Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:12 am

Marine Corps History: The Emblem and Seal
Source: Reference Branch, USMC History Division
by Military.com
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Historic Marine Emblem

The history of the Marine Corps emblem is a story related to the history of the Corps itself. The emblem of today traces its roots to the designs and ornaments of early Continental Marines as well as British Royal Marines. The emblem took its present form in 1868. Before that time many devices, ornaments, and distinguishing marks followed one another as official marks of the Corps.

In 1776, the device consisted of a "foul anchor" of silver or pewter. The foul anchor still forms a part of the emblem today. (A foul anchor is an anchor which has one or more turns of the chain around it). Changes were made in 1798, 1821, and 1824. In 1834 it was prescribed that a brass eagle be worn on the hat, the eagle to measure 3 ½ inches from wingtip to wingtip. During the early years numerous distinguishing marks were prescribed, including "black cockades", "scarlet plumes," and "yellow bands and tassels." In 1859 the origin of the present color scheme for the officer's dress uniform ornaments appeared on an elaborate device of solid white metal and yellow metal. The design included a United States shield, half wreath, a bugle, and the letter "M."

In 1868, Brigadier General Commandant Jacob Zeilin appointed a board "to decide and report upon the various devices of cap ornaments of the Marine Corps." On 13 November 1868, the board turned in its report. It was approved by the Commandant four days later, and on 19 November 1868 was signed by the Secretary of the Navy.

The emblem recommended by this board consists of a globe (showing the Western Hemisphere) intersected by a foul anchor, and surmounted by a spread eagle. On the emblem itself, the device is topped by a ribbon inscribed with the Latin motto "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful). The uniform ornaments omit the motto ribbon.


The general design of the emblem was probably derived from the British Royal Marines' "Globe and Laurel." The globe on the U.S. Marine emblem signifies service in any part of the world. The eagle also indirectly signifies service worldwide, although this may not have been the intention of the designers in 1868. The eagle which they selected for the Marine emblem is a crested eagle, a type found all over the world. On the other hand, the eagle pictured on the great seal and the currency of the United States is the bald eagle, strictly a North American variety. The anchor, whose origin dates back to the founding of the Marine Corps in 1775, indicates the amphibious nature of Marines' duties. On 22 June 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an Executive Order, which approved the design of an official seal for the United States Marine Corps. The new seal had been designed at the request of the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr.

The new seal consisted of the traditional Marine Corps emblem in bronze; however, an American bald eagle replaced the crested eagle depicted on the 1868 emblem, and is depicted with wings displayed, standing upon the western hemisphere of the terrestrial globe, and holding in his beak a scroll inscribed with the Marine Corps motto "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful) with the hemisphere superimposed on a foul anchor. The seal is displayed on a scarlet background encircled with a Navy blue band edged in a gold rope rim and inscribed "Department of the Navy, United States Marine Corps" in gold letters. Coincident with the approval of this seal by the President, the emblem centered on the seal was adopted in 1955 as the official Marine Corps Emblem.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:25 am

Jacob Zeilin
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Jacob Zeilin
7th Commandant of the Marine Corps (1864-1876)
Born July 16, 1806
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died November 18, 1880 (aged 74)
Washington, D.C.
Place of burial Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1831-1876
Rank US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General
Commands held Commandant of the Marine Corps
Battles/wars
Mexican-American War
Battle of Rio San Gabriel
Siege of Los Angeles
Battle of La Mesa
Battle of Guaymus
Battle of San Jose
Battle of Mazatlán
American Civil War
First Battle of Manassas
Siege of Charleston Harbor
Signature

Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin (July 16, 1806 – November 18, 1880) was the first United States Marine Corps non-brevet general. He served as the seventh commandant of the United States Marine Corps from 1864 to 1876.[1]

Early life

Jacob Zeilin was born in Philadelphia on July 16, 1806. He attended the United States Military Academy from 1822 to 1825,[2] but dropped out due to poor grades in philosophy and chemistry.[3]

U.S. Marine Corps career

Zeilin was commissioned in the Marine Corps as a second lieutenant on October 1, 1831. After completing the preliminary training of a Marine officer in Washington, D.C., Zeilin's first tours of duty were ashore at the Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, and at Gosport, Virginia. He first went to sea on board the sloop of war Erie in March 1832, which was followed by a tour of duty at Charlestown (Boston), Massachusetts. In August 1834, he again joined the sloop Erie on a long and eventful voyage which lasted for more than three years. He was promoted to first lieutenant on 12 September 1836.[2]

From September 1837 to April 1841, Zeilin again served at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and New York. In February 1842, he returned to sea duty, on board the USS Columbus, and during the cruise that followed spent several months on the Brazil station. Upon the conclusion of this tour of sea duty, and after again serving at important Marine Corps stations on the east coast of the United States from 1842 to 1845, he was transferred to duty aboard the frigate USS Congress of the U.S. Pacific Squadron.

Mexican-American War

During the Mexican-American War, Zeilin commanded the Marine Detachment embarked in Congress, which ship was attached to Commodore Robert F. Stockton's force. He took part in the conquest of California (1846–1847) and was brevetted to the rank of major (two grades above his rank at the time) for gallantry during the action at the San Gabriel River crossing on January 9, 1847. Later, he took part in the capture of Los Angeles and in the Battle of La Mesa.[4]

On 28 January 1847, Zeilin was appointed Military Commandant of San Diego and served in that capacity until the completion of the conquest of California. He was promoted to the regular rank of captain on 14 September 1847. During the following few months, Zeilin, with the Marines of the Pacific Squadron, participated in the capture of important ports in lower California and the west coast of Mexico, and served as Fleet Marine Officer of the Pacific Squadron.[1] In September 1847, he served with the forces that captured Guaymas and those that met the enemy at San Jose on the 30th. For the remainder of the war, Mazatlán was his center of activity, and he fought in several skirmishes with the Mexicans in that area.[4]

Interwar period

After the close of the war with Mexico, Zeilin proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia, where he served for a time, then to New York. He remained at New York until June 1852. He was selected to accompany Commodore Matthew C. Perry as Fleet Marine Officer in the famous expedition to Japan, serving with the Marine Detachment in USS Mississippi in which he cruised to Japan with the expedition. With elaborate ceremonies, the Marines under his command took a prominent part in the expedition. He was the second person to set foot on shore at the formal landing of the naval forces at Kurihama, Yokosuka, Japan on 14 July 1853, and was one of those later accorded special honor for his part in the expedition that opened the doors of Japan to the outside world.[1]

Upon his return from Japan, he was again stationed at Norfolk. This duty was followed by his being placed in command of the Marine Barracks of the Washington Navy Yard. After remaining for a time at Washington, he again went to sea, this time aboard the frigate Wabash, on the European Station, until 1859.[1]

American Civil War

During the early part of the American Civil War, Zeilin was on garrison duty in command of Marine Barracks, firstly at Philadelphia and later at Washington, D.C. Five days later, he was appointed to the regular rank of major. On July 21, 1861, he commanded a company of Marines during the First Battle of Manassas and received a slight wound.[1]

In 1863, Zeilin was given command of the battalion of Marines sent to support the naval force whose mission was the capture of Charleston, South Carolina, but, because of illness, he returned after a few weeks of this duty to garrison duty at Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Later, he returned to sea, serving with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron under Rear Admiral John Dahlgren. In 1864, Zeilin assumed command of the marine barracks at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.[1]

Commandant of the Marine Corps

On June 10, 1864, he was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Marine Corps in the rank of colonel. His faithful and efficient performance of the duties of Commandant of the Marine Corps during the trying period of the last year of the war and those years immediately following the close of the war is evidenced by the fact that he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general on 2 March 1867.[1] Upon his promotion, he became the Marine Corps' first general officer.

After the war, Brigadier General Zeilin successfully defended the Marine Corps against its critics. In 1868, Zeilin approved of the design of the "Eagle, Globe, and Anchor," as the emblem for the Marine Corps.[1]

Zeilin retired from the Marine Corps on November 1, 1876 after serving over forty-five years as a Marine Corps officer.[1] When considering his time at West Point, he served over 49 years in uniform.[5]

Personal life

Zeilin married Virginia Freeman on October 22, 1845.[6][7] Together they had one son, William Freeman Zeilin (1851-1880) and two daughters, Margaret Freeman Very (1850-1911) (wife of Edward Wilson Very) and Anne V. Stockton (wife of one of Senator John P. Stockton's sons).[5][8]

General Zeilin was a member of the Pennsylvania Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States - a military society of officers who served in the Union armed forces.

On 18 November 1880, he died in Washington, D.C.[5] He is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.[9]

Namesakes

Two ships in the United States Navy have been named USS Zeilin in his honor: USS Zeilin (DD-313) in 1920 and USS Zeilin (AP-9) in 1941.

He is the namesake for Zeilin Road, on Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia.

He is the namesake for Zeilin Street, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in California.

References

1. "Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin, USMC (deceased)". www.history.usmc.mil. United States Marine Corps History Division. Retrieved 31 December 2014.
2. Millett, Allan Reed; Jack Shulimson (2004). Commandants of the Marine Corps. Annapolis, MD: US Naval Institute Press. pp. 85–96. ISBN 0-87021-012-2.
3. Nofi, Albert (1997). The Marine Corps Book of Lists. Conshohocken, Pa.: Combined Pub. p. 144. ISBN 9780938289890. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
4. Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John (1889). Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, Volume 6. New York: D. Appleton & Sons. pp. 657–658. Retrieved 31 December 2014.
5. "Death of Gen. Zeilin". Army and Navy Journal and Gazette. 18: 314. 1881. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
6. Tucker, George Holbert (2001). Abstracts from Norfolk city marriage bonds (1797-1850) and other genealogical data. Baltimore, Md.: Reprinted for Clearfield Co. by Genealogical Pub. Co. p. 179. ISBN 9780806351155. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
7. Laas, Virginia Jeans; Cornish, Dudley Taylor (1999). Wartime Washington: The Civil War Letters of Elizabeth Blair Lee. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. p. 469. ISBN 9780252068591. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
8. "Not a Dime for her Husband". The Washington Times. Washington, DC. January 31, 1895. p. 6. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
9. Jacob Zeilin at Find a Grave
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 4:22 am

The Oklahoma City Bombing After 22 Years
by Dr. Paul Craig Roberts
Global Research
April 20, 2017

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Today, April 19, 2017, is the 22nd anniversary of the Oklahoma City Bombing. The bombing of the federal Murrah office building was blamed by federal authorities on a bomb made from fertilizer inside a truck parked in front of the building by Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols.

There are many anomalies associated with the official explanation, including mysterious deaths of some, including a police officer, who understood that the actual facts did not accord with the explanation.

Investigators who report the actual facts are branded “conspiracy theorists” and dismissed. This has been the Deep State’s way of controlling explanations since the 1940s.

Americans, being the insouciant people that they are, never noticed that the Murrah building blew up from the inside out, not from the outside in.

However, Air Force General Benton K. Partin, the US Air Force’s top explosive expert, did notice. He prepared a detailed report containing “conclusive proof that the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was not caused solely by the truck bomb. Evidence shows that the massive destruction was primarily the result of four demolition charges placed at critical structural points at the third floor level.” Here is a copy of General Partin’s letter accompanying the report he sent to US Senator Trent Lott.


Letter from Gen. Partin to U.S. Sen. Trent Lott

Benton K. Partin, Brigadier Gen. USAF (Ret.)
8908 Captains Row
Alexandria, Virginia 22308
703-780-7652
July 30, 1995

Sen. Trent Lott
United States Senate
487 Senate Russell Office Building
Washington, DC 205102403

Dear Sen. Lott:

The attached report contains conclusive proof that the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was not caused solely by the truck bomb. Evidence shows that the massive destruction was primarily the result of four demolition charges placed at critical structural points at the third floor level.

Weapons Experience: I do not offer such an analytical conclusion lightly. I have spent 25 years in research, design, development, test and management of weapons development. This included: handson work at the Ballistic Research Laboratories; Commander of the Air Force Armament Technology Laboratory, and ultimately management responsibility for almost every nonnuclear weapon device in the Air Force (at the Air Force System command, Air Staff and the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) levels). I was also the first chairman of the OSD joint service Air Munitions Requirements and Development Committee. (A more detailed resume appears at Tab 1.)

Observations in Oklahoma City: To verify earlier analysis, I visited Oklahoma City during the last week of June. There I had the opportunity to view hundreds of photographs taken throughout the cleanup operation as the layers of debris were cleared away. The photos present irrefutable evidence that at least four demolition charges were set off at four critical columns of the reinforced concrete structure at the floor level of the third floor.

Conclusion: Based on my experience in weapons development and bomb damage analysis, and on my review of all evidence available, I can say, with a high level of confidence, that the damage pattern on the reinforced concrete superstructure could not possibly have been attained from the single truck bomb. The total incompatibility of this pattern of destruction with a single truck bomb lies in the simple, incontrovertible fact that some of the columns collapsed that should not have collapsed if the damage were caused solely by a truck bomb, and, conversely, some of the columns were left standing that should have collapsed if the damage had been caused solely by the truck bomb.

It is my hope and request that, as a Member of Congress, you will support a Congressional investigation to determine the true initiators of this bombing, which could not have occurred the way in which it has been portrayed as having happened. Further, it is requested that you defer action and reserve judgment on socalled antiterrorism legislation that has serious civil liberties implications, and which would not be passed except for the Oklahoma City bombing until the causes of the Oklahoma City disaster are determined by independent investigators.

Both the Federal Building in Oklahoma and the Trade Center in New York (See New York Times, October 28, 1993, p. A1) show evidence of a counterterrorism sting gone wrong.

No government law enforcement agency should be permitted to demolish, smash and bury evidence of a counterterrorism sting operation, sabotage or terrorist attack without a thorough examination by an independent, technically competent agency.

If an aircraft crashed because of a bomb, or a counterterrorism sting or an FAA Controller error, the FAA would not be permitted to gather and bury the evidence. The National Transportation Safety Board would have been called in to conduct an investigation and where possible every piece of debris would have been collected and arrayed to determine cause of failure.

To remove all ambiguity with respect to the use of supplementary demolition charges, the FBI should be required to release the high quality surveillance color TV camera tape of the Murrah building bombing on April 19, 1995.

It is my observation that the effort required to bomb the A. P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City pales in comparison with the effort to cover up evidence in Oklahoma and the media's withholding of vital information from the American people.

Sincerely yours,

Benton K. Partin
Brigadier Gen. USAF (Ret.)
BKP:aw
Enclosure


http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/RANCH ... IN/ok8.htm

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General Partin was my neighbor in Alexandria, Virginia. I went through his report those years ago, and it is clear that the official “investigation” ignored all the facts presented by General Partin. Indeed, Partin’s report is not even part of the record. Wikipedia does not even mention the report as a “conspiracy theory” in Wikipedia’s recitation of the official line.

There was no more an investigation of the Oklahoma City Bombing than there was of 9/11.


It has never been clear to me why a number of people knew better than to come to work that day in the Murrah building or why what was likely deep state perpetrators desired to kill several hundred people, including children.

Perhaps it was targeted at the militias and the creation of police powers that could be used against them. Two years previously the Clinton regime murdered approximately 100 men, women, and children at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. The religious sect was threatening no one and in violation of no laws, but it was a dissident group that the US government decided to terminate.

The focus on dissidents changed with 9/11, which Israel and Israel’s American neoconservative allies used to apply wide-ranging and long-lasting massive violence to seven Muslim countries, costing US taxpayers trillions of dollars and what remained of the reputation of the United States.

The main consequence of “terrorism” is the extraordinary growth of unconstitutional police state powers throughout the Western world. Every protective shield of individual rights, except for the Second Amendment, has been stripped from the US Constitution by the so-called “war on terror.”


All of the alleged terrorist attacks have puzzling, uninvestigated, and unreported anomalies. It is astonishing that the media never asks any questions. Consider, for example, the Nice, France, Truck attack.

Nice police authorities have the unambigious evidence of the security cameras on every block of the truck’s alleged murderous route. There should be no question whatