Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Possibly better than tootsie rolls, illustrated screenplays are tasty little nuggets of cinematic flavor in a convenient pdf wrapper. Download and read your favorite movie in a quarter of the time it takes to watch it. And you can grab quotes and images.

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:01 pm

Saud bin Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/8/17

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image
Saud Al Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
His Royal Highness Prince Saud al Faisal bin Abdul Aziz (5550131494) (cropped).jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Term 13 October 1975 – 29 April 2015
Predecessor Faisal
Successor Adel al-Jubeir
Monarch Khalid
Fahd
Abdullah
Salman
Born 2 January 1940
Ta'if, Saudi Arabia
Died 9 July 2015 (aged 75)
Los Angeles, United States
Spouse Jawhara bint Abdullah bin Abdul-Rahman
Full name
Saud Al Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Father King Faisal
Mother Iffat Al-Thunayan
Religion Islam
Saud bin Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (Arabic: سعود بن فيصل بن عبد العزيز آل سعود‎), also known as Saud Al Faisal (Arabic: سعود الفيصل‎‎; 2 January 1940 – 9 July 2015), was a Saudi diplomat and statesman who served as Saudi Arabia's foreign minister from 1975 to 2015. A member of the Saudi royal family, he was the longest-serving foreign minister in world history since Klemens von Metternich.

Early life, education and early political career

Saud bin Faisal was born in Taif on 2 January 1940.[1][2] He was the second son of King Faisal and Iffat Al-Thunayan.[3][4] He attended the Hun School of Princeton[5] and graduated from Princeton University in 1964 or 1965 with a bachelor of arts degree in economics.[6][7] He was the full brother of Mohammed bin Faisal, Turki bin Faisal, Luluwah bint Faisal, Sara bint Faisal and Haifa bint Faisal.[8]

He became an economic consultant for the ministry of petroleum.[6] In 1966, he moved to general organization for petroleum and mineral resources (Petromin).[6] In February 1970, he became deputy governor of Petromin for planning affairs.[6] He was also a member of the High Coordination Committee.[6] In 1971, he became deputy minister of petroleum.[6] Prince Saud served in this post at the oil ministry until 1975 when he was appointed as state minister for foreign affairs.[9]

Foreign Minister

Saud bin Faisal was the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia. He was appointed to the post in October 1975.[9] His term ended on 29 April 2015 when he was replaced by Adel al-Jubeir, a former Saudi ambassador to the United States.[10]

Timeline

On 13 October 1975, King Khalid appointed him as foreign minister.[9][11] He currently holds the record for having been the world's longest-serving foreign minister. He was well regarded in the diplomatic community.[12] He spoke seven languages: Arabic, English, Spanish, Hebrew, French, Italian, and German.[12]

In May 1985, he officially visited Iran and meetings were focused on the annual pilgrimage of Iranians to Mecca.[13] The same year Prince Saud raised awareness in Britain of Soviet activity in the Horn of Africa.[3] He asked Condoleezza Rice to focus on "key substantive issues" of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. He complained that US banks were auditing Saudi Embassy banks illegally. He asserted that auditors were "inappropriate and aggressive". He also declared that the Saudi Embassy has diplomatic immunity.[14]

Prince Saud said in 2004 that Saudi Arabia would like to reduce its dependence on U.S.-dominated security arrangements.[15] In July 2004, he claimed the real source of problems in the Middle East were not Muslims but "injustice and deprivation inflicted in the region".[16] In August 2007, he denied allegations that terrorists were travelling from Saudi Arabia to Iraq and claimed it was vice versa.[17][18]

On 10 March 2006, he met with Hamas leaders in Riyadh.[19] In July 2006, he urged U.S. President George W. Bush to call for a ceasefire in the Lebanon bombing.[20] In January 2008, he supported parliamentary elections in Pakistan. He indicated that Pakistan did not need "overt, external interference" to solve political division. He commended Nawaz Sharif as stable bipartisan candidate.[21]

In February 2010, he told General[who?] Jones to distinguish between friends and enemies in Pakistan rather than using indiscriminate military action. He insisted that Pakistan's army must maintain its credibility.[22] In November 2010, he led the Saudi delegation at the G-20 Summit.[23]

In January 2011, he withdrew out of mediation efforts to reinstate a government in Lebanon.[24] In March 2011, he went to Europe to rally support for Saudi Arabia's intervention in Bahrain.[25]

Image
Prince Saud in 2012

After U.S. Gulf Cooperation Council forum at the GCC secretariat in Riyadh on 31 March 2012, he said it was a "duty" to arm the Syrian opposition and help them defend themselves against the daily bloody crackdown by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad.[26] Commenting on the fragile security situation, Prince Saud noted that: "One of the most important causes is the continuation of the unresolved conflict as well as the continuation of the Israeli aggression policy against the Palestinians. "We have discussed, in the meeting, many issues, especially the heinous massacre against the Syrian people. We also discussed the latest developments in Yemen, and reviewed the overall developments and political situation in the Persian Gulf region, the Middle East and North Africa, as well as their repercussions on the security and stability of the region and the world," Prince Saud said.[27]

Iran and Lebanon

Rather than military action on Iran, Saud Al Faisal called for tougher sanctions such as travel bans and further bank lending restrictions.[28] He has stated U.S. foreign policy has tilted more power for Iran.[29] He compared the Iranian influence in Iraq with Iranian influence in Lebanon.[14] He commended positive developments by Iran such as its influence over Hezbollah to end street protests.[14]

In early 2011, he expressed fear of the "dangerous" instability in Lebanon after the fall of the Saad Hariri government. He also stated that Lebanon's ability to establish peaceful coexistence with so many different groups may be a significant loss in the Arab world if the nation failed in creating a government.[24]

Image
Prince Saud (left) meets Russian President Vladimir Putin on 14 February 2008.

In May 2014 it was reported that Prince Saud had invited Iran's foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif to visit Riyadh, breaking the ice in one of the most hostile relationships in the Middle East ahead of key talks on Iran's nuclear program in Vienna. Speaking to reporters in the Saudi capital, Foreign Minister Prince Saud said the kingdom was ready to host Iranian Foreign Minister "anytime he sees fit" and indicated that Riyadh was willing to open negotiations with its nemesis on the many combustible issues dividing them.[30]

Other governmental activities

Starting in 1998 under the reign of King Fahd, Saud Al Faisal and then the Crown Prince Abdullah managed the energy sector through a committee of technocrats and princes.[31] More specifically, Prince Saud was appointed chairman of the Saudi Aramco's committee charged with the project assessment in September 1999.[32]

On 20 November 2009, King Abdullah appointed Prince Saud as the chairman of the influential supreme economic council of Saudi Arabia.[33][34] Prince Saud was also a member of the military service council.[35]

Influence

Saudi foreign policy is designed by the King, not by the foreign minister.[3] Prince Saud worked closely with King Khalid, King Fahd and King Abdullah.

