, Permissions Request, Revised Manuscript ad the Audience

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Conversation on co-publishing with the lawyer of UMS, director and a colleague of UMS Press and a prospective author.

Tuesday, 8 November: 9:00-12:00: Third lecture/workshop session, lunch follows (includes an open forum)
9.00-9.45: Discussion of selected book proposal forms: Blurb, major marketing instruments of the book globally
9.45-10.15: Typesetting, Proofreading and Book production
10.45-11:15: Marketing the Book
11:15-11:30: Recognition of the Book
11:30-12:00: Aiming at a win-win situation: Advantage of Co-publishing: Global recognition and local prices

[x]
Book donation to the director of the University Library of UMS in Kota Kinabalu, a colleague from UMS University Press and an author from UMS.

Tuesday, 8 November, 13:30-16:30: Fourth Session: Experience of Publishing with Springer Nature
13.30-14:00: Assoc. Prof. Mikio Oishi (who published with Springer) to talk about his own experience in publishing);
14:00-14:30: Prof. from the Natural Sciences—this session will also include open forum
15:00-16:00: Hans Günter Brauch: Looking at the Product: Introducing three peer reviewed Book Series and Launching my three recent peer reviewed coedited books on Ecology and Peace:
– Handbook on Sustainability Transitions and Sustainable Peace
– Addressing Global Environmental Challenges from a Peace Ecology Perspective
– Regional Ecological Challenges for Peace in Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Asia Pacific

[x]
Farewell dinner with colleagues from Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Japan

[x]
A cultural show after the farewell dinner with colleagues at UMS in Kota Kinabalu.

Friday, 4 November 2016
UNIVERSITI SAINS ISLAM MALAYSIA: ISLAMIC SCIENCE UNIVERSITY OF MALAYSIA

[x]
Signing of the guest book with the Vice Chancellor (Rector) and members of USIM Press.

[x]
A group photo with selected participants of the Publishing workshop at USIM.

Thursday, 3 November 2016,
National University of Malaysia (UKM)
UNIVERSITI KEBANGSAAN MALAYSIA: NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MALAYSIA

[x]
A group photo with participants of the publishing workshop at UKM during my third visit
after 2010, 2012 that was arranged by Prof. Dr. Zarina Othman.


Wednesday, 2 November 2016,
University of Malaysia
UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA: The Leader in Research & Innovation
PUBLICATION WORKSHOP: "TOWARDS GLOBAL PUBLISHING" By: Prof Hans Gunter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
Scientific Editor, five English Book series (Springer)
DATE: 3 November 2016 (Thursday)
VENUE: THE CUBE, ACADEMY OF ISLAMIC STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA
Contact: Research and Development Office, Academy of Islamic Studies, University of Malaya, Tel.: 03-79676012 (Mrs. Fiza)

Monday, 31 October 2016
MULTIMEDIA UNIVERSITY

[X]

MULTIMEDIA UNIVERSITY
Workshop on Publishing with Global English Language Publishers
Date: 31 Oct 2016 (Monday_
Venue: CCU seminar Room, Chancellery Building, MMU Cyberjaya
Time: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Name: Dr. Hans Gunter Brauch
Nationality: Germany
PD Dr. Hans Gunter Brauch, FU Berlin, UNU-EHS; AFES=PRESS chair; Editor, Hexagon Book Series, Springer Publishers; Adj. Prof. (Privatdozent) at the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, Free University of Berlin; since 2005 fellow at the Institute on Environment and Human Security of the United Nations Unviersity (UNU-EMS); since 1987 chairman of Peace Research and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS).

He was guest professor of international relations at the universities of Frankfurt on Main, Leipzig, Greifswald and in Erfurt. From 1976-1989 he was research associate at Heidelberg and Stuttgart universities, a research fellow at Harvard and Stanford University and he was teaching at the universities of Darmstadt, Tubingen, Stuttgart, Heidelberg, Science Po, and since 2010 at Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok and the National University of Malaysia (UKM). He is editor of two peer reviewed book series by Springer-Verlag (Heidelberg-New York) o the Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace (HESP) and of Springer Briefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESOP) and of the Pioneers in Science and Practice (PSP).

Topic:
1) Publishing with Global Scientific Publishers
2) Interactive part where the participants should raise practical experiences and questions on publishing.
Open to all MMU Staff & Student. Limited number of seats. Please contact rmc@mmu.edu.my for any inquiries
Organized by Research Management Centre

[x]

Friday, 28 October 2016
UNIVERSITI TEKNIKAL MALAYSIA MELAKA
Lecture on: Sustainability Transitions and Sustainable Peace as Transformative Science

Wednesday 26-Thursday, 27 October 2016
UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MALAYSIA
Technical University of Malaysia, Johor Bahru
26 October, UTM Workshop on Scientific Publishing

[X]
A group photo after the lecture in the Prayer Room of the Department on Islamic culture.

27 October, Public Lecture on Scientific Publishing with
Global English Language Publisher

[x]
Photo after lunch with Dr Suri Ebrahmi, an author and Senior lecturer on Islamic Civilization, who had organized and coordinated my lecture tour to seven universities in Malaysia, Prof. Kamaruzaman Yusoff, Faculty of Islamic Civilization, and Dr. Mohd Fauzi Abu Hussin, junior lecturer and prospective author.

9 September 2016, 10:30 – 12:00
Wuppertal Institute, Bergische Universität Wuppertal
Maja Göpel: The Great Mindshift: Why We Need a New Economic Paradigm for Sustainability Transformations
Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, John Grin, Jürgen Scheffran (Eds.): Handbook on Sustainability Transitions and Sustainable Peace

Speakers: (Invitation Flyer)

Prof. Dr. Uwe Schneidewind, Wuppertal Institut, President
Dr. Maja Göpel,Wuppertal Institut, Head, Berlin Office
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Scheffran, Hamburg University, CLISEC
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, FU Berlin & AFES-PRESS
Prof. Dr. Derk Loorbach, Erasmus University Rotterdam, DRIFT, Discussant

In the Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace Handbook 60 authors from many disciplines and from 18 countries examine in ten parts: Moving towards Sustainability Transition; Aiming at Sustainable Peace; Meeting Challenges of the 21st Century: Demographic Imba¬lances, Temperature Rise and the Climate–Conflict Nexus; Initiating Research on Global Environmental Change, Li¬mits to Growth, Decoupling of Growth and Resource Needs; Developing Theoretical Approaches on Sustainability and Transitions; Analysing National Debates on Sustainability in North America; Preparing Transitions towards a Sustainable Economy and Society, Production and Consumption and Urbanization; Examining Sustainability Transitions in the Water, Food and Health Sectors from Latin American and European Perspectives; Preparing Sustainability Transitions in the Energy Sector; and Relying on Transnational, International, Regional and National Governance for Strategies and Policies Towards Sustainability Transition.

Sustainable development is the 21st Century’s wicked problem. For over 40 years, the world has known about ecological limits to economic growth and social limits to economic inequality.

Yet, our attempted solutions – mostly more efficient technologies – have reversed few unsustainable trends. So sustainability advocates now call for a paradigm shift, Great Transformation, radical change or system innovations - changes which evolve the current design of incentives, policies and institutions.

This book describes the path ahead. It combines system transformation research with political economy and change leadership insights when discussing the need for a great mindshift in how human wellbeing, economic prosperity and healthy ecosystems are understood, illustrating its nature through mapping pioneering practices and their commonalities.

[x]
Prof: Dr. Uwe Schneidewind, President, Wuppertal Institut, Wuppertal and Dr. Maja Göpel, Head of the Berlin Office, Wuppertal Institut. © Photo by Andreas Fischer, Wuppertal

[x]
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Chairman, AFES- PRESS, Mosbach, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Scheffran, Universität Hamburg and Dr. Maja Göpel, Head of the Berlin Office, Wuppertal Institut. © Photo by Andreas Fischer, Wuppertal

29-30 July 2016
CESNASV, Mexico City
10 Hours of Teaching in the PhD Programme of
ARMADA DE MEXICO CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS SUPERIORES NAVALES

29 July 2016:
Changes in the Security Concept: From the Peace of Versailles to the End of the Cold War: Emergence of International and National Security

30 July 2016:
The Reconceptualization of Security since the End of the Cold War Three Reasons

ISA, Atlanta
16-19 of March 2016
ISA
International Studies Association, Atlanta, United States of America
16 March, 8.15-10.00
WA63: Enhancing Dialogue between Environmental and Peace Studies:
Towards Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace
Hans Günter Brauch
Introduction to the Panel

2015
16 November 2015, Mosbach
Contribution to the European Week
of the Federal Parliament Dr. Dorothee Schlegel

[X]
Dr. Brauch gives his German book on Climate Change to Dr. Dorothee Schlegel
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Part 2 of 2

29-30 October 2015, Munich,
Academic Memorial for Prof. Dr. Ulrich Beck, University of München
Academic Symposium for Prof. Dr. Ulrich Beck, University of München

September 2015, South Africa
World Social Science Forum, ICC Durban, South Africa, 13-16 September 2015
Participation as a press observer on behalf of Springer Nature as a contact person for publication projects of African scholars in the social sciences

Humboldt Foundation
German – Israeli Roundtable Sustainability and Peace-Building
July 13 – 14, 2015
Freie Universität Berlin

[x]
Photo: © Humboldt-Stiftung/Svea Pietschmann

Report in German on the website of the Humboldt Foundation
Monday, July 13. Senate Assembly Hall, Henry Ford Building,
Garystraße 35, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem
16:30: Synopsis Day 1: Regional Resilience and Peace
Chair: Hans Gunter Brauch
17:30: End of Day 1

[x]
Photo: © Humboldt-Stiftung/Svea Pietschmann. Prof. Dr. Dan Rabinowitch, director of the Potter School on the Environment, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Prof. Dr. Miranda Schreurs, director, FFU, Free University of Berlin (USA) and PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, AFES-PRESS chairman, Mosbach (Germany).

Tuesday, July 14. Senate Assembly Hall, Henry Ford Building, Garystrasse 35, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem
12:00 Session 4: Sustainability and peace-building: the Middle East and Beyond
Chairs: Hans Gunter Brauch, Peace Research and European Security Studies, Sustainability and peacebuilding in the Anthropocene
Mirana Schreurs, Freie Universitat Berlin, Environmental Peace Building: Comparative Perspectives

Presentation 1 by Hans Günter Brauch (14 July 2015)
Humboldt German – Israeli Scientific Panel
Sustainability and Peace-Building in the Middle East

July 15, 2015
Venue: Freie Universität Berlin, Botanisches Museum
Großer Hörsaal, Königin-Luise-Straße 6-8, 14195 Berlin

17:00 Greetings and Welcome: Avraham Nir-Feldklein, Minister of the Israeli Embassy in Germany. Volker Beck, Chair, German-Israeli Group of Parliamentarians. Professor Klaus Muhlhahn, Vice President, Freie Universitat Berlin.

17:30 Opening Remarks: Professor Avi Gottlieb, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and Porter School of Environmental Studies, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Sustainable Peace-Building in the Middle East

Panel Speakers

17:50: Professor Stuart Schoenfeld, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, York University, Canada. Sustainability and Peace-Building in the Eastern Mediterranean: Deadlock and Opportunities

18:30 Gidom Bromberg & Nader Khateeb, Israeli and Palestinian Co-Directors, EcoPeace Middle East (FoEME). The Water and Energy Nexus as a Catalyst for Middle East Peace

18:50 Professor Hans Gunter Brauch, Chair, Peace Research and European Security Studies, Germany. Sustainability and Peacebuilding in the Anthropocene

19:20 Discussion and Closing Remarks
Chair: Professor Miranda Schreurs, Director, Environmental Policy Research Centre, Freie Unviersitat Berlin

20:00 End of Conference

Presentation 2 by Hans Günter Brauch (15 July 2015)

28 - 29 May 2015
Bilkent University, Ankara
Bilkent Universitesi
ISTANBUL POLICY CENTER, SABANCI UNIVERSITY, STIFTUNG MERCATOR INITIATIVE
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM)

Climate Change and Security in Turkey: Challenges and Opportunities
Turkish-German Expert Roundtable Draft Agenda
Co-organized by Istanbul Policy Center, Sabancı University
Department of International Relations, Bilkent University

Roundtable conveners:
Dr. Ethemcan Turhan (Mercator-IPC fellow, Istanbul Policy Center, Sabancı University)
Asst. Prof. Clemens Hoffmann (Bilkent University, Department of International Relations)
International Organisation for Migration (IOM) (Turkey Country Office)
Discussions were off the record (Chatham House rules)

2nd Day: 29 May 2015, Friday
17:00-17:30 Wrap-up session. Discussant: Prof. Hans Günter Brauch . Dr. (Adj. Prof.), Free University of Berlin, Otto-Suhr Institute for Political Science (Ret.), Peace Research and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS), Chairman. Scientific Editor of Hexagon Series on Human, Environmental Security and Peace (HESP), Springer.

Ankara, Turkey
Thursday, 28 May, 9-12 o‘clock
Bilkent Universitesi
Faculty of Economics, Administrative and Social Sciences
Hans Günter Brauch
Training Workshop Publishing with Global Scientific Publishers

21 April
Mosbach-Neckarelz, 21. April 2015
KZ Gedenkstätte Neckarelz
[x]
100 Jahre Giftgas als Waffe-Vom 1. Weltkrieg bis heute
RNZ, 20 April 2015 and 24 April 2015

April 2015, Abuja, Nigeria
AFRICA PEACE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION ASSOCIATION: AFPREA
AFPREA Conference,
Abuja, Nigeria, 13-15 April 2015
At the
ECOWAS PARLIAMENT
The Quest for Peace and Security in Africa: Socio-cultural, Economic, Political and Legal Considerations

[x]
Ladies at the opening session of the AFPREA conference in Abuja

Presentations by Hans Günter Brauch
at the ECOWAS Parliament in Abuja
Monday, 13 April
Commission 6: Regional Integration and Resource Control for Equity
Climate Change Impacts on Security for (West) Africa:
Are there Sustainable Alternatives?

[x]
Former IPRA President Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico) with the Co-Secretary Generals of IPRA, Dr. Ibrahim Shaw (Sierra Leone/UK) and Dr. Nerine Kenar (Turkey)

Wednesday, 15 April 2015
Plenary Session: Training Workshop
Publishing with Global Scientific Publishers

[x]
Fairwell dinner with the Co-Secretary Generals of IPRA, Dr. Ibrahim Shaw (Sierra Leone/UK) and Dr. Nerine Kenar (Turkey)

March 2015, Cancun, Mexico
Fourth Special Session of the Committee on
Science and Technology (CST S-4) and
UNCCD 3rd Scientific Conference
9-12 March 2015, Cancun, Mexico
Workshop 2.5: Desertification, land degradation and restoration
Poster 2 (with Hans Guenter Brauch)
Towards a Proactive Soil Security: A Strategy for a Sustainability Transition by combating desertification, land degradation and drought for poverty reduction and sustainable development

[x]
Hans Günter Brauch, Peace Research and European Security (AFES-PRESS). Photo © ENB, Canada

2014
THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION
THE STANLEY FOUNDATION
GERDA HENKEL STIFTUNG
Global Security Seminar 2014
London, 22 October - 24 October
Session: Our New, Hotter World
Climate Change, Security & Conflict:
Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Chairman, AFES-PRESS
Searching for Sustainable Alternatives

Lübeck, 22-24 September 2014
Max-Planck-Institut fur Meteorologie
Universitat Hamburg
clisap
Climate, Land use and Conflict in Northern Africa
Workshop of the Excellence Cluster CliSAP and the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology at KlimaCampus Hamburg
22-24 September 2014

Climate, Land Use, and Conflict in Northern Africa MPIM
CLISAP
Wednesday, 24 September 2014
Conflict – Synthesis (2/2):
9:00 10:00 session chair: Hans Günter Brauch
9:00 9:20 Jürgen Scheffran, Jasmin Link, Michael Link, Tobias Ide, and Grace Ngaruiya Climate Change, Water, Land Use and Conflict in Northern Africa
9:20 9:40 Janpeter Schilling: Climate Change, Vulnerability and Conflict in Northern Africa
9:40 10:00 9:40 10:00 Short Discussion chair: Hans Günter Brauch

25th IPRA General Conference on the Occasion of 50th Anniversary of IPRA
Uniting for Peace: Building Sustainable Peace Through Universal Values
in cooperation with
SAKARYA UNIVERSITY

Istanbul, Turkey
August 10-14 2014
Ecology and Peace Commission (Programme)
Co-convenors: Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico) & Hans Günter Brauch (Germany)
Tuesday 12 August: 14h00-15h30
Session 2: Sustainability Transition and Peacebuilding
PD Dr. Hans Guenter Brauch, Chairman, Peace Research and European Security Studies, Germany: Building sustainable peace by moving towards sustainable transition
Wednesday, 13 August 2014, 11:30-13:00
Joint Session 4: with Gender, Global Political Economy, Human Rights, and Ecology & Peace Commissions
Betty Reardon: A Pioneer in Education for Peace, Gender Equality, Ecology and Human Rights
PD Dr. Hans Guenter Brauch, Chairman, Peace Research and European Security Studies, Germany:
Honouring the Scientific Excellence of Pioneers in Science and Practice, especially of Peace Scholars: Betty Reardon

Frankfurt, Germany
World International Studies Conference (WISC), 4th Global International Studies Conference 2014
Frankfurt on Main, 6-9 August 2014
Session WA05: Climate Change, Migration and Conflict
Time: Wednesday, 06 Aug 2014: 2:00 pm-3:45 pm
Session Chair: Tobias Ide, University of Hamburg
Discussant: Hans Guenter Brauch, AFES-PRESS
Panel Programme with Abstracts

International Congress, Adaptation Futures 2014
Third International Conference on Climate Change & Adaptation in Fortaleza (Ceará), Brazil, 12-16 May 2014

Panel C-3, Topic 22:
The nexus of development & security particularly in arid and semi-arid conflict-prone regions: Climate change is likely to be a stress multiplier in areas subject to conflict – is this emerging and what can be done to ameliorate it?
PD Dr. Hans Guenter Brauch, Chairman, Peace Research and European Security Studies, Germany
Securitizing Land Degradation by Moving towards A Proactive Soil Security Concept

ISA Annual Convention
8 April 2014
ISA
ISA Annual Convention
ISA Toronto, 25-29 March 2014
Thursday, March 27, 2014. 4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
TD14: Workshop Panel – Sustainable Transition and Roundtable: Sustainable Peace - Policy Initiatives of Governments and International Organizations
© Hans Günter Brauch, Chairman, Peace Research and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS)
Editor, Hexagon Series on Human, Environmental Security and Peace
Editor, SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development & Peace
Introduction to the Roundtable

February 2014
New Publications
(Summer 2013- January 2014)
Springer Briefs on Pioneer in Science and Practice (PSP)

Vol. 5: Johan Galtung [Norway]: Pioneer of Peace Research. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 5 – presented by Dietrich Fischer [Switzerland] (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 7: Chadwick Alger [USA]: Pioneer in the Study of the Political Process and on NGO Participation in the United Nations. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 7 – presented by Carolyn Stephenson [USA] (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 8: Chadwick F. Alger: The UN System and Cities in Global Governance. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 8. Subseries Texts and Protocols No. 3 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 9: Chadwick F. Alger: Peace Research and Peacebuilding. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 9. Subseries Texts and Protocols No. 4 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 10: Lourdes Arizpe Schlosser: A Mexican Pioneer in the Study of Anthropology. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 10 – presented by x (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 13: Arthur H. Westing [USA]: Texts on Environmental and Comprehensive Security SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 13 – Subseries Texts and Protocols No. 7 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 14: Klaus von Beyme: Pioneer in the Study of Political Theory and Comparative Politics. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 14 – Presented by Rainer Eisfeld (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 15: Klaus von Beyme: On Political Culture, Cultural Policy, Art and Politics. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice Vol. 15 – Subseries Texts and Protocols No. 8 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 16: Samir Amin: Pioneer on the Rise of the South SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 16 – presented by Dieter Senghaas (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer, 2013).

Vol. 17: Samir Amin: Theory is History. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 17. Texts and Protocols No. 9 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 20: Hartmut Soell [Germany] (ed.): Helmut Schmidt: Pioneer of the Reform of the International Economic and Financial System – presented by Hartmut Soell. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 20. Policy-makers Subseries No. 1 (Cham – Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP)

Vol. 4: Gamal M. Selim: Euro-American Approaches to Arms Control and Confidence-Building Measures in the Middle East: A Critical Assessment from the South. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 4 – Mediterranean Studies Subseries No. 1 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 6: Lourdes Arizpe, Cristina Amescua (Eds.): Anthropological Perspectives on Intangible Cultural Heritage. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 6 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 7: Ebru Gencer: Natural Disasters and Risk Management in Urban Areas: A Case Study of the Istanbul Metropolitan Area. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 7 Mediterranean Studies Subseries No. 2 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 8: Selim Kapur, Sabit Erşahin (Eds.): Soil Security for Eco-system Management. Mediterranean Soil Ecosystems 1. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 8 - Mediterranean Studies Subseries No. 3 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 10: Nur Azha Putra, Aulalia Han (Eds.): Governments Responses to Climate Change: Selected Examples from Asia-Pacific. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 10 - ASEAN Studies Subseries No. 1 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 11: Sara Hellmüller, Martina Santschi (Eds.): Is Local Beautiful? Peacebuilding between International Interventions and Locally Led Initiatives. – SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 10 – Peace and Security Studies Subseries No. 1. (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 12: Úrsula Oswald Spring, Hans Günter Brauch, Keith G. Tidball (Eds.): Expanding Peace Ecology: Security, Sustainability, Equity and Peace: Perspectives of IPRA’s Ecology and Peace Commission. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 12 - Peace and Security Studies Subseries No. 2 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 14: Liliana Rivera-Sánchez, Fernando Lozano-Ascencio (Eds.): The Practice of Research on Migration and Mobilities. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 14 – Migration Studies Subseries No. 1 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 15: Yongyuth Chalamwong - Naruemon Thabchumpon, Supang Chantavanich (Eds.): Temporary Sheltered and Surrounding Communities. Livelihood Opportunities, the Labour Market, Social Welfare and Social Security. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 15 – Migration Studies Subseries No. 2 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 16 Suwattana Thadaniti, Supang Chantavanich (Ed.): The Impact of Displaced People’s Temporary Shelters on Their Surrounding Environmen Security. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 16 – Migration Studies Subseries No. 3 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 17: Premjai Vungsiriphisal, Dares Chusri, Supang Chantavanich (Eds.): Humanitarian Assistance for Displaced Persons from Myanmar. Royal Thai Government Policy and Donor, INGO/NGO and UN Agency Delivery. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 17 – Migration Studies Subseries No. 4 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Vol. 18: Benjamin Harkins, Supang Chantavanich (Eds.): Resettlement of Displaced Persons on the Thai-Myanmar Border. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 18 – Migration Studies Subseries No. 5 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2014).

Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace

Truong, Thanh-Dam; Gasper, Des; Handmaker, J., Bergh, S.I. (Eds.): Migration, Gender and Social Justice – Perspectives on Human Insecurity. Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace, vol. 9 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer, 2013).

This open access book is for free download here

(October 2013 - January 2014
Guest Professorship
Bangkok, Thailand
Chulalongkorn University
Faculty of Political Science

Workshop on Publishing:
Peer-reviewed Publishing in English with International Publishers in peer-reviewed indexed social science journals and in peer-reviewed books with major social science publishers

2013
18 December 2013
Bangkok, Thailand
Chulalongkorn University
Asian Research Center for Migration (ARCM);
Institute of Asian Studies (IAS),
Consortium for Southeast Asian Studies in Asia (SEASIA)
International Labour Organization (ILO);
International Organization for Migration (IOM)
Labour Rights Promotion Network (LPN)
Annual Conference on the International Migrant Day

Book Launch by Hans Günter Brauch of four Springer Books
Temporary Shelters and Surrounding Communities: Livelihood Opportunities, the Labour Market, Social Welfare and Social Security
The Impact of Displaced People's Temporary Shelters on Their Surrounding Environment
Humanitarian Assistance for Displaced Persons from Myanmar: Royal Thai Government Policy and Donor, INGO, NGO and UN Agency Delivery
Resettlement of Displaced Persons on the Thai-Myanmar Border

9-13 December 2013
Bangkok, Thailand
Chulalongkorn University
Social Research Institute (CUSRI),
Winter School: Transformative Social Sciences for Sustainability and
Social Justice
9 December 2013: Sustainability Transition: Introduction to
a New Research Area in the Social Sciences
11 December 2013: Systemic Approach to Sustainability Transition:
From Top-down and Bottom-up:
System & Technology Innovation & Societal Transformation
11 December 2013: The Dual Focus of Sustainability Transition:
The Supply vs. the Demand Side
13 December 2013: Diffusion and Publications of Research Results

2 December 2013
Mahasarakham University, Khamriang Sub-District, Kantarawichai District
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences,
Lecture on PEISOR Model and Perspectives of Human Security & Peace Ecology

25 October, 2013
Kasetsart University and Koh Kret, Nonthaburi
Faculty of Architecture
Chulalongkorn University,
Social Research Institute (CUSRI)
International Workshop on “Urban Climate Change and Community Resilience”
Lecture on Analyzing Urban Climate Change and Community Resilience. The PEISOR Model and Perspectives of Human Security & Peace Ecology
Teaching in the Political Science Faculty of Chulalongkorn University
in the English language programme of the
Master in International Development Studies (MAIDS)
Lecture 1: Reconceptualization of security and the evolution of the human security debate: policy and science
Lecture 2: Evolution of the human security debate: policy and science Freedom from want and to live in dignity
Lecture 3: Security in (South East) Asia Regional Debate on Human Security in Asia
Lecture 4: Environmental Security
Lecture 5: Climate Change and Human Security
Lecture 6: Global Change, Natural & Environmental Disaster: Migration, Conflicts and Policy Response

1 July 2013
ISA
Annual Convention
The Politics of International Diffusion: Regional and Global Dimensions
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, USA
APRIL 3-6, 2013 ISA
ISA Sponsored Catalytic Workshop
organized by
AFES-PRESS
2 April 2013, ISA Workshop (Programme)
Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace: Policy Initiatives of Governments and International Organizations
This workshop with all abstracts, powerpoints and audio podcasts is documented here:
Presentations by Hans Günter Brauch
2 April 2013, ISA workshop
Seven Dimensions of ‘Sustainability Transition’: Temporal, Spatial, Scientific,Societal, Economic, Political and Cultural
Abstract,powerpoint, paper, audio podcast
4 April 2013: Chair of a panel on: Sustainability Transition: theories, approaches and perspectives from Europe, North and Latin America
Abstract, powerpoint, audio podcast [SF_02]
Programme, abstracts, powerpoint presentations and podcasts are here:
5 April 2013: presentation of two papers by Hans Günter Brauch on:
FB63: Friday 10:30 AM - 12:15 PM:
Panel, Migration Theories and Approaches: Bringing the Environment in
Bringing the environment into migration theory: Theoretical approaches, sectoral debates and controversies on migration, the environment and climate change
Abstract, powerpoint, paper
FC62: Friday 1:45 PM - 3:30 PM: Climate Change Security Nexus: Achievements and Shortcomings
Contextualizing and assessing the climate change and security discourses and policy debate (2000-2012): stages, schools and qualitative approaches
Abstract, powerpoint,paper

4 February 2013
New Coedited Book in Turkish
Publication during 2012 by
Hans Günter Brauch as Editor of three Book Series with
Springer Publishers (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London)
Springer Briefs on Pioneer in Science and Practice (PSP)

Vol. 1: Arthur H. Westing [USA]: Arthur H. Westing: Pioneer on the Environmental Impact of War. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 1– presented by Hans Günter Brauch (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 2: Rodolfo Stavenhagen [Mexico]: Pioneer on Indigenous Rights. Springer Briefs in Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 2– presented by Ursula Oswald Spring (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 3: Rodolfo Stavenhagen [Mexico]: The Emergence of Indigenous Peoples. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice, vol. 3, Subseries with Texts and Protocols, vol. 1 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol. 4: Rodolfo Stavenhagen [Mexico]: Peasants, Culture and Indigenous Peoples: Critical Issues. Springer Briefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice, vol. 4, Subseries with Texts and Protocols, vol. 2 (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

Vol.6: Dieter Senghaas [Germany]: Pioneer of Peace and Development Research. SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice No. 6 – presented by Michael Zürn (Heidelberg – New York – Dordrecht – London: Springer-Verlag, 2013).

SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP)

Vol. 1: Mely Caballero-Anthony, Youngho Chang and Nur Azha Putra (Eds.) [Singapore]: Energy and Non-Traditional Security (NTS) in Asia. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace [ESDP] vol. 1 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2012).

Vol. 2: Mely Caballero-Anthony, Youngho Chang and Nur Azha Putra (Eds.) [Singapore]: Rethinking Energy Security in Asia: A Non-Traditional View of Human Security. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 2 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2012).

Vol. 3: Philip Jan Schäfer [Germany]: Human and Water Security in Israel and Jordan. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace, vol. 3 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2012).

Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace

Scheffran, Jürgen; Brzoska, Michael; Brauch, Hans Günter; Link, Peter Michael; Schilling, Janpeter (Eds.): Climate Change, Human Security and Violent Conflict: Challenges for Societal Stability. Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace, vol. 8 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer-Verlag, 2012).

2012
December
Thailand
Conversation with the Dean of Political Science at Thammasat University in Bangkok, 8 December 2012

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(from left to right): Prof. Dr. Siriporn Wajjwalku (Dean, Faculty of Political Sciences, Thammasat University, Bangkok), Prof. Dr. Zarina Othman, UKM, Malaysia; Mr. Max (Thammasat Univ.), PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Free University of Berlin, AFES-PRESS)

Lectures and Conferences
Teaching in Thailand at
Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok
11 - 14 December 2012
Tuesday, 11 December 2012
13.30-15.00
Book launch: Climate Change, Human Security and Violent Conflict
Roundtable Panel: Dr. Chantana Banpasrichote / Prof. Dr. Kingkarn Thepkanjana / Dr. Taweewong Sriburi/ Dr. Saengchan Limjrakarn/ Jacques-Chai Chomthongdee, FOCUS / Pongtip Somranjit, Local Act, Dr. Bantoon Setsiroj (GSEI) and Human Security National Strategy Working Group (CU and MSDHS) / Prof. Surichai / Dr. Prapaporn / Dr. Surangrut at Center for Peace and Conflict Studies
Wednesday, 12 December 2012
9.00 – 12.00 Teach at MAIDS. Coping with Global Environmental Change in the Anthropocene
13.30 – 15.00 Workshop on Publication. (organized by Human Security Cluster (CU)) Prof. Dr. Kingkarn Thepkanjana, Coordinator, Human Security Cluster (CU) Prof. Dr. Vira Somboon, etc.
15.00 – 16.00 Book launch : Climate Change, Human Security and Violent Conflict: Challenges for Social Stability. Chair: Assoc. Prof. Dr. Suthipand Chirathiwat, Director, Chula Global Network Room 148, Maha Chukrisirintorn Building)
Thursday, 13 December 2012
9.30 – 12.00 Reconceptualizing Security and Securitization of Climate Change
13.00-15.00 Teach at A Ph.D. in Political Science Class: Climate Change, Human Security and Violence: Challenges for Democracy

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16.00-17.00
Consultation on Human Security Research
Dr. Naruemon Thabchumpol and Dr. Chantana Banpasrichote
Friday, 13 December 2012
9.30 – 12.00
Join First Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Lecture on Sustainable Development (2012) Dr. Vandana Shiva, Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis

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Written comments by Hans Günter Brauch
15.00 –18.00 Teach at EDS (Environment Development and Sustainability) Ph.D. Program. Environment, Development and Sustainability. (Dr. Sangchan Limjirakarn at the Institute of Environmental Research)

National University of Malaysia (UKM)
3-7 December 2012
Visiting Professor
Professor Hans Günter Brauch (PhD)
School Of History, Politics and Strategic Studies & Ikon
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Bangi, Selangor
3 December 2012
8.30 am - 11.30 pm (3 hours):
Graduates Seminar, Lecture Hall: 3F-201
Politics and International Relations Students
Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century: End of the Cold War, Globalization and Global Environmental Change

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12.00 pm - 01.30 pm: Meeting/Lunch with Deputy Vice Chancellor-Chancellery
(Professor Dato’ Dr. Noor Azlan Ghazali - Academic and International Affairs)
2.00 pm - 04.30 pm
Publication Workshop with Professor Gunter Brauch: Peace, Security, Environment and Development in ASEAN
(Eds.: Zarina Othman, Sity Daud and Nor Azizan Idris), Meeting Room, Block A (Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences)

06:00 pm – 09:00 pm (3 hours)
Graduates Seminar - SKSS 6023-Contemporary International Relations, Meeting Room, Level 6
School of History, Politics and Strategic Studies
Coping with Global Environmental Change-Sustainability Revolution & Sustainable Peace

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4 December 2012
9.00 am - 12.45 pm
Roundtable Discussion and Book Launch
Globalization, Peace and Human Security in SE Asia
Auditorium, Faculty of Science and Technology (FST)

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Speakers: 1. Professor Gunter Brauch, Free University, Berlin, Germany

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2. Associate Professor Dr. Rashila Ramli, Director, IKON, UKM

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3. Dr. Sharifah Munirah Syed Hussein Alatas, Senior Lecturer (Strategic Studies and International Relations) & Principal Fellow, UKM-Southeast Asia Disaster, Prevention Research Institute (SEADPRI)

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Moderator: Emeritus Professor Dato’ Dr. Abdul Samad Hadi, Principal Fellow, UKM-Institute for Environment and Development (LESTARI)

Book Review: Professor Datuk Paduka Mohamad Abu Bakar, Department of Strategic Studies and International Relations, University Malaya

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Book Launch: Emeritus Professor Dato’ Dr. Abdul Rahman Embong, Principal Fellow, Institute of Malaysian and International Studies (IKMAS)

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02.00 pm - 4.00 pm (2 hours)
Graduates Seminar- SKSU 6253: International Security Issues
School of History, Politics and Strategic Studies, Meeting Room, Level 6, Block E
Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, UKM
Security Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks in US National Security Documents (1990-2010)

5 December 2012
09.00 am - 12.00 pm (3 hours) Graduates Seminar - SKSS 6033: Globalization and International Security Issues
Meeting Room, Level 6, Block E. School of History, Politics and Strategic Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, UKM
Climate Policy of the G8 Countries or Climate Policy of the G20 Countries
02.00 pm - 04.30 pm PhD Students’ Workshop with Professor Gunter Brauch .
Writing and Publishing: Why, When, and How?
Meeting Room, Level 6, Block E, School of History, Politics and Strategic Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, UKM

6 December 2012
09.00 am - 12.00 pm
Visitation of Institute for Occidental Studies (IKON)
oral discussion without presentation
Afternoon: Counseling of individual Ph.D candidates

7 December 2012
3.00-4.30 pm Publication Workshop with Hans Günter Brauch, Editor, Faculty of Humanities and Social Science

8.00-10.00 pm Dinner in Honour of the Nobel Laureate Mohamad Yunus (Bangladesh). Launching of the New UKM Chair on Social Business

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Photo (from right to left): Son of the present King of Malaysia, Prof. Dr. Mohamad Yunus, Nobel Peace Laureate, PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Free University of Berlin, AFES-PRESS)

CENTRE FOR NON-TRADITIONAL SECURITY STUDIES: A Centre of the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Nanyang Technological University

Book Launch in Singapore, Nanyang Technical University (NTU)
30 November 2012
Sustainable Development and the Nexus between Climate Change and Energy Security
Meeting Documentation (NTS website)

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Hans Günter Brauch

Business-as-Usual vs. Sustainability Transition in the Context of the Nexus between Climate Change and Energy Security

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Part 3 of 4

Book Launch
Hans Günter Brauch
Springer Briefs in Environment, Security, Development & Peace, vol. 1-2
SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science & Practice, vol. 1
Hexagon Series on Human, Environmental Security and Peace, vol. 8

IPRA: International Peace Research Association
IPRA Global Conference
‘Peace and Justice in a Globalized World: Opportunities & Challenges’
Tsu City, Mie University, Japan,
24-28 November 2012

[x]
IPRA Secretary Generals (2010-2012) Prof. Dr. Jake Lynch (UK, Australia), Prof. Dr. Katsuya Kodama (Japan) in July 2010 in Sydney

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IPRA Secretary Generals (2010-2012) Prof. Dr. Jake Lynch (UK, Australia). Prof. Dr. Katsuya Kodama (Japan) at Mie City, Japan (Nov. 2012)

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Prof. Dr. Katsuya Kodama (Japan) receives the Inter-national Award of Non-Violence from S.L. Gandhi (President of Anuvrat Global Organisation

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Plenary 1: ‘A better world is possible: Prof. Dr Ursula Oswald Spring (Mexico), former President José Ramos-Horta (East Timor, Nobel Peace Laureate, 1995)

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Bernadette Muthien (South Africa), Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring (Mexico), Prof. Dr. Vidya Jain (India)

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Former IPRA Secretary General Chad Alger at the Reception during the IPRA Conference (2012)

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Japanese Cultural performance at the Reception during the IPRA Conference in Mie-City on 24 November 2012

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IPRA Secretary Generals (2012-2014):. Dr. Nesrin Kenar, University of Sakarya (Turkey), Dr. Ibrahim Seaga Shaw (University of the West of England) (Sierra Leone/UK)

Ecology and Peace Commission (EPC)
Saturday, 24 November 2012, 16:20-18:20
Session 2: Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Pe

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Photo: (Co-chairs of the Ecology and Peace Commission, 2012-2014): Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico); PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Germany), without Prof. Dr. Keith Tidballs (USA)
Hans Günter Brauch: From Rio 1 to Rio 2: Climate Change Implementation Gap
Ecology and Peace Commission
Saturday, 24 November 2012, 16:20-18:20
Session 2: Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace
Hans Günter Brauch: Security and Peace Impacts of the Climate Paradox: Assessing the Hobbesian Climate Change & Security Discourse

2 November 2012
ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY OF THE EUROPEAN CROSS-BORDER ENERGY SUPPLY INFRASTRUCTURE
30-31 October 2012, Moscow, Russia
The Workshop will be hosted by Sergeev Institute of Environmental Geoscience RAS
ORGANISERS: Russian Academy of Sciences, Sergeev Institute of Environmental Geoscience (IEG RAS_
This workshop is supported by "The Science for Peace and Security Programme", indicating that the meeting is funded by NATO

Tuesday, 30 October 2012, 16:20 – 16:40
Hans Günter Brauch
Environmental and Energy Security: Conceptual Evolution and Potential Applications to European Cross-boundary Energy Supply Infrastructure

Wednesday, 24 October 2012, 14:00-16:00
AARHUS UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF CULTURE AND SOCIETY
HUMAN SECURITY
MASTER IN HUMAN SECURITY
Aarhus University Humans Security
Hans Günter Brauch
Poster announcement
Securitizing Global Environmental Change & Climate Change, International, National & Human Security & Violent Conflicts? Two Discourses Posing Challenges for Research and Policy in the 21st Century

10-13 September 2012
First Sustainability Transition and Sustainable Peace Workshop
UNAM/CRIM and AFES-PRESS
Sponsored by the German Foundation on Peace Research (DSF) and UNAM/CRIM, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico
Towards a Fourth Sustainability Revolution and Sustainable Peace: Visions and Strategies for Long Term Transformative Change to Sustainable Development in the 21st Century
10-13 September 2012, in Yautepec, Morelos, Mexico
Monday, 10 September 2012

1. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin and AFES-PRESS, Mosbach, Germany: The Climate Paradox: Policy Declarations and Lack of Implementation: The Political Context for the Fourth Sustainability Revolution

Abstract
Presentation
Podcast

This paper has been accepted after peer review by the Special English issue of Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional - Brazilian Journal of International Politics on Global Climate Governance and Transition to a Low Carbon Economy, November 2012 that is coedited by Eduardo Viola, Full Professor of the Institute of International Relations of the University of Brasília, and Prof. Antônio Carlos Lessa, Editor, Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional - Brazilian Journal of International Politics and Associate Professor - Institute of International Relations - University of Brasília.

2. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin and AFES-PRESS, Mosbach, Germany: Seven Dimensions of ‘Sustainability Transition’: Temporal, Spatial, Scientific, Societal, Economic, Political and Cultural

Abstract
Presentation
Podcast

Wednesday, 12 September 2012

3. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin: From DESERTEC to NAFSOLTEC: Macro Projects for a transition towards renewable energies in Europe, the MENA Region and in North America

Abstract
Presentation
Podcast

16.30-19.00 Twelfth Final Session: Roundtable Discussions on Visions and Strategies for a Fourth Sustainability Revolution moderated by Prof. Dr. Margarita Velázquez Gutierréz, Director, UNAM/CRIM

4. Roundtable Discussion Part B: Prof. Dr. Czeslaw Mesjasz, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Scheffran, PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch: Impact Research on the Linkages between Transformations towards Sustainability and Sustainable Peace at the local, regional and global levels Podcast

1-4 April 2012
ISA
ISA’s 53rd Annual Convention
San Diego, USA, 1-4 April 2012
Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition
All papers my be downloaded by ISA members at ISA archives for San Diego Conference in 2012
Panel SD 54: Sunday, 1 April 2012, 4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Climate Change, Environmental Stress, and
Conflict Sponsor: Environmental Section
Chair: Salehyan, Idean: University of North Texas
Disc.: Levy, Marc A.: Columbia University

The PEISOR Model: Global Environmental Change – A Human, Gender and Environmental (HUGE) Security Perspective Focusing on Mexico
Brauch, Hans Günter: AFES-PRESS
Oswald Spring, Ursula: National University of Mexico
paper
presentation

Climate Wars Redux? On Climate Variability and Armed Conflict in Asia
Buhaug, Halvard: Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO)
Wischnath, Gerdis: Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO)

Explaining the Strength of Rainfall Shock: Social Conflict Links in Asia
Hendrix, Cullen: The College of William & Mary

Climate Change, Migration, and Conflict
Koubi, Vally: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), University of Bern

Panel: MA26: Monday 8:15 AM - 10:00 AM
Climate Change, Environmental Migration,
Sustainable Energy and Security Theory

Chair: Brauch, Hans Günter: AFES-PRESS
Disc.: Schreurs, Miranda: Free University of Berlin
Dalby, Simon: Carleton University

Confronting NAFTA's Climate Paradox: A Sustainable Energy Perspective for the Post-Kyoto Regime and Rio+20
Brauch, Hans Günter: AFES-PRESS
paper
presentation

Climate Risks and Security Providers
Brzoska, Michael: University of Hamburg
presentation

Uncertainty, Complexity and Prediction in Theories of Security
Mesjasz, Czeslaw: Cracow University of Economics
presentation

Global Environmental Change and Environmental-Induced Migration
Oswald Spring, Ursula: National University of Mexico
paper
presentation

6 February 2012 (Book in print)
Climate Change, Human Security and Violent Conflict
Scheffran, Jürgen;Brzoska, Michael; Brauch, Hans Günter; Link, Peter Michael; Schilling, Janpeter (Eds.): Climate Change,Human Security and Violent Conflict: Challenges for Societal Stability Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace, vol. 8 (Heidelberg – Dordrecht – London – New York: Springer, 2012).
ISBN: 978-3-642-28625-4 (Print)

2011
Germany
2 December 2011
French-German Excellence Prize for Charlène Cabot (Montpellier), SciencePo (Paris) and Free University of Berlin
Engagement für nachhaltige Entwicklungsarbeit
Press Release 377/2011 Free University of Berlin
Press Release of the Otto-Suhr Institute for Political Science (25 November 2011)

Thesis adviser was PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, tto Suhr Institute for Political Science, Free University of Berlin and Master of Public Administration, ScienePo (Paris)

universite franco allemande

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Charlène Cabot and Paul Scheebeli of Rotary Club Paris in Straßburg on 18 November 2011

Report of the Informationsdienst Wissenschaft (21 November 2011)
See report on the website of French-German University
Press folder on the 2011 prize recipients

28 November 2011
NATO OTAN: EMERGING SECURITY CHALLENGES DIVISION
CARNEGIE EUROPE
CARNEGIE ENDOWMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE
The New Challenges to Global Security
NATO's Response
Monday, 28 November 2011
The Stanhope Hotel
Brussels, Belgium
Conference Programme
NATO and Partner Countries discuss
New Challenges to Global Security
About 200 experts from NATO and partner countries gathered in Brussels on 28 November 2011 for the first conference on “New Challenges to Global Security” organised by NATO’s new Emerging Security Challenges Division.


“Many of these challenges cannot be kept at bay by the mere threat of military retaliation; and many require a much stronger focus on prevention and on enhancing the resilience of our infrastructure”, said the head Emerging Security Challenges Division, Assistant Secretary General Gabor Iklódy, welcoming participants from NATO and partner countries and from academic institutions.


Talking Notes by Dr. Hans Günter Brauch
Links to reports on the websites of the organizers:
NATO

NATO and Partner Countries discuss New Challenges to Global Security
by NATO OTAN North Atlantic Treaty Organization
28 Nov. 2011 - | Last updated: 29 Nov. 2011 17:23

About 200 experts from NATO and partner countries gathered in Brussels on 28 November 2011 for the first conference on “New Challenges to Global Security” organised by NATO’s new Emerging Security Challenges Division.

“Many of these challenges cannot be kept at bay by the mere threat of military retaliation; and many require a much stronger focus on prevention and on enhancing the resilience of our infrastructure”, said the head Emerging Security Challenges Division, Assistant Secretary General Gabor Iklódy, welcoming participants from NATO and partner countries and from academic institutions.

The conference was an opportunity for security matter experts to look closely at the new Division’s agenda, ranging from threats to cyber networks and international terrorism to securing energy supplies and preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. During the discussions, participants encouraged NATO’s Emerging Security Challenges Division to expand partnerships and enhance capabilities in dealing with modern threats. Assistant Secretary General Iklódy noted the importance of working together with partners and said that with regard to emerging challenges, “NATO will either be a team player, or it will be no player at all”.

The conference was sponsored by the Alliance’s “Science for Peace and Security” Programme and Carnegie Europe.


and

Carnegie Europe

The New Challenges to Global Security: NATO's Response
by Pierre Goldschmidt, Jan Techau
November 28, 2011
Brussels

Summary: Global Security in the 21st century is an ever elusive goal and NATO must face emerging security challenges in counter terrorism, cyber defense, energy security, and non-proliferation.

This one day conference, initiated by NATO in partnership with Carnegie Europe, brought together a trans-Atlantic pool of experts to tackle the emerging security challenges facing the Alliance and its partners. Part of NATO’s response to the changing dynamics of this environment has been the strategic development of its Emerging Security Challenges (ESC) Division, and more specifically the inclusion of the Science for Peace and Security (SPS) Programme. This conference provided a good opportunity to learn about, as well as challenge, this response to the emerging security threats of the 21st Century.

Through the day, adjacent sessions on pertinent issues such as counter terrorism, cyber defense, energy security, the non-proliferation of WMDs and the role of nuclear deterrence were tackled by speakers and participants from key stakeholder audiences as well as the Alliance itself.


DGVN
DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR DIE VEREINTEN NATIONEN e.V.
Stuttgart, Friday, 28 October 2011, 7pm
Global Environmental and Climate Change (in German)
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch: Book presentation: Coping with Global Environmental Change, Disasters and Security: Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities & Risks (in German)

Mosbach, Thursday, 27 October 2011
Announcement, Rhein-Neckar-Zeitung, 19 October 2011 (in German)
Mosbach
Joint Presentation by Prof. Oswald Spring and Dr. Brauch (in German)
Photo of Book transfer ceremony (Photo by Ursula Brinkmann, RNZ Mosbach)

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Mr. Horst Hertel, representative of the Sparkasse Neckartal-Odenwald (sponsor), Mr. Wiegand, director of the municipal public library of Mosbach (recipient of two book gifts), Prof. Dr. Albrecht Dinkelacker (DHBW, recipient of two book gifts), Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (UNAM, CRIM, co-editor and author), Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (FU Berlin, co-editor and author) and Mayor Michael Keilbach (host of the book transfer ceremony)

Report in Rhein-Neckar-Zeitung (31 October 2011, in German)
Photo Gallery with photos by Carmen Oesterreich and Ursula Brinkmann
Invitation
DHBW Mosbach
Duale Hochschule Baden-Württemberg, 19:00 Uhr
Studium Generale
Global Environmental and Climate Change and Sustainability (in German)
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Mosbach):Global climate change, political changes in the Arab world and change in energy policy in Germany: perspective for a sustainable development in the Mediterranean (in German)
Globaler Klimawandel, Umbruch in der Arabischen Welt und Energiewende in Deutschland: Perspektive für eine nachhaltige Entwicklung des Mittelmeerraumes
Report: DHBW Website (in German)
Announcement on the Website of the Organizer

Poland
Tuesday, 25 October 2011, 5pm
Warsaw, Warsaw School of Economics
Participants: Prof. dr hab. Katarzyna Żukrowska, Head, International Security Department, Introduction
PD Dr. habil. Hans Günter Brauch, Reconceptualization of Security in the Early 21st Century
Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring, Water and Food Security in the 21st Century

Monday, 24 October 2011, 2pm Cracow,
Cracow University of Economics
Participants: Assoc. Prof. dr hab. Czesław Mesjasz, Management Process Departmnent, CUE. PD
Dr. habil. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin: Reconceptualization of Security in the Early 21st Century, Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico: (UNAM): Water and Food Security in the 21st Century

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Opening session with the Vice Rector for Scientific Research of the Cracow University of Economics, Prof. Dr. hab. Andrzej Malawski and Prof. Dr. hab. Czeslaw Mesjasz (moderator), PD Dr. hab. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin and Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Centre for Regional Multidisciplinary Studies (CRIM), Cuernavaca.

Photo Gallery

Germany
Thursday, 20 October 2011, 6 pm,
Berlin, Foreign Ministry of Germany
Programme (in German)
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University Berlin, UNU-EHS, AFES-PRESS

Mexico City, 27 September, 19:00-23:00
Book Launch and Reception at the German Embassy,
Mexico City, 27 September 2011 of
Coping with Global Environmental Change, Disasters and Security Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks
Presentations by:
Dra. Estela Morales, Coordinadora de Humanidades [Vice Rector], UNAM
Dr. Rodolfo Stavenhagen, Prof. Em., El Colegio de México
Dra. Úrsula Oswald Spring, CRIM-UNAM, editor
Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Universidad Libre de Berlin, editor

WISC
Presentations by
Third World International Studies Conference,
Porto, Portugal from 17-20 August 2011

The World in Crisis: Revolution or Evolution in the International Community?

Panel: Responding to Climate Change in the Anthropocene: Security Impacts and a Needed Fourth Sustainable Revolution

Powerpoint by Hans Günter Brauch: Implementing Climate Change Commitments: Sustainability Revolution, Changes in Worldviews and Mindsets

Other papers by:

Úrsula Oswald Spring: Cultural Change and Fourth Sustainable (Green) Revolution

Paul J. Smith: Geopolitical and security challenges of climate change for US national security

Book Launch of

Reconceptualizaiton la seguridad en el sigio xxi
Coping with Global Environmental Change, Disasters and Security
Mexico City, 28 April, 11:00
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
Facultad de Ciencias Politícas
Sala Fernanda Benitez
Poster
Speakers/Ponentes
Prof. Dr. Ignacio Carriquiriborde, UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias Politícas
Dr. Clemente Rueda, UNAM, Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring
Adj. Prof. Hans Günter Brauch (version Español, English version)
Moderatora: Prof. Dr. Bodek Stavenhagen

New York, United Nations
United States of America
14 April 2011
Informal Thematic Debate of the 65th Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Human Security

Informal Thematic Debate on Human Security
by General Assembly of the United Nations
President of the 65th Session

Background

Today, millions of men, women and children continue to find themselves in extreme and vulnerable circumstances. Threatened by intra-state conflicts, organised crime, chronic poverty, environmental degradation, deadly infectious diseases, and risks posed by natural hazards, the human, economic and social capital lost to these situations continue to exert a devastating toll on the survival, livelihood and dignity of large numbers of citizens around the globe.

Whereas in the past, the concept of security was equated primarily with territorial security, today cross-border military threats are only one, and often not the most significant challenge confronting people’s lives. As a result, the guarantee of security no longer rests on military responses alone. Essential to its advancement is also healthy political, social, environmental, economic and cultural systems that together strengthen the inter-linkages between security, development and human rights and help advance human freedoms for all. Similarly, the shift towards a global environment has meant that national borders are permeable and insecurities in one area have the potential to pose grave threats not only to the immediate victims but also to the collective security of the international community.

In response to these developments, the United Nations General Assembly agreed at the 2005 World Summit to further discuss and define the notion of human security. Paragraph 143 of the World Summit Outcome (A/RES/60/1) recognizes that “all individuals, in particular vulnerable people, are entitled to freedom from fear and freedom from want, with an equal opportunity to enjoy all their rights and fully develop their human potential.”

Drawing input from a number of governments as well as intergovernmental organisations, civil society groups, scholars and other prominent individuals, human security is gaining support not only at the United Nations but also in other forums. Subsequently, the notion of human security is increasingly reflected in the agendas of intergovernmental organizations such as the African Union, the European Union, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the League of Arab States (LAS) and the Organization of American States (OAS).

At the United Nations, in addition to human security related activities undertaken by UN agencies, funds and programmes (A/62/695, annex), the General Assembly, in May 2008, held an informal thematic debate on human security. During the course of deliberations, consensus was reached by Member States on the need for a new culture of international relations that goes beyond fragmented responses and calls for comprehensive, integrated and people-centred approaches that help prevent or mitigate the growing instances of human insecurity around the world.

To this end, in March 2010, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issued his report on human security (A/64/701). A formal debate on human security was subsequently held at the General Assembly on 20 and 21 May 2010, and in July 2010, the General Assembly adopted by consensus its resolution on human security entitled Follow-up to paragraph 143 on human security of the 2005 World Summit Outcome (A/RES/64/291).

Objective and Expected Outcomes

The Informal Thematic Debate of the General Assembly on Human Security aims to support the goals set out in General Assembly Resolution 64/291 and to contribute to discussions on a notion of human security. It is envisioned that the debate will provide an opportunity for experts and Member States to share ideas and attempt to forge a common understanding on the core elements of human security, its added value, and a possible definition thereof.

Programme

The informal thematic debate took place on 14 April 2011 at UN Headquarters in New York. The debate, which consisted of two moderated panel discussions with high-level experts, focused on a possible approach to defining human security and its added value as a practical approach to addressing the growing interdependence of threats to peace and development for the people on the ground. The floor was opened to delegates for questions to the panellists as well as interventions.

Time / Programme

10 – 10:30 a.m. Opening Remarks. H.E. Mr. Joseph Deiss, President of the General Assembly. H.E. Ms. Asha-Rose Migiro, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General

10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Interactive Panel Debate 1: A Possible Approach for Defining Human Security
Moderator. Ms. Margareta Wahlström, Special Representative to the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction. Panelists: H.E. Mr. Olusegun Obasanjo, Former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and Founder of the Centre for Human Security; Dr. Frene Ginwala, Former Speaker of the National Assembly, Republic of South Africa and Member of the Commission on Human Security; Dr. Jennifer Leaning, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at Harvard School of Public Health; Dr. Amitav Acharya, Professor of International Relations and Chair of the ASEAN Studies Center at American University

3 – 5:45 p.m. Interactive Panel Debate 2: Human Security - its application and added-value. Moderator:
Ms. Valerie Amos, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator. Panelists: H.E. Ms. Sonia Picado, President of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights and Member of the Commission and Advisory Board on Human Security; Mr. Cheick Sidi Diarra, Special Adviser on Africa and High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States; Dr. Andrew Mack, Director of the Human Security Report Project at Simon Fraser University and Former Director of the Strategic Planning Office in the Executive Office of United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan; Dr. Hans-Günter Brauch, Chairman of Peace Research and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS) and Fellow at the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security
5:45 – 6 p.m. Closing Remarks. Mr. Yukio Takasu, Special Advisor to the Secretary-General on Human Security; H.E. Mr. Joseph Deiss, President of the General Assembly


[x]
Photo (from left to right): President of the 65th Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations, Dr. Joseph Deiss (Switzerland) and Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Chairman of AFES-PRESS

Report of the Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon on Human Security (8 March 2010)

Resolution adopted by the General Assembly, 64/291 (27 July 2010).
Follow-up to paragraph 143 on human security of the 2005 World Summit Outcome

Background and Programme
Press Release (15 April 2011)
Contributions of Hans Günter Brauch
Background Paper
Talking Notes

New York, United Nations
23 March 2011
United States of America
UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY, Office at the UN, New York
Book Launch, 1:15 - 2:45
United Nations Headquarters,
44th and 1st Avenue, Conference Room 8
Website of UNU-ONY for additional information
Website of AFES-PRESS for full event documentation and background texts
Text of Speeches and TV Podcasts
Speech by Hans Günter Brauch and Podcast
Speech by Úrsula Oswald Spring and Podcast
Photo Gallery
Interview of Kamma Thordarson, Staff Correspondent MediaGlobal, Voice of the Global South, United Nations Secretariat 15 April 2011
with Ursula Oswald Spring and Hans Günter Brauch

Montreal, Canada
ISA Annual Convention 2011
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, March 16-19,
2011 Global Governance: Political Authority In Transition
Panel with a Book Launch
WB63: Wednesday, 16 March, 10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Panel: Coping with Global Environmental Change, Disasters and Security:
Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks
Hans Günter Brauch: Introduction (Powerpoint)
Hans Günter Brauch: AFES-PRESS: Political Geoecology for the Anthropocene
Powerpoint – Paper on ISA website – Book chapter at SpringerLink – Bibliography
Photo Gallery
Website of AFES-PRESS for full event documentation and background texts

15 March 2011
Programme for ISA workshop at Montreal
Sheraton Le Centre Hotel, Salon 3, 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Gendered Peace: The Problematique of Gender Analyses in Peace Research
Hans Günter Brauch
Security in peace research and security studies: Deficits on gender issues?
PaperPowerpoint Presentation

Ottawa, Canada
14 March 2011
British High Commission Ottawa
Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN STUDIES
The Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, the Centre for European Studies (European Union Centre of Excellence) at Carleton University, and the British High Commission in Ottawa
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
British High Commission, 80 Elgin Street, Ottawa
Book Launch & Reception
Powerpoint Presentation by
Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin, Co-editor
Website of AFES-PRESS for full event documentation and background texts

14 March, 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.l, A220 Loeb
Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies and Centre for European Studies (European Union Centre of Excellence)
Invitation Flyer
Seminar on
Environmental Change, Security and Migration: Towards Sustainable Transformation
Presented By Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Chairman, Peace Research and European Security Studies (AFES-PRESS)
Mosbach, Germany; Editor, Hexagon Series on Human, Environmental Security and Peace

Global Environmental Change: Environmental Hotspots in North Africa and in Mexico Proactive Policies towards a Sustainabe Transformation: A DESERTEC Vision for North America & NAFTA

Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring, Research Professor, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias CRIM - UNAM, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62210 México

Migration: A Complex Analytical Process

26 January
Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch
at UNAM, CIE, Cuernavaca
CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION EN ENERGIA
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
on:
Coping with the Causes of Climate Change: Renewable Energy Policies in Germany and the European Union:
Moving towards a gradual decarbonization of the energy economy by 2050 with a fourth green sustainability revolution
Conference announcement
Powerpoint presentation

2010
Brussels, 18-19 November 2010
ASEAN REGIONAL FORUM
Seminar on International Security Implications of Climate Change
Programme and Agenda

Interventions by Hans Günter Brauch on 19 November 2010 Session 2.1:Challenges, Threats, Risks related to Climate Change
Presentation: Potential Societal Impacts of the Physical Effects of Climate Change

Session 3.2: The Way Forward: A View From Civil Society Oral Intervention
This event has been documented at the ARF Website

EUROPEAN PEACE UNIVERSITY (EPU) PRIVATE UNIVERSITY
20 Years of Peace Studies in a Medieval Environment
EPU, Rochusplatz
8-12 November 2010, Schlaining, Burgenland, Austria
Lectures and Seminar: Resource and Environmental Conflicts

A World Without Walls 2010: An International Conference on Peace building, Reconciliation and Globalization in an Interdependent World
(Berlin, 6th – 10th November 2010)
Programme
Timetable
Speakers
Conference Report

6 November 2010
Opening Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch: Tensions, Conflicts and Peace Agreements: Historical Macrostructures and Turning Points since 1945 (Podcast)

Panel Discussion with Prof. Dr. Johan Galtung, Prof. Dr. Anthony Giddens, The Rt. Hon. Dr. Alfredo Palacios, former President of Ecuador, Dr. Miomir Zuzul, former foreign Minister of Croatia

Moderator: Lord Jack McConnell, former first minister of Scotland

Podcast
Photo gallery of Panel discussion
A Panel Debate
with
President Dr. Alfredo Palacio, Ecuador
Prof. Dr. Anthony Giddens, UK
Prof. Dr. Johan Galtung, Norway
Iannis Kasoulides
Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Germany
Moderator, Jack McConnell
Institute for Cultural Diplomacy
icdchannel
93 Minutes

8 November 2010
Second Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch: A Response to the Fall of the Berlin Wall: Reconceptualization of Security: Global Human and Environmental Security Handbook for the Anthropocene

Panel Discussion on the Future of Anti-Nuclear Proliferation and the Arms Trade with Dr. Luc Reychler, Dr. Hans Guenter Brauch, Dr. Jan Oberg (Podcast)

Interview with Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Berlin, 6. November 2010) conducted by Ana Lucas-Palomares and Joel MacMillan

Freie Universitat Berlin
5 November 2010
Opening Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch
Graduate Seminar at the Free University of Berlin
Climate Change Impacts for International, European, National and Human Security: Causal, Discourse, Scenario and Empirical Analyses of Hotspots

THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY: Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies
International Peace Research Association
6-10 July 2010, in Sydney, Australia
Communicating Peace
Lectures by
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring (Mexico)
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Germany)
Wednesday, 7 July 2010
Presentation in the Ecology and Peace Commission: Human Security: Policy Debates and Scientific Discourses
Friday, 9 July 2010 (morning session)
IPRA Plenary
Securitizing Global Climate Change: Discourses on International, national and human security [doc. 19]
Friday, 9 July 2010 (evening session)
IPRA Book launch: Hexagon book series and the Global Environmental and Human Security Handbook for the Anthropocene (GEHSHA)

Announcement of Speakers:

Professor Johan Galtung, founder of the TRANSCEND network
Irene Khan, former Secretary General of Amnesty International, Sydney Peace Prize Laureate
Patrick Dodson, ‘father of reconciliation’ in Australia
Oliver Richmond, University of St Andrews, author, Peace in International Relations
David Kinley, Professor of Human Rights Law, University of Sydney, author, Civilising Globalisation
George Kent, University of Hawai’i, author, Freedom from Want: the Human Right to Adequate Food
Michael Intriligator, UCLA & Vice Chair, Board of Directors of Economists for Peace and Security
Carolyn Arguillas, founding editor, Mindanews (Philippines)
Lawrence Wittner, author, Confronting the Bomb
Ursula Oswald Spring and Hans Guenter Brauch, co-editors,
Hexagon Series on Human, Environmental Security and Peace: HESP

Malaysia
30 June – 2 July 2010
Guest professorship at the Science University of Malaysia (USM), Penang Center for Global Sustainability Studies (CGSS)
Lectures by
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring (Mexico)
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Germany)
Public Seminar - Coping with Global Environment Change in the Anthropocene [doc 17]
Roundtable Discussion – CGSS – Human Security Concepts in Policy and Science

28 June – 30 June 2010
Guest professorship at the
[Various]
28 June
UKM: Roundtable Discussion: Globalisation and Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualising Security in the 21st Century
Programme
Speakers:
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, FU Berlin, AFES-PRESS, Mosbach, Germany
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring, UNAM-CRIM, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico
UKM (IKON) Book Launch: Facing Global Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts

Moderator: Emeritus Prof. Dato’ Dr. Abdul Rahman Embong, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia IKMAS Principal Research Fellow

Speakers: PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, FU Berlin, AFES-PRESS, Mosbach, Germany
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring, UNAM-CRIM, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico

Laudator: Prof. Dr. K.S. Nathan, Institute für USA Studies, IKON, UKM

Book Launch (Animation)
Photo Gallery
29 June (Announcement)
UKM - SSIR: Seminar- Strategic Studies and International Relations Program Security in Peace Research and Security Studies
30 June (Announcement)
UKM- IGMAS Seminar-Institute of Malaysian and International Studies: Globalization, Security and Its Linkages with Peace, Development and Environment

Paris , 31 March –1 April 2010
SciencesPo.
THE MASTER OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Book launch
Thursday, 1 April 2010, 15.00 – 16.30
Room 711 A/B, 117 Blvd Saint Germain
Master of Public Affairs, Sciences Po, 75007 Paris, 1 st floor
Flyer of Invitation in English

Moderator: Chris Brooks, Associate Director for Community Relations

Speakers:
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, FU Berlin, UNU-EHS, Bonn; AFES-PRESS, Mosbach
Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring, UNAM-CRIM, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico, UNU-EHS

Lectures in the The Master of Public Affairs (MPA)

Shahrbanou Tadjbakhsh and Hitomi Kubo
Human Security Concentration Overview Course

Wednesday, 31 March 2010, 10.15 – 12.15 and 12.30-14.30
Part 1: Environmental Security
Part 2: Securitization of Global Environmental Change

Brussels, 24 March 2010
The UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION BELGIUM/FLANDERS
Wednesday 24 March 2010, 12:30 - 15.00
UNRIC, the UN Regional Information Centre, rue de la Loi 155, 1000 Brussels, 7th floor
Book Launch
Facing Global Environmental Change
Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

24 March 2010, 17.00-18.30
Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch
Water and Security: A European Perspective
Royal High Institute for Defence
Brussels, Campus Renaissance
Av. De la Renaissance 30, 1000 Brussels

ISA Annual Convention 2010
NEW ORLEANS , LA, USA , FEBRUARY 17-20, 2010
THEORY VS. POLICY? CONNECTING SCHOLARS AND PRACTITIONERS
Panel, Wednesday, 17 February WA 5, 8.30-10.15
Peace and Security in the Anthropocene
Sponsor(s): Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners

Chair Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin and AFES-PRESS
Discussant: Ronnie Lipschutz, University of California, Los Angeles

8.30-8.35: Chair Hans Günter Brauch, AFES-PRESS:. Introduction and presentation of the speakers

Impacts of Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought (DLDD) on Security Policy in the Anthropocene
8.35-8.50: Hans Günter Brauch , Free University of Berlin and AFES-PRESS

Assessing and Preventing Climate Conflicts and Security Risks
8.50-9.05: Jürgen Scheffran: University of Hamburg, Geography/KlimaCampus

The Bottom Billion and Climate Change
9.05-9.20: Nils Petter Gleditsch: International Peace Research Institute,
Oslo , Halvard Buhaug: International Peace Research Institute, Oslo,
Åshild Falk: International Peace Research Institute, Oslo.

Towards Sustainable Peace in the Anthropocene
9.20-9.35: Ursula Oswald Spring: National University of Mexico

9.35-9.50: Discussant: Ronnie Lipschutz, University of California, Los Angeles
9.50-10.15: Discussion

The four powerpoint presentations may be viewed and downloaded here.

The academic papers are available for ISA members only at the ISA paper archives website at: by going to this website of Allacademic.
You must login with your Email address registered by ISA.

2009
Thursday, 10 December, Bern, Switzerland
swisspeace
Donnerstag, 10. Dezember 2009 [in German]
11:00-13:00 Uhr mit Referaten, Laudatio, Diskussion und Apero
Swisspeace, Sonnenbergstrasse 17, Bern
11:15 Vorstellung der Buchreihe und des Bandes (Hans Günter Brauch)
11:30 Umgang mit globalem Umwelt- und Klimawandel (Ursula Oswald Spring)
Photos von Lukas Krienbühl, Swisspeace, Bern

Thursday, 19 November, Hamburg University: Climate Change, Social Stress and Violent Conflict
State of the Art and Research Needs
International Conference, KlimaCampus, Hamburg University,
November 19 & 20, 2009
13:30 – 15:00 Parallel session 2 (IFSH/ZNF Seminar Room, Beim Schlump 83)
A. Water scarcity and flood disasters as conflict constellations
Hans Günter Brauch: Policy response to climate change in the Middle East and North Africa

18:15 – 19:15 Book presentation (ZMAW, Bundesstr. 53, seminar room)
Facing Global Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health &
WaterSecurity Concepts (Springer Hexagon Book Series, 2009s)
Contributions by: Hans Günter Brauch and Úrsula Oswald Spring (Editors),
Heinz-Dieter Jopp (Commentator, Laudator, Critic)
Photos by Felix Bayode Olorunfemi, Ibadan, Nigeria

Monday, 26 October
Freie Universitat Berlin
Berlin, 16.00-18.00
Introductory Powerpoint Presentation for the graduate seminar
Otto-Suhr-Institut für Politikwissenschaft, WS 2009/20010
HS 15332 Climate Change Impacts: Securitization of Water, Food, Soil, Health, Energy and Migration

Wednesday, 14 October
Miércoles 14 de Octubre de 10:00 a 13:00 horas
SALÓN 1 DEL POSGRADO FCPS
UNAM
El Programa de Posgrado en Ciencias Políticas y Sociales y el
Seminario Permanente de Estudios Prospectivos a través del
Proyecto PAPIME Inteligencia Prospectiva.
CONFERENCIA Y PRESENTACIÓN DEL LIBRO
“RECONCEPTUALIZAR LA SEGURIDAD EN EL SIGLO XXI”
CON LA PRESENCIA DE
Dr. Hans Günter Branch
de la Universidad Libre de Berlín
Dra. Ursula Oswald Spring
del CRIM UNAM UNU-EHS
Presentación

Tuesday, 13 October
Conferencia Magistral
13 de Octubre 2009, 12.00 a 14:00, Auditorio del CRIM
Seguridad y su Reconceptualización
Long version of the Presentation in English – Presentación (Spanish)
Podcast in Spanish on You Tube

Parte/ Part / Presentación/Presentation

1. Introduction: Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald-Spring, UNAM-CRIM
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
2. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
3. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
4. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
5. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
6. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
7. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin
8. PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin

Inofficial Audio Podcast of a Mexican participant
Reconceptualizando la seguridad en el siglo XXI
Autor Revista Digital Independiente Voz Universitaria
Tuesday, 20 de October de 2009
Modificado el Tuesday, 20 de October de 2009
Conferencia Magistral Audio de la conferencia magistral "Reconceptualizar la Seguridad en el Siglo XXI"
Dr. Hans Gunter Brauch.
Introducción de la Dra. Ursula Oswald.
13 de Octubre 2009. CRIM-UNAM.
Cuernavaca-México.
Grabación
realizada por la Revista Digital Independiente Voz Universitaria http://www.vozuniversitaria.org.mx
Revista Digital Independiente Voz Universitaria
The session may be listened at:

1 September 2009
Cuernavaca, Mexico – Mosbach, Germany
Publication of this Spanish Book
Press Release (70th Anniversary of the Outbreak of World War II)
Reconceptualization of Security in the 21st Century
Úrsula Oswald Spring y Hans Günter Brauch
Reconceptualizar la Seguridad en el Siglo XXI
(Mexico D.F., Cuernavaca, Mexico: UNAM/CRIM/CEIICH/CCA
— Mosbach, Germany: AFES-PRESS, 2009)
ISBN 878-392-69-7578-0 888 pages
Book Launch in Mexico

1 September 2009
Cuernavaca, Morelos, México
Sala Manuel M. Ponce, Jardín Borda, Cuernavaca, Morelos
Reconceptualizar la seguridad en el siglo XXI
Úrsula Oswald Spring y Hans Günter Brauch (Editores )

Germany
Munich , 29 July 2009, 7-10 pm [in German only]
Climate Change, Water Scarcity and Combating Desertification: A Huge Challenge for Human, Gender and Envronmental Security

Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch:
Einführung zum Buch: Facing Global Environmental Change - Der globale Umweltwandel als Sicherheitsfrage
Globaler Klimawandel – Eine Herausforderung für die internationale und menschliche Sicherheit: 2 Diskurse
(mit Ursula Oswald Spring): Desertifikation, Bodenerosion und Dürre: Herausforderungen für die menschliche, nationale und internationale Sicherheit

Stuttgart, 24 July 2009, 6-8pm [in Germany only]
Climate Change, Water Scarcity and Combating Desertification: A Threat to Human Security and Electricity from the Sahara

Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch:
Zum Buch Facing Global Environmental Change - Der globale Umweltwandel als Sicherheitsfrage. Podcast
(mit Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald Spring):: Desertifikation, Bodenerosion und Dürre: Herausforderungen für die menschliche, nationale und internationale Sicherheit: UNCCD-Studie. Podcast
Radio interview by Utku Pazarkaya, Südwestrundfunk, © SWR International, 27.09.09. This podcast is made available with the kind permission of SWR Stuttgart. Podcast

(23 June 2009)
DESERTEC Project: Solar Energy from the Sahara
15 Publications (1994-2009) by Hans Günter Brauch and of AFES-PRESS on technical, economic and security aspects in English, German and French
These publications may here be ordered from AFES-PRESS

19-20 June 2009
University of Vienna
Dialogue with Iranian Experts on a Peaceful World Order
Castle of Schlaining, Burgenland, Austria
Background paper by Hans Günter Brauch

Security in Peace Research and Security Studies
that is based on this copy-righted book chapter:
Albrecht, Ulrich; Brauch, Hans Günter, 2008: “Security in Peace Research and Security Studies” , in: Brauch, Hans Günter; Oswald Spring, Úr­sula; Mesjasz, Czeslaw; Grin, John; Dunay, Pal; Behera, Navnita Chadha; Chou­rou, Bé­chir; Kameri-Mbote, Pa­tricia;Liotta, P.H. (Eds.): Globalization and En­vi­ronmen­tal Challen­ges: Recon­cep­tualizing Security in the 21 st Century. Hexagon Series on Hu­man and Envi­ronmental Security and Peace, vol. 3 ( Berlin – Heidelberg – New York: Springer-Verlag): 503-525.
This original book chapter may be purchased here.

Security in Peace Research and Security Studies

Abstract

In the Covenant of the League of Nations (1919) and in the United Nations Charter (1945), ‘international peace and security’ have been used together as the key purposes of both international organizations to be achieved by global (chap. VI and VII of UN Charter) and regional systems (chap. VIII of UN Charter) of collective security, as well as by collective and national self defence (Art. 51 UN Charter; chap. 4 by Wæver; chap. 35 by Bothe).

Security in Peace Research and Security Studies
by Ulrich Albrecht and Hans Günter Brauch

38.1 Introduction1

In the Covenant of the League of Nations (1919) and in the United Nations Charter (1945), ‘international peace and security’ have been used together as the key purposes of both international organizations to be achieved by global (chap. VI and VII of UN Charter) and regional systems (chap. VIII of UN Charter) of collective security, as well as by collective and national self defence (Art. 51 UN Charter; chap. 4 by Wæver; chap. 35 by Bothe).

International relations as a social science discipline (chap. 37 by Baylis) has emerged after the Peace Conference in Versailles (1919), relying on knowledge in political philosophy, diplomatic and military history and international law, and it was influenced by the three ideal type traditions the English school has identified with realism (Hobbes), rationalism or pragmatism (Grotius 1625, 1975), and idealism (Kant), that have also existed in other intellectual traditions (Chinese, Indian, Arabic, pre-Columbian) and may be associated with many other thinkers unknown to the Western debate (chap. 3 by Brauch; chap. 10 by Oswald; and chap. 11–21).

Peace research and security studies are two distinct research programmes within the sub-discipline of international relations (IR) and also beyond, due to their multidisciplinary approaches that combine knowledge from philosophy, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law. Both research programmes are identified with one of the two common goals and purposes of the League of Nations and of the United Nations. While peace research has evolved primarily in the idealist and security studies in the realist tradition, the Grotian tradition has offered a common middle ground for both programmes.

This chapter addresses two questions: How have the concepts of security evolved in both schools during the 20th century? Did the three global changes: a) the global contextual change in 1990, b) globalization, and c) the emerging ‘anthropocene’ (Crutzen/Stoermer 2000; Crutzen 2000) trigger a reconceptualization of security? To answer these questions, books surveying the evolution and results in both schools will be reviewed in the next five parts.

However, much of the conceptual debate on security and on its reconceptualization has taken place in scientific journals: for peace research especially in the Journal of Peace Research and Security Dialogue published by the International Peace Research Institute in Oslo (PRIO), and for security studies in Survival (IISS) that has been interested more in issues of the changing security agenda and International Security (Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University), the leading journal in the US, where many of the new global dangers for US national security have been addressed.2

The evolution of both schools since 1919 will be reviewed (38.2) and the key conceptual disputes between both schools prior to, during, and after the Cold War will be listed (38.3) that provided the framework for the evolution of the security concept in security, strategic, and war studies (38.4) as well as in peace research (38.5) and for the post Cold War dispute between those who adhere to a narrow primarily military and diplomatic security concept and the ‘widerners’ who have combined five dimensions and sectors with five different referent objects and levels of analysis (38.6).

38.2 The Two Schools and Three Traditions

The discipline of international relations was born on 30 May 1919 at the Peace Conference in Versailles (Paris) when policy advisers of US President W. Wilson and British Prime Minister L. George agreed to establish scientific institutes for the study of international relations in their countries that should focus on the causes, conditions, and forms of war and peace, and on the approaches and results of international conflict resolution as its conceptual core (Meyers 1979, 1984, 1993, 1994, 1994a). Meyers (2000) saw this new discipline as a science interpreting and resolving crises. According to this interpretation the study of international relations may be understood as an answer of the scientific community to extra-scientific, socioeconomic, and political crises that could not be satisfied by the traditional approaches of diplomatic history, political philosophy, and international law (Meyers 1994a: 231).

In the two decades between the World Wars (1919–1939), in the new discipline of international relations an idealist approach focusing on international organizations and institutions prevailed that was being challenged from a realist perspective (e.g. by Carr 1939; Spykman 1942; Morgenthau 1948, 1960; Waltz 1959, 1979).

During the Cold War period (1947–1989) international relations in the West was dominated by theoretical approaches and concepts developed by and disputes among different schools of American scholars that influenced this emerging field in Europe, in the Asia Pacific, as well as in many Third World countries in Africa, Latin America, and in the Arab world whose IR experts were primarily trained in American, British, Canadian, and French universities and graduate schools. During the period of state socialism (1917– 1991), the theoretical and conceptual debate in the East was influenced by the Marxist-Leninist ideology, and in China by Maoist thinking that was gradually revised by Deng Xia Ping during the 1980’s. In the Socialist world many scholars and political leaders from liberation movements and progressive governments were trained in Marxist approaches to international politics. In the South, in Asia, Africa, and Latin America different regional and national traditions prevailed that were often inspired by the political leaders of liberation movements (Nasser, Nkruma, Nyere) and by third world intellectuals (e.g. Abdel Malek, Samir Amin). From the 1960’s to the 1980’s, in Latin America, the school of ‘dependencia’ influenced the thinking on international relations and on development.

With the end of the Cold War the US intellectual dominance in the IR discipline has declined, and the Soviet influence disappeared with the implosion of the USSR. Since then an increasing theoretical and conceptual diversity has emerged and many new centres of conceptual innovation are blossoming in all parts of the world (Albrecht 1987, 1997, 1999; Crawford/Jarvis 2001). Despite the many schemes and approaches in IR, three scientific traditions are crucial.

38.2.1 Scientific Traditions and Schools of International Relations

Three intellectual traditions of thought, macro theories, or images of the world on IR have been distinguished by the English school (Wight 1991; Bull 1977; Buzan 2001, 2004, 2006):

• the Hobbesian or Machiavellian pessimist or realist with the primary focus on power politics and with a specific emphasis on military strategy (Malnes 1993);

• the Kantian optimist or idealist focusing on international law and human rights (Covell 1998);

• the Grotian pragmatic internationalist or rationalist pursuing opportunities for cooperation irrespective of the power difference and the democratic deficit (Bull/Kingsbury/Roberts 1992; Onuma 1993).


While in the early years of international relations during the inter-war period, legal perspectives in the Wilsonian tradition prevailed in the UK and US (Alger 1968; Meyers 1979, 1994a), since 1945 scholars working in the US have dominated and influenced the thinking and writing on international relations. Since then, at least five debates (Maghoori 1982; Baldwin 1993) between two opposite schools of thought occurred first in the US and later within the ‘OECD world’:

• 1st debate in the late 1940’s and 1950’s between supporters of realism (Carr 1939; Morgenthau 1948, 1969; Herz 1959; Niebuhr 1949) that called for power politics and the so-called idealists in the Wilsonian tradition who stressed international law and institutions (Claude 1962; Clark/Sohn 1966). Realist notions and concepts dominated the teaching of undergraduates, in graduate schools, and in ...

_______________

Notes:

1. The authors appreciate the critical and constructive comments and stimulating suggestions by Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico) who commented on two text versions, and by Czesaw Mesjasz (Poland) and Pál Dunay (Hungary) who reviewed the second revised text. Their comments are reflected in this text.

2. See: Lynn-Jones/Miller 1995; Ullman 1983, HomerDixon 1991, 1994; Lowi 1993, 1995, 1998; Lowi/Shaw 2000; Gleick 1990, 1991, 1993, 1993a, 1994, 1998, 2000.
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Part 4 of 4

This chapter has been translated into Spanish: Albrecht, Ulrich; Brauch, Hans Günter, 2009: “Seguridad en la Investigación para la Paz y los Estudios de Seguridad”, in : Oswald Spring, Úrsula; Brauch, Hans Günter (Eds.) :Reconceptualizar la Seguridad en el Siglo XXI(Mexico D.F. – Cuernavaca : UNAM/CRIM): 329-382.

The Spanish book may be ordered in August 2009: here

A new text will be published in 2010 in a book edited by Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Lohlker, University of Vienna

Observance of the World Day to Combat Desertification
17 June 2009
Old City Hall, Markt, Bonn
Agenda
18:00-18:30 Observance ceremony; Welcome Statement by Bürgermeister Ulrich Hauschild , City of Bonn;
Opening Statement by Luc Gnacadja, Executive Secretary, UNCCD; Statement by Reza Ardakanian, Representative of the Heads of the United Nations Agencies in Germany, Director of the UN-Water Decade Programme on Capacity Development (UNW-DPC). Moderator: Arnt Diener, BIMUN/SINUB e.V.
18:30- 20:00 Lectures: Hans Günter Brauch, P eace R esearch and E uropean S ecurity S tudies: Securitizing the ground, grounding security

Marc Paganini, European Space Agency: Combating land degradation from space

Ulrich Kindermann, Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) GmbH: Down to earth: Desertification challenges in the Pamir, Tajikistan

Additional information
Background Note in English
Message from the Secretary-General of the UN, Ban Ki-Moon
Press Release
Report in English
Report in Spanish
Video
Event Documentation

[x]
The panel of presenters, from left to right: Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Reza Ardakanian, Ulrich Hauschild, Luc Gnacadja, Arnt Diener, Ulrich Kindermann and Marc Paganini

United States of America
United Nations, New York, Friday, 15 May 2009

[x]
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch at the Entrance of the UN Headquarters
Second Side Event at the 17 th Session of UN-CSD
United Nations, New York, Thursday, 14 May, 6.15-7.45
United Nations Headquarters, 46 th Street and 1 st Avenue, Conference Room 2

Launching of the UNCCD Report
Grounding Security – Securitizing the Ground
Hans Günter Brauch
Úrsula Oswald Spring
UNCCD, May 2009
Securitizing the Ground-Grounding Security
Download English version

Úrsula Oswald Spring
Hans Günter Brauch
UNCCD, May 2009
Seguritizar la Tierra Aterrizar la Seguridad
Download Spanish version

Powerpoint Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch and Úrsula Oswald Spring

[x]
From left to right: Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Germany), chairman, AFES-PRESS; Free University of Berlin, UNU-EHS, Bonn; Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico), UNAM-CRIM, Cuernavaca; UNU-EHS, Bonn; Dª. Alicia Villauriz Iglesias ( Spain), Secretary General of Rural Affairs, Ministry of Environment and Rural Affairs, Madrid; Mr. Luc Gnacadja (Benin), Executive Director, UNCCD, Bonn; Mr. Marcos Montoiro (Spain), Awareness Raising, Communication and Education Unit , UNCCD, Bonn. Photo by: Mr. Sergio Zelaya (Honduras), Policy and Advocacy on Global Issues and Platforms, UNCCD, Bonn.

Podcast
Photo Gallery of UNCCD Events in New York

First Side Event at the 17th Session of UN-CSD
New York , Monday, 11 May, 1.15-2.45
United Nations Headquarters, 44th and 1st Avenue, Conference Room 7
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch
Event documentation of UNU-ONY
Event page of AFES-PRESS
Podcast of the whole event
By clicking below the photo on any name you can listen to this speaker

[x]
From right to left : H.E. Amb. Prof. Dr. Joy Ogwu ( Nigeria), Permanent Representative of Nigeria at the UN; H.E. Amb. Thomas Matussek ( Germany), Permanent Representative of Germany at the UN; Dr. Jean-Marc Coicaud (France), director, UNO-ONY, New York

[x]
From right to left: Mr. Achim Steiner (Germany), Under Secretary General of the United Nations, Executive Director of UNEP, Nairobi; Dr. Hans Günter Brauch (Germany), chairman, AFES-PRESS; Free University of Berlin, UNU-EHS, Bonn; Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring (Mexico), UNAM-CRIM, Cuernavaca; UNU-EHS, Bonn

Interview of Dr. Jean-Marc Coicaud, director, UNU-ONY, with Úrsula Oswald Spring and Hans Günter Brauch

Interviews of Ms. Sydney Kinnear, UNU-ONY with Úrsula Oswald Spring and Hans Günter Brauch

[x]
From left to right: Ms. Sydney Kinnear ( USA), Junior Professional, UNU-ONY, New York interviewing Dr. Hans Günter Brauch ( Germany), chairman, AFES-PRESS; Free University of Berlin, UNU-EHS, Bonn

Podcast at the book launch event with USTREAM
Photo Gallery of the Event at UNU-ONY Website
Photo Gallery of the Event at the AFES-PRESS Website

Bonn , Wednesday, 29 April 2009, 14.00-15.30
World Conference Centre, 53113 Bonn , Görresstr. 15,
Room “Süßmuth” at TNT (formerly UNU-EHS)
Springer: the language of science, DUETSCHE WELL, UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY
Book Launch of
Facing Global Environmental Change: Environ­men­tal, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts
Editors : Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, John Grin, Czeslaw Mesjasz, Patricia Kameri-Mbote, Navnita Chadha Behera, Béchir Chourou, Heinz Krummenacher (Berlin/ Heidelberg/New York : Springer, 2009)
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

29 April 2009, 4.00-5.30 pm
Panel: Responding to Social Challenges of Global Change : Role of Knowledge
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch
Responding to Social Challenges Posed by Global Change: Knowledge and State, Societal and Business Actors

Berlin , Mittwoch, 22 April 2009, 18.00-19.30
im Besucherzentrum des Auswärtigen Amts

Book Launch
Facing Global Environmental Change: Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts
Editors : Hans Günter Brauch, Úrsula Oswald Spring, John Grin, Czeslaw Mesjasz, Patricia Kameri-Mbote, Navnita Chadha Behera, Béchir Chourou, Heinz Krummenacher (Berlin/ Heidelberg/New York : Springer, 2009)
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

Thursday, 12 March 2009, Session 56
Human Migration – Geopolitical Conflicts - Climate Security
CLIMATE CHANGE: Global Risks, Challenges & Decisions
COPENHAGEN 2009
10-12 March
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Climate Change Impacts on Migration: Conflict and Cooperation in the Mediterranean

50th ISA Annual Convention, New York, 15-18 February, 2008
Panel, Tuesday, 17 February, 2.15-4.00 pm
Facing Global Environmental Change:
Climate Change, Food Sovereignty and Security in the AnthropoceneCo-sponsorsed by ISA Peace Studies Section with Environmental Studies Section
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Securitizing Climate Change

2008
17 October 2008
India
On the Vardhaman Mahaveer Open University in Kota, Rajasthan, India
Jaipur, Rajasthan, India, 14-15 October 2008
Reconceptualising Security in the 21st Century :
The South Asian Context

[x]

Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Securitzing Global Environmental Change: The Environmental Dimension of Human Security

[x]
Amb. Prof. Dr. S.D. Muni, JNU, New Delhi, Prof. Dr. Naresh Dadhich, Vice Chancellor Vardhaman Mahaveer Open University (VMOU). with PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch ( Germany)

13 October 2008
Website on this conference
Session: Climate Change and Migration
Paper presentations:
International Relocation from Pacific Island Countries : Adaptation Failure? by Dr. John R. CAMPBELL
Economic Policies and Design Strategies Related to Mitigation and Adaptation to Climatic Changes in Argentina. Their Importance in the Determination of Migration Scenarios by Dr. Ana Maria FERNÁNDEZ EQUIZA
Rising Sea-Levels, Kingtides and the Modern Subject : Local Dialogue on an Environmental Crisis in Coastal Papua New Guineaby Dr. David LIPSET
Climate Change, Desertification and Environmentally-Induced Migration in the Western Mediterranean: Possible Scenarios for Southern Europe and North Africa by 2020 and 2050by Dr. Hans Günter BRAUCH

Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Climate Change, Desertification and Environmentally-Induced Migration
in the Western Mediterranean: Possible Scenarios for Southern Europe and North Africa by 2020 and 2050


[x]
Dr. Brauch explains his PEISOR model on the linkage between security challenges posed by global environmental change and their potentially extreme outcomes leading to environmentally-induced migration, crises, disasters and conflicts.

Interview (in German) with Julia Grimminger (KNA), 27.10.2008
[The bomb is ticking, Climate change triggering migration]
Die Bombe tickt
Der Klimawandel lässt die Flüchtlingsströme anschwellen

8 October 2008
EuroMesaco and
Al-Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies (ACPSS)
Third Preparatory Meeting of the 2008 EuroMeSCo Annual Conference
Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, 6 & 7 October 2008

Strengthening Euro-Mediterranean Relations. Emerging Dynamics, Challenges and their Potential Implications for the Mashreq

[x]

Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Soft Security Risks in the Euro-Mediterranean Area: What Justification for Increased Securitization?

1 October 2008
IFRI Website
Impacting health, the environment and global governance
The challenges of taking a security approach
Paris, 26 September 2008
Programme
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch: Environment and Security: A Historic Link

Slovenia
Second World Conference on International Studies
Ljubljana, Slovenia , 23-26 July 2008
Friday, 25 July 2008, 4:30-6:00 pm, FD 02
132 Reconceptualising Security in the 21st Century: First Scientific Results

Introduction by Hans Guenter Brauch, Free University of Berlin: Introduction: Goals and Achievements of the Mental Mapping on Reconceptualising Security in the 21 st Century: The Security Handbook for the Anthropocene

Paper and Presentation by Hans Guenter Brauch, Free University of Berlin; editor of the Hexagon Book Series: From a State-centred Security Dilemma Towards a Human-centred Survival Dilemma

Belgium
ipra
BUILDING SUSTAINABLE FUTURES: Enacting Peace and Development
2008 GLOBAL CONFERENCE
UNIVERSITY OF LEUVEN, BELGIUM
15-19 JULY
Wednesday, 16 July 2008, 20:00-21:30
Sint-Michielskerk, Peace Church, Leuven,
Book Launch
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch
Thursday, 17 July 2008, 14:00-15:30
Ecology and Peace Commission, Panel 5: Conceptual Quartet
Introduction by Hans Guenter Brauch: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century: A Global Scientifíc Mapping Project
Paper and Presentation by Hans Guenter Brauch: Conceptual Quartet of Security, Peace, Develop-ment and Environment

Brussels, 14 July 2008, 18.00-19.30
EGMONT, EASTWEST INSTITUTE, INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY, THE CENTRE
Co-organized by the Institute for Environmental Security (IES), EGMONT – The Royal Institute for International Relations , and the EastWest Institute and hosted by The Centre
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

Switzerland
Geneva, 26 June 2008 at 12th EADI General Conference
Thursday, 26 June 2008, 13.30-16.30 Book launch during the 12 th EADI Conference
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

Germany
Berlin, 23 June 2008, 18.00-20.00 (followed by a reception)
23 June 2008: Book Launch in the German Foreign Ministry [in German only]
Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch

April 2008
22 April 2008, New York, USA, 3 - 6pm
United Nations University Office at the United Nations
New York, 2 UN Plaza, DC2-2060, New York, New York 10017
Hans Günter Brauch
Book Launch, 22 April 2008
Globalization and Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century

21 April 2008, Washington, D.C., USA
Union of Concerned Scientists, Monday, 21 April 2008, 11.30-1pm
Hans Günter Brauch
Climate Change an International and Human Security Challenge and Opportunity for Multilateral Cooperation and Book Launch of Globalization and Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century

11 April 2008, Cuernavaca, Mexico
Seminario Intedisciplinario Cultura y Sociedad
El hombre y su medioambiente
Secondo ciclo, coordinador : Dr. Luis Tamayo
Hans Günter Brauch
Global Environmental Change and Security Impacts for Mexico

1 April 2008, Berkeley, California, USA
University of California, Berkeley,
International and Area Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies
Hans Günter Brauch
Morning: Reconceptualizing Security: Global Environmental Change and Security Impacts for Society
Afternoon: Securitization of Climate Change: Impacts for the Mediterranean

March 2008
26 March 2008, San Francisco, California, USA
Hans Günter Brauch
Paper presented at the 49 th ISA Annual Convention,
San Francisco, March 26th-29th, 2008
Reconceptualizing Security: Global Environmental and Climate Change as new Security Dangers and Concerns
Abstract, Paper, Bibliography (to be added in May 2008 )

2007
December 2007
6-8 December 2007, Montpellier, France
Hans Günter Brauch: Projected Climate Change Impacts for Mediterranean Security by 2020 and 2050
Vulnerability of Mediterranean Urban Centres –
Energy Vision of Montpellier: Mediterranean Renewable Partnership
Presented at the Plan Bleu round table /Energaïa
(powerpoint presentation in English and in French)
(scientific paper: English and in French)
Conference programme
Friday, 7 December, 14.30 – 17.30
Mediterranean countries and economical activities : energy and climate stakes

President of the session: Pierre ICARD – Plan Bleu – Directeur de l’Unité Thématique
Urban planning and tourism in Mediterranean countries : current situation and prospects

Round table 1 : Mediterranean urban spaces’ vulnerability and adaptation facing climate change effects -- Les enjeux énergétiques des programmes de l’Habitat au Maroc - Morocco Building programmes’ Energetic stakes

Animateurs : Mohamed BERDAI - CDER – Directeur de la Coopération Internationale (Maroc) / Ali GUERIDA - Ministère de l’Habitat et de l’Aménagement de l’Espace – Directeur Technique de l’Habitat (Maroc)

Projected climate change impacts for Mediterranean by 2020 and 2050
Key speaker : Hans Guenter BRAUCH - Professeur à Berlin (Allemagne)

Euro Mediterranean collectivities and ecodistricts’ stakes : the Montpellier «Communauté d’Agglomération» example Speaker :Jean-Pierre MOURE - Premier Vice Président de la Communauté d’Agglomération de Montpellier - Conseiller Général du Département de l’Hérault - Maire de la commune de Cournonsec (France)

Impacts and adaptation in the costal zone of Egypt. Speaker :Mohamed EL RAEY - Professeur à l’Université d’Alexandrie (Egypte)

Maroc, l’exemple d’Agadir, Morocco : Agadir example. Speaker :Tariq KABBAGE - Président du Conseil Communal – Mairie d’Agadir (Maroc)

November 2007
HEINRICH BOLL FOUNDATION
Green Wars?
Hans Günter Brauch: Climate Change Scenarios and Possible Impact for the MENA Region: Hazards, Migration and Conflicts
Abstract
Conference Report and Discussion on the Presentation
Beirut, Lebanon, 2-3 November 2007

July 2007
Hans Günter Brauch: Global Change and Desertification: Scenarios and Social and Eco­logical Impact
Abstract
Keynote speech at the meeting of the Spanish Environment Ministry and the Fundacion Biodiversidad on:
Global Change and Desertification
June 2007
Opening Lecture by
Hans Günter Brauch
Global Environmental Change and Security for the People
Ipogea and ITKNET (International Traditional Knowledge Network Conference)
Hans Günter Brauch
Free University of Berlin; UNU-EHS, Fellow, Bonn; AFES-PRESS
Climate Change and Reconceptualization of Security

2006
December 2006
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch
Free University of Berlin; UNU-EHS, Fellow, Bonn; AFES-PRESS
Impact of Global Environmental Change on National, Environmental and Human Security in the Mediterranean Region by 2020 and 2050
presentation at the
WORKSHOP: NATO Collaborative Linkage Grant
“Combating Desertification with Traditional Knowledge – A Contribution to Euro-Mediterranean Security”
Rome (Italy), 5-6 December, 2006
Organised by Prof. Dr. Pietro Laureano
President of IPOGEA
Italian Research Centre on Local and Traditional Knowledge

November 2006
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch
Panel Discussion on the Role of Genebanks in Promoting the Use of Agricultural Biodiversity to Combat Desertification
Desert Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt
27 November 2006, 10:00-13:00

[X]
Prof. Dr. Ismail Abd El-Galil Hussein, President, DRC, Cairo, Egypt;
Dr. Wagdi George Ayad, Regional Director, International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Regional office for Central West Asia and North Africa (CWANA), Aleppo, Syria
Dr. Emile A. Frison, Director General, Biodiversity International, Rome,Italy
PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, AFES-PRESS Chairman, Mosbach, Germany
Prof. Dr. Ismail H. El-Bagouri, Head of Dept. of Soil and Water Conservation,
Desert Research Center, Cairo, Egypt


Training Course on the Role of Genebanks in Promoting the Use of Agricultural Biodiversity to Combat Desertification from 27 November – 7 December 2006 in Cairo, and El Arish, Sinai, Egypt
27 November – 7 December 2006

Organised by the Desert Research Centre (DRC), Cairo, Egypt in cooperation with Biodiversity International, Rome

Sponsored by the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation and the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

[x]
Prof. Oswald and Dr. Brauch with participants from the Training Course from Egypt and Sub-Saharan Africa in El Arish

PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch
Free University of Berlin, UNU-EHS, Fellow, Bonn, AFES-PRESS

Desertification and Climate Change: Challenges, Impacts and Policy Responses in the 21st Century for North African, Sahelian, Horn and Nile Basin Countries

[x]
Prof. Oswald and Dr. Brauch and a colleague from the DRC in Cairo at the entrance the Cheops pyramid in Giza, Cairo, Egypt

Prof. Dr. Úrsula Oswald Spring: Hazard Prone Regions due to Desertification and New Security Concepts Combining Top-down and bottom-up Response Strategies

An Experiment in Food Sovereignty: Learning from Indigenous Knowledge in Mexico. Introducing the Cactus as a new Source of Food to Egypt

[x]

October 2006

[x]

Her Majesty the Queen of Spain and the speaker, 25 October 2006, Almeria
Hans Günter Brauch:
Member of the Scientific Committee
Desertification and Migration
From Almeria I to Almeria II: Achievements and Policy Tasks
International Symposium Desertification and Migration
Almeria, Spain, 25-27 October 2006
Conclusions and Lectures
Official Conclusions of the Symposium (English)
Oral Presentation
Text of Scientific Paper
Policy Conclusions (English) and (Spanish) will be added later
Website of Organisers
English, Spanish, French
Press Reaction to this Symposium
Press Release of the Royal Palace, October 2006
Press release of the Spanish Ministry of the Environment, 25 October 2006

Press Reaction collected by Universidad of Almeria:
ABC, 26 October 2006
El Mundo, 26 October 2006
Ideal, 26 October 2006
Expansion, 26 October 2006
Diario de Almeria, 26 October 2006
La Voz de Almeria, 26 October 2006
Noticias Television, RT1, 25 October 2006

Spanish Press Reaction on the proposal for the Creation of a Centre of Research on Desertification and Migration in Almeria:
Ideal de Almeria, 26 October 2006
Noticias Ya.Com, 26 October
Ideal, 26 October
La Voz de Almeria, 26 October
La Andalucia Investiga, 3 November 2006

Spanish and Mexican press reaction on the proposal of a Spanish-Mexican-German cooperation in the fight against Desertification:
El Periodico de Mexico, 27 October 2006
Almeria Verde
Terra Actualidad, 27 October 2006

German Press Reaction:
Abschluss des Internationalen Jahres der Wüstenbekämpfung
The International Year to Combat Desertification Ends

UNU-EHS and Munich Re Foundation
Summer Academy on Social Vulnerability
23-29 July 2006, Castle Hohenkammer, Germany

[x]

PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch UNU-EHS, Fellow, Member of the College of Associated Scientists and Advisors (CASA)

The Conceptual Security Context: Human, Environmental and Water Security. Do Water-related Social Vulnerabilities Create Human Security Threats, Challenges Vulnerabilities and Risks?
For a shorter version of this keynote speech please press here:
Access to all presentations at the Summer Academy:

Bangkok, Thailand, 30 May 2006 and 5 June 2006

[x]

Human Security Network
International Symposium On Building and Synergizing Partnership for Global Human Security and Development
Bangkok, Thailand, 30-31 May 2006
Scientific Presentation by Hans Günter Brauch to Panel II
Towards a Fourth Pillar of Human Security: "Freedom from Hazard Impacts". Addressing Global Environmental Change, Environmental Stress and Natural Hazards

Recommendations from the HSN International Symposium on Building and Synergizing Partnership for Global Human Security and Development

8th Ministerial Meeting of the Human Security Network
Bangkok, Thailand, 30-31 May 2006
Chairman's Summary
List of participants
List of activities of HSN countries:
Address by H.E. Dr. Kantathi Suphamongkhon, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Thailand, at the Opening Ceremony of The 8th HSN Ministerial, 1 June 2006
Press Conference
Photo: 8th Ministerial Meeting, Bangkok, Thailand, 1-2 June 2006
Slovenia has taken over the chairmanship of the HSN on 2 June 2006, for details
Report on transfer of chairmanship
Slovenia's work programme

H.E. Yukio Takasu, Ambassador of Japan in charge of Human Security: "Towards Forming Friends of Human Security"

on the occasion of 8th Ministerial meeting of the Human Security Network, Bangkok, 2.6.2006
Human Security Speeches by Prime Minister, Foreign Minister and Japanese Representatives

Luncheon Lecture by Hans Günter Brauch: Environment and Human Security
Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 5 June 2006

Between Globalization and Civil Literacy: A Human Security Course Planning and Applied Research Strategies Workshop

The notion "freedom from hazard impact" was first suggested by Hans Günter Brauch in two UNU-EHS publications during 2005 that may be downloaded as:
Intersection 2/2005:
Source 1/2005:

Joint poster presentation with Ursula Oswald Spring
Third International Conference on Early Warning (EWC III): From Concept to Action, Bonn, Germany, 27-29 March 2006

[url]Mainstreaming Early Warning of Hazards and Conflics[/url]

Fourth World Water Forum in Mexico: Local Action for Global Change
Mexico City, México, 16-22 March 2006
Programme of two sessions:
Water Scarcity and Degradation - Posing a Survival Dilemma - Policy tasks for an integrated water and conflict management, prevention and avoidance

UNU-EHS Workshop, Yautepec, Morelos, México
13-15 March 2006
Social Vulnerability and Resilience
Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and the Tsunami in the Indian Ocean:
Case Studies on USA, Mexico, Cuba and in Central America
Survival Dilemma, Hazards, and Human Security

4 Public Lectures at the invitation of El Colegio de Tlaxcala
Tlaxcala, State Tlaxcala, México, 8-9 March 2006
Poster Programme

[x]

Los Quatros Pilares de la Seguridad Humana: Libertad de temores, Libertad de pobreza, Libertad de impactos de desastres y Libertad de vivir con dignidad

Four Pillars of Human Security: Freedom from Fear, Freedom from Want, Freedom from Hazards Impacts and Freedom to Live in Dignity

Reunion con investigadores de El Colegio de Tlaxcala
Proyectos de Investigacion

Meeting with researchers of El Colegio de Tlaxcala

Cambio ambiental global: Retos de la seguridad ecológica y ambiental por los cambios de clima y la desertificación

Global Environmental Change: Ecological Security Challenges due to Climate Change and Desertification

Conferencia magistral: Perspectivas de la Seguridad Multilateral Europea: La estrategia de seguridad de la Unión Europea.

Multilateral European Security Perspective: The European Security Strategy of the EU of 2003

Public Lecture at the
Centro Regional de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias
de la UNAM (CRIM), Cuernavaca, Morelos, México
Monday, 6 March 2006:
Poster Invitation for the Public Lecture at UNAM-CRIM
Global Environmental Change and Extreme Outcomes: Implications for Human and Environmental Security

6-17 February 2006,
NATO Advanced Study Institute,
Arrava Institute for Environmental Studies, Israel
Joint lecture programme with Ursula Oswald on 7 February 2006


[x]

Reconceptualising Security: Concepts and PEISOR Model on Global Environmental Change, Effects & Impacts

Environmental Challenges to Security & Survival in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Environmental Change, Effects & Impacts

Cooperative Opportunities: Addressing Environmental Security Challenges on Water, Soil, Food and Energy. Environmental Change, Effects & Impacts

Lectures by Úrsula Oswald Spring

[x]

Water Security and Desertification

Globalization, Hydro-Diplomacy, Cooperation and Peace

27-29 January 2006, Iserlohn
Ver-Wüstungen und Tsunamis
Politik und Praxis für einen nachhaltigen Umgang mit unseren Lebensgrundlagen

[x]

2005
October 2005
Fifth AFES-PRESS Workshop on Reconceptualising Security
at the Sixth Open Meeting of the Global Environmental Change Research Community
Bonn, Germany, October 9-13, 2005
"Gobal Environmental Change, Globalization and International Security"
Panel 3: Monday, 10 October, Early Warning of Natural Hazards and Disasters
Towards a mainstreaming of early warning of hazards and Conflicts (Abstract)

August 2005
Fourth AFES-PRESS Workshop on Reconceptualising Security: "Security Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks", First World International Studies Conference (WISC) at Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, 24- 27 August 2005.

Hans Günter Brauch: "Reconceptualising of Security: Stages and Goals"

Hans Günter Brauch: "Concepts of Security Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks" (UNU-EHS report).

Download the 100 page report: "Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilites and Risks in Environmental and Human Security" by Hans Günter Brauch

Hans Günter Brauch: "Learning from Mitrany, Marshall, Monnet, Gorbachev: 60 Years of Peace in Europe".

July 2005
Hans Günter Brauch with Janos Bogardi, short presentation on 21 July 2005 (in German) at the Wissenschaftszentrum, Berlin, during a book presentation of Andreas Rechkemmer (Ed.): UNEO: Towards an International Environment Organization: Approaches to a sustainable reform of global environmental governance (Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2005).

10 May 2005, Bonn, Bundestag Conference Centre
UNCCD Third Session of the Committee for the Review of the Implementation of the Convention (CRIC 3): Global Interactive Dialogue (GID)

Chairman: Amb. Mohamed M. El Ghaouth, Representative of Mauritania at the United Nations, New York
Moderator PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch, Free University of Berlin & AFES-PRESS

Moderator Dr. Hans Günter Brauch: From Almeria, Valencia to Bonn: Introduction of the theme and the panellists(19 slides)

Prof. Dr. Ursula Oswald, PD Dr. Hans Günter Brauch: Desertification and Migration: Case Study on Mexico, short version. (39 slides) and long version (84 slides)

Panellists: Prof. Dr. Jose L. Rubio, European Society for Soil Conservation, Spain; (English text; Spanish text)
Prof. Dr. Janos Bogardi, United Nations University UNU-EHS Institute for Environment and Human Security;
Mr. Sisir Ratho, Focal Point of the Government of India; Mr. Issa Martin Bikienga, Deputy Executive Secretary of CILSS;
Mr. Marc Baltes, Deputy Co-ordinator of OSCE Economic and Environmental Activities.

Moderator's summary report: and UNCCD-Version:

Report: © IISD: "CRIC-3, Final", in: Earth Negotiations Bulletin, Vol. 4, No. 175, p. 14-15.
Background on UNCCD,
CRIC-3,
UNCCD Journal on 10 May 2005 (announcement);
Journal on 11 May 2005 (brief report);
Interview mit Ursula Oswald und Hans Günter Brauch

February 2005
Hans Günter Brauch: Reconceptualising Security in the 21st Century. Facing the Challenges of Global Environmental Change and Globalisation
Opening remarks to Seminar, 21.-23.2.2005

Hans Günter Brauch: Reconceptualising Security: Relevance for GMOSS?, GMOSS Meeting Consolidated Security ConceptGoldegg / Salzburg February 17.2. - 18.2.2005

2004
October 2004
Hans Günter Brauch: Impact of Global Warming and Non-Conventional Water Resources: Potential of solar thermal desalination to defuse water as a conflict issue - A conceptual contribution to conflict resolution and long-term conflict avoidance, Scientific Paper and Powerpoint Presentation at the Second International Israeli Palestinian Conference: Water for Life in the Middle East, 10th - 14th October 2004, Porto Bello Hotel, Antalya, Turkey.
Website of Organisers
Conference Programme
Conference Abstracts
IPCRI
Final Statement

September 2004

Hans Günter Brauch: Introducing the book project, especially of part II on philosophical, ethical and religious contexts, Introduction of Keynote Speaker at the Third AFES-PRESS-GMOSS workshop, 5th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, The Hague, The Netherlands, 10 September 2004.

Hans Günter Brauch: Conceptual quartet: Security linkages with peace, development and environment, Presentation at the Third AFES-PRESS-GMOSS workshop, 5th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, The Hague, The Netherlands, 9 September 2004.

Hans Günter Brauch: Introduction: Global Monitoring for Stability & Security (GMOSS) Contributing to GMES, Third AFES-PRESS-GMOSS workshop, 5th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, The Hague, The Netherlands, 9 September 2004.

Hans Günter Brauch: The Three Worldviews of Hobbes, Grotius and Kant: Foundations of Modern Thinking on Peace and Security - Contextual Change and Reconceptualisation of Security, Opening speech at the Third AFES-PRESS-GMOSS workshop, 5th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, The Hague, The Netherlands, 8 September 2004.

Hans Günter Brauch: Landscape Ecology and Environmental Security, Threats, Challenges, Vulnerabilities and Risks - Common and Differentiated Trends in the Mediterranean During the 21st Century, Keynote speech at the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Use of Landscape Sciences for Environmental Assessment, Pilot Study Meeting at Lecce (Italy), 5-9 September 2004, Linkages among Landscape Assessment, Quality of Life and Environmental Security.

Hans Günter Brauch: "Climate Change and Long-term Impacts in the Mediterranean Region. Environmental Security, Conflicts and Conflict Avoidance", Speech in Session VII: Commitments, Mechanisms and Political Challenge of UNFCCC, Ankara Climate Change Conference, 1-3 September 2004, The Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, UNDP.

July 2004

Hans Günter Brauch: Global Monitoring for Stability & Security (GMOSS)
Contributing to GMES, Book Project: Reconceptualising Security, 40th Anniversary Conference of IPRA, Peace and Conflict in a Time of Globalisation, Sopron, Hungary, 5-9 July 2004, 6 July 2004, 14:00 - 15:30: Water and Security, Joint Session of the IPRA Commissions on Environment, Security and Global Political Economy

Hans Günter Brauch: From Sussex to Sopron IPRA Security Commission: (1986-2004), 40th Anniversary Conference of IPRA, Peace and Conflict in a Time of Globalisation, Sopron, Hungary, 5-9 July 2004, 6 July 2004, 16:00 - 17:30: Reconceptualising Security, Survival Dilemma and Alternative Security Strategies, Joint Session of the Commissions on Environment, Security and Global Political Economy

Hans Günter Brauch: From a Hobbesian Security to a Grotian Survival Dilemma, 40th Anniversary Conference of IPRA, Peace and Conflict in a Time of Globalisation, Sopron, Hungary, 5-9 July 2004, 6 July 2004, 16:00 - 17:30: Reconceptualising Security, Survival Dilemma and Alternative Security Strategies, Joint Session of the Commissions on Environment, Security and Global Political Economy

Hans Günter Brauch: Global Environmental and Climate Change and Conflicts: Towards a Peace Research Agenda for Environmental Conflict Avoidance in the 21st Century, 40th Anniversary Conference of IPRA, Peace and Conflict in a Time of Globalisation, Sopron, Hungary, 5-9 July 2004, Friday, 9 July 2004, 11:00 - 12:30 Plenary: Peace and Ecology
May 2004

Hans Günter Brauch: "Global Change and Environmental Conflict Avoidance Towards a Research and Policy Agenda", The Hague Conference on Environment, Security and Sustainable Development, 9-12 May 2004, The Peace Palace, The Hague, Netherlands.

For more information; see programme overview, detailed programme, other conference papers, and background material.

March 2004
Four talks in Washington, D.C., USA

Hans Günter Brauch: "Climate Change, Natural Disasters and Conflicts in the Mediterranean", Global Disaster Information Network, GDIN Conference 2004, Washington, D.C., 26-29 March 26 2004, U.S. Department of State and Hilton Hotel, Alexandria, SESSION 23c: Regional Cooperation - A comparative View, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe and the Mediterranean, Saturday, 27 March, 3.45-6.00 pm.

Abrupt Climate Change Workshop, Paris, 30 September- 1 October Draft papers Working Papers Library

Hans Günter Brauch: Abrupt Climate Change and Conflicts: Security Implications from a European Perspective - Hobbesian vs. Grotian Analyses, Talk & discussion organized by the Washington Office of the Friedrich Ebert Foundation,29 March 2004, 12-2pm, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, The Choate Room, 1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. (Invitation text)

Background information by the PEW Center on the film: The Day After Tomorrow: Could it Really Happen?

On the Scientific basis: U.S. National Research Council's Report in Brief on Abrupt Climate Change:and on the book

The Study by Randall and Schwartz for the Pentagon on: "An Abrupt Climate Change Scenario and Its Implications for United States National Security,"

For the report by Hans Günter Brauch: Climate Change and Conflicts

Hans Günter Brauch: Book Presentation: Security and Environment in the Mediterranean - Conceptualisation Security and Environmental Conflicts hosted by the Henry Stimson Center, Washington, DC, 30 March 2004, 2-4 pm

Hans Günter Brauch: Security and Environment in the Mediterranean. Long-term Human and Environmental Security Challenges for the Eastern Mediterranean during the 21st Century at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Environmental Change and Security Project Washington, D.C, 31 March, 10-11.30, Event Summary by Shannon Green and Meaghan Parker

Montreal, Canada, ISA Conference, 17-20 March
Friday, 19 March 2004, Reconceptualising Security I: Environmental Security

Chair: Hans Günter Brauch, Free University Berlin, AFES-PRESS, GMOSS: Introduction: EU-Network of excellence on security: Global Monitoring for Stability and Security (GMOSS) - AFES-PRESS contribution on Reconceptualising of security

Speaker 1: Hans Günter Brauch (Free University of Berlin; AFES-PRESS & GMOSS):
Reconceptualsing Security: A Contribution to the Fourth Phase of Research on Human and Environmental Security and Peace (HESP)

Additional nine papers by other speakers

January 2004

Hans Günter Brauch: Introductory Presentation to a Meeting of GlobalEurope 2020, Session 2 on North America on 28 January 2004 at Institute of International Relations Clingendael, The Hague, Netherlands on: Nonmilitary environmental security challenges for Europe and North America from the MENA region

On the second session focusing on North America in The Hague
Programme
Participants
Report [coming soon]

On GlobalEurope 2020, seven anticipation seminars with high-level diplomats and European decision-makers

On the first session focusing on the Arab world in Paris

On the second session focusing on North America in The Hague

On the third session focusing on Russia in Warsaw [with Czeslaw Mesjasz]

2003
December 2003
Two lectures in Amman, Jordan, 18 December 2003
Seminar at the Sheraton Amman Al Nabil Hotel & Towers
Hans Günter Brauch: Environment and Development in the Middle East
Part 1: Environmental Challenges to Security and Survival
Part 2: Development Opportunities: Addressing Non-Military Environmental Challenges by Functional Cooperation for Sustainability: Water, Soil, Food and Energy

December 2003

Hans Günter Brauch: Introductory Invited Lecture at the NATO-Workshop. Security issues of desertification in the Mediterranean region in Valencia, Spain, 2.-5.12.2003 on this subject: Desertification - A New Security Challenge for the Mediterranean? Policy agenda for recognising and coping with fatal outcomes of global environmental change and potentially violent societal consequences

[url]NATO Conference Report[/url]

Security issues of desertification in the Mediterranean region debated at NATO workshop
2-5 December 2003

Security issues related to desertification in the Mediterranean region was the subject of a workshop, which took place in Valencia, Spain, on 2-5 December. Desertification is an issue widely debated among specialists, particularly within the framework of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD). However, this NATO workshop presented the first opportunity for desertification in the Mediterranean region to be discussed in connection with security, and this novel approach attracted a large attendance, with 225 participants, and a correspondingly large number of contributed papers.
The opening address was given by Mr. Jean Fournet, NATO Assistant Secretary General for Public Diplomacy, in which he stressed the importance of combined action by scientists, policy-makers, members of governments and international organisations for a better understanding of the consequences of desertification for stability and security in the Mediterranean region.

Official delegations from all the Mediterranean Dialogue countries attended, and experts participated from the following NATO or NATO Partner countries - Albania, Armenia, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Spain, Turkey and the United States. International organisations were also represented, including OSCE, European Union and FAO. Sponsored jointly by the NATO Science Committee and the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS), workshop organizers included the US Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Valencia, the UNCCD and the Desert Research Institute of the University of Nevada. The co-directors were Dr. Jose Rubio of the University of Valencia, Spain, and Dr. William Kepner of the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Dr. Kepner gave a presentation in which he posed the question – How is desertification related to security? - and slides from this opening presentation are provided here, together with those from his closing presentation. Also provided are the extensive slides of Prof. Hans Guenther Brauch of Germany, whose presentation focused on possible security-related, pro-active strategies to prevent desertification issues posing security challenges.

Other contributions which were particularly relevant to the security issue came from Dr. Peter Liotta (US Naval War College) on the subject of Environmental and Human Security, which highlighted the “trigger mechanisms” that can unleash conflicts and create socio-economic disparity; and from Prof. Uriel Safriel of the University of Jerusalem who spoke about dryland development, desertification and security in the Mediterranean. The Executive Secretary of UNCCD, Ambassador H. A. Diallo also participated in the workshop and gave a far-reaching presentation on the social and economic consequences of desertification in different regions of the world.

The main points raised during a full three days of discussions were as follows:

Desertification is a common threat to the Mediterranean region. There is a need for a common understanding of the causes of desertification so that opportunities to develop international trans-boundary solutions to confront the desertification challenges can be found;

Desertification is not only a biophysical phenomenon but also has socio-economic and political implications. The concept of desertification is associated with land degradation, water scarcity and loss of productivity due to natural and human-induced causes;

Although countries of the Mediterranean region face similar desertification challenges, nevertheless differences exist, and particularly between the northern and southern parts of the region;

The main implications of desertification identified in Mediterranean countries were:

Water crises in terms of quantity and quality of resources;

Loss of fertile areas and reduction in food production;

Drop in rural incomes and lack of opportunities.

Greater pressure on productive land causes an increase in migration of people within their own countries and to foreign countries, which eventually produces an imbalance between more populated urban areas and desertified areas;

Desertification can be seen as a break in the equilibrium between natural resources and the demands of a society.


In addition:

Economic damage from land degradation is very high;

Desertification is progressing in the Mediterranean region and is creating social conflict;

Droughts aggravate the situation and induce destabilisation in populations;

Farmers and herders thus compete for limited land and water resources;

Desertification increases conflict between grazing rights and ownership rights.


The experts who gathered in Valencia were among the leading authorities in this field, and the high-level discussions allowed for the direct involvement of experts and policy-makers of the Mediterranean Dialogue countries. The workshop was able to provide a better view and understanding of an environmental phenomenon that is likely to have serious consequences for human dynamics and security of societies. In addition, this network of experts on desertification is now available to assist NATO and other potentially interested parties, and it is hoped that they will provide a tool for future assessment of the situation and for further initiatives, which will contribute to a more stable and peaceful Mediterranean region.


Introduction by William R. Kepner, U.S.-EPA, Las Vegas, Nevada and David Mouat, Desert Research Center, Reno, Nevada on: Desertification and Security: Perspectives for the Mediterranean Region

Conference Conclusions by William R. Kepner, U.S.-EPA, Las Vegas, Nevada on: Desertification in the Mediterranean Region: A Security Issue

Book Announcement: Kepner - Rubio - Mouat - Pedrazzini (Eds.): Desertification in the Mediterranean Region. A Security Issue (2005)

October 2003

Hans Günter Brauch: Presentation at the Vienna Conference 2003 on: Mediterranean Security, Stability and Cooperation: An Issue for all of Europe - The Eastern Mediterranean Region, in Vienna, Austria, 18-20 October 2003, organised by the Bureau for Security Policy at the Austrian Federal Ministry for Defence, Lecture 3: "The Political and Security-political Partnership and its Influence on Stability in the Region" on: "Long-term Security Challenges for the Eastern Mediterranean" (pdf file, 1,9 MB)

Hans Günter Brauch: Presentation at the Vienna Conference 2003 on: Mediterranean Security, Stability and Cooperation: An Issue for all of Europe - The Eastern Mediterranean Region, in Vienna, Austria, 18-20 October 2003, organised by the Bureau for Security Policy at the Austrian Federal Ministry for Defence, Working Group 3: Conflict Dimensions in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: Factors of Risk and Instability on: "The Human and Environmental Dimension: Coping with Water and Food Insecurity: Instruments for Long-term Conflict Avoidance" (pdf file, 470 KB)

Hans Günter Brauch: Presentation at the Second International Conference on Early Warning (EWC 2 organised by the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and German Federal Foreign Office (AA), in Bonn, 16 - 18 October 2003, in Section 13.1: Emergent Issues on: "Mainstreaming Early Warning of Natural Disasters and Conflicts" (pdf file, 773 KB)

Abstract of this talk by H. G. Brauch
Abstracts of all talks
Opening Speech by Federal Environment Minister Juergen Trittin
Major Policy Speeches
Press Releases
18.10.2003: Early Warning Can Save Lives! Leaders Learn How
16.10.2003: International Conference Calls Upon International, National and Local Leaders to Integrate Early Warning of Disasters into Policies
Photos of the Opening Ceremony
Summary Report in html, pdf, text formats

June 2003

Hans Günter Brauch: Presentation in the security section of the Third GMES Forum in Athens, Greece, 5-6 June 2003 organised by the EU Commission and ESA (5 June 2003) on: "Security Linkages Among Fatal Outcomes of Global Environmental Change: Natural Disasters, Environmentally-induced Migration, Crises and Conflicts - GMES Contribution to EU Policies for Conflict Prevention"

More details on GMES (Global Monitoring on Environment and Security)

Hans Günter Brauch: Keynote Address on: Environment and Security Challenges in the Mediterranean until 2050 - Potential Contributions of GMES to Reducing Natural Disasters, Environmental Migration and Avoiding Conflicts for a Eurisy Workshop in Matera (Italy) on Security: Services and Benefits from GMES, supported by the Italian Space Agency, Telespazio, the Council of Europe, EC/Joint Research Centre and the European Space Agency (28 January 2003)

2002

Hans Günter Brauch: Contribution on: "Urbanization and Natural Disasters in the Mediterranean - Population Growth and Climate Change in the 21st Century" for a Conference of the ProVention Consortium at the World Bank on: Building Safer Cities (5 December 2002); Powerpoint Slides:
And text of publication: (word, final, 16.9.2007). This paper was published and should be cited as:

Brauch, Hans Günter, 2003: “Urbanization and Natural Disasters in the Mediterranean – Po­pu­lation Growth and Climate Change in the 21st Century”, in: Kreimer. Alcira; Arnold, Margaret; Carlin, Anne (Eds.): The Future of Disaster Risk: Building Safer Cities. December 2002. Conference Papers (Washington, D.C.: World Bank): 149-164.

Hans Günter Brauch: "A Survival Pact for the Mediterranean: Linking "virtual water" and "virtual sun", in: Malta, 29 November 2002 (pdf-file, 2,8 MB)

See a press report on this talk by Julian Manduca: "Virtual Water, Virtual Sun", in: Malta Star, Friday, December 06, 2002; as PDF file

Hans Günter Brauch: Keynote address for the GMES Forum in Brussels at a workshop by the EU Commission and ESA (15-17 July 2002): Environment and Security Challenges in the Mediterranean until 2050 - Potential Contributions of GMES to Reducing Natural Disasters, Environmental Migration and Avoiding Conflicts (16 July 2002)

Hans Günter Brauch: "Climate Change, Environmental Stress and Conflict - Cases of Bangladesh and Egypt" in The Hague (29 June 2002). (pdf-file, 2,3 MB)

Hans Günter Brauch: "Vulnerabilities due to Environmental Degradation - A Human Security Perspective on Disaster Reduction", in Berlin (20 June 2002). (pdf-file, 1,1 MB)

Hans Günter Brauch: "Climate Change and Conflict Prevention", in Bonn (Side Event at SBSTA 16, 10 June 2002). (pdf-file, 1,8 MB)

Hans Günter Brauch: "A Survival Pact for the Mediterranean: Linking virtual water and virtual sun", joint Colloquy of TERI (New Delhi) with the Heinrich Böll Foundation, 24 March 2002, New York (pdf-file, 3,4 MB). This chapter was published by TERI in New Delhi, For Programme ;Order

Hans Günter Brauch: "New Security Challenges in the 21st Century", 12th EFGP Council Meeting, Hotel Agro, Budapest, 30 November - 1 December 2001, Budapest (pdf-file, 300 KB)

Publications

Book Chapters

Hans Günter Brauch: "Urbanization and Natural Disasters in the Mediterranean - Population Growth and Climate Change in the 21st Century", in: Kreimer. Alcira; Arnold, Margaret; Carlin, Anne (Eds.): The Future of Disaster Risk: Building Safer Cities. December 2002. Conference Papers (Washington, D.C.: World Bank, forthcoming 2003).

Journal Articles

Hans Günter Brauch: "Book Review: Ted Munn (ed): Encyclopedia of global environmental change (Egec)", in: Naturwissenschaften, Vol. 19, 2003 (pdf-file, 170 KB)

Lexicon Articles

Hans Günter Brauch: "Disarmament": in: Helmut Volger (Ed.): A Concise Encyclopedia of the United Nations, Preface by Kofi Annan (The Hague: Kluwer Law International, June 2002), 832 pp. Contents

Links to publishers

Springer-Verlag
Lit-Verlag
TERI, New Delhi
AFES-PRESS Publishers
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

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Soviet Peace Committee
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 9/1/18

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


The Soviet Peace Committee (SPC, also known as Soviet Committee for the Defense of Peace, SCDP, Russian: Советский Комитет Защиты Мира) was a state-sponsored organization responsible for coordinating peace movements active in the Soviet Union.[1] It was founded in 1949 and existed until the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.[2]

[Yuri Georgy Aleksandrovich Zhukov was] Deputy Chairman of the Soviet Peace Committee (1962-1982) and Chairman (1982-1987).

-- Yuri Zhukov (journalist), by Wikipedia


History and activities

The Soviet Peace Committee was founded in August 1949.[2] It was a member of the World Peace Council (an organization that was also founded in 1949).[2] The inaugural meeting was called the First All-Union Conference of the Partisans of Peace or the all-Soviet Peace Conference.[3][4]

The WPC [World Peace Council] was directed by the International Department of the Central Committee of the tongari[???] Soviet Communist Party through the Soviet Peace Committee, although it tended not to present itself as an organ of Soviet foreign policy, but rather as the expression of the aspirations of the "peace loving peoples of the world".

-- World Peace Council, by Wikipedia


The Soviet Peace Committee supported anti-war campaigns against the wars or militarization of the non-communist, Western countries, but failed to condemn similar actions originating from the USSR or its allies.[2] For example, in 1962 during a World Peace Council conference in Moscow, the Committee strongly objected to criticism of Soviet resumption of nuclear testing and threatened with deportation non-aligned activists who wanted to distribute leaflets.[5] In the early 1980s, it criticized the European Nuclear Disarmament (END) for its portrayal of the Soviet Union on the same level as NATO and the United States, arguing that while NATO deployment of nuclear missiles in Europe was "an aggressive policy", the Soviet Union had the right to deploy such weapons defensively.[6][7][8] Some even saw the Committee as a front for the KGB.[9][10]

Independent peace movements in the USSR which operated without permission of the Committee were seen as suspect.[7]


It gained some independence during the liberalization of the Soviet Union (perestroika) in 1985–1991.[2] In the last years of its existence, in the early 1990s, the organization's official publication, Vek XX i Mir (20th Century and Peace), previously seen as a "reliable propaganda instrument",[11] addressed issues controversial in the USSR, such as the death penalty, liberalism, human rights, totalitarianism and the Katyn Massacre.[2]

The Soviet Peace Committee ceased to exist with the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. In 1992, remnants of the Soviet Peace Committee were reorganized into the Federation for Peace and Conciliation.[2]

Chairmen

Soviet Peace Committee had four chairmen:[2]

• Nikolay Semenovich Tikhonov (1949–1979)
• Yevgeny Konstantinovich Fyodorov (1979–1981)
• Yury Zhukov (1982–1987)
• Genrikh Borovik (1987–1991)

Notes

1. Peace and disarmament, Progress Publishers, 1982
2. Soviet Peace Committee
3. Free Dictionary
4. W. E. B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century 1919-1963, by David Levering Lewis, p 545.
5. Lawrence S. Wittner, The Struggle Against the Bomb: Volume Two, Resisting the Bomb: A History of the World Nuclear Disarmament Movement, 1954-1970, Stanford University Press, 1997, ISBN 0-8047-2918-2, Google Print, p.317-318
6. Michael Bess, Realism, utopia, and the mushroom cloud: four activist intellectuals and their strategies for peace, 1945-1989, University of Chicago Press, 1993, ISBN 0-226-04421-1, Google Print, p.142
7. Matthew Evangelista, Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War, Cornell University Press, 2002, ISBN 0-8014-8784-6, Google Print, p.163
8. Paul Cooke, Jonathan Grix, East Germany: continuity and change, Rodopi, 2000, ISBN 90-420-0579-3, Google Print, p.113
9. Michael McFaul, Sergei Markov, The troubled birth of Russian democracy: parties, personalities, and programs, Hoover Press, 1993, ISBN 0-8179-9232-4, Print, p.301
10. Peter Vincent Pry, War scare: Russia and America on the nuclear brink, Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999, ISBN 0-275-96643-7, Google Print, p.143
11. Herman Ermolaev, Censorship in Soviet literature, 1917-1991, Rowman & Littlefield, 1997, ISBN 0-8476-8322-2, Google Print, p.224
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

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Part 1 of 2

World Peace Council
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 9/1/18

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Not to be confused with World Peace Congress.

The World Peace Council (WPC) is an international organization that advocates universal disarmament, sovereignty and independence and peaceful co-existence, and campaigns against imperialism, weapons of mass destruction and all forms of discrimination. It was founded in 1950, emerging from the policy of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union to promote peace campaigns around the world in order to oppose "warmongering" by the United States. Its first president was the French physicist and activist Frédéric Joliot-Curie. It was based in Helsinki, Finland from 1968 to 1999 and since in Athens, Greece.

History

Origins


Image
1952 WPC Congress in East Berlin showing Picasso's dove above the stage, banner reading "Germany must be a land of Peace"

In August 1948 through the initiative of the Communist Information Bureau (Cominform) a "World Congress of Intellectuals for Peace" was held in Wroclaw, Poland.[1] This gathering established a permanent organisation called the International Liaison Committee of Intellectuals for Peace—a group which joined with another international Communist organisation, the Women's International Democratic Federation to convene a second international conclave in Paris in April 1949, a meeting designated the World Congress of Partisans for Peace (Congrès Mondiale des Partisans de la Paix).[1] Some 2,000 delegates from 75 countries were in attendance at this foundation gathering in the French capital.[1]

Founded on October 5, 1947, Cominform (from Communist Information Bureau) is the common name for what was officially referred to as the Information Bureau of the Communist and Workers' Parties.[1] It was the first official forum of the International Communist Movement since the dissolution of the Comintern and confirmed the new realities after World War II, including the creation of an Eastern Bloc.

The intended purpose of Cominform was to coordinate actions between Communist parties under Soviet direction. It was not intended to be a replacement or successor to the Comintern. The Cominform was not a world Communist party, it did not have subordinates or power, other than its publication. It had its own newspaper, For Lasting Peace, for People's Democracy! It limited itself to one goal: "to organize an exchange of experience, and where necessary to coordinate the activity of the Communist parties, on the basis of mutual agreement."[2] In other aspects, Cominform was also used to repel anti-communist expansion.[3] The French and Italian parties were tasked specifically with the obstruction of the implementation of the Marshall Plan and the Truman Doctrine.[4] Cominform divided the world into imperialist and anti-imperialist.[5]

Cominform was a Soviet-dominated organization of Communist parties founded in September 1947 at a conference of Communist party leaders in Szklarska Poręba, Poland. It was founded with nine members, the Communist parties of the U.S.S.R., Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Yugoslavia, France, and Italy. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin called the conference in response to divergences among communist governments on whether or not to attend the Paris Conference on the Marshall Plan in July 1947.


Cominform was initially located in Belgrade (then the capital of the Federative People's Republic of Yugoslavia). After the expulsion of Yugoslavia from the group in June 1948, the seat was moved to Bucharest, Romania. The expulsion of the Communist Party of Yugoslavia from Cominform for Titoism initiated the Informbiro period in that country's history. One of the most decisive factors that led to the expulsion of Yugoslavia was their commitment to the insurgency in Greece, and their decision to station troops in Albania.[6]

The newspaper was published in several languages. It was originally printed in Belgrade; it was moved to Bucharest after the expulsion of the Yugoslavian party.[7] A vast array of articles was published, including some from the Canadian Communist Party.[8]

The Cominform was dissolved on April 17, 1956, after the Soviet rapprochement with Yugoslavia and the process of De-Stalinization.[4]

-- Cominform, by Wikipedia


The Communist International (Comintern), known also as the Third International (1919–1943), was an international communist organization that advocated world communism. The Comintern resolved at its Second Congress to "struggle by all available means, including armed force, for the overthrow of the international bourgeoisie and the creation of an international Soviet republic as a transition stage to the complete abolition of the state".[1] The Comintern was founded after the 1915 Zimmerwald Conference in which Vladimir Lenin had organized the "Zimmerwald Left" against those who refused to approve any statement explicitly endorsing socialist revolutionary action, and after the 1916 dissolution of the Second International.

The Comintern held seven World Congresses in Moscow between 1919 and 1935. During that period it also conducted thirteen "Enlarged Plenums" of its governing Executive Committee, which had much the same function as the somewhat larger and more grandiose Congresses. The Comintern was officially dissolved by Joseph Stalin in 1943 to avoid antagonizing its allies the United States and the United Kingdom.

-- Communist International, by Wikipedia


A new permanent organization emerged from the April 1949 conclave, the World Committee of Partisans for Peace.[1] At a Second World Congress held in Warsaw in November 1950, this group adopted the new name World Peace Council (WPC).[1] The origins of the WPC lay in the Cominform's doctrine that the world was divided between "peace-loving" progressive forces led by the Soviet Union and "warmongering" capitalist countries led by the United States, declaring that peace "should now become the pivot of the entire activity of the Communist Parties", and most western Communist parties followed this policy.[2]

In 1950, Cominform adopted the report of Mikhail Suslov, a senior Soviet official, praising the Partisans for Peace and resolving that, "The Communist and Workers' Parties must utilize all means of struggle to secure a stable and lasting peace, subordinating their entire activity to this" and that "Particular attention should be devoted to drawing into the peace movement trade unions, women's, youth, cooperative, sport, cultural, education, religious and other organizations, and also scientists, writers, journalists, cultural workers, parliamentary and other political and public leaders who act in defense of peace and against war."[3]


Lawrence Wittner, a historian of the post-war peace movement, argues that the Soviet Union devoted great efforts to the promotion of the WPC in the early post-war years because it feared an American attack and American superiority of arms[4] at a time when the USA possessed the atom bomb but the Soviet Union had not yet developed it.[5]

Wroclaw 1948 and New York 1949

Image
Session of the World Congress of Intellectuals for Peace in Wrocław in 1948

The World Congress of Intellectuals for Peace met in Wroclaw on 6 August 1948.[4][6] Julian Huxley, the chair of UNESCO, chaired the meeting in the hope of bridging Cold War divisions, but later wrote that "there was no discussion in the ordinary sense of the word".

In biologically recent times, one primate line broke through from the mammalian to the human type of organization. With this, the evolutionary process passed a critical point, and entered on a new state or phase, the psychosocial phase, differing radically from the biological in its mechanism, its tempo, and its results. As a result, man has become the latest dominant type in the evolutionary process, has multiplied enormously, has achieved miracles of cultural evolution, has reduced or extinguished many other species, and has radically affected the ecology and indeed the whole evolutionary process of our planet. Yet he is a highly imperfect creature. He carries a heavy burden of genetic defects and imperfections. As a psychosocial organism, he has not undergone much improvement. Indeed, man is still very much an unfinished type, who clearly has actualized only a small fraction of his human potentialities. In addition, his genetic deterioration is being rendered probable by his social set-up, and definitely being promoted by atomic fallout. Furthermore, his economic, technical and cultural progress is threatened by the high rate of increase of world population.

The obverse of man's actual and potential further defectiveness is the vast extent of his possible future improvement. To effect this, he must first of all check the processes making for genetic deterioration. This means reducing man-made radiation to a minimum, discouraging genetically defective or inferior types from breeding, reducing human over-multiplication in general and the high differential fertility of various regions, nations and classes in particular. Then he can proceed to the much more important task of positive improvement. In the not too distant future the fuller realization of possibilities will inevitably come to provide the main motive for man's overall efforts; and a Science of Evolutionary Possibilities, which to-day is merely adumbrated, will provide a firm basis for these efforts. Eugenics can make an important contribution to man's further evolution: but it can only do so if it considers itself as one branch of that new nascent science, and fearlessly explores all the possibilities that are open to it.

Man, let me repeat, is not a biological but a psychosocial organism. As such, he possesses a new mechanism of transmission and transformation based on the cumulative handing on of experience, ideas and attitudes. To obtain eugenic improvement, we shall need not only an understanding of what kind of selection operates in the psychosocial process, not only new scientific knowledge and new techniques in the field of human genetics and reproduction but new ideas and attitudes about reproduction and parenthood in particular and human destiny in general. One of those new ideas will be the moral imperative of Eugenics.

-- Eugenics in Evolutionary Perspective, by Sir Julian Huxley, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.


Speakers delivered lengthy condemnation of the West and praises of the Soviet Union. Albert Einstein had been invited to send an address, but when the organisers found that it advocated world government and that his representative refused to change it, they substituted another document by Einstein without his consent, leaving Einstein feeling that he had been badly used.[4]

The Congress elected a permanent International Committee of Intellectuals in Defence of Peace (also known as the International Committee of Intellectuals for Peace and the International Liaison Committee of Intellectuals for Peace) with headquarters in Paris.[7] It called for the establishment of national branches and national meetings along the same lines as the World Congress.[5][7] In accordance with this policy, a Cultural and Scientific Conference for World Peace was held in New York City in March 1949 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, sponsored by the National Council of Arts, Sciences and Professions.[7][8]

Paris and Prague 1949

The World Congress of Partisans for Peace in Paris (20 April 1949) repeated the Cominform line that the world was divided between "a non-aggressive Soviet group and a war-minded imperialistic group, headed by the United States government".[4] It established a World Committee of Partisans for Peace, led by a twelve-person Executive Bureau and chaired by Professor Frédéric Joliot-Curie, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, High Commissioner for Atomic Energy and member of the French Institute. Most of the Executive were Communists.[2][5] One delegate to the Congress, the Swedish artist Bo Beskow (sv), heard no spontaneous contributions or free discussions, only prepared speeches, and described the atmosphere there as "agitated", "aggressive" and "warlike".[9] A speech given at Paris by Paul Robeson—the polyglot lawyer, folksinger, and actor son of a runaway slave—was widely misquoted in the American press as stating that African Americans should not and would not fight for the United States in any prospective war against the Soviet Union; following his return, he was subsequently blacklisted and his passport confiscated for years.[10] The Congress was disrupted by the French authorities who refused visas to so many delegates that a simultaneous Congress was held in Prague."[5] Robeson's performance of "The March of the Volunteers" in Prague for the delegation from the incipient People's Republic of China was its earliest formal use as the country's national anthem. Picasso's lithograph, La Colombe (The Dove) was chosen as the emblem for the Congress[11] and was subsequently adopted as the symbol of the WPC.

Sheffield and Warsaw 1950

In 1950, the World Congress of the Supporters of Peace adopted a permanent constitution for the World Peace Council, which replaced the Committee of Partisans for Peace.[2][5] The opening congress of the WPC condemned the atom-bomb and the American invasion of Korea. It followed the Cominform line, recommending the creation of national peace committees in every country, and rejected pacifism and the non-aligned peace movement.[2] It was originally scheduled for Sheffield but the British authorities, who wished to undermine the WPC,[12] refused visas to many delegates and the Congress was forced to move to Warsaw. British Prime Minister Clement Attlee denounced the Congress as a "bogus forum of peace with the real aim of sabotaging national defence" and said there would be a "reasonable limit" on foreign delegates. Among those excluded by the government were Frédéric Joliot-Curie, Ilya Ehrenburg, Alexander Fadeyev, and Dmitri Shostakovich. The number of delegates at Sheffield was reduced from an anticipated 2,000 to 500, half of whom were British.[7]

1950s

The WPC was directed by the International Department of the Central Committee of the tongari Soviet Communist Party[13] through the Soviet Peace Committee,[14] although it tended not to present itself as an organ of Soviet foreign policy, but rather as the expression of the aspirations of the "peace loving peoples of the world".[15][16]

In its early days the WPC attracted numerous "political and intellectual superstars",[17] including W. E. B. Du Bois, Paul Robeson, Howard Fast, Pablo Picasso,[17] Louis Aragon, Jorge Amado, Pablo Neruda, György Lukacs, Renato Guttuso,[18] Jean-Paul Sartre, Diego Rivera,[19] Muhammad al-Ashmar[20] and Joliot-Curie. Most were Communists or fellow travellers.

In the 1950s, congresses were held in Vienna,[21] Berlin, Helsinki and Stockholm.[5]

The WPC led the international peace movement in the decade after the Second World War, but its failure to speak out against the Soviet suppression of the 1956 Hungarian uprising and the resumption of Soviet nuclear tests in 1961 marginalised it, and in the 1960s it was eclipsed by the newer, non-aligned peace organizations like the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.[4] At first, Communists denounced the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament for "splitting the peace movement"[22] but they were compelled to join it when they saw how popular it was.

1960s

Throughout much of the 1960s and early 1970s, the WPC campaigned against the US's role in the Vietnam War. Opposition to the Vietnam War was widespread in the mid-1960s and most of the anti-war activity had nothing to do with the WPC, which decided, under the leadership of J. D. Bernal, to take a softer line with non-aligned peace groups in order to secure their co-operation. In particular, Bernal believed that the WPC's influence with these groups was jeopardized by China's insistence that the WPC give unequivocal support to North Vietnam in the war.[23]

In 1968, the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia occasioned unprecedented dissent from Soviet policy within the WPC. It brought about such a crisis in the Secretariat that in September that year only one delegate supported the invasion.[23] However, the Soviet Union soon reasserted control, and according to the US State Department, "The WPC's eighth world assembly in East Berlin in June 1969 was widely criticized by various participants for its lack of spontaneity and carefully orchestrated Soviet supervision. As the British General Secretary of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace and a delegate to the 1969 assembly wrote (Tribune, July 4, 1969): 'There were a number [of delegates] who decided to vote against the general resolution for three reasons (a) it was platitudinous (b) it was one sided and (c) in protest against restrictions on minorities and the press within the assembly. This proved impossible in the end for no vote was taken.'"[16]

Activities

Image
Romesh Chandra (left), President of the World Peace Council, with Erich Honecker, East German head of state, 1981

Until the late 1980s, the World Peace Council's principal activity was the organization of large international congresses, nearly all of which had over 2,000 delegates representing most of the countries of the world. Most of the delegates came from pro-Communist organizations, with some observers from non-aligned bodies. There were also meetings of the WPC Assembly, its highest governing body. The congresses and assemblies issued statements, appeals and resolutions that called for world peace in general terms and condemned US weapons policy, invasions and military actions. The US Department of State described the congresses as follows: "The majority of participants in the assemblies are Soviet and East European communist party members, representatives of foreign communist parties, and representatives of other Soviet-backed international fronts. Token noncommunist participation serves to lend an element of credibility. Discussion usually is confined to the inequities of Western socioeconomic systems and attacks on the military and foreign policies of the United States and other imperialist, fascist nations. Resolutions advocating policies favored by the U.S.S.R. and other communist nations are passed by acclamation, not by vote. In most cases, delegates do not see the texts until they are published in the communist media. Attempts by noncommunist delegates to discuss Soviet actions (such as the invasion of Afghanistan) are dismissed as interference in internal affairs or anti-Soviet propaganda. Dissent among delegates often is suppressed and never acknowledged in final resolutions or communiques. All assemblies praise the U.S.S.R. and other progressive societies and endorse Soviet foreign policy positions."[16]

The WPC was involved in demonstrations and protests especially in areas bordering US military installations in Western Europe believed to house nuclear weapons. It campaigned against US-led military operations, especially the Vietnam War, although it did not condemn similar Soviet actions in Hungary and in Afghanistan.

On 18 March 1950, the WPC launched its Stockholm Appeal at a meeting of the Permanent Committee of the World Peace Congress,[7] calling for the absolute prohibition of nuclear weapons. The campaign won popular support, collecting, it is said, 560 million signatures in Europe, most from socialist countries, including 10 million in France (including that of the young Jacques Chirac), and 155 million signatures in the Soviet Union – the entire adult population.[24] Several non-aligned peace groups who had distanced themselves from the WPC advised their supporters not to sign the Appeal.[5]


Yet he is a highly imperfect creature. He carries a heavy burden of genetic defects and imperfections. As a psychosocial organism, he has not undergone much improvement. Indeed, man is still very much an unfinished type, who clearly has actualized only a small fraction of his human potentialities. In addition, his genetic deterioration is being rendered probable by his social set-up, and definitely being promoted by atomic fallout. Furthermore, his economic, technical and cultural progress is threatened by the high rate of increase of world population.

The obverse of man's actual and potential further defectiveness is the vast extent of his possible future improvement. To effect this, he must first of all check the processes making for genetic deterioration. This means reducing man-made radiation to a minimum.

-- Eugenics in Evolutionary Perspective, by Sir Julian Huxley, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.


A World Congress of People for Peace was held in Vienna in January 1952. It represented Joseph Stalin's strategy of peaceful coexistence,[25] resulting in a more broad-based conference. Among those attending were Jean-Paul Sartre and Hervé Bazin.

[T]he anti-Semite adds a new touch to the portrait: the Jew, he tells us, is an abstract intellectual, a pure reasoner. And we perceive at once that the terms abstract, rationalist, intellectual here take on a pejorative sense; it could not be otherwise, since the anti-Semite lays claim to a concrete and irrational possession of the values of the nation. But if we recall that rationalism was one of the principal instruments of human liberation, we must refuse to consider it a pure play of abstractions; on the contrary, we must insist on its creative power. In rationalism two centuries — and not the least important — placed all their hope; from rationalism sprang the sciences and their practical application; it was an idea and a passion; it tried to bring men together by uncovering for them universal truths on which they could all reach agreement, and in its naive and agreeable optimism it deliberately confounded evil with error. We shall understand nothing about Jewish rationalism if we see it as some kind of abstract taste for disputation, instead of what it is — a youthful and lively love of men.

At the same time, however, it is also an avenue of flight— I may even say, the royal road of flight. Up to this point, we have discussed those Jews who attempt, in their individual personalities, to deny their situation as Jews. But there are others who have chosen to espouse a conception of the world that excludes the very idea of race. No doubt this is really an attempt to conceal from themselves their own situation as Jews; but if they could succeed in persuading themselves and others that the very idea of Jews is contradictory, if they could succeed in establishing their vision of the world in such fashion that they became blind to the reality of Jewishness just as the colour-blind person is blind to red or green, could they not then declare in good faith that they are "men among men"?

-- Anti-Semite and Jew: An Exploration of the Etiology of Hate, by Jean-Paul Sartre


In 1955, another WPC meeting in Vienna launched an "Appeal against the Preparations for Nuclear War", with grandiose claims about its success.[26]

In June 1975 the WPC launched a second Stockholm Appeal during a period of détente between East and West. It declared that, "The victories of peace and détente have created a new international climate, new hopes, new confidence, new optimism among the peoples."[5]

In the 1980s it campaigned against the deployment of U.S. missiles in Europe.

It published two magazines, New Perspectives and Peace Courier. Its current magazine is Peace Messenger.[27]

Associated groups

In accordance with the Comniform's 1950 resolution to draw into the peace movement trade unions, women's and youth organisations, scientists, writers and journalists, etc., several Communist mass organisations supported the WPC, for example:

• Christian Peace Conference[28][29]
• International Federation of Resistance Fighters[30]
• International Institute for Peace[28][29]
• International Association of Democratic Lawyers[30]
• International Organization of Journalists[30]
• International Union of Students[30]
• World Federation of Democratic Youth[30]
• World Federation of Scientific Workers[30]
• World Federation of Trade Unions[30]
• Women's International Democratic Federation[30]

Relations with non-aligned peace groups

The WPC has been described as caught in contradictions as "it sought to become a broad world movement while being instrumentalized increasingly to serve foreign policy in the Soviet Union and nominally socialist countries."[31] From the 1950s until the late 1980s it tried to use non-aligned peace organizations to spread the Soviet point of view, alternately wooing and attacking them, either for their pacifism or their refusal to support the Soviet Union. Until the early 1960s there was limited co-operation between such groups and the WPC, but they gradually dissociated themselves as they discovered it was impossible to criticize the Soviet Union at WPC conferences.[4]

From the late 1940s to the late 1950s the WPC, with its large budget and high-profile conferences, dominated the peace movement, to the extent that the movement became identified with the Communist cause.[5] The formation of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in Britain in 1957 sparked a rapid growth in the unaligned peace movement and its detachment from the WPC. However, the public and some Western leaders still tended to regard all peace activists as Communists. For example, US President Ronald Reagan said that the big peace demonstrations in Europe in 1981 were "all sponsored by a thing called the World Peace Council, which is bought and paid for by the Soviet Union",[32][33] and Soviet defector Vladimir Bukovsky claimed that they were co-ordinated at the WPC's 1980 World Parliament of Peoples for Peace in Sofia.[34] The FBI reported to the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that the WPC-affiliated U.S. Peace Council was one of the organizers of a large 1982 peace protest in New York City, but said that the KGB had not manipulated the American movement "significantly."[35] International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War was said to have had "overlapping membership and similar policies" to the WPC.[28] and the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs and the Dartmouth Conferences were said to have been used by Soviet delegates to promote Soviet propaganda.[29] Joseph Rotblat, one of the leaders of the Pugwash movement, said that although a few participants in Pugwash conferences from the Soviet Union "were obviously sent to push the party line ... the majority were genuine scientists and behaved as such".[36]

As the non-aligned peace movement "was constantly under threat of being tarnished by association with avowedly pro-Soviet groups", many individuals and organizations "studiously avoided contact with Communists and fellow-travellers."[37] Some western delegates walked out of the Wroclaw conference of 1948, and in 1949 the World Pacifist Meeting warned against active collaboration with Communists.[4] In the same year, several members of the British Peace Pledge Union, including Vera Brittain, Michael Tippett, and Sybil Morrison, criticised the WPC-affiliated British Peace Committee for what they saw as its "unquestioning hero-worship" of the Soviet Union.[4] In 1950, several Swedish peace organizations warned their supporters against signing the WPC's Stockholm Appeal.[5] In 1953, the International Liaison Committee of Organizations for Peace stated that it had "no association with the World Peace Council". In 1956, a year in which the WPC condemned the Suez war but not the Russian suppression of the 1956 Hungarian uprising,[4] the German section of War Resisters International condemned it for its failure to respond to Soviet H-bomb tests. In Sweden, Aktionsgruppen Mot Svensk Atombomb discouraged its members from participating in Communist-led peace committees. The WPC attempted to co-opt the eminent peace campaigner Bertrand Russell, much to his annoyance, and in 1957 he refused the award of the WPC's International Peace Prize.[38] In Britain, CND advised local groups in 1958 not to participate in a forthcoming WPC conference. In the USA, SANE rejected WPC appeals for co-operation. A final break occurred during the WPC's 1962 World Congress for Peace and Disarmament in Moscow. The WPC had invited non-aligned peace groups, who were permitted to criticize Soviet nuclear testing, but when western activists including the British Committee of 100[39] tried to demonstrate in Red Square against Soviet weapons and the Communist system, their banners were confiscated and they were threatened with deportation.[4][40][41] As a result of this confrontation, 40 non-aligned organizations decided to form a new international body, the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, which was not to have Soviet members.[42]

From about 1982, following the proclamation of martial law in Poland, the Soviet Union adopted a harder line with non-aligned groups, apparently because their failure to prevent the deployment of Cruise and Pershing missiles.[43] In December 1982, the Soviet Peace Committee President, Yuri Zhukov, returning to the rhetoric of the mid-1950s, wrote to several hundred non-communist peace groups in Western Europe accusing the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation of "fueling the cold war by claiming that both NATO and the Warsaw Pact bear equal responsibility for the arms race and international tension. Zhukov denounced the West Berlin Working Group for a Nuclear-Free Europe, organizers of a May 1983 European disarmament conference in Berlin, for allegedly siding with NATO, attempting to split the peace movement, and distracting the peaceloving public from the main source of the deadly threat posed against the peoples of Europe-the plans for stationing a new generation of nuclear missiles in Europe in 1983."[16] In 1983, the British peace campaigner E. P. Thompson, a leader of European Nuclear Disarmament, attended the World Peace Council's World Assembly for Peace and Life Against Nuclear War in Prague at the suggestion of the Czech dissident group Charter 77 and raised the issue of democracy and civil liberties in the Communist states, only for Assembly to respond by loudly applauding a delegate who said that "the so-called dissident issue was not a matter for the international peace movement, but something that had been injected into it artificially by anti-communists."[43] The Hungarian student peace group, Dialogue,[44] also tried to attend the 1983 Assembly but were met with tear gas, arrests, and deportation to Hungary;[43] the following year the authorities banned it.[45]

Rainer Santi, in his history of the International Peace Bureau, said that the WPC "always had difficulty in securing cooperation from West European and North American peace organisations because of its obvious affiliation with Socialist countries and the foreign policy of the Soviet Union. Especially difficult to digest, was that instead of criticising the Soviet Union's unilaterally resumed atmospheric nuclear testing in 1961, the WPC issued a statement rationalizing it. In 1979 the World Peace Council explained the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan as an act of solidarity in the face of Chinese and US aggression against Afghanistan."[5] Rob Prince, a former secretary of the WPC, suggested that it simply failed to connect with the western peace movement because it used most of its funds on international travel and lavish conferences. It had poor intelligence on Western peace groups, and, even though its HQ was in Helsinki, had no contact with Finnish peace organizations.[17]

After the demise of communism

By the mid-1980s the Soviet Peace Committee "concluded that the WPC was a politically expendable and spent force,"[17] although it continued to provide funds until 1991.[46] As the Soviet Peace Committee was the conduit for Soviet direction of the WPC, this judgement represented a downgrading of the WPC by the Soviet Communist Party. Under Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet Peace Committee developed bilateral international contacts "in which the WPC not only played no role, but was a liability."[17] Gorbachev never even met WPC President Romesh Chandra and excluded him from many Moscow international forums.[17] Following the 1991 breakup of the Soviet Union, the WPC lost most of its support, income and staff and dwindled to a small core group.[47] Its international conferences now attract only a tenth of the delegates that its Soviet-backed conferences could attract (see below), although it still issues statements couched in similar terms to those of its historic appeals.[27]

Location

The WPC first set up its offices in Paris, but was accused by the French government of engaging in "fifth column" activities and was expelled in 1952. It moved to Prague and then in 1954 to Vienna.[48] In 1957 it was banned by the Austrian government. It was invited to Prague but did not move there,[48] had no official HQ but continued to operate in Vienna[5] under cover of the International Institute for Peace.[49] In 1968 it re-assumed its name and moved to Helsinki,[5] Finland, where it remained until 1999. In 2000 it re-located to Athens, Greece.[21]

Funding

According to the WPC, 90 percent of its funding came from the Soviet Union,[50] which was said to have given it $49 million.[29] Its current income is believed to derive mainly from the interest on a $10m payment made by the Soviet Peace Committee in around 1991, although its finances remain shrouded in mystery.[46]
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

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Part 2 of 2

Allegations of CIA measures against the WPC

The Congress for Cultural Freedom was founded in 1950 with the support of the CIA to counter the propaganda of the emerging WPC,[51] and Philip Agee claimed that the WPC was a Soviet front for propaganda which CIA covertly tried to neutralize and to prevent the WPC from organizing outside the Communist bloc.[52]

In the Feb. 7, 1941 issue of Life magazine, founder and publisher Henry Luce authored and signed an editorial, "The American Century," announcing that the American Synarchists intended to rule the world at the close of the war and impose their own jaded version of "American values" on the world, through "any means necessary." Luce's thesis was reproduced and mass-circulated throughout the United States.

The populations of the world, exhausted from the destruction of war and the bestiality of Hitler, Stalin, and Hiroshima, naturally hoped for something better. But the universal glimmer of optimism, of being able to rebuild, was further shattered when Allen Dulles, John J. McCloy, and their associates, including Luce, deployed to create the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CFF), whose explicit purpose was to launch a fascist assault on truth as science and on Classical culture.

Time magazine was created in 1923 as a mouthpiece for the American Synarchists, grouped around the banking interests of J.P. Morgan. It is hardly a coincidence that, simultaneous to the launching of Time, in Europe, Count Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi, another leading Synarchist, was launching his Pan-European Union, which would be a leading propaganda vehicle for the winning of support among Europe's financial oligarchy for the "Hitler-Mussolini" universal fascism project.

Henry Luce was just out of Yale University, where he was a member of the secret society Skull and Bones (class of 1920). Morgan funnelled Luce start-up cash, and Luce tapped numbers of his friends from his secret brotherhood to create and run what would become a propaganda empire. In 1930, for example, Luce chose Russell Davenport, an intimate Bonesman, to become Fortune magazine's first editor-in-chief.

Initial members of the board of directors of Time included Henry P. Davison, Jr., a fellow classmate and Bonesman, whose father was a senior partner at J.P. Morgan. Davison brought in Dwight Morrow, another Morgan partner, to finance the start-up. Morgan interests were further strengthened, when in 1927, John Wesley Hanes was placed on the board. Start-up funding also came from William Hale Harkness, a board member, who was related to Rockefeller partner Edward S. Harkness.

Luce's personal lawyer, who would come to represent his entire media empire, was his brother-in-law Tex Moore, of Cravath, deGersdorff, Swaine and Wood, the same firm which deployed both Allen and John Foster Dulles to facilitate bringing Hitler to power in the early 1930s.

Luce was an intimate of Britain's Lord Beaverbrook and the Prince of Wales, who were notoriously pro-Hitler and members of the Cliveden set. He also formed an extremely close relationship with Winston Churchill, himself a promoter of Hitler in the early 1930s.

Americans were introduced to Benito Mussolini and Fascism in one of Time's first issues when the Synarchists decided to celebrate Il Duce's 40th birthday, and have Americans join them, by placing his portrait on the cover of the Aug. 6, 1923 issue of Time. This would be the first of five cover appearances.

Luce was America's fascist "Elmer Gantry." He toured the country selling fascism to America's business elite and upper class on the one hand, and using his mass propaganda outlets to "sell it to the mickeys" on the other.

Luce unabashedly promoted Synarchy. Appearing before business groups, he promulgated the idea that America's corporate and banking elites were more powerful and important than the U.S. government, stating, "It is not a seat in Congress but on the directorate of the greatest corporations which our countrymen regard as the greater post of honor and responsibility." Likening America's financial tycoons to Europe's aristocracy, he featured both in the pages of Fortune magazine.

In an article in 1928, Luce declared the U.S. Constitution obsolete and called for "a new form of government." What was this new form of government? In March of the same year, in a speech to businessmen in Rochester, N.Y., he stated "America needs at this moment a moral leader, a national moral leader. The outstanding national moral leader of the world today is Mussolini." On Nov. 28, 1930, he stated to a Chicago audience that Mussolini's Italy was a success story: "A state reborn by virtue of Fascist symbols, Fascist rank and hence Fascist enterprise." Luce further declared, on April 19, 1934 in a speech to the Scranton, Pa. Chamber of Commerce, "The moral force of Fascism, appearing in totally different forms in different nations, may be the inspiration for the next general march of mankind."

While Luce organized the upper crust through Fortune, he fed the general population a carefully crafted diet of stories about Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco through the writings of his foreign news editor, Laird Goldsborough, a publicly avowed fascist, anti-Semite, and pro-Nazi who in 1933 interviewed both Hitler and Mussolini.

Luce had a visceral hatred of FDR and the New Deal. He attacked them both on his speaking tours and in print. Intimates reported that he became apoplectic with violent rage at the mere mention of FDR's name.

Luce's role in the Morgan-organized "Smedley Butler" coup plot against Roosevelt was significant. Luce prepared the entire July 1934 issue of Fortune as a detailed study of the political, cultural, and economic experiments of Italian fascism. This was unheard of. The issue was timed to appear as the coup went into its final month, and it was undoubtedly intended to rally upper-class support for the coup and the transition to an American form of fascism.

Although Luce later promoted the turn away from fascism, when it was necessary to defeat Hitler, he heralded the postwar policy of the Anglo-American Synarchists with his famous 1941 Life magazine editorial, "The American Century," which announced the Synarchist goal of Anglo-American world domination at the close of the war. Luce wrote: "We must accept whole-heartedly our duty and our opportunity as the most powerful and vital nation in the world and in consequence to exert upon the world the full impact of our influence, for such purposes as we see fit and by such means as we see fit." The editorial was mass-produced and circulated widely; it appeared in full in the Washington Post and Reader's Digest. Although he did not include the point in this editorial, Luce would soon argue, also in the pages of Life, for preventive nuclear war against the Soviet Union.

The outlook of today's Beast-Men, led by Vice President Dick Cheney, is a continuation of the policies represented by Luce and the fascists of the 1930s and 1940s. Cheney's inner core of neocons are all signers of the founding principles of William Kristol's Project for a New American Century, explicitly modelled on Luce's theme. The Children of Satan, as Lyndon LaRouche has determined they rightly be called, had Henry Luce as one of their godfathers. Luce's brothers at Skull and Bones gave him the secret name of "Baal."

The Congress for Cultural Freedom was created to implement Luce's "American Century." Luce helped finance its operations, and his trusted vice president at Time-Life, C.D. Jackson, oversaw much of its policy as special advisor to the President for psychological warfare.

-- Henry Luce's Empire of Fascism, by Steven P. Meyer and Jeffrey Steinberg


CIA's Direction of Cultural Warfare

CIA employee Tom Braden, who had been the MoMA's managing director from 1947 to 1949 before he began working for the CIA, was initially in charge of the CIA section that oversaw the culture cold war. The section was called the International Organisations Division (IOD). The IOD indirectly, via their fronts and agreeable Foundations, funded prestigious journals, organized conferences, music competitions and art exhibitions.

The rationale behind this covert philanthropy was that American avant-garde culture that was both leftist and anti-communist could be an effective foil against Stalinist Communism's rise in Western Europe, post World War II. It was not just the CIA that directed the flow of money, it was also some very influential and wealthy Americans with names that included Rockefeller, Ford, and Dodge. Although they were not CIA fronts, many other foundations have been implicated as having received CIA monies.

The primary beneficiary of the Farfield Foundation's philanthropy was another CIA front, the Congress for Cultural Freedom, and its US Chapter, the American Committee for Cultural Freedom, which in turn funded groups and individuals through themselves. Even early neoconservative thinkers received funding from covert CIA sources for journals and freelance authorship.


The need for secrecy was as much for domestic reasons as foreign. The McCarthy-era federal politicians distrusted modern culture and viewed it as destructive of American Ideals; it is highly unlikely that Norman Rockwell paintings and evangelical-styled Christian missionaries would have been successful in holding Communism's cultural allure at bay in Post-WWII Western Europe.

What's wrong with the CIA covertly funding the export of American Expressionism? It is a true art form. It is a product of America that many have felt an affinity to. Artists have usually required patrons supporting both their physical sustenance, and their psychological well being in a positive recognition of their creative worth. Historically, artists' sponsorship has often been government or religious officials. Communism's spread was viewed as a positive force, or in muted fatalism, an inevitability, amongst many of Western Europe's Post WWII cultural elite. The unbridled individualism of expressionism offered an effective contrast, as well as viable alternative to the stark bleakness of Soviet Realism's portrayal of grayscaled existence within the Stalinist sphere of influence. The Soviet Government had their own arsenal of covert actions too. It would be a great stretch of logic to view the funding of musicians who were virtuosi of Jazz's improvisational spontaneity in the 50's on working trips to Europe as the acts of an evil empire. There is an aura of comical irony swirling about an effective usage of the frequently apolitical lords of American Abstract Art and the drop out Icons of the Beat Generation as the USA's secret Cold War arsenal in cultural warfare. Both American politicians and their Soviet analogs viewed them as part of an American degeneracy that was infecting their country, and causing a decline in domestic morality. Soviet politicians perceived it as an effect of capitalism's excesses, while American politicians viewed it as a creeping red menace.

What is condemnable isn't the act of funding artists in an ideological cultural war, it is the unseen hands of manipulative elitists, who believe they are acting for the greater common good, secretly affecting the World's societies. The overuse of and dependence upon a methodology of opaque actions, and an unyielding faith in the propriety of the use of stealth within an open democratic society is where the malevolence lies. The same mechanisms used for covertly funding and secretly manipulating culture to fight communism were also used to covertly aid undemocratic-but-anti-communist regimes around the world. Instead of just listening to Coltrane, Byrd, Gillespie or Brubeck, while contemplating the artworks of Motherwell, Pollock, Rothko or Kline; reflect also upon "Papa Doc" and "Baby Doc" Duvalier of Haiti, Anastasios Somoza of Nicuragua, Augusto Pinochet of Chile, General Suharto of Indonesia, Hugo Banzer of Bolivia, Jonas Savimbi of South Africa, Lon Nol of Cambodia, Manuel Noriega of Panama, Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire, Raoul Cedras of the Raboteau massacre, Reza Shah Pahlavi of Iran, Roberto D'Aubuisson of El Salvador, and do not forget Saddam Hussein. Secrecy surrounding government's foreign policy is all too often used to obfuscate foreign policy that is a destructive force on the receiving end. The target country's citizenry ends up taking the brunt of the force, and the seeds of their democratic will are sown into the wind. Covert action is also used to hide governmental practices that would be viewed negatively by the majority of American citizens if it were not kept secret. It ends up being an antidemocratic government action, ostensibly engaged upon for protecting and expanding liberty and democracy world-wide. This hypocrisy causes the onset of anti-Americanism, leads to blowback, as well as being a primary cause for the disbelieving naiveté Americans often express when confronted with the storm of antagonism resultant from the hidden actions, having awakened just in time to reap its whirlwind.

-- Farfield Foundation, by SourceWatch


Steinem has always pretended that she had been a student radical. "When I was in college, it was the McCarthy era," she told Susan Mitchell in 1997, "and that made me a Marxist." (Icons, Saints and Divas: Intimate Conversations with Women who Changed the World 1997. p 130) Her bio-blurb in June 1973 MS. Magazine states: "Gloria Steinem has been a freelance writer all her professional life. Ms magazine is her first full-time salaried job."

Not true. Raised in an impoverished, dysfunctional family in Toledo Ohio, Steinem somehow managed to attend elite Smith College, Betty Friedan's alma mater. After graduating in 1955, Steinem received a "Chester Bowles Student Fellowship" to study in India. Curiously, an Internet search reveals that this fellowship has no existence apart from Gloria Steinem. No one else has received it.

In 1958, Steinem was recruited by CIA's Cord Meyers to direct an "informal group of activists" called the "Independent Research Service." This was part of Meyer's "Congress for Cultural Freedom," which created magazines like "Encounter" and "Partisan Review" to promote a left-liberal chic to oppose Marxism. Steinem, attended Communist-sponsored youth festivals in Europe, published a newspaper, reported on other participants, and helped to provoke riots.

One of Steinem's CIA colleagues was Clay Felker. In the early 1960's, he became an editor at Esquire and published articles by Steinem which established her as a leading voice for women's lib. In 1968, as publisher of New York Magazine, he hired her as a contributing editor, and then editor of Ms. Magazine in 1971. Warner Communications put up almost all the money although it only took 25% of the stock. Ms. Magazine's first publisher was Elizabeth Forsling Harris, a CIA-connected PR executive who planned John Kennedy's Dallas motorcade route. Despite its anti establishment image, MS magazine attracted advertising from the crème of corporate America. It published ads for ITT at the same time as women political prisoners in Chile were being tortured by Pinochet, after a coup inspired by the US conglomerate and the CIA.

Steinem's personal relationships also belie her anti establishment pretensions. She had a nine-year relationship with Stanley Pottinger, a Nixon-Ford assistant attorney general, credited with stalling FBI investigations into the assassinations of Martin Luther King, and the ex-Chilean Foreign Minister Orlando Latelier. In the 1980's, she dated Henry Kissinger.
For more details, see San Francisco researcher Dave Emory.

Our main misconception about the CIA is that it serves US interests. In fact, it has always been the instrument of a dynastic international banking and oil elite (Rothschild, Rockefeller, Morgan) coordinated by the Royal Institute for Internal Affairs in London and their US branch, the Council for Foreign Relations. It was established and peopled by blue bloods from the New York banking establishment and graduates of Yale University's secret pagan "Skull and Bones" society. Our current President, his father and grandfather fit this profile.

The agenda of this international cabal is to degrade the institutions and values of the United States in order to integrate it into a global state that it will direct through the United Nations. In its 1947 Founding Charter, the CIA is prohibited from engaging in domestic activities. However this has never stopped it from waging a psychological war on the American people. The domestic counterpart of the "Congress for Cultural Freedom" was the "American Committee for Cultural Freedom." Using foundations as conduits, the CIA controlled intellectual discourse in the 1950´s and 1960's, and I believe continues to do so today. In The The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, Francis Stonor Saunders estimates that a thousand books were produced under the imprint of a variety of commercial and university presses, with covert subsidies.

-- Gloria Steinem - How The CIA Used Feminism To Destabilize Society, by Henry Makow, Ph.D.


AEI is the most prominent think tank associated with American neoconservatism, in both the domestic and international policy arenas. Irving Kristol, widely considered a father of neoconservatism, was a senior fellow at AEI (arriving from the Congress for Cultural Freedom following the widespread revelation of the group's CIA funding) and many prominent neoconservatives—including Jeane Kirkpatrick, Ben Wattenberg, and Joshua Muravchik—spent the bulk of their careers at AEI.

-- American Enterprise Institute, by Wikipedia


Not everyone was enchanted by the renegade psychedelic scene at Harvard. A confidential memorandum issued by the CIA's Office of Security, which had utilized LSD for interrogation purposes since the early 1950s, suggested that certain CIA-connected personnel might be involved with Leary's group. This prospect was disconcerting to Security officials, who considered hallucinogenic drugs "extremely dangerous." "Uncontrolled experimentation has in the past resulted in tragic circumstances and for this reason every effort is made to control any involvement with these drugs," a CIA agent reported. The document concluded with a specific directive: "Information concerning the use of this type of drug for experimental or personal reasons should be reported immediately.... In addition, any information of Agency personnel involved with ... Drs. ALPERT or LEARY, or with any other group engaged in this type of activity should also be reported."

It is known that during this period Leary gave LSD to Mary Pinchot, a painter and a prominent Washington socialite who was married to Cord Meyer, a high-level CIA official. (Meyer oversaw the CIA's infiltration of the US National Student Association and the Congress for Cultural Freedom in Europe, which provided financial support to numerous Cold War liberal intellectuals and writers.) Leary and Pinchot struck up a cordial friendship during her occasional visits to Cambridge in the early 1960s. She asked him to teach her how to guide an LSD session so she could introduce the drug to her circles in Washington. 'I have this friend who's a very important man," she confided to Leary. "He's very impressed with what I've told him about my own LSD experience and what other people have told him. He wants to try it himself." Leary was intrigued, but Pinchot wouldn't tell him who she intended to turn on. Nor did she inform her LSD mentor of her marriage to a CIA bigwig.

-- Acid Dreams, The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and Beyond, by Martin A. Lee & Bruce Shlain


The Fugitives: The Fabian Society Joins the Klan (1920s)

In 1917, Walter L. Fleming was appointed dean of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. During the preceding years, the college, once Southern Methodist Church-sponsored, had been taken over by a consortium of Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan Wall Street financier interests. Vanderbilt, under Fleming, would provide the launching pad for the Fugitives, a literary mafia that would promote a revival of Confederate ideology and wage cultural war against the American System paradigm of scientific and technological progress and republican statecraft. Beginning in the 1920s, the Fugitives published a literary magazine of the same name.

Fleming's most famous work had been his 1905 history of the original post-Civil War Ku Klux Klan, which he prepared in consultation with many of the surviving "Tennessee Templars" who had led that organization. Fleming, along with other political, cultural, and spiritual leaders, had been instrumental in the 1915 re-launching of the Klan, which was promoted through the mass circulation of Hollywood's first full-length feature film, D.W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation, beginning with highly publicized screenings at President Woodrow Wilson's White House, and at the Supreme Court.

The Fugitive's high priest was a Rosicrucian mystic, Sidney Mttron Hirsch. Its temporal leader, John Crowe Ransom, had just returned from his Rhodes Scholarship studies at Oxford University. Ransom was well known, at least by his family connections, to Dean Fleming, because his great uncle, Tennessee Templar and Ku Klux Klan founder James R. Crowe, had been Fleming's chief source on Klan history. In fact, the entire Crowe family were KKK, and Ransom cherished his childhood memories of mama Ella Crowe, and the other Crowe women, sitting around the family hearth, sewing sheets together for the rallies.

This was not an aberration. The core of the Fugitive circle, and their later literary and political collaborators, were descended from Tennessee Templars, officers of Nathan Bedford Forrest's Confederate Army "Critter Company." The small Fugitive circle, in addition to Ransom, included five others: William Yandell Elliott, Bill Frierson, Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, and Cleanth Brooks. All but Tate were also to be Rhodes Scholars. And Warren, Brooks, and Tate, along with Ransom's younger students, John "Jack" Thompson, Robbie Macauley, and Robert Lowell, were all to play leading roles in the Congress for Cultural Freedom.


At the time Ransom's Fugitive circle was formed, the main Fabian Society publication was a journal called The New Age, which was financed by the Fabian playwright, and promoter of Friedrich Nietzsche, George Bernard Shaw and published by a Theosophist, Alfred Richard Orage, who later became a disciple of the Russian mystic, Georg Gurdjieff. In The New Age, the works of Fabians Shaw, H.G. Wells, G.K. Chesterton, and Hilaire Belloc, appeared alongside those of the leading Satanist of the 20th Century, the self-proclaimed "Great Beast", Aleister Crowley, and assorted other pornographers and mystics like William Butler Yeats, future Fascist spy Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and D.H. Lawrence.

Chesterton and Belloc, though associated with the Fabian Society early in the 20th Century, were to become the leaders, along with Maurice Baring, of a Synarchist, pro-Spanish Inquisition, pro-Roman Empire, pro-Fascist Catholic grouping known as the Distributists. Fellow New Ager (and later Nobel Prize winner and major figure in CCF operations) T.S. Eliot, was to ally with them in this effort, as were Ransom and the Fugitives.

During the First World War, Chesterton, Wells, and others of the New Age crowd worked for Wellington House, Britain's propaganda unit under Charles Masterman, which was taken over by Lord Beaverbrook [aka Max Aitken] in 1917.

The alliance between the New Age crowd and the Fugitives was initially forged by William Yandell Elliott. During his Rhodes Scholarship term, 1922-24, at Oxford's Balliol College, he came under the influence of leading Round Table and Fabian Society figure, A.D. Lindsay. Elliott's subsequent professional career at Harvard's Government Department, and in various Congressional and Executive positions in Washington, centered on the idea that the United States Constitution should be scrapped, and the nation reorganized as a section of a "New British Empire," an idea derived from Lindsay's Round Table program.

At Oxford, Elliott had consorted with the occultist literary figures of The New Age. He was part of a late-night drinking circle including Aleister Crowley's one-time lodge brother, the Nobel Prize-winning poet William Butler Yeats, and long-time Fugitive intimate Robert Graves. Future CCF operative Graves is known today for his adoring history of the Roman Empire, I Claudius and his promotion of the cult of the White Goddess.

-- The CCF and the God of Thunder Cult, by Stanley Ezrol & Jeffrey Steinberg


Current organisation

The WPC currently states its goals as: Actions against imperialist wars and occupation of sovereign countries and nations; prohibition of all weapons of mass destruction; abolition of foreign military bases; universal disarmament under effective international control; elimination of all forms of colonialism, neo-colonialism, racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination; respect for the right of peoples to sovereignty and independence, essential for the establishment of peace; non-interference in the internal affairs of nations; peaceful co-existence between states with different political systems; negotiations instead of use of force in the settlement of differences between nations.

The WPC is a registered NGO at the United Nations and co-operates primarily with the Non-Aligned Movement. It cooperates with United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), International Labour Organization (ILO), and other UN specialized agencies, special committees and departments. It is said to have successfully influenced their agendas, the terms of discussion and the orientations of their resolutions.[53] It also cooperates with the African Union, the League of Arab States, and other inter-governmental bodies.[54]

Leadership

• President: Socorro Gomes, Brazilian Center for Solidarity with the People and the Struggle for Peace (CEBRAPAZ)
• General Secretary: Thanasis Pafilis, Greek Committee for International Détente and Peace (EEDYE)
• Executive Secretary: Iraklis Tsavdaridis, Greek Committee for International Détente and Peace (EEDYE)[27]

Secretariat

The members of the Secretariat of the WPC are:

• All India Peace and Solidarity Organisation (AIPSO)
• Brazilian Center for Solidarity with the People and the Struggle for Peace(CEBRAPAZ)
• Congo Peace Committee
• Cuban Movement for Peace and Sovereignty of the Peoples (MOVPAZ)
• German Peace Council (DFR)
• Greek Committee for International Détente and Peace (EEDYE)
• Japan Peace Committee
• Palestinian Committee for Peace and Solidarity (PCPS)
• Portuguese Council for Peace and Cooperation (CPPC)
• South African Peace Initiative
• Syrian National Peace Council
• US Peace Council (USPC)
• Vietnam Peace Committee (VPC)[27]

Peace prizes

The WPC awards several peace prizes, some of which, it has been said, were awarded to politicians who funded the organization.[46]

Congresses and assemblies

The highest WPC body, the Assembly, meets every three years.[55]

Year / Event / Location / No. of delegates / Countries represented / Comments

1948 / World Congress of Intellectuals in Defense of Peace / Wrocław / 600 / 46[56] / --
1949 / World Congress of Advocates of Peace / Paris and Prague / 2,200 / 72 / Established the World Committee of Partisans for Peace, chaired by Frédéric Joliot-Curie.
1950 / World Congress of the Supporters of Peace / Sheffield and Warsaw / -- / -- / Moved from Sheffield to Warsaw as a result of the British government refusing visas to delegates.
1951 / -- / Stockholm[23] / -- / -- / --
1952 / Congress of the People for Peace / Vienna[21] / -- / -- / Presiding committee included Jean-Paul Sartre, Paul Robeson, Pablo Neruda, Diego Rivera, and Louis Aragon.[19] Also attended by Madame Sun Yat Sen, Ilya Ehrenburg and Hewlett Johnson.[57]
1952 / -- / Berlin / -- / -- / --
1953 / -- / Helsinki -- / -- / --
1954 / -- / Berlin / -- / -- / 23–28 May
1955 / -- / Budapest / -- / -- / --
1958 / World Congress on Disarmament and International Cooperation[21] / Stockholm / -- / -- / Bertrand Russell withdrew his sponsorship of the congress and denounced the WPC for its refusal to condemn the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 1956 and the kidnapping and murder of Hungarian prime minister, Imre Nagy.[58]
1962 / World Conference for General Disarmament and Peace[21] / Moscow / -- / -- / Addressed by Nikita Khrushchev, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.[59]Attended by delegates from non-aligned groups. Sponsors include Bertrand Russell and Canon John Collins of CND.[40] As a result of confrontation between western and Soviet delegates, 40 non-aligned organizations form the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, without Soviet membership.[42]
1965 / World Congress for Peace, National Independence and General disarmament / Helsinki / 1,470[60] / 98[60] / Called for withdrawal of all U.S. armed forces from Vietnam.[60][61]
1971 / Assembly / Budapest[62] / -- / -- / --
1973 / World Congress of Peace Forces[63] / Moscow / 3,200[64] / -- / Chaired by Romesh Chandra, general secretary of the WPC.[64] The main speaker was Leonid Brezhnev
1977 / -- / Warsaw[16] / -- / -- / --
1980 / World Parliament of Peoples for Peace / Sofia / 2,230[29] / 134[29] / Launched campaigns against stationing of new US nuclear weapons in Western Europe, against Camp David Accords between Egypt and Israel, and campaigns of solidarity with Vietnam, Syria, Cuba, the PLO and the Soviet-backed regime in Afghanistan.[65]
1983 / World Assembly for Peace and Life Against Nuclear War[5] / Prague / 2,635[29] / 132[66] / Noted that "An especially acute danger is represented by plans to deploy first-strike nuclear missiles in Western Europe."[66]Members of Charter 77 not permitted to attend.[67]Members of the unofficial Hungarian student peace movement Dialógus (Dialogue) who attempted to attend "were met with tear gas, arrests, and later deportation back to Hungary."[43]
1986 / World Congress for the International Year of Peace[5][68] / Copenhagen / 2,648[29] / -- / The International Year of Peace was declared by the United Nations.[69]This was said to be the first WPC-sponsored congress to be held in a NATO country.[68] The Coalition for Peace through Security demonstrated against the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, giving rise to worldwide media coverage.[70]
1990 / -- / Athens / -- / -- / --
1996 / -- / Mexico / -- / -- / --
2000 / -- / Athens / -- / 186[71] / --
2004 / -- / Athens / 150[72] / 50+[72] / --
2005 / -- / Seoul[71] / -- / -- / --
2008 / World Congress of the World Peace Council[73] / Caracas, Venezuela / 120 / 76 / --
2009 / -- / New York / 400[71] / 194[71] / --
2012 / World Peace Assembly and Conference[27] / Kathmandu/Nepal / -- / -- / --
2016 / Anti-Nato Conference[27] / Warsaw / 85 / 22 / --


Past presidents

• Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1950–58)
• John Desmond Bernal (1959–65)
• Isabelle Blume (1965–69)
• Romesh Chandra (General Secretary in 1966–1977; President in 1977–90)
• Evangelos Maheras (1990–93)
• Albertina Sisulu (1993–2002)
• Prof Niranjan Singh Maan (General secretary)
• Orlando Fundora López (2002–08)

Current members

Under its current rules, WPC members are national and international organizations that agree with its main principles and any of its objectives and pay membership fees. Other organizations may join at the discretion of the Executive Committee or become associate members. Distinguished individuals may become honorary members at the discretion of the Executive Committee.[55]

As of March 2014, the WPC lists the following organizations among its "members and friends".[74]

Current Communist States

• Chinese Association for Peace and Disarmament
• Cuban Movement for Peace and Sovereignty of the Peoples
• Lao Peace and Solidarity Committee
• Korean National Peace Committee (North Korea)
• Vietnam Peace Committee

Former Soviet Union

• Armenian Peace Committee
• Belarus Peace Committee
• Georgian Peace Committee
• Ukraine Anti-Fascist Committee
• Latvian Peace Committee
• International Federation for Peace and Conciliation (the former Soviet Peace Committee a federation of a number of organizations in the CIS). Its member organizations, at the time of its founding in 1992, included:[75]
• Armenian Committee for Peace and Conciliation
• National Peace Committee of Republic of Azerbaijan
• Public Association Belarusian Peace Committee
• Peace Committee of the Republic of Georgia
• Public Association Council for Peace and Conciliation of the Republic of Kazakhstan
• Public Association Council for Peace and Conciliation of the Kyrgyz Republic
• Latvian movement for peace
• Lithuanian Peace Forum,
• Public Association "Аlliance for Peace of the Republic of Moldova"
• Russian Peace Committee
• Republican Public Association Peace Committee of the Republic of Tajikistan
• Peace Fund of Turkmenistan
• Ukrainian Peace Council


Former Eastern bloc

• Bulgarian National Peace Council
• Czech Peace Movement
• Hungarian Peace Committee
• Mongolia Union for Peace and Friendship


Europe

• Austrian Peace Council
• Vrede (Belgium)
• Croatia Anti-Fascist Committee
• Cyprus Peace Council
• Danish Peace Council
• Finnish Peace Committee
• Mouvement de la Paix (France)
• German Peace Council
• Greek Committee for International Detente and Peace
• Ireland Peace and Neutrality Alliance
• Forum against War (Italy)
• Peace Committee of Luxembourg
• Malta Peace Council
• Netherlands Hague Platform
• Portuguese Council for Peace and Cooperation
• Belgrade Forum for a World of Equals (Serbia)
• Swedish Peace Committee
• Swiss Peace Movement

Asia

• Bangladesh Peace Council
• Bhutan Peace Council
• Burmese Peace Committee
• Cambodian Peace Committee
• All India Peace and Solidarity Organisation
• Association for the Defense of Peace, Solidarity and Democracy (Iran)
• Peace Committee of Israel
• Lebanese Peace Committee
• Japan Peace Committee
• Nepal Peace and Solidarity Council
• Pakistan Peace and Solidarity Council
• Palestinian Committee for Peace and Solidarity
• Philippines Peace and Solidarity Council
• Peace and Solidarity Organisation of Sri Lanka
• Sri Lanka Peace and Solidarity Council
• Syrian National Peace Council
• Timor-Leste Conselho da Paz
• Peace Association of Turkey
• Yemen Peace Committee

Africa

• Angolan League for the Friendship of the Peoples
• Congo Peace Committee (Democratic Republic of the Congo)
• Egyptian Peace Committee
• Ethiopian Peace Committee
• Peace Council of Mozambique
• Peace Committee of Madagascar
• Peace Committee of Namibia
• Nigerian Peace Committee
• South African Peace Initiative
• Sudan Peace and Solidarity Council
• Tunisian Peace Committee
• Zimbabwe Peace Committee

Americas

• Movimento por la Paz, Soberania y Solidaridad (Argentina)
• Caribbean Movement for Peace and Integration (Barbadoes)
• Comite Boliviano por la Paz, Tupaj Amaru
• Brazilian Center for Solidarity with the Peoples and Struggle for Peace
• Canadian Peace Congress
• Peace Committee of Chile
• Colombian Peace Committee
• Costa Rican National Peace Council
• Dominican Union Journalists for Peace
• Ecuador Peace and Independence Movement
• Movimento Mexicano por la Paz y el Desarollo
• Comite de Paz de Nicaragua
• Comite Nacional de Defensa de Solidaridad y Paz (Panama)
• Comite de Paz de Paraguay
• Comite Peruano por la Paz
• Movimento Salvadoreno por la Paz
• U.S. Peace Council
• Uruguay Grupo Historia y Memoria
• Comite de Solidaridad Internacional (Venezuela)

Oceania

• Australian Peace Committee
• New Zealand Peace Council

Other

• International Action for Liberation
• European Peace Forum

See also

• List of anti-war organizations
• List of peace activists
• Active measures
• Soviet influence on the peace movement
• International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace
• Communist propaganda
• Front organization
• National Council of Arts, Sciences and Professions
• Peace movement
• World peace
• World union for peace and fundamental human rights and the rights of peoples

Footnotes

1. Milorad Popov, "The World Council of Peace," in Witold S. Sworakowski (ed.), World Communism: A Handbook, 1918–1965. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1973; pg. 488.
2. Deery, Phillip (2002). "The Dove Flies East: Whitehall, Warsaw and the 1950 World Peace Congress". Australian Journal of Politics and History. 48.
3. Suslov, M., The Defence of Peace and the Struggle Against the Warmongers, Cominform, 1950.
4. Wittner, Lawrence S., One World or None: A History of the World Nuclear Disarmament Movement Through 1953 (Vol. 1 of The Struggle Against the Bomb) Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993. Paperback edition, 1995.ISBN 0804721416
5. Santi, Rainer, 100 years of Peace Making: A History of the International Peace Bureau and other international peace movement organisations and networks, Pax förlag, International Peace Bureau, January 1991.
6. "Communists", Time Magazine, 2 May 1949.
7. Committee on Un-American Activities, Report on the Communist "peace" offensive. A campaign to disarm and defeat the United States, 1951
8. Gerald Horne, Mary Young (eds), W.E.B. Du Bois: An Encyclopedia, p. 47.
9. Andersson, Stellan, "'Madness is Becoming More Widespread.' Peace and disarmament".
10. Barbara J. Beeching, "Paul Robeson and the Black Press:The 1950 Passport Controversy", The Journal of African American History, Vol. 87 (Summer, 2002), pp. 339-354
11. Picasso's poster for the Congrès Mondiale des Partisans pour la Paix
12. Defty, A., Britain, America, and anti-communist propaganda, 1945–53, Routledge, 2004. p. 217
13. Laird, R. F., and Erik P. Hoffmann. Soviet Foreign Policy in a Changing World, New York: Aldine, 1986. p. 189.
14. Burns, J. F., "Soviet peace charade is less than convincing", New York Times, 16 May 1982.
15. The Way to Defend World Peace Archived 4 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine., Speech by Liao Cheng-Chin at the Stockholm session of the World Peace Council, 16 December 1961.
16. United States Department of State,The World Peace Council's "Peace Assemblies", Foreign Affairs Note, 1983
17. Prince, R., "The Ghost Ship of Lönnrotinkatu", Peace Magazine, May–June 1992.
18. Moro, R., "Catholic Church, Italian Catholics and Peace Movements: the Cold War Years, 1947–1962".
19. "Congress For Peace - Vienna 1952" (book), A History of the World in 100 Objects.
20. Moubayed, Sami M. (2006), Steel & Silk: Men & Women Who Shaped Syria 1900–2000, Cune Press, p. 368
21. "World Peace Council Collected Records (CDG-B Finland), Swarthmore College Peace Collection". Retrieved 25 December 2016.
22. Seedbed of the Left, Workers Liberty, WL Publications, 1993.
23. Wernicke, Günther, "The World Peace Council and the Antiwar Movement in East Germany", in Daum, A. W., L. C. Gardner and W. Mausbach (eds), America, The Vietnam War and the World, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
24. Mikhailova, Y., Ideas of Peace and Concordance in Soviet Political Propaganda (1950 – 1985).
25. Stalin, J. V. The People Do Not Want War.
26. DOI: Andrew G. Bone, "Russell and the Communist-Aligned Peace Movement in the Mid-1950s", Russell:The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies, Vol. 21, 2001
27. "World Peace Council". Retrieved 25 December 2016.
28. U.S. Congress. House. Select Committee on Intelligence, Soviet Covert Action: The Forgery Offensive, 6 and 19 Feb. 1980, 96th Cong., 2d sess., 1963. Washington, DC: GPO, 1980.
29. Richard Felix Staar, Foreign Policies of the Soviet Union, Hoover Press, 1991, ISBN 0-8179-9102-6, pp. 79–88.
30. Effect of Invasion of Czechoslovakia on Soviet Fronts, CIA.
31. Wernicke, Günter, "The Communist-Led World Peace Council and the Western Peace Movements: The Fetters of Bipolarity and Some Attempts to Break Them in the Fifties and Early Sixties", Peace & Change, Vol. 23, No. 3, July 1998, pp. 265–311(47).
32. E. P. Thompson, "Resurgence in Europe and the rôle of END", in J. Minnion and P. Bolsover (eds), The CND Story, London: Allison and Busby, 1983.
33. "Were the 1980s' Anti-Nuclear Weapons Movements New Social Movements?". Peace & Change. 22: 303–329. doi:10.1111/0149-0508.00054. Retrieved 26 September 2014.
34. Vladimir Bukovsky, "The Peace Movements and the Soviet Union", Commentary, May 1982, pp. 25–41.
35. John Kohan, "The KGB: Eyes of the Kremlin", Time, 14 February 1983.
36. Rotblat, Joseph, "Russell and the Pugwash Movement", The 1998 Bertrand Russell Peace Lectures.
37. Russell, Bertrand, and A. G. Bone (ed.), The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell (Volume 28): Man's Peril, 1954–55, Routledge, 2003.
38. Schwerin, Alan (2002). Bertrand Russell on Nuclear War, Peace, and Language: critical and historical essays. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-313-31871-9. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
39. Driver, Christopher, The Disarmers, London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1964.
40. "Moscow Peace Congress: Criticism Allowed", Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, October 1982, p. 42.
41. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, June 1963, p. 39
42. Donald Keys and Homer A. Jack, "Oxford Conference of Non-aligned Peace Organizations", 30 January 1963.
43. Bacher, John, "The Independent Peace Movements in Eastern Europe", Peace Magazine, December 1985.
44. Egy eljárás genezise: a Dialógus Pécsett (in Hungarian)
45. Matthew Evangelista, Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1999. p. 163
46. Prince, Rob, The Last of the WPC Mohicans, The View from the Left Bank, 1 August 2011.
47. Prince, R., "Following the Money Trail at the World Peace Council", Peace Magazine, November–December 1992.
48. Clews, John, Communist Propaganda Techniques, New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1964
49. Barlow, J. G., Moscow and the Peace Offensive, 1982.
50. WPC, Peace Courier, 1989, No. 4.
51. Origins of the Congress for Cultural Freedom, 1949–50, Central Intelligence Agency.
52. Agee, Philip (1975). Inside the Company: CIA Diary. Farrar Straus & Giroux. pp. 60–61. ISBN 0883730286.
53. Roger E. Kanet (ed.), The Soviet Union, Eastern Europe and the Third World, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
54. "Information letter about the World Peace Council". World Peace Council. 7 January 2008. Archived from the original on 3 December 2009. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
55. WPC Rules
56. "Ziemie Odzyskane i miłośnicy pokoju". Wroclaw.gazeta.pl. 2008-09-18. Retrieved 24 August 2012.
57. "Dirty hands", Time Magazine, Monday, 22 December 1952.
58. John Ballantyne, "Australia's Dr Jim Cairns and the Soviet KGB", National Observer (Council for the National Interest, Melbourne), No. 64, Autumn 2005, pp. 52–63.
59. "World Peace Conference: Moscow - British Pathé". britishpathe.com. Retrieved 26 September 2014.
60. "World Congress Sees US War in Viet Nam as Threat", The Afro American, 14 August 1965.
61. "World Congress in Helsinki", The Current Digest of the Russian Press (formerly The Current Digest of the Post-Soviet Press), No. 28, Vol. 17, 4 August 1965, pp. 23–23.
62. Assembly of the World Peace Council, Budapest, May 13–16, 1971: Documents, World Peace Council.
63. Freden angår oss alla – Material och dokument från Fredskrafternas världskongress i Moskva den 25–31 oktober 1973. Stockholm: Svenska Fredskommittén, 1974. p. 36–37
64. Freden angår oss alla – Material och dokument från Fredskraf.
65. Von Geusau, F. A. M., "Pacifism in the Netherlands", in Laqueur, W., and R. E. Hunter, European Peace movements and the Future of the Western Alliance, Transaction Books, 1988. p. 206
66. Appeal adopted by the World Assembly for Peace and Life Against Nuclear War, Prague, 1983.
67. Hauner, M., Charter 77 and Western Peace Movements, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2011.
68. "World Peace Council: Copenhagen Congress", Hansard, 14 October 1986.
69. "A/RES/37/16. International Year of Peace". Retrieved 25 December 2016.
70. Lewis, Julian, "George Miller-Kurakin: Anti-communist campaigner who inspired Conservative activists during the Cold War", The Independent, Thursday, 26 November 2009.
71. "ГОЛОВНА - Українська Рада Миру". Retrieved 25 December 2016.
72. "Yahoo! Groups". uk.groups.yahoo.com. Retrieved 26 September 2014.
73. "Caracas Capital Mundial de la Paz". Retrieved 25 December 2016.
74. Members and Friends
75. Peace at Home and All Over the World, Moscow: International Federation for Peace and Conciliation, p. 345.

Further reading

• World Peace Council Collected Records, 1949 – 1996 in the Swarthmore College Peace Collection.
• Prince, Rob (May–June 1992). "The ghost ship of Lonnrotinkatu". Peace Magazine. 8 (3). p. 16.
• Prince, Rob (November–December 1992). "Following the money trail at the World Peace Council". Peace Magazine. 8 (6). p. 20.
• Honecker, Erich (1979). Welcoming Address (Speech). World Peace Council meeting. East Berlin. At the Internet Archive.
• Ballantyne, John (Autumn 2005). "Australia's Dr Jim Cairns and the Soviet KGB". National Observer (64). Melbourne: Council for the National Interest. pp. 52–63.
• Committee on Un-American Activities, US House of Representatives (19 April 1949). Review of the Scientific and Cultural Conference for World Peace Arranged by the National Council of the Arts, Sciences and Professions and Held in New York City on March 25, 26 and 27, 1949 (PDF). Washington, DC. at The Danish Peace Academy.

External links

• Official website
• Film of the World Congress of Partisans for Peace, Paris, 1949
• Pathe News film of 1962 Moscow Congress
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

Postby admin » Sat Sep 01, 2018 8:04 am

Komsomol
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 9/1/18

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Image
All-Union Leninist
Young Communist League
Всесоюзный ленинский коммунистический союз молодёжи
Founded 29 October 1918
Dissolved September 1991
Ideology Communism,
Marxism-Leninism
Mother party Communist Party of the Soviet Union
International affiliation Young Communist International
World Federation of Democratic Youth
Newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda

The All-Union Leninist Young Communist League (Russian: Всесою́зный ле́нинский коммунисти́ческий сою́з молодёжи (ВЛКСМ), About this sound listen (help·info)), usually known as Komsomol (/ˌkɒmsəˈmɒl/; Russian: Комсомо́л, a syllabic abbreviation of the Russian kommunisticheskiy soyuz molodyozhi), was a political youth organization in the Soviet Union. It is sometimes described as the youth division of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), although it was officially independent and referred to as "the helper and the reserve of the CPSU".

The Komsomol in its earliest form was established in urban centers in 1918. During the early years, it was a Russian organization, known as the Russian Young Communist League, or RKSM. During 1922, with the unification of the USSR, it was reformed into an all-union agency, the youth division of the All-Union Communist Party.

It was the final stage of three youth organizations with members up to age 28, graduated at 14 from the Young Pioneers, and at nine from the Little Octobrists.[1]

History

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1933 Komsomol poster. Caption says "Prepare for worthy successors to the Leninist Komsomol"

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Monument to Courage, Firmness and Faithfulness of Members of the Komsomol in Sevastopol

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90th Anniversary of Russian YCL

Before the February Revolution of 1917 the Bolsheviks did not display any interest in establishing or maintaining a youth division, but the policy emphasis shifted in the following months.[2] After the Russian Civil War of 1917-1922 ended, the Soviet government under Lenin introduced a semi-capitalist economic policy to stabilize Russia’s floundering economy. This reform, the New Economic Policy (NEP), introduced a new social policy of moderation and discipline, especially regarding Soviet youth. Lenin himself stressed the importance of political education of young Soviet citizens in building a new society.

The first Komsomol Congress met in 1918 under the patronage of the Bolshevik Party, despite the two organizations' not entirely coincident membership or beliefs. Party intervention in 1922-1923 proved marginally successful in recruiting members by presenting the ideal Komsomolets (Komsomol youth) as a foil to the "bourgeois NEPman".[3] By the time of the second Congress, a year later, however, the Bolsheviks had, in effect, acquired control of the organization, and it was soon formally established as the youth division of the Communist party. However, the party was not very successful overall in recruiting Russian youth during the NEP period (1921-1928).

This came about because of conflict and disillusionment among
Soviet youth who romanticised the spontaneity and destruction characteristic of War Communism (1918-1921) and the Civil War period.[4] They saw it as their duty, and the duty of the Communist Party itself, to eliminate all elements of Western culture from society. However, the NEP had the opposite effect: after it started, many aspects of Western social behavior began to reemerge.[5] The contrast between the "Good Communist" extolled by the Party and the capitalism fostered by NEP confused many young people.[6] They rebelled against the Party's ideals in two opposite ways: radicals gave up everything that had any Western or capitalist connotations, while the majority of Russian youths felt drawn to the Western-style popular culture of entertainment and fashion. As a result, there was a major slump in interest and membership in the Party-oriented Komsomol.

In March 1926, Komsomol membership reached a NEP-period peak of 1,750,000 members: only 6 percent of the eligible youth population.[7] Only when Stalin came to power and abandoned the NEP in the first Five Year Plan (1928–1933) did membership increase drastically.[8]

The youngest people eligible for Komsomol membership were fourteen years old. The upper age-limit for ordinary personnel was twenty-eight, but Komsomol functionaries could be older. Younger children joined the allied Vladimir Lenin All-Union Pioneer Organization. While membership was nominally voluntary, those who failed to join had no access to officially sponsored holidays and found it very difficult (if not impossible) to pursue higher education.

The Komsomol had little direct influence on the Communist Party or on the government of the Soviet Union, but it played an important role as a mechanism for teaching the values of the CPSU to youngsters. The Komsomol also served as a mobile pool of labor and political activism, with the ability to relocate to areas of high-priority at short notice. Active members received privileges and preferences in promotion. For example, Yuri Andropov, CPSU General Secretary (1982-1984) in succession to Leonid Brezhnev, achieved political importance through work with the Komsomol organization of Karelia in 1940-1944. At its largest, during the 1970s, the Komsomol had tens of millions of members; about two-thirds of the present adult population of Russia is believed to have joined.

During the early phases of perestroika in the mid-1980s, when the Soviet authorities began cautiously introducing private enterprise, the Komsomol received privileges with respect to initiating businesses, with the motivation of giving youth a better chance. The government, unions and the Komsomol jointly introduced Centers for Scientific and Technical Creativity for Youth (1987). At the same time, many Komsomol managers joined and directed the Russian Regional and State Anti-Monopoly Committees. Folklore quickly coined a motto: "The Komsomol is a school of Capitalism", hinting at Vladimir Lenin's "Trade unions are a school of Communism".

The reforms of Mikhail Gorbachev, perestroika and glasnost, finally revealed that the quality of Komsomol management was bad. The Komsomol, long associated with conservatism and bureaucracy, had always largely lacked political power. The radical Twentieth Congress of the Komsomol (April 1987) altered the rules of the organization to represent a market orientation. However, the reforms of the Twentieth Congress eventually destroyed the Komsomol, with lack of purpose and the waning of interest, membership, and quality of membership. At the Twenty-second Congress of the Komsomol in September 1991, the organization was disbanded. The Komsomol's newspaper, Komsomolskaya Pravda, outlived the organization and is still published (as of 2015).

A number of youth organizations of successor parties to the CPSU continue to use the name Komsomol, as does the youth organization of Ukrainian communists: Komsomol of Ukraine.


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Klim Voroshilov at a meeting with Komsomol members (1935)

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Komsomol membership card, (1983)

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Komsomol direction. Document in the USSR youth guarantee compulsory employment (1980)

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20 Congress Komsomol, (1987)

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21 Congress Komsomol, (1990)

The ideal Komsomolets

Not only was the ideal Communist youth an asset to his or her organization, but (s)he also "lived correctly". This meant that every aspect of a Komsomolets’s life was to be in accordance with Party doctrine. Smoking, drinking, religion, and any other activity the Bolsheviks saw as threatening were discouraged as "hooliganism". The Komsomol sought to provide its members with alternative leisure activities that promoted the improvement of society, such as volunteer work, sports, and political and drama clubs.[9] These efforts proved largely unsuccessful, since the Bolshevik Party and the Komsomol were not in touch with Soviet youth's desires and thus were unable to manipulate them. Soviet youth remained relatively politically unaware or uninterested during the NEP period.[10]

Youth campaigns during the NEP period

In 1922 with the establishment of the New Economic Policy, the Soviet government changed their rhetoric directed towards the youth from a revolutionary, militaristic tone to one with emphasis on philosophical education through book-learning and stability of the state by peaceful means. The young communists were uninterested in these new principles, and mass culture campaigns became the most important tool used by the Komsomol as an attempt to retain membership during the 1920s.

One of the most popular campaigns was the Novyi Byt (The New Way of Life). At these assemblies, the leadership of the Komsomol promoted the values they considered to be the most important for the ideal young communist. The New Soviet Man was to be "a lively, active, healthy, disciplined youngster who subordinates himself to the collective and is prepared for and dedicated to learn, study, and work."[11] By establishing strict guidelines to what they expected, the Komsomol was able to denounce the traits and habits they saw harmful to the youth.
It condemned sexual promiscuity, drinking, smoking and general mischievous behavior, as it posed moral danger to the organization’s young members. The majority of the youth did not take this well, as unsavory activities were enticing to them. At a time when membership was at its lowest (1.7 million in 1925), the Komsomol harmed only itself, as this type of campaign further distanced the organization from their target audience.

The Komsomol also launched campaigns of an anti-religious nature. The new communist regime wished to dismantle the already limited control the Orthodox church had on society, and the young were generally interested in seeing the upheaval of old traditions than their elders who had lived under the tsar’s rule. The Komsomol rallied members to march in the streets, declaring their independence from religion. Problems came when the enthusiastic youth took this passion too far. Open harassment of church members sprang up, and earned the Komsomol a negative image in the minds of older generations. When the League made attempts to draw back on their anti-religious rhetoric, Soviet youth became increasingly disinterested in the organization.[12]

Youth reactions

Many youths were drawn to "hooliganism" and the Western culture of entertainment, which included cinema and fashion magazines. It is no coincidence that these youths were primarily from the peasantry or working class. They saw Western culture as a way to elevate or distinguish themselves from their humble beginnings.[13] The Soviet authorities eventually made their own films with ideologically "pure" messages, but it was not the same. Soviet pictures, which were often informational or political, lacked the draw of Westerns or romances from Hollywood.[14] Both the authorities and the youths themselves blamed the NEP for corrupting Soviet youth culture. Because the Komsomol was simply not as attractive to these young men and women, the government began to limit their cultural and entertainment options. This signalled the end of the NEP, and the end of the brief influx of Western culture in Soviet Union before Stalin’s ascendancy.[15]

Militant young Communists were a threat to the older Bolsheviks because they had the potential to undermine the new, NEP-based society. The shift from destruction of an old state to creation of a new one, mirrored by the shift from War Communism to the NEP, was necessary to maintain and stabilise the Bolshevik regime. The Party’s disapproval of young militants was necessary in order not only to define what was considered proper behavior, but also to maintain social and political control over the masses. However, after Stalin came to power and the NEP was abandoned in favor of the Five-Year Plans, many of the young socialists ideas were absorbed back into the mainstream and they no longer presented a problem.[16]

Young women in the Komsomol

The ideology of the new Soviet regime under Vladimir Lenin strove to break down societal barriers believed to be harmful to the goal of unity. Specifically, the regime hoped to elevate women to a level of equality with men. The Komsomol pushed hard to recruit young women and raise them in this new consciousness. In the period of the early 1920s, women primarily stayed at home and performed the majority of housework. Membership of the Komsomol seemed to offer a doorway into public life at a level previously unseen by women of the time. Young women enthusiastically joined as they were finally given a chance to detach themselves from the traditional patriarchal structure. Moreover, they were drawn to the Komsomol because it promised them an education during a time when young girls were deprived of a proper one in favor of preparing them for household duties. The Soviets encouraged women to take an active role in the new system and participate in the same activities and work as their male counterparts.[17] The Soviets desperately needed to create unity between men and women at this young age in order to establish legitimacy and security to their rule.

Major conflicts surfaced when the regime took these new steps. The Bolshevik Party was not the most popular at the time, and much of the rest of the nation wished to hold onto their patriarchal values. Parents hesitated to allow their daughters to join the youth organization, because "the Komsomol seemed like an immoral organization, for it removed young girls from adult control, and then required them to attend meetings held at night."[18] Soviet citizens felt that if they released their hold on their children, they would be corrupted by the Komsomol’s influence. They also worried that if their daughters became independent and promiscuous, then no man would want to marry them. Moreover, parents wondered who would take care of the home if all the young women left home to join the Komsomol.[19]

Women, generally, were also unprepared for the realities of the workforce. The ancient structure of female subordination allowed for little in terms of work experience. Men had been given better education and were traditionally raised to take part in military and industry. Therefore, they had a much wider range of opportunity than women whose only role had been caretaking. Here lies the irony of the regime’s efforts; the Komsomol tried desperately to empower young women achieve equality, yet women’s perceptions of themselves worsened because they were now being directly compared to their much more prepared counterparts.[20]

Even though the Communist Party preached and demanded equality, men dominated both the governing body and the Komsomol’s leadership. Upward mobility, contrary to initial belief, was incredibly hard for women to achieve. In addition, the organization openly encouraged its female members to pursue positions of teaching and nurturing of young Soviets rather than positions of real authority.

Recruitment of peasant women

The Komsomol also found it difficult to recruit and motivate young women amongst the rural populations. During NEP, this demographic represented only 8% of the organization.[21] Poor membership numbers from rural areas were the result of several different factors. By 1925, the failure to implement equality in the Komsomol was evident to young rural women, society still perceiving them to be inferior both because they were women and because they came from the peasant class. Various women’s organizations criticized the Komsomol for these failures. Chiefly, the Women’s Bureau of the Communist Party, known as Zhenotdel, openly criticized the youth organization.[22] Komsomol women were provided little in the way of programs that might encourage their involvement. Annual conferences, where organization leaders gathered to discuss topics of interest to female members, were in fact the only activities in which early Komsomol women took part. The Youth League therefore made concerted efforts to resolve these issues and raise membership amongst peasant women.

Strategies for recruiting women in the 1920s

The Komsomol’s original tactic to recruit peasant women failed miserably. Representatives were sent to the countryside to reveal to potential recruits that they were being oppressed by male dominance, and that the youth organization provided them with an opportunity to recreate themselves as independent women. However, women did not rally to the League in the numbers that the organization hoped for. The Komsomol turned to the Zhenotdel, which was more favorable to young peasant women, and cooperated with them to achieve better results.[23] Another strategy was the addition of activities suited to the interests of the target demographic. Sewing and knitting classes became popular during the 1920s for rural Komsomol women. Additionally, educational classes, such as health and feminine hygiene were used to both draw more female members and alleviate concerns of rural parents. Peasant families were more inclined to allow their daughters to join the Komsomol since they knew they would be participating in beneficial programs rather than mischievous behaviors such as drinking and dancing.

Demographic issues

Soldiers returning from the Civil War, students in provincial towns, and workers fleeing the poverty of the cities established the first rural Komsomol cells in 1918. Most administrators, who wanted to retain the "proletarian character" of the organization, did not initially welcome peasants into the Komsomol. However, it soon became obvious that peasants were too large a part of the population (80%) to ignore. Also, peasants, who were benefiting from the NEP’s compromise with small producers, were in a better position to join than workers, who struggled with unemployment and other economic problems and thus had less interest in joining.

Older peasants reacted negatively to the growth of the Komsomol in rural areas. They saw the administrators as intruders who prevented their children from fulfilling their family obligations. The Komsomol needed full-time commitment, and peasant youths, who saw it as a chance for social mobility, education, and economic success, were willing to abandon their traditional duties to join. At the end of NEP, the majority of Komsomol members were peasants, while the administration remained largely urban.[24]

Both the urban and rural populations had problems with the Komsomol’s attempts to unify the two demographics. Rural parents believed that because the League’s administration was city-centered, their children would be negatively influenced by city dwellers. In addition, land owning peasants were much more affected by the government’s revocation of private ownership, and many were uninterested in allowing their children to participate. For its part, the urban population viewed itself as superior to the peasants. They saw the rural members as backward and uneducated, and were angered by their swelling numbers.[25]

Leaders (First Secretary of the Central Committee)

• Yefim Tsetlin (1918–1919)
• Oscar Rivkin (1918–1921)
• Lazar Shatskin (1921–1922)
• Piotr Smorodin (1922–1924)
• Nikolai Chaplin (1924–1928)
• Aleksandr Milchakov (1928–1929)
• Alexander Vasilievich Kosarev|Aleksandr Kosarev (1929–1938)
• Nikolai Mikhailov (1938–1952)
• Aleksandr Shelepin (1952–1958)
• Vladimir Semichastny (1958–1959)
• Sergei Pavlovich Pavlov (1959–1968)
• Yevgeny Tyazhelnikov (1968–1977)
• Boris Pastukhov (1977–1982)
• Viktor Maksimovich (1982–1986)
• Viktor Mironenko (1986–1990)
• Vladimir Zyukin (1990–1991)

Branches

• Armenian SSR: ՀԼԿԵՄ (abbreviation)
• Byelorussian SSR: Ленінскі Камуністычны саюз моладзі Беларусі, ЛКСМБ
• Estonian SSR: Eestimaa Leninlik Kommunistlik Noorsooühing, ELKNÜ[26]
• Karelo-Finnish SSR: Ленинский коммунистический союз молодежи Карело-Финской ССР, ЛКСМ КФССР
• Latvian SSR: Latvijas Ļeņina Komunistiskā Jaunatnes Savienība, LĻKJS
• Lithuanian SSR: Lietuvos Lenino komunistinė jaunimo sąjunga, LLKJS
• Moldavian SSR: UTCLM (abbreviation)
• Russian SFSR: Ленинский коммунистический союз молодёжи РСФСР, ЛКСМ РСФСР
• Ukrainian SSR: Komsomol of Ukraine, Ukraine Leninist Communist League of Youth (Ленінська Комуністична спілка молоді України (ЛКСМУ), ЛКСМУ)
• Uzbek SSR: Ўзбекистон Ленинчи коммунистик ёшлар союзи

Public safety

• Voluntary People's Druzhina

Children's organization

• Young Pioneer organization of the Soviet Union

Honors

The Komsomol received three Orders of Lenin, one Order of the Red Banner, one Order of the Red Banner of Labour, and one Order of the October Revolution. The asteroid 1283 Komsomolia is named after the Komsomol.

Gallery

• Komsomol badge
• The sign of the winner of Lenin Komsomol
• Soldier's Valour sign of the Central Committee of the Komsomol
• Old version of Komsomol badge on stamp
• Badge of Komsomol membership
• Soviet Union stamp, 1970, CPA 3897. XVI Congress of VLKSM

References

Notes


1. Britannica Komsomol article
2. Kenez, Peter (1985-11-29). "The Komsomol in the Civil War". The Birth of the Propaganda State: Soviet Methods of Mass Mobilization, 1917-1929. Cambridge University Press (published 1985). pp. 85–86. ISBN 9780521313988. Retrieved 2015-12-08. [N]either the Mensheviks nor the Bolsheviks organized a special youth section before 1917. Te Bolsheviks, like the Mensheviks, had only a limited number of activists to carry out revolutionary tasks, a disproportionate number of them were very young. To create two overlapping organizations, each involved in dangerous underground work, would have been self-defeating. Also, such an organization would have violated the principals of centralization and unity of command. It was hard enough for the Leninist leadership to control the local organizations that grew up in the country; it would have been even more difficult to control the work of the impulsive youth. [...] In May 1917 a group of Mensheviks, Socialist Revolutionaries, Anarchists, and some Bolsheviks created a proletarian youth group called Trud i Svet (Labor and light). Its leader, P. Shevstov, proposed a program to unify the socialist young people by deemphasizing factional-political differences. The core of the program [...] was to spread enlightenment among the working youth. The organization grew quickly, and within a few weeks it had 50,000 members. [...] The Leninists saw in Trud i svet [sic] a great threat, and its existence compelled them to develop a policy toward youth organizations. They set themselves two tasks: They attempted to capture the leadership of Trud i svet and then destroy it from the inside and at the same time to build their own organization for Bolshevik youth. The first task turned out to be easier than the second. As Bolshevik power and influence grew in the capital, so did the number of their followers within Trud i svet. In August a conference of working youth decided to dissolve Shevtsov's organization and endorse instead a much smaller group controlled by the Bolsheviks. [...] This organization, headed by V. Alekseyev, was called the Socialist Union of Working Youth; by the time of the October Revolution it had only 10,000 members. [...] In major cities around the country the Bolsheviks attempted to build their own organizations and at the same time to capture organizations created by their Socialist competitors. [...] Both the Sixth Party Conference session in July and the Sixth Congress session in August in Petrograd devoted considerable attention to youth organizations. These meetings began the work of defining the character and competence of the Communist Youth League.
3. Gooderham 1982, p. 509
4. Gorsuch 1997, p. 565
5. Gooderham 1982, p. 507
6. Gorsuch 1992, p. 192
7. Gorsuch 1992, p. 201
8. Gorsuch 1997, p. 573
9. Gorsuch 1992, p. 191
10. Gooderham 1982, p. 518
11. Neumann, Matthias (2008). "Revolutionizing Mind and Soul? Soviet Youth and Cultural Campaigns during the New Economic Policy (1921-8)". Social History. 33 (3): 248.
12. Neumann, 2008, 255.
13. Gorsuch 1992, p. 198
14. Gooderham 1982, p. 512
15. Gorsuch 1992, p. 200
16. Gorsuch 1997, p. 569-77
17. Gorsuch, Anne E. (1996). "A Woman Is Not a Man": The Culture of Gender and Generation in Soviet Russia, 1921-1928". Slavic Review. 55 (3): 641.
18. Gorsuch, 1996, 636.
19. Tirado, 1996, 351.
20. Gorsuch, 1996, 643.
21. Tirado, 1996, 347.
22. Tirado, 1996, 348.
23. Tirado, 1996, 349.
24. Tirado 1993, p. 464
25. Tirado, 1993, 463.
26. Toivo Miljan (21 May 2015). Historical Dictionary of Estonia. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-8108-7513-5. Retrieved 8 May 2016.

Bibliography

• Gooderham, Peter (1982). "The Komsomol and Worker Youth: The Inculcation of 'Communist Values' in Leningrad during NEP". Soviet Studies. 34 (4): 506–28. doi:10.1080/09668138208411442. JSTOR 151905.
• Gorsuch, Anne E (1996). "A Woman Is Not A Man: The Culture of Gender and Generation in Soviet Russia, 1921-1928". Slavic Review. 55 (3): 636–60. JSTOR 2502004.
• Gorsuch, Anne E (1997). "NEP Be Damned! Young Militants in the 1920s and the Culture of Civil War". Russian Review. 56 (4): 564–80. JSTOR 131566.
• Gorsuch, Anne E (1992). "Soviet Youth and the Politics of Popular Culture during NEP". Social History. 17 (2): 189–201. doi:10.1080/03071029208567834. JSTOR 4286015.
• Krylova, Anna. Soviet Women in Combat: A History of Violence on the Eastern Front (2010)
• Tirado, Isabel A (1993). "The Komsomol and Young Peasants: The Dilemma of Rural Expansion, 1921-1925". Slavic Review. 52 (3): 460–76. JSTOR 2499719.
• Neumann, Matthias (2008). "Revolutionizing Mind and Soul? Soviet Youth and Cultural Campaigns during the New Economic Policy (1921-8)". Social History. 33 (3): 243–67. JSTOR 25594258.
• Tirado, Isabel A (1996). "The Komsomol and the KrestIanka: the Political Mobilization of Young Women in the Russian Village, 1921-1927". Russian History. 23 (1): 345–366. doi:10.1163/187633196X00222.

Further reading

• Il'insky, I. VLKSM v politicheskoi systeme sovetskogo obshchestva. (The VLKSM in the political system of Soviet society). Moscow: Molodaia gvardiia, 1981. —In Russian.

External links

• Komsomol Russia
• Komsomol Ukraine
• Komsomol Moldova
• Komsomol Belarus
• Komsomol Kazakhstan
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

Postby admin » Sun Sep 02, 2018 6:21 am

The Silence of the Lambs: A New Round in the Crackdown against Adygean Environmentalist Valery Brinikh
Adygea Supreme Court Upholds Decision Declaring Article “The Silence of the Lambs” Extremist
by TheRussianReader.com
March 22, 2015

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


On March 20, 2015, the Supreme Court of the Republic of Adygea heard an appeal filed by Valery Brinikh, chair of the Adygean branch of the All-Russian Society for Nature Conversation (VOOP), against a December 17, 2014, decision by the Maykop City Court in which Judge Irina Ramazanova had ruled Brinikh’s article “The Silence of the Lambs” extremist. The Supreme Court rejected Brinikh’s appeal.

Image
Valery Brinikh

The article, published in August of last year, dealt with the environmental problems caused by Kievo-Zhuraki JSC, a pig-breeding facility located in Adygea’s Teuchezhsky District. Vyacheslav Derev, who represents Karachay-Cherkessia in the Federation Council, Russia’s upper house of parliament, founded Kievo-Zhuraki JSC. The publication of “The Silence of the Lambs” served as a spurious pretext for launching a crackdown against Valery Brinikh and stopping his environmental work by any means possible. All of the republic’s law enforcement agencies, working in concert, as if on orders and following a unified plan, started a campaign of persecution against Brinikh. The republic’s FSB office and the Russian Interior Ministry’s Extremism Prevention Department (Center “E”) in Adygea led the investigation. The Adygean Prosecutor’s Office filed the lawsuit requesting that the article be ruled extremist, while the Investigation Department of the Russian Investigative Committee in the Republic of Adygea filed extremism charges against Brinikh under Article 282 of the Russian Federal Criminal Code.

We were accused of not having scored any victories in our campaign against the law-breaking pig producers. I had to explain that we have won victories, albeit small ones, and that in conditions of total corruption it would be pointless to expect quick and easy victories in the fight against dirty businessmen. That it would be much easier for me if in the district as a whole and in every village and farm we had active assistance. It is one thing when two or three witnesses come to a court hearing and testify that it stinks where they live, and quite another if hundreds of people would gather in the square outside the court and demand that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC stop poisoning people’s lives. Perhaps the judge, even if he or she had been “inspired” by their superiors, would find it much more difficult morally to hand down an unjust ruling.

And I also said that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC had stocked up on all sorts of certificates and evaluations approving their operations, and that was all the officials who inspected them needed to see. In reality, nobody had really inspected the pig producers and punished them....The regime despises the people, and the people despise this regime. They despise it and fear it. It is a vicious circle. To paraphrase the famous saying, every people deserves the regime it tolerates....

Why is Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC planning to raise cows outside of Maykop while it breeds pigs in the Teuchezhsky District?... Because in practical terms, excuse my use of jargon, the Muslim population has been “punked,” meaning it has been humiliated to the point where people have lost their self-esteem. Humiliated people are easier to manage: you can wrap them round your little finger....The Holy Quran forbids the faithful from eating pork, except in cases when they are forced to eat it. But who or what has forced the Adyghe to breathe manure-polluted air and swim in ponds poisoned by sewage? Nothing but cowardice and a lack of self-esteem. How does living in filth differ from the consumption of pork? For, according to the Quran, the pig is considered a dirty animal, because it lives in filth. But the residents of the Teuchezhsky District also, as a matter of fact, live in filth. It turns out that the stench from Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC’s pig farm poisons not only people’s bodies but also their souls.

People used to sing,


“No one will grant us deliverance,
No god, no tsar, no hero.
We will win our liberation,
With our very own hands.”


Now they sing completely different songs, songs tolerant of the powers that be and the shit they generously reward people for their obedience. And they themselves place their hope in God, fear the tsar, and hope a hero will save them. No hero will save you, my dear fellow countrymen, until you cease being afraid of tsars. And God will not help you until you roll up your sleeves. The Russians have a saying: “God helps those who help themselves.” And the great French thinker Voltaire argued that God helps those battalions that shoot best. So when are we going to start shooting better, villagers?

-- Silence of the Lambs, by Valery Brinich


Only the timely intervention of the Presidential Human Rights Council and its chair, Mikhail Fedotov, who made a special trip for the purpose to Maykop, helped alleviate the attack on Brinikh to some extent. However, the ruling made by the Adygean Supreme Court on March 20 shows that the authorities have decided to proceed with the criminal case against Brinikh.

Judge Vera Meister presided at the first hearing of Brinikh’s appeal on March 10. However, a decision was not rendered in the case. Brinikh managed to sow doubts as to the admissibility of the only piece of the evidence in the case, a certified linguistic analysis of the article “The Silence of the Lambs,” which was produced by the criminal investigation. Brinikh pointed out that according to Russian Federal Constitutional Court Decision No. 18-O, dated February 4, 1999 (“On a Complaint by Citizens M.B. Nikolskaya and M.I. Sapronov That Their Constitutional Rights Had Been Violated by Individual Provisions of the Federal Law ‘On Criminal Investigations'”), the results of a criminal investigation cannot be admitted as evidence in court; they can only be admitted as such only after they have been secured through due process. The judge decided to postpone examination of the appeal for ten days, summoning the expert who conducted the linguistic analysis, Police Lieutenant Colonel Sergei Fedyayev, and questioning him in court. Judge Meister obviously crossed paths with forces that needed a fast and definite decision from the judge. Therefore, at the next hearing, on March 20, Brinikh’s appeal was heard by a new panel of judges. The presiding judge was Olga Kulinchenko, who is deputy chair of the Adygean Supreme Court and chair of the republic’s Council of Judges.

Despite this lofty status, Judge Kulinchenko violated procedural requirements from the outset of the hearing. The expert witness invited to give testimony was not removed from the courtroom prior to being questioned, and he was not made to sign an acknowledgement that he had been warned about criminal liability for perjury. During questioning, the chief expert from the Forensic Center of the Main Directorate of Internal Affairs in Krasnodar Krai was unable to explain why he had been assigned the analysis by the deputy head of the Federal Security Service (FSB) in the Republic of Adygea, and not by the head of the Forensic Center, as stipulated by the Law “On State Forensic Expertise in the Russian Federation.” To explain how the package containing the material for linguistic analysis had been delivered to him in Krasnodar by guarded courier post from Maykop in five minutes (a trip that takes between ninety minutes to two hours by car), Fedyayev claimed that his working day began at 7 a.m. (According to the certified linguistic analysis, the work on it was begun at 9:05 a.m. on March 15, on orders, dated March 15, from the deputy head of the Federal Security Service in the Republic of Adygea.) In keeping with this line of argument, when he signed the accompanying letter on March 15 in Maykop, the deputy head of the Federal Security Service’s office in Adygea would have had to have been at work in the wee hours of Monday morning, March 15, as would have his clerk, who registered the letter. Therefore, the method of the ultra-fast delivery from Maykop to Krasnodar of the package containing the publication remains a mystery. These discrepancies did not trouble Judge Kulinchenko, however. During closing arguments, she constantly interrupted Brinikh, preventing him from fully stating his case and hurrying to finish the spectacle, whose ending was predetermined. The two other judges on the panel were flagrantly bored, since, apparently, they knew in advance how it would all turn out.

And that is what happened. The hearing, a shameful episode for the Russian judicial community, ended with the judges rejecting Brinikh’s appeal against the lower court’s ruling. Thus, as of March 20, the article “The Silence of the Lambs” is officially deemed extremist.

Now we should expect an abrupt reactivation of the investigation into the charges filed against Valery Brinikh on December 11, 2014, under Article 282.1 of the Russian Federal Criminal Code (“incitement to hatred or hostility, and humiliation of human dignity on the basis of ethnicity”). The investigation can now base its conclusions on the Maykop City Court’s ruling, which is now final and legally binding, something that it previously had critically lacked to legitimize this critical case.

The purpose of all these actions is obvious: to railroad, through the combined efforts of the local offices of the FSB, the Interior Ministry’s Center “E,” the Investigative Committee, the prosecutor’s office, and the courts, one of Russia’s most active conservationists, a man who prevents corrupt officials and unscrupulous businessmen from living peacefully.

For more information, call +7 (918) 425-8435

____________________

“The silence of the lambs”: why the smell of manure must be endured
by Elena Borovskaya
December 23, 2014
openrussia.org

How an Adygean environmentalist “fomented hatred” and “incited” locals “to action” in his fight against a Federation Council member’s pig farm

Criminal charges have been filed against Valery Brinikh, head of the Adygean branch of the All-Russian Society for Nature Conversation for an article he published on the Internet, “The Silence of the Lambs.” Brinikh has been accused of inciting hatred and calling for extremist actions under Article 282.1 of the Russian Federal Criminal Code. Observers have linked the persecution of the environmentalist to his long campaign against a pig farm owned by Russian Federation Council member Vyacheslav Derev, which has been polluting the surrounding area with manure.

The article “The Silence of the Lambs” was published on the website For Krasnodar! on September 8, 2014. Currently, the article has been deleted from the site and is available only in search engine caches. In the article, Brinikh describes his meetings with residents of the villages of Gabukay and Assokolay in the Teuchezhsky District, who had complained of the stench from the Kievo-Zhuraki JSC pig-breeding facility and other environmental problems. Local authorities made note of the trip there undertaken by Brinikh and his environmentalist colleagues. In Assokolay, they were greeted by prosecutors, policemen, and Center “E” officers instead of villagers. Sharing his impressions in the article, Brinikh criticizes the passivity of local residents in defending their rights and their “fear of tsars,” quoting aphorisms by Voltaire, and Russian and Adyghe proverbs in the process.

We were accused of not having scored any victories in our campaign against the law-breaking pig producers. I had to explain that we have won victories, albeit small ones, and that in conditions of total corruption it would be pointless to expect quick and easy victories in the fight against dirty businessmen. That it would be much easier for me if in the district as a whole and in every village and farm we had active assistance. It is one thing when two or three witnesses come to a court hearing and testify that it stinks where they live, and quite another if hundreds of people would gather in the square outside the court and demand that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC stop poisoning people’s lives. Perhaps the judge, even if he or she had been “inspired” by their superiors, would find it much more difficult morally to hand down an unjust ruling.

And I also said that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC had stocked up on all sorts of certificates and evaluations approving their operations, and that was all the officials who inspected them needed to see. In reality, nobody had really inspected the pig producers and punished them....The regime despises the people, and the people despise this regime. They despise it and fear it. It is a vicious circle. To paraphrase the famous saying, every people deserves the regime it tolerates....

Why is Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC planning to raise cows outside of Maykop while it breeds pigs in the Teuchezhsky District?... Because in practical terms, excuse my use of jargon, the Muslim population has been “punked,” meaning it has been humiliated to the point where people have lost their self-esteem. Humiliated people are easier to manage: you can wrap them round your little finger....The Holy Quran forbids the faithful from eating pork, except in cases when they are forced to eat it. But who or what has forced the Adyghe to breathe manure-polluted air and swim in ponds poisoned by sewage? Nothing but cowardice and a lack of self-esteem. How does living in filth differ from the consumption of pork? For, according to the Quran, the pig is considered a dirty animal, because it lives in filth. But the residents of the Teuchezhsky District also, as a matter of fact, live in filth. It turns out that the stench from Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC’s pig farm poisons not only people’s bodies but also their souls.

People used to sing,


“No one will grant us deliverance,
No god, no tsar, no hero.
We will win our liberation,
With our very own hands.”


Now they sing completely different songs, songs tolerant of the powers that be and the shit they generously reward people for their obedience. And they themselves place their hope in God, fear the tsar, and hope a hero will save them. No hero will save you, my dear fellow countrymen, until you cease being afraid of tsars. And God will not help you until you roll up your sleeves. The Russians have a saying: “God helps those who help themselves.” And the great French thinker Voltaire argued that God helps those battalions that shoot best. So when are we going to start shooting better, villagers?

-- Silence of the Lambs, by Valery Brinich


On November 20, the Adygea Prosecutor’s Office petitioned the court to rule the article “The Silence of the Lambs” extremist on the basis of an examination performed in conjunction with the local office of the Federal Security Service (FSB). According to the document, a linguistic analysis performed by the Main Directorate of Internal Affairs in Krasnodar Krai showed that the article contained statements “that could be understood on the basis of ethnicity [and] origin [sic] to promote the degradation of the human dignity” of a group of persons (the Adyghe), as well as statements “that could be understood to incite [the Adyghe] to take actions probably related to violence against a group of persons, [i.e.,] ‘representatives of the local authorities.'”

On December 17, the Maykop City Court satisfied the request by the Adygea Prosecutor’s Office and ruled the article “The Silence of the Lambs” extremist. At the previous court hearing, on December 12, Brinikh became ill and was taken by ambulance to the Republican Hospital. After he underwent medical procedures, Brinikh was taken into custody by police, who informed him he had been charged under Article 282 of the Russian Federal Criminal Code and took him to his residence to conduct a search. Brinikh was then questioned by the Investigation Department of the Russian Investigative Committee in Adygea and released on his own recognizance. However, investigators attempted to prevent lawyer Ludmila Alexandrova from seeing Brinikh, writes the website Environmental Watch on North Caucasus.

The same day, police investigators arrested Vitaly Isayenko, moderator of the website For Krasnodar! in Krasnodar and took him to Maykop for questioning in the “Silence of the Lambs” case. Lawyers did not know his whereabouts for a long time. According to activist Alexander Yesipyonok, investigators questioned Isayenko through the night, after which he was hospitalized in serious condition due to an aggravation of his diabetes.

Yesipyonok is convinced there are no statements in the article “The Silence of the Lambs” that could be construed as extremist or offensive.

“Rather than supporting Valery Brinikh in his fight to preserve a clean environment, the law enforcement authorities of the Republic of Adygea have organized his criminal prosecution by arbitrarily interpreting the laws, committing numerous procedural violations, and engaging in flagrant psychological pressure,” he wrote in a letter to the editors of Open Russia.


Observers have linked the criminal case against Brinikh to his fight against violations of environmental law by Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC, an industrial pig-breeding facility owned by Vyacheslav Derev, Karachay-Cherkessia’s representative in the Federation Council. Brinikh’s confrontation with Kievo-Zhuraki has lasted for several years. According to environmentalists, the facility has caused a permanent stench in the surrounding villages, and discharges of manure have repeatedly killed off fish and seedlings in the fields. After a series of articles by Brinikh, Kievo-Zhuraki management filed a lawsuit to protect its commercial reputation, but the court sided with the environmentalist. In addition to environmental issues, Brinikh has written about corruption: about the ties between Derev and Adygean authorities, and abuses during construction of the pig-breeding facility.

The Presidential Human Rights Council has announced it will be monitoring the Brinikh case. Council chair Mikhail Fedotov and Greenpeace Russia’s executive director Sergei Tsyplenkov studied the situation when they visited Adygea during a field meeting of the council in Krasnodar Territory from December 15 to 17.

She has been involved in environmental activism with Greenpeace Russia, opposing development projects in the Khimki Forest, and was a volunteer at the Children's Psychiatric Hospital in Moscow.

-- Maria Alyokhina, by Wikipedia


Image

After a decade of President Vladimir Putin’s authoritarian rule in which civil society seemed to be comatose, a new protest movement is growing in Russia. Infuriated by electoral fraud and galloping corruption, the so-called “creative class” is fighting back by means of music, poetry, multi-media, and daring art performances. In this presentation, Artem Troitsky gave a firsthand account of the situation.

Artem Troitsky is the first, and best known, Russian rock journalist, author of Back in the USSR: The True Story of Rock in Russia and Tusovka: Whatever Happened to the Soviet Underground Culture. He currently teaches in the Journalism Department of Moscow State University, hosts TV and radio shows (including on Ekho Moskvy), writes for Novaya gazeta, is a member of the board of Greenpeace Russia
, and is a well-known blogger and opposition activist.

-- Enemies of the State: Pussy Riot and the New Russian Protest Rock, by National Endowment for Democracy, Part of IERES’ Behind the Headlines Series, Co-sponsored with the National Endowment for Democracy’s International Forum for Democratic Studies with Artem Troitsky, Moscow State University


The largest environmental NGOs survived the 1990s, in many cases by relying on funding from foreign governments and foundations to continue their work; small grass-roots groups also persisted, working on local issues...

Within the broader environmental movement, environmental organizations tend to fall into three broad categories (Henry 2010). First, there are a limited number of “professional” environmental organizations, such as WWF and Greenpeace, which are based in Moscow or regional capitals. In the second category are grassroots environmental organizations... Finally, in the third category are a number of government-sponsored environmental NGOS that receive funding from state programs and that work closely with state agencies to help them achieve their goals....

Many environmental NGOs in Russia were able to operate in the post-Soviet period due to foreign funding for their work from governmental donors such as USAID, the UK’s DIFD, and private foundations. Larin and his co-authors describe environmentalists’ struggle to continue their work in the 1990s as state funding for nature protection declined and few domestic alternatives emerged (Larin et al. 2003). Foreign support influenced the development of the environmental movement. To survive, NGO representatives proposed projects on issues that interested foreign funders and environmentalists who had facility in foreign languages were more likely to successfully obtain grants. Contact with foreign partners offered the opportunity to exchange ideas as well as develop organizational capacity and new kinds of expertise. Globalization, Russia’s integration into global consumer society, and the country’s emerging role as a natural resource provider also changed the “master frames” of environmentalists (Yanitsky 2010, 191–194). This international orientation also may have increased the distance between environmentalists and average Russians, however....

The Putin administration offers rhetorical concessions to some environmental campaigns but largely resists environmentalists’ demands, in part by portraying activists as anti-Russian and by insinuating that environmental groups receiving funds from abroad do not work in Russia’s national interest. In recent years, the government has attempted to more directly regulate NGOs. Among environmental NGOs, groups such as EWNC, Baikal Wave, and Greenpeace, as well as a number of regional groups have had their offices inspected and their documents and computers confiscated. Criticism of NGOs receiving funding from abroad led to the 2012 Law on Foreign Agents, which requires that public organizations receiving foreign funding and engaging in “political activity” register as “foreign agents,” pay significant fines, or cease operating. In May 2015, the Ministry of Justice listed 127 NGOs on its foreign agent register, including at least 20 organizations with an explicitly environmental purpose (Ministry of Justice, Russian Federation n.d.). Technically, “the protection of flora and fauna” is excluded from the definition of political activity, but representatives of environmental groups have been cited for activities such as attending public meeting and making written appeals to the authorities. Given that the term “foreign agent” has the negative connotation of traitor or spy, most organizations have vowed that they would fight the designation in court. In July 2014, Moscow-based anti-nuclear organization Eco-Defense, which receives funding from the EU and several German foundations, was declared a foreign agent. Vladimir Slivyak, the leader of Eco-Defense, initiated a court case to have the decision overturned.

-- The state of environmental protection in the Russian Federation: a review of the post-Soviet era, by Joshua P. Newell & Laura A. Henry


As Olga Tsepilova left a political opposition rally in St. Petersburg, Russia, last April, a member of the special forces police squad descended upon her. With a full overhead swing, he cracked Tsepilova in the face with his nightstick, fracturing her nose and cheekbone, sending her to the hospital for a month.

Tsepilova, 49, a sociologist and senior research fellow at the Russian Academy of Sciences, has run afoul of state authority before. In 2004, she hoped to study the social consequences of pollution in Russia by focusing on two closed nuclear zones. One of them, the town of Ozyorsk in the southern Urals, is the site of the infamous Mayak nuclear facility. Now a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, Mayak suffered the Soviet Union's largest pre-Chernobyl nuclear accident, an explosion in 1957 that spread radiation over an area of 14,300 sq. mi. (23,000 sq km). Scientists say the area has never been adequately decontaminated....

The Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper, noting that the U.S.'s National Endowment for Democracy provided some of Tsepilova's funding, labeled her research project a "spying scandal."....

Far from improving the situation at Mayak and other troubled sites, the Federal Atomic Energy Agency has been importing waste from foreign countries, turning nuclear sites in the Urals and elsewhere into what Greenpeace says are some of the world's largest nuclear dumps.
To help lift the veil of nuclear secrecy that has persisted since the Soviet Union's disintegration, Tsepilova has joined the liberal opposition Yabloko party as head of its green wing, and is running in December's election for the Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament.

-- Olga Tsepilova, by Brett Forrest


*****************************

"Silence of the Lambs"
by Valery Brinich

In dealing since 2012 with the problems caused by the illegal operations of Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC, I have often met with local residents who complained to me about the stench from the pig sheds. However, despite the increased activism of our organization in the Teuchezhsky District, at present there is not a single member of the All-Russian Society for Nature Conservation in this municipality. It has just so happened that the main core of our organization in the republic is made up of residents of Maykop and the Maykop District, while there are almost no members of the Society in Adygea’s ethnic districts.

To remedy this situation, I had asked my Adyghe friends to organize meetings with local residents in the villages of the Teuchezhsky District. We needed to look for assistants in our environmental work. The negative impact of Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC’s pig-breeding facility on the environment and people’s health was a good occasion for such meetings. It would be interesting to hear directly from the people who lived next door to the pig-breeding facility whether they enjoyed having such a neighbor or not. It was also interesting to see whether we could count on the villagers of the Teuchezhsky District in our fight with the polluting pig producers, who had been violating Russian law and people’s right to a healthy environment.

From long years of personal experience I knew how hard it was encourage ordinary folk in our country to engage in more vigorous actions. Since Soviet times, our people have been used to letting off steam in the kitchen, in narrow circles of likeminded people, while in public they approve any moves made by the authorities, however idiotic. Still, I nourished a glimmer of hope that they had not all grown accustomed to the smell of pig manure, that not everyone was happy with the fact that fish were going belly up in the local ponds, and that the authorities would not lift a finger to improve the situation.

But the reality proved harsher, both to me and to my hopes. First, we stopped at Gabukay, which is located literally right next to the buildings of the pig farm. The village was not crowded on that quiet August evening. In the center, right on the square, about a dozen mainly elderly men were relaxing and playing chess on benches. Among them was the man whom my good friend Kasei Khachegogu had brought me to meet. After introducing myself, I asked the villagers how they liked living next to the pig farm. And immediately it was like something in those people exploded. It turned out they felt there was nothing good about having such a neighbor. But they smelled the stench from the fields and sensed the indifference of the authorities, both local and Adygean, in solving the problems of the village of Gabukay. For, as it transpired, the village had many other environmental problems. For example, back in the day the authorities had altered the course of the river Pshish, and now there were problems with the old riverbed. According to local residents, the authorities had skimped on reclamation works. To put it simply, they had stolen part of the funds allotted, so the work was done not to plan but catch-as-catch-can. Consequently, the old riverbed has become overgrown and has not been irrigated. It has thus become a breeding ground for snakes right on the outskirts of the village. And there is plenty of garbage in the vicinity of Gabukay, just as near any rural settlement in Adygea, because the only authorized solid waste landfills are outside of Maykop and Adygeisk.

After chatting with people and handing out application forms for joining the All-Russian Society for Nature Conversation, we hurried on to the village of Assokolay. Frankly, we were hoping we would find more people there. Especially because we had given the residents of Assokolay prior warning through fellow villagers that we would be coming to meet with the people and survey them about pressing environmental problems. However, as soon as they drove into the village, my comrades met a woman they knew hurrying home from the center. She told them that people were already waiting for us near the local House of Culture; only they were not village residents, but police and prosecutors from Adygeisk. And the people who had been there to meet us had simply been dispersed to their homes. The woman advised us not to go there, but to return to Maykop. It was all the same, she said, because we could not talk to anyone but law enforcement officers.

We decided to go all the way to the end: as they say, to drink the cup to the dregs. The square outside the club really was crowded. Waiting for us there were Lieutenant Colonel Ruslan Akhidjak, head of the Adygeisk intermunicipal police department, his deputy, and a dozen of his officers, including several patrol cars. Also in attendance were the Teuchezhsky interdistrict deputy prosecutor, an officer from the extremism prevention department, and several more “men in black.” The local residents were in the minority: around ten to fifteen people in all. As soon as we got out of our vehicles, we were immediately showered with reproaches. Why hadn’t we notified the authorities of our arrival? We tried to explain that we had not been planning any public events, but had only wanted to talk to the villagers, ask them about problems, and suggest that they join the All-Russian Society for Nature Conservation. The fact is that in this case our organization would have a greater chance of defending the rights and interests of local residents, including protecting them from the negative impacts of Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC’s pig farm.

In the end, I insisted that, since we had come all the way from Maykop, we would talk to however many people showed up. That is just what we did: under the watchful eye of police officers and prosecutors, and with a female officer from the Adygeisk police department standing next to us with a tape recorder turned on. Basically, the conversation was a repeat of the conversation we had had in Gabukay. The only difference was that there were two elderly men present who had gone with me to the court hearings in Adygeisk when our organization had been in a lawsuit with Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC last spring. Thus, the conversation was more heated. We were accused of not having scored any victories in our campaign against the law-breaking pig producers. I had to explain that we have won victories, albeit small ones, and that in conditions of total corruption it would be pointless to expect quick and easy victories in the fight against dirty businessmen. That it would be much easier for me if in the district as a whole and in every village and farm we had active assistance. It is one thing when two or three witnesses come to a court hearing and testify that it stinks where they live, and quite another if hundreds of people would gather in the square outside the court and demand that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC stop poisoning people’s lives. Perhaps the judge, even if he or she had been “inspired” by their superiors, would find it much more difficult morally to hand down an unjust ruling.

And I also said that Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC had stocked up on all sorts of certificates and evaluations approving their operations, and that was all the officials who inspected them needed to see. In reality, nobody had really inspected the pig producers and punished them.
I see all the violations; I know how to punish the guilty parties and, most importantly, how to remedy the situation. But I am a social activist, and I am not authorized to do this, while those who do have the authority do not wish to use it. The regime despises the people, and the people despise this regime. They despise it and fear it. It is a vicious circle. To paraphrase the famous saying, every people deserves the regime it tolerates.

I was saying all this while secretly mulling over the thought that the authorities in Adygea feared any independent opinion, any unauthorized sigh. Look, a whole flock of them had flown into Assokolay, not even begrudging going to work on a Friday evening, right before the weekend. Apparently, local law enforcement was under strict orders from the Adygean government to prevent the opposition (and all real social activists and environmentalists are always in opposition to any government) from meeting with the local population. I recalled the anti-corruption rallies that had not been held because of the authorities, and the rally we had wanted to hold on June 5, World Environment Day, which had been dispersed by police. They clearly know who butters their bread.

Speaking of fat, I have always wondered why it was decided to place the pigsties amid the Adyghe villages and not somewhere in the Russian-speaking region of Adygea. Why is Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC planning to raise cows outside of Maykop while it breeds pigs in the Teuchezhsky District? You find yourself involuntarily wondering whether Adygea’s current authorities have not done this on purpose. Because in practical terms, excuse my use of jargon, the Muslim population has been “punked,” meaning it has been humiliated to the point where people have lost their self-esteem. Humiliated people are easier to manage: you can wrap them round your little finger. And that is what is done to them. As Khazret Bogus, a local farmer and born columnist from the village of Krasnoe, wrote, there is an Adyghe saying: If you have tackled shit, hold on tight, because you have been soiled all the same. The Holy Quran forbids the faithful from eating pork, except in cases when they are forced to eat it. But who or what has forced the Adyghe to breathe manure-polluted air and swim in ponds poisoned by sewage? Nothing but cowardice and a lack of self-esteem. How does living in filth differ from the consumption of pork? For, according to the Quran, the pig is considered a dirty animal, because it lives in filth. But the residents of the Teuchezhsky District also, as a matter of fact, live in filth. It turns out that the stench from Kievo-Zhuraki Agribusiness JSC’s pig farm poisons not only people’s bodies but also their souls.

People used to sing,

“No one will grant us deliverance,
No god, no tsar, no hero.
We will win our liberation,
With our very own hands.”


Now they sing completely different songs, songs tolerant of the powers that be and the shit they generously reward people for their obedience. And they themselves place their hope in God, fear the tsar, and hope a hero will save them. No hero will save you, my dear fellow countrymen, until you cease being afraid of tsars. And God will not help you until you roll up your sleeves. The Russians have a saying: “God helps those who help themselves.” And the great French thinker Voltaire argued that God helps those battalions that shoot best.

So when are we going to start shooting better, villagers?
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Re: Act & Punishment: The Pussy Riot Trials

Postby admin » Sun Sep 02, 2018 8:02 am

Yuri Zhukov (journalist)
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 9/1/18

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Image
Journalist Yuri Zhukov and film director Sergei Gerasimov at a plenary session of USSR creative unions leadership


Yuri Georgy Aleksandrovich Zhukov (Russian: Юрий Александрович Жуков; also Георгий Александрович Жуков; 1908-1991) was a prominent journalist and political figure in the Soviet Union.

Member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Around 1938-1945 he toured Dalkrai and wrote books on Soviet Far East and Japan.

Later, he sat on the editorial board of Soviet daily Pravda (1946-1987); he was also a columnist of the paper. Zhukov served as the newspaper's Paris correspondent in 1948-1952. From 1952 to 1957 he was the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the newspaper.

In 1957 he became the first Chairman of the powerful State Committee for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries (GKKS), an organ that took sizable portion of responsibilities from the Soviet Foreign Ministry from 1957 to 1967. Zhukov would oversee preparations and signing of the first agreement on cultural exchanges with the United States (Lacy-Zarubin act, signed in January 1958) and the Soviet national exhibition in New York in summer 1959. He also hosted Vice President Richard M. Nixon on an unofficial visit to the Soviet Union July 23 - August 2, 1959 to open the American National Exhibition in Sokolniki Park in Moscow.

In the late 1950s he was a speechwriter for Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev.

Deputy Chairman of the Soviet Peace Committee (1962-1982) and Chairman (1982-1987).


In December 1982, the Soviet Peace Committee President, Yuri Zhukov, returning to the rhetoric of the mid-1950s, wrote to several hundred non-communist peace groups in Western Europe accusing the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation of "fueling the cold war by claiming that both NATO and the Warsaw Pact bear equal responsibility for the arms race and international tension. Zhukov denounced the West Berlin Working Group for a Nuclear-Free Europe, organizers of a May 1983 European disarmament conference in Berlin, for allegedly siding with NATO, attempting to split the peace movement, and distracting the peaceloving public from the main source of the deadly threat posed against the peoples of Europe -- the plans for stationing a new generation of nuclear missiles in Europe in 1983."

-- World Peace Council, by Wikipedia


He was a candidate member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.
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