Prince Saud was firmly anti-Soviet and was an Arab nationalist.[3] He was more resistant to Israeli proposals than King Fahd.[3] He lamented his legacy might be defined "by profound disappointment than by success". He regretted how his generation of leaders have failed to create a Palestinian state.[12] He encouraged Iraqis to defend their country's sovereignty.[36]

In the Saudi royal court, his relationship with King Fahd was strained,[3] but he was one of King Abdullah's closest allies.[37] He was among the Saudi officials who worked to improve Saudi Arabia's international image and maintain its strong relationship with the United States after the September 11 attacks.[38][39]

Upon the death of King Abdullah, he was replaced as foreign minister by a younger commoner, Adel al-Jubeir.[37][40]

Personal life

Prince Saud was married to his cousin Jawhara bint Abdullah bin Abdul-Rahman,[7] and together they have three sons and three daughters.[1][3][41] His daughter Haifa bint Saud is married to Prince Sultan bin Salman,[42] the first of Royal Blood and the first Arab astronaut. Prince Saud lived in Jeddah.[14] Unlike other members of the Al Saud, he often spoke publicly and interacted with reporters.[43] Prince Saud spoke excellent English. He liked to play tennis.[3]

Social roles

Prince Saud was closely involved in philanthropy. He was a founding member of the King Faisal Foundation and chairman of the board of directors for the King Faisal School and Al Faisal University in Riyadh. He was also a member of the Society for Disabled Children and the Madinah Society for Welfare and Social Services.[44]

Illness and death

Prince Saud suffered from Parkinson's disease and back pain.[43] He had surgery in the United States.[43] His physical appearance showed signs of health deterioration, especially difficulty standing upright.[43] On 11 August 2012, he had another surgery to remove a "simple" blockage in the intestines due to adhesions resulting from previous surgery.[45] The operation was performed at the Specialist Hospital in Jeddah.[46] Prince Saud went to Los Angeles after he left the hospital on 6 September 2012. The ministry announced that he would stay there for a while.[47] On 25 January 2015, Prince Saud had a successful spine surgery in the U.S.[48] In March 2015 he was photographed using a walker.[49] With age, Saud faced many health problems, suffering from chronic back pain and having had various surgeries.[50]

Prince Saud died on 9 July 2015 at the age of 75 in Los Angeles.[51][52] His funeral prayer was held in Grand Mosque in Makkah.[53]

References

1. Saudi Arabia King Fahd bin Abdulaziz. Int'l Business Publications. 1 January 2005. p. 94. ISBN 978-0-7397-2740-9. Retrieved 10 March 2013.
2. "Prince Saud bin Faisal bin Abdulaziz". Saud Al Faisal. Retrieved 21 July 2013.
3. "Briefing" (PDF). The Guardian. 25 September 1985. Retrieved 13 October 2012.
4. Winberg Chai (22 September 2005). Saudi Arabia: A Modern Reader. University Press. p. 193. ISBN 978-0-88093-859-4. Retrieved 26 February 2013.
5. Thomas, Katrina. "America as Alma Mater", Saudi Aramco World, May/June 1979. Retrieved 27 January 2011. "Prince Sa'ud, the fourth son, also went to Hun School and Princeton."
6. "Saudi-European Relations: Towards a Reliable Partnership" (PDF). European Policy Centre. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
7. Luddington, Nick (5 April 1975). "King Faisal's eight sons". Lewiston Evening Journal. Jeddah. AP. Retrieved 26 February 2013.
8. Bahgat Korany; Ali E. Hillal Dessouki (1 January 2010). The Foreign Policies of Arab States: The Challenge of Globalization. American Univ in Cairo Press. p. 369. ISBN 978-977-416-360-9. Retrieved 14 September 2013.
9. "New Saudi Arabia King Picks Deputy Premiers". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. UPI. 30 March 1975. Retrieved 3 August 2012.
10. "Saudi king replaces crown prince in cabinet reshuffle". Al Jazeera. 29 April 2015. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
11. http://saudalfaisal.com/index_En.html
12. Michael Slackman (17 December 2009). "A Legacy of Regret for a Saudi Diplomat". The New York Times.
13. Gary G. Sick (Spring 1987). "Iran's Quest for Superpower Status". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 28 July 2013.
14. James C. Oberwetter (24 February 2007). "APHSCT Townsend February 6 meeting with foreign minister Prince Saud Al Faisal". WikiLeaks. WikiLeaks cable: 07RIYADH367. Archived from the original on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
15. Wenran Jiang (11 July 2007). "China's Growing Energy Relations" (PDF). Chine Brief. 12 (14): 12–15. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
16. Prince Saud Al Faisal; Peter G. Peterson. "The United States and Saudi Arabia: A Relationship Threatened by Misconceptions". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
17. "Iraq: Regional Perspectives and U.S. Policy" (PDF). Retrieved 25 May 2011.
18. "Saudi Arabia slams UN double standard". Coastal Digest. 28 September 2010. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
19. Mahjoob Zweiri (2006). "The Hamas Victory: shifting sands or major earthquake?" (PDF). Third World Quarterly. 27 (4): 675–687. doi:10.1080/01436590600720876. Retrieved 14 December 2012.
20. Abramowitz, Michael, and Robin Wright.Saudi Arabia Asks U.S. to Intervene in Lebanon. The Washington Post, 24 July 2006. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
21. Ford Fraker (2 January 2008). "Saudi Foreign Minister on the situation in Pakistan". WikiLeaks. WikiLeaks cable: 08RIYADH7. Archived from the original on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
22. "Scenesetter for special representative Ambassador Holbrooke's February 15–16 visit to Riyadh". WikiLeaks. 12 February 2010. WikiLeaks cable: 10RIYADH182. Archived from the original on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
23. "Prince Saud leads Saudi delegation to G-20 Summit". Saudi Embassy. 11 November 2010. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
24. "Saudis give up on Lebanon mediation talks". CNN. 19 January 2011.
25. Matthew Rosenberg; Jay Solomon; Margaret Coker (27 May 2011). "Saudi Bid to Curb Iran Worries U.S". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
26. "Saudi foreign minister says supporting Syrian opposition is a 'duty'". Al Arabiya. 31 March 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
27. "Arming Syrian opposition is a duty, says Prince Saud". Saudi Gazette. 1 April 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
28. Vilensky, Mike. "WikiLeaks: Saudi King Abdullah Encouraged U.S. to Attack Iran; Chinese Politburo Hacked Into Google – Daily Intel". NY Mag. Retrieved 25 May2011.
29. James Smith (11 February 2010). "Scenesetter for Secretary Clinton's Feb 15–16 visit to Saudi Arabia". WikiLeaks. WikiLeaks cable: 10RIYADH178. Archivedfrom the original on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
30. "In thaw, Saudi Arabia extends invitation to Iran". Washington Post. Retrieved 5 March 2015.
31. Seznec, J. F. (October 2002). "Stirrings in Saudi Arabia" (PDF). Journal of Democracy. 13 (4): 33–40. doi:10.1353/jod.2002.0080. Retrieved 8 April 2012.
32. David G. Victor; David R. Hults; Mark C. Thurber (8 December 2011). Oil and Governance: State-Owned Enterprises and the World Energy Supply. Cambridge University Press. p. 184. ISBN 978-1-107-00442-9. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
33. Clasmann, Anne-Beatrice (20 November 2009). "Discreetly, Saudis speculate about the throne succession". M&C News. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
34. "Royal Decree to add Prince Saud Al Faisal, Prince Mohammed bin Naif". Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Supreme Economic Council. 16 November 2009. Retrieved 29 April 2012.
35. "Saudi Authority to monitor audiovisual media". MEFAFN. Arab News. 4 September 2012. Retrieved 4 September 2012.
36. "No politics for Ben Ali in Kingdom". Arab News. 19 January 2011. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
37. MacDowall, Angus (29 April 2015). "NEWSMAKER-Saudi veteran foreign minister Prince Saud al-Faisal". Reuters. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
38. "Saudi Arabia's veteran foreign minister Prince Saud al-Faisal dies". Al-Araby. 10 July 2015. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
39. Saudi Arabia in the Balance: Political Economy, Society, Foreign Affairs (2006), ed. by Paul Aarts and Gerd Nonneman
40. Adamczyk, Ed (29 April 2015). "Saudi king shakes up ministries, line of succession". United Press International. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
41. "About Ministry". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 3 November 2012.
42. "Family Tree of Saud bin Faisal". Datarabia. Retrieved 30 March 2012.
43. Henderson, Simon. "Foreign Policy: A Prince's Mysterious Disappearance". NPR. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
44. "Saudi Arabia: HRH Prince Saud Al Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud". American Bedu. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
45. Sara Anablawi (12 August 2012). "Saudi's foreign minister undergoes abdominal surgery". Arabian Business. Retrieved 5 September 2012.
46. "King Visits Prince Saud Al Faisal". Saudi Press Agency. 19 August 2012. Retrieved 20 August 2012.
47. "Saudi Arabia: Foreign minister recovering from abdominal surgery in his Los Angeles home". The Washington Post. AP. 10 September 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2012.
48. "الديوان الملكي: نجاح عملية أجراها سعود الفيصل". Al Arabiya. 25 January 2015. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
49. "Saudi FM urges coalition to face ISIS challenge on the ground". The Daily Star. 5 March 2015. Retrieved 5 March 2015.
50. "Former Saudi FM Prince Saud al-Faisal dies". Al Jazeera. 9 July 2015. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
51. "Former Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al Faisal Dies". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
52. "Breaking: Saudi ex-Foreign Minister Saud Al Faisal dead at 75". Gulf News. Reuters, AFP. 9 July 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
53. "Teary farewell to Prince Saud". Susris. 12 July 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2015.

• Michael Slackman (16 December 2009). "A Legacy of Regret for a Saudi Diplomat". The New York Times. Retrieved 17 December 2009.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:18 pm

Island of Roses: The Jews of Rhodes in Los Angeles
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/8/17

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Island of Roses: The Jews of Rhodes in Los Angeles
Image
Directed by Gregori Viens
Release date
1995
Running time
55 min.
Country USA
Language English, Italian and French Ladino with subtitles

Island of Roses: The Jews of Rhodes in Los Angeles is a 1995 documentary about the dying Sephardic community in Los Angeles. The film shares interviews with some of the last surviving immigrants, who offer nostalgic memories of their lost home, and explores how the once vibrant community of Rhodes Jews in Los Angeles now struggles to preserve its traditions as younger, assimilated generations have to make a conscious effort to maintain the practices of their ancestors.

Summary

The Sephardic Jews of Rhodes were once Spaniards who came to find an idyllic new home in the Greek island of Rhodes. The same night that Christopher Columbus set sail in 1492, the King and Queen of Spain forced all Jews out of their country. Sephardic refugees settled throughout the Mediterranean, and a large number of them chose to make their home on the beautiful Rhodes, where almond and lemon trees grew and the smell of roses was always in the air.

Image
Palace of the Grand Master in the city of Rhodes

For centuries the Jews of Rhodes lived peacefully under the Ottoman-Turkish rule, preserving the medieval form of the Ladino language they took with them from Spain and practicing their own distinct Sephardic traditions. But the quiet island was invaded by Germany in 1944, and Rhodes Jews were among the many sent off in cattle cars to their deaths.

The Mediterranean island of Rhodes was once heavily populated by Jews, but only a few still live there today. Many of those who survived and fled World War II and its aftermath immigrated to Los Angeles, where the warm weather and sunny beach reminded them of home.

Awards

Silver Screen Award at the US International Film and Video Festival, 1995

References

"Island of Roses: The Jews of Rhodes in L.A". The Jewish Channel. 2008. Retrieved 4 August. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:19 pm

Fear in Louisiana over Biological Agent Test
by Dave Eberhart
Stars and Stripes Veterans Affairs Editor
Oct 23, 2000

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


In Louisiana, the towns of Deridder and Leesville are known primarily for their proximity to Fort Polk, the home of the Army's Joint Readiness Training Center. Relations between the 199,000-acre base and surrounding civilian community have long been excellent - until now.

But when the Department of Defense announced quietly in the back notice pages of the Beauregard Daily News on Aug. 26 that it planned to spray a biological agent in an "urban" test of bio-agent detection hardware, the long ties of friendship began to unravel.

Residents who read the fine print quickly began to challenge the Army's plan. Dan Nance, the post's deputy public affairs officer, soon had his hands full.

Today, a growing number of the post's civilian neighbors are angry over the way the Army has handled both the proposed spraying and the concerns voiced by nearby residents.

"We are really disgusted with the Army," said Kathy McDaniel, a local resident-turned-activist. "They have told us it does not matter at this point how many phone calls against the testing or how many letters against the testing they receive."

McDaniel told The Stars and Stripes Oct. 23 that the Army has only gone through the motions of sharing information about the tests and has said it intends to begin the spraying by the end of the year. "If that was their attitude all along why did they bother posting the notice and why did they bother extending the comment period?" she asked.

Opponents of the spraying say they were upset the Army did only the minimum required to inform them of the test. "I needed a magnifying glass to read it," McDaniel said of the newspaper notice.


After the notice was published and the controversy began to grow, Fort Polk officials circulated copies of the environmental assessment document to local libraries. The Army also posted factsheets and other information on the Fort Polk internet website.

Fort Polk is the home of the 7th Chemical Co., a specialized Army unit set up to detect the presence of biological agents. Its primary equipment is the Biological Integrated Detection System, a Humvee-mounted suite of sensors that can detect and identify the type of biological agent and its concentration in the atmosphere. The system was developed on an expedited basis after the 1991 Persian Gulf War, when U.S. officials learned the extent to which Iraq had developed and "weaponized" biological warfare agents, including anthrax.

The Environmental Assessment document, available at local libraries, portrayed the planned Fort Polk tests as benign:

"The proposed training activity poses virtually no risks to human health or the environment. It involves the use of a simulated biological agent so that soldiers of the 7th Chemical Company can train with the Biological Integrated Detection System (BIDS) .... "

"The simulant to be used is a dead form of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis-a non-pathogenic bacterium commonly found in soils, water and decomposing plant residue. This substance has been tested extensively and is not considered toxic to humans, plants or animals.

"This simulant has been used at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, for more than 40 years and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, for over six years under conditions similar to those proposed at Fort Polk. During the period of use, no environmental or health effects have been documented at those installations.

"The release of the simulant poses virtually no risk to the public or environment. It would be released in water in an aerosol spray through an agriculture-type sprayer to allow the BIDS system operating in the vicinity to detect the simulated agent. The only effect it will have will be to trigger a response in the BIDS system.

"The spores to be used would be irradiated with gamma radiation rendering it dead before it arrived at Fort Polk. The use of gamma radiation is a common sterilization process used by the food industry to make food safer and by the medical industry for instrument sterilization. Spores will then be tested to insure that the radiation procedure was effective and that the spores are in fact dead.

"Only three areas at Fort Polk will be used for this training and it will only be conducted in weather conditions favorable to prevent off-post drift of the release. This training would occur only 12 times a year .... "

The factsheet did not quell a growing concern over the safety of the proposal, and a number of curious and still wary citizens began to do their own investigation.

One concern was that the troops spraying a supposedly "dead" spore would be outfitted with level-4 "MOPP" gear, the Pentagon's term for the highest level of protective clothing and gas masks.

Readily available medical references revealed the fact that Bacillus subtilis can cause upper respiratory distress and provoke an attack of conjunctivitis (an inflammation of the eye).

And this particular bacterium was not something right off nature's shelf, either. Army officials now admit the spray to be used has been genetically altered.

And how could anyone guarantee that the spores would stay on the base, the activists argue. Not even the Army can control the prevailing winds, they contend.


The testing at Folk Polk is now scheduled to begin in Jan. 2001.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:19 pm

Revisiting the Military's Tailhook Scandal
by Michael Winerip
New York Times
May 13, 2013

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


In 1992, a young Navy lieutenant named Paula Coughlin said she had been sexually assaulted at the 35th Annual Tailhook Symposium in Las Vegas.

Her complaints revealed an ugly side to the annual convention for “Top Gun” aviators: 83 women and 7 men were later found to have been assaulted during the raucous party weekend in September 1991. The resulting scandal forced the resignation of the secretary of the Navy, the censure of several admirals and the enactment of a reform agenda that stressed a “zero tolerance” policy.

Did it make a difference? More than two decades later the news remains extremely discouraging.

Last week the Pentagon released a report estimating that 26,000 people in the military were sexually assaulted in the 2012 fiscal year, up from 19,000 in 2010. Making matters worse, the officer in charge of sexual assault prevention programs for the Air Force was arrested in Arlington, Va., and charged with sexual battery.


This week’s developments make the Retro Report video documentary on the Tailhook scandal particularly timely for providing a historical context to a problem that will not go away. On the Retro Report video, Navy Petty Officer Jenny McClendon tells an interviewer of the abuse she faced years after the supposed Tailhook reforms were adopted: “I presumed that I was going to join a group of people who were my comrades. When I got to the ship, it was a while before – was probably a couple of months before we went from harassment to – to the groping, and the groping eventually culminated in several physical assaults and a cou — — a few rapes.”

The Tailhook report is the second in a weekly series that is re-examining the leading stories of decades past. Videos are typically 10 to 12 minutes long and are part of a collaboration between The Times and Retro Report, a documentary news organization formed last year.

The online project was conceived of by Christopher Buck, a former television editor whose father was a co-founder of the Subway restaurant chain. Started with a grant from Mr. Buck, Retro Report — which has a staff of 12 journalists and 6 contributors — is a nonprofit online video news organization that aims to provide a thoughtful counterweight to today’s 24/7 news cycle.

There is a tendency to think we’ve made social progress on so many fronts in recent decades, but watching the Tailhook video, you wonder.

While the Pentagon report released last week estimated there were 26,000 assaults, the military recorded only 3,374, suggesting that many victims continue not to report the crimes for fear of retribution or a lack of justice under the department’s system for prosecuting them.

Here is how in the Retro Report video Paula Coughlin describes what happened to her in 1991: “I squatted down to break his hold and bit him and somebody reached between my knees and tried to grab my panties.”

And here is how the news reports last week described the behavior of the officer in charge of sexual assault prevention programs for the Air Force: “The police say the colonel approached a woman in a parking lot in Arlington near the Pentagon and grabbed her breasts and buttocks before she fended him off and called 911.”
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:20 pm

Malcolm H. Kerr
by Wikipedia
Accessed 12/10/17

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image
Malcolm Kerr
Born Malcolm Hooper Kerr
October 8, 1931
Beirut, Lebanon
Died January 18, 1984 (aged 52)
Beirut, Lebanon
Nationality American
Alma mater Johns Hopkins University
Princeton University
Scientific career
Fields Middle Eastern studies
Institutions American University of Beirut

Malcolm Hooper Kerr (October 8, 1931 – January 18, 1984) was a university professor specializing in the Middle East and the Arab world. An American citizen, he was born, raised, and died in Beirut, Lebanon. He served as President of the American University of Beirut until he was killed by gunmen in 1984.

Early life and education

His youth was spent in Lebanon, on and near the campus of the American University of Beirut, where his parents taught for forty years.[1] His parents, Elsa Reckman and Stanley Kerr, were married in Marash, where they met while they were rescuing Armenian women and orphans after the Armenian Genocide. After the Marash Affair they moved to Beirut. There his father became the chairman of the Department of Biochemistry at AUB and his mother was Dean of Women.[2] During World War II the family relocated to Princeton University in New Jersey. Following the war they returned to Beirut where Malcolm attended the American Community School at Beirut. Shortly thereafter, Malcolm went back alone to the USA, where he graduated from high school at the Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts.

His undergraduate degree in 1953 came from Princeton University where he had studied with Professor Philip Hitti. An early onset of arthritis caused him to return to his family in Lebanon. He entered a masters program in Arabic studies,[3] completing it in 1955 at the American University of Beirut. Here he met his wife, Ann Zwicker Kerr, with whom he had four children. He commenced his doctorate work in Washington, D.C., at the School for Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, from where he received his Ph.D. in 1958. His dissertation was written under the guidance of Majid Khadduri and Sir Hamilton Gibb.[4]

Professor

Following his doctorate, Kerr returned to teach at the American University of Beirut for three years, becoming assistant professor at the Department of Political Science in 1962. The same year, he accepted a similar post, teaching at the University of California at Los Angeles.[5] There, he would become a full professor. He was appointed as chairman of the Department of Political Science and then Dean of the Division of Social Sciences (1973–1976).

In 1959, his first book was published, emerging from his master's thesis: Lebanon in the Last Years of Feudalism. Then, at Oxford University, he did post-doctorate work for a year with Professor Albert Hourani. While he was at Oxford, Professor Gustave von Grunebaum recruited Kerr for a teaching post at the University of California at Los Angeles; his career matured over the course of twenty years of teaching in Los Angeles, from 1962 to 1982.

Kerr and his family returned often to Beirut, during vacations and breaks from UCLA. In 1964–1965, an academic grant sent him to Cairo, where he worked on his most well-known book, The Arab Cold War, published in 1965. The next year he published Islamic Reform, a reworking of his doctorate dissertation. Following the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, Kerr sensed a drastic change for the worse in the tone of Arab politics, which became harsh and bitter. In 1970–1971, he accepted an academic grant to France and North Africa and worked on a third edition of The Arab Cold War. Kerr served as president of the Middle East Studies Association in 1972. Subsequently, an award of the Middle East Studies Association was named in his honor.[6]

His own scholarship was forthright and honest to the point of sometimes getting him into trouble. While he was often thought of as 'pro-Arab' in writing about the Israeli-Arab conflict, he could be as critical of the Arabs as he was of the Israelis. He spoke the truth as he saw it and was committed to the cause of Arab-Israeli peace and to building understanding between the Arab World and the West."[7]


The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990), which often severely disrupted all life in Beirut, also interrupted the Kerr family's yearly travels. Accordingly, in 1976–1977, Kerr was again in Egypt, serving as 'visiting distinguished professor' at the American University in Cairo. Eventually, he marshalled a Ford Foundation grant to fund a joint project of the Von Grunebaum Center at UCLA (which he then headed) and the Strategic Studies of the Al-Ahram Foundation in Egypt. He returned to Cairo in 1979, where he edited the results of this joint Egyptian-American academic effort, the book Rich and Poor States in the Middle East.

President of AUB

The Presidency of the American University of Beirut was offered to Kerr in 1982. Although the civil war was still being fiercely battled on occasion, with the recent exit of the Palestinian Liberation Organization, the Lebanese civil struggle for domestic change had been a more focused effort, which encouraged hope for resolution. "Betting on these chances and feeling a sense of calling to the job, the Kerrs decided to go to Beirut." He accepted the position, serving as President for seventeen months. Appointed president in March, effective July 1, the Israeli invasion of Lebanon and occupation of Beirut made him work first from the New York office. He arrived at his College Hall office at the University in September 1982.[8]

Death

On January 18, 1984, Kerr was shot and killed by two gunmen outside his office; he was 52. Years later, information regarding Kerr's assassins and their motives still remain uncertain, but an Islamic Jihadist took credit for the murder.[9][10] Yet some doubt remains as to the perpetrator.

News of his sudden death, which was yet another tragic event in the civil war, appeared in the media worldwide.[11]

[Pastor Strawcutter] Now, did he ever carry out some of these murders himself?

[Kay Griggs] Of, of course! In fact he told me about Malcolm Kerr’s murder. Malcolm Kerr was a British double agent who worked in California. He was one of these JOINT intelligence operatives who worked for both sides. And he had been in California. But he was doing intelligence work in Beirut, undercover. He was the head of the American University of Beirut, AUB, which is in Lebanon.

Now, my husband was the liaison between the White House and President Gemayel, the brother of the first president who was murdered. My husband was involved with assassinations and operations. He was very upset with Malcolm Kerr because Malcolm Kerr refused – although they were already there – the marine sniper assassins, who were under my husband and General Joy and Al Gray, of course, who were hiding in the dormitory at this university. And of course General Gray, General Krulak, General Wilhelm – Charlie Wilhelm was there -- he is my husband’s special boss, and they were undercover there. And they had Malcolm Kerr murdered simply because Malcolm Kerr would not allow the marines to stay in the dormitory. Had I been Malcolm Kerr, I wouldn’t have wanted rowdy marine assassins living in a dormitory with children, essentially, adolescent young children, having sex, with their perversion and some of their behaviors. So he was put away for that very reason, George told me. He told me that he had to be gotten rid of because of that.

He then said that – and this is interesting – Mary Clark Yost Hallab, my husband is handled by her. She is an American double agent who was put on my husband’s case, because she could handle him. They had an affair while my husband was first married. I found out about it because she called the house after we were married, and wanted to talk to him. And I found in his papers a photograph of her and her bio and all kinds of interesting information on her, and her address in his address book. And I want you all to see that in this movie, because I have a photograph of her. They had a long-term affair the whole time he was in Beirut while she was married to an Arab intelligence double-agent who was underneath Malcolm Kerr, and who took over when Malcolm Kerr was murdered by them.

So what you have here is a favor, essentially, done to Yost.

-- Interview with Kay Griggs, by Pastor Strawcutter


Personal life

Kerr had four children: Susan, John, Steve, and Andrew. Steve Kerr is a former NBA player and the current head coach of the Golden State Warriors [12] His brother-in-law, Hans van de Ven, is an expert on Chinese history at the University of Cambridge.

Selected publications

Malcolm H. Kerr, Lebanon in the Last Years of Feudalism 1840–1868. A contemporary account by Antun Dahir Al-Aqiqi (American University of Beirut 1959)
Malcolm H. Kerr, The Arab Cold War. Gamel Abd al-Nasr and his Rivals, 1958–1970 (Oxford University 1965, 3d ed. 1975)
Malcolm H. Kerr, Islamic Reform. The political and legal theories of Muhammad 'Abduh and Rashid Ridā (Princeton University 1966)
Malcolm H. Kerr, The Elusive Peace in the Middle East (SUNY 1975)
Abraham S. Becker, Bent Hudson, & Malcolm H. Kerr, editors, Economics and Politics of the Middle East (New York: Elsevier 1975)
Malcolm H. Kerr and al-Sayyid Yasin, editors, Rich and Poor States in the Middle East. Egypt and the New Arab Order (Westview 1982)
Samir Seikaly and Ramzi Ba'labakki, editors, Quest for Understanding. Arabic and Islamic studies in honor of Malcolm H. Kerr (American University of Beirut 1991)

References

1. His father taught as Professor of Biochemistry at the University; his mother served as Dean of Women for a term. "Malcolm H. Kerr" at American University of Beirut
2. "The Inside Story Of Steve Kerr And His Family's Little-Known History Of Altruism In The Middle East". UPROXX. 2016-05-25. Retrieved 2016-06-03.
3. Office of President AUB
4. Kerr, "Preface" to his Islamic Reform (1966).
5. UCLA
6. MESA's Malcolm H. Kerr Dissertation Awards
7. At MESA: "Malcolm H. Kerr biography" by Ann Z. Kerr
8. "Malcolm H. Kerr" at American University of Beirut
9. Winslow, Charles (1996). Lebanon: War and Politics in a fragmented Society. London and New York: Routledge. p. 246.
10. At MESA: "Malcolm H. Kerr biography" by Ann Z. Kerr Text and Beirut quotation.
11. American University of Beirut: newsletter 1999 "Malcolm H. Kerr Biography" [cached at Google]. Condolences and remembrance came from many respected sources.
12. Farid, Farid (June 16, 2016). "STEVE KERR AND HIS MOTHER TALK ABOUT THE LEGACY OF HIS FATHER'S ASSASSINATION". The New Yorker. The New Yorker. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:21 pm

The Death of Malcolm Kerr, AUB President and Father of a Future NBA Coach
by Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training
05/09/2016 12:05 pm ET

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image

He was a brilliant scholar who focused on the Middle East and whose books were widely read by Arabists. His son Steve would later play for the NBA champion Chicago Bulls and then become coach of the Golden State Warriors and lead them to a championship in 2015 and break the record for most wins in a regular season in 2016. Malcolm Kerr grew up in Lebanon, on and near the campus of the American University of Beirut (AUB), where his parents taught for forty years. He returned to the U.S. and went graduated from high school at the Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts and later got his Bachelor’s from Princeton.

After teaching at UCLA, he moved to Cairo and in 1965 published his book The Arab Cold War. He became President of AUB in 1982, in the midst of the Lebanon Civil War. U.S. Ambassador Frank Meloy and Economic Counselor Robert Waring were assassinated in 1976. U.S. Embassy Beirut was bombed in 1983 and the Marine Corps barracks were attacked just a few months later. Sadly, Kerr would also become a victim to the violence: On January 18, 1984, he was shot and killed by two gunmen outside his office. He was 52.

William A. Rugh was in Beirut doing Arabic language study; he later served as Ambassador to Yemen from 1984-87. Philip C. Brown was Cultural Affairs Officer in Algiers, Algeria in 1970-1972 when he first met the Kerr family. George Q. Lumsden was Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 1982-1986 and went to school with Kerr. He recounts the events that led to Kerr’s assassination. All were interviewed by Charles Stuart Kennedy, beginning in March 1996, January 2012, and January 2000, respectively.

You can read about other Moments on the Middle East.

“He was one of the best friends the Arab world could ever had had”
-- William A. Rugh, Arabic language study, Beirut, 1964


RUGH: Relations with the United States were excellent. That was what we believed at the time. Maybe it was a bit starry-eyed in the sense that we were talking to friendly factions and we weren’t sensitive enough to the discontent of Shiite groups and others who were becoming more and more disaffected. But as far as we knew, Lebanon was a successful experiment in pluralism.

I remember very distinguished scholars such as Malcolm Kerr writing that Lebanon was a model for harmony among different social groups and we believed that. It was a society that was very friendly to the United States. The 1958 crisis with the American intervention, direct military intervention, seemed to have been a successful use of American military power to help stabilize the situation. Of course, we found out later that doesn’t always work.

But at that time, in 1964, the American University, AUB, was a very positive factor. Later it became faction-ridden and had a lot of political difficulties. The American University Hospital was considered the best in the Middle East. The American official presence was considered benign and benevolent by most people. Of course, in those years there was a wave of Arab nationalism led primarily by Nasser, in Egypt, and to some extent people in Lebanon were reflecting that and feeling that.

Philip Brown, Branch Cultural Affairs Officer, Algiers, 1970-1972

BROWN: One of the most interesting American families we met during our stay in Algiers was the Malcolm Kerr family. He and his wife I think were on a Fulbright scholarship traveling through North Africa when they stayed with us. Malcolm Kerr eventually became President of the American University of Beirut; he was a very astute student of the Arab world and one of the best friends the Arab world could ever had had...

Image
(The Kerr family in the mid-1970s at their home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., from left to right: Steve, Andrew, mother Ann, dog Hoagie, father Malcolm, John and Susan. Photo: Ann Kerr)

Among their children was a son named Steve, who went on to become a National Basketball Association star with the San Antonio Spurs....We knew him when he was just a little kid, running around that big house we had in Algiers.

“Coming to grips with this took me quite some time”
-- George Lumsden, Ambassador to The United Arab Emirates (UAE), 1982-1986


LUMSDEN: I will now embark on an interesting story. 1983. The Christmas-New Year’s season arrived. The intelligence community in Washington, through Mossad, the Israeli intelligence service, and their good infiltration into Lebanon immediately following the Kuwait embassy bombing, noted the first rising of Shia radicalism because the Shias had been fairly lethargic up to the point.

Under the aegis of the Iranian ambassador in Damascus, a hardliner named Hashi Mupoor, the southern Lebanese Shia were being organized away from the Islamic Jihad group to form a new, pure Shia group which is known as Hezbollah. This would have been in ‘83. We know how that has developed.

They picked up that the Kuwait embassy bombing was step one. Step two was to be the assassination of a major American figure in the Gulf, an ambassador. Not only that, they were going to get a French ambassador, too. France for obvious reasons of its own interest was very happy that the Iraq tilt was being worked out. France had flown [Ayatollah] Khomeini back to Tehran and didn’t get anything for it. Plus, they had a lot of interest in Iraq and still do.

I didn’t know anything. I find that armored limousines are being flown from Washington to Abu Dhabi (I didn’t have an armored car) and that special American bodyguard details from the State Department are coming to live with us because the intelligence said that the best target was Abu Dhabi and the French and American ambassadors there were the targets. They knew the weapons that they had, the serial numbers, the silencers. The whole smear came through the intelligence community.

So, wow! Here we are. Christmastime. My kids are visiting from college. The American security moves in. The halftrack [a civilian or military vehicle with regular wheels at the front for steering and continuous tracks at the back to propel the vehicle and carry most of the load] gets parked in the driveway. A platoon of UAE infantry digs in around the residence. My ability to move about the country becomes very, very inhibited.

The Foreign Minister is terribly worried. The Kuwaiti ambassador picks this up because it was our embassy in his country. He is terribly worried. So, everybody is sweating.

We get the kids out as quickly as we can. Helen and I have to go out to be trained on how to use an Uzi and a .38 caliber, the whole smear. We have that in our room and we have U.S. security agents sleeping outside our door. It’s not so much fun with these kinds of things.

[The French ambassador] got the same thing. They made him wear a bulletproof vest everywhere and he looked ridiculous. I had it on once and said, “I just can’t do this.”

They all packed around me when we went in a building for a meeting.

This is a bittersweet story. Nothing happened. New Year came. New Year went. We were now into January 1984. All this tension was still there. About the 10th of January, the signal came through and they left. The local government knew the group was there. However, they hadn’t done anything.

The UAE government was very afraid to apprehend all these people that had the Iranians’ backing when they hadn’t done anything or demonstrated any malicious intent. But the security wall apparently convinced whoever was orchestrating this thing — probably Hashi Mupoor — that it wasn’t such a soft target after all.

What happened? On the 1[8]th of January, the President of the American University in Beirut, Malcolm Kerr, was assassinated. The bullet markings jived with this group. We became a hardened target.

They said, “We’ve got to get a prominent American who’s gettable.” They got Malcolm Kerr, who I had seen in Abu Dhabi fundraising for the American University of Beirut about three months before.

Image

Now, it gets really bittersweet. Malcolm Kerr I had known since he was 13 years old. He was a class behind me at Deerfield Academy and was a class behind me at Princeton University.

Coming to grips with this took me quite some time. I have only recently begun to speak about this situation. Through roommates and things I have just tried to figure out when, if ever, I should talk to his wife and son about this particular incident. Maybe somebody has told them.

As an extra added postscript, the son involved is a young man named Steve Kerr. Steve was substitute point guard for the Chicago Bulls-Michael Jordan dynasty. You may have seen him on television. I think he’s out of the League now, but that is just apropos of nothing except my interest in sports...

I haven’t told many people this story. Actually, it’s sort of a catharsis for me to get rid of some of this stuff.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Feb 14, 2018 9:23 pm

Paul R. Chesebro H'14 Inducted as Headmaster
The Hun School of Princeton
History
Accessed: 12/8/17

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image

Paul Chesebro graduated from Amherst College in 1927 and from Princeton university with a Master of Arts in 1929, the same year he married his wife, Florence. Together, they had two daughters. In 1951, the Lawrence Institute of Technology honored him with an honorary doctorate. It was while he was a student at Princeton that Dr. Chesebro first worked at The Hun School as a part-time proctor. He had a varied career, which included serving as a Hun School math and science teacher and assistant principal. After teaching at Princeton High School, he once again returned to The Hun School in 1951 to serve as headmaster and continued to do so for the next 25 years. Dr. Chesebro’s ability to revitalize the School caused many to see him as a second founder.

Class of 1951 Graduates; Mr. Chesebro Inducted as Headmaster
The Mall
Published by the Students of the Hun School of Princeton
Vo. VIII, Princeton, N.J.
June, 1951

Image

On the morning of Jun 1, the inauguration of Mr. Paul R. Chesebro as Headmaster of the Hun School of Princeton took place. The ceremony was very impressive. Chairman of the Hun School Board of Trustees, Mr. John P. Poe, conducted the inauguration. Mr. Chesebro followed his induction with a short talk. This event was the climax of Mr. Chesebro's long and faithful devotion to Hun.

Soon after the inauguration was completed, the graduation of the Class of 1951 took place, followed by the customary awards. For the first time in several years, every senior received a diploma. The commencement proceedings were followed by the commencement address, delivered by the Honorable Alfred E. Driscoll, Governor of New Jersey. Other speakers in ...
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:08 pm

A Trust Betrayed: The Untold Story of Camp Lejeune and the Poisoning of Generations of Marines and Their Families [EXCERPT]
by Mike Magner
Copyright 2014 by Mike Magner

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


The NACIP process in the early 1980s required three steps: an initial assessment study, a confirmation study, and remedial measures. At Camp Lejeune, the Marine Corps hired Grainger Laboratories, a state-certified environmental lab based in Raleigh, North Carolina, to conduct a NACIP study in 1982.

The effort was barely under way when Grainger engineer Mike Hargett called base chemist Elizabeth Betz on May 6, 1982, to report that in tests for THMs at both the Tarawa Terrace and Hadnot Point water systems, "peaks" of the cleaning solvents TCE and PCE had been found. It was essentially a repeat of the findings by the Army lab eighteen months earlier.

Betz immediately notified her supervisor, Danny Sharpe, who sent the results "up the chain of command" to the base maintenance officer and the utilities director. About a week later, Betz was asked to brief Colonel Kenneth Millice and one of his assistants at base headquarters. But when she met with Millice and a lieutenant colonel on May 14, 1982, neither seems to have been informed about the test results; Millice simply requested that Betz prepare a report for him to read later on the status of testing for THMs. "No mention was made of extra peaks [of the other contaminants, TCE and PCE] that Grainger found in the Tarawa Terrace and Hadnot Point systems samples," Betz wrote in a memo summarizing the meeting. Betz also noted that she didn't bring up the solvents issue because the meeting was focused on the contaminants that were being regulated.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:21 pm

Millice Jr, Kenneth, Col, Deceased
by Pamela Jeans (Pam)-Historian to remember Marine Col Kenneth Millice Jr.
marines.togetherweserved.com
April 18, 2013

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Name: Col Kenneth Paul Millice Jr
Birth Date: 12 May 1934
Birth Place: Seven Mile, Butler County, Ohio, United States of America
Death Date: 2006
Death Place: Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach City, Virginia, United States of America
Has Bio?: Y
Father: Kenneth P. Millice
Mother: Florence Millice
US Marine Corps Vietnam Veteran: He served from 1957 to 1988
-- findagrave.com


Last Rank: Colonel
Last Primary MOS: 1302-Combat Engineer Officer
Last MOSGroup: Engineer, Construction And Equipment
Primary Unit: 1982-1984, Engineer School, Camp Le Jeune
Service Years: 1957 - 1988
Year of Birth: 1934
Home Town: Seven Mile
Last Address: 1060 Commodore Drive, VA Beach, VA 23454
Date of Passing: Not Specified
Military Association Memberships: 1993, Marine Corps Engineer Association (MCEA) [Verified]
Last Known Activity: He passed away in 20006 no further info is available.
Unit Assignments: II MEF/2nd Marine Division
3rd Combat Engineer BnMARDET Fort Belvoir VAUSMC (United States Marine Corps)
3rd Marine Regiment/3rd Bn, 3rd Marine Regiment (3/3)
4th Combat Engineer BnMCB Camp Lejeune, NCEngineer School, Camp Le Jeune
1957-1958, 1302, 2nd Marine Division/2nd Pioneer Bn
1958-1960, 1302, 2nd Marine Division/2nd FSR Force Troops
1964-1965, 3rd Combat Engineer Bn/Engineer Support Co
1965-1968, MARDET Fort Belvoir VA
1969-1972, MCB, MCAS, Facilities etc
1976-1977, 3rd Marine Regiment/3rd Bn, 3rd Marine Regiment (3/3)
1977-1980, 4th Combat Engineer Bn/Engineer Support Co, Baltimore, MD
1980-1982, MCB Camp Lejeune, NC
1982-1984, Engineer School, Camp Le Jeune
Combat and Non-Combat Operations: 1990-1991 Gulf War
Colleges Attended: 1953-1957, Ohio State University1
Image
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:35 pm

Opening arguments in the court-martial of accused Marine turncoat...
by Bruce Douglas
upi.com
November 13, 1980

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.




CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. -- Opening arguments in the court-martial of accused Marine turncoat Robert Garwood were postponed again today when defense attorneys challenged trial procedures.

The military judge, Col. R.E. Switzer, said the opening arguments would begin Friday.

At issue today was the judge's instructions to the five-member jury that will hear the case against Garwood, the only Vietnam veteran accused of desertion and collaboration with the enemy.

The defense asked Switzer to emphasize the 'terrorization' that occurred in Vietnamese prison camps and its effect on Garwood.

Defense attorney John Lowe said the life of a prisoner of war was similar to someone living with 'a gun to their head.'

'We are referring to the uniqueness in this case to distinquish the real terrorization which caused prison camp activities to be involuntary in any sense of the word,' Lowe said.

Garwood's lawyers again indicated the 34-year-old Marine may not testify because of psychiatric problems.

Attorney Vaughan Taylor said Garwood has flashbacks when subjected to strenuous questioning.

'It's a problem that occurs whenever anything is likely to appear as an interrogation,' Taylor said. 'That makes his testifying accurately as to these matters impossible.'

Garwood, of Adams, Ind., is charged with desertion, collaboration with the enemy and two counts of verbal and physical assault on Americans held captive by the communists.

He returned to the United States in March 1979 after nearly 14 years with the Vietnamese. A young jeep driver with only 10 days left on his Vietnam tour, Garwood was one of the first Americans to fall into enemy hands when he disappeared near Danang in 1965.

He claims he was a prisoner, captured in a gunbattle with the Viet Cong, and was held in North Vietnam against his will during the mass repatriation of American POWs in 1973.

But when testimony begins, a handful of former POWs will give a different account of Garwood's years with the enemy.

In a pre-trial hearing that began last November, former POWs told of encountering Garwood in the jungles of South Vietnam, dressed in the uniform of the enemy and carrying a rifle. They also accused him of joining the Viet Cong in the indoctrination and interrogation of POWs.

He faces a possible life sentence if convicted.

The case has been beset by repeated delays brought on by changes in attorneys and lengthy pre-trial hearings in which the defense sought to have the charges dropped, or to have the scope of the case widened to include an examination of all POW conduct.

While awaiting his military trial, Garwood was arrested in September on two felony sex charges, alleging he molested a 7-year-old girl from the Jacksonville area. He has denied those charges; the case is not scheduled to come to trial until his court-martial is over.

One juror, Col. K.P. Millice [Colonel Kenneth P. Millice], was excused from the case during a hearing Wednesday because defense attorneys were not convinced he had not been prejudiced by his exposure to publicity about the sex charges.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24483
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

PreviousNext

Return to Illustrated Screenplays

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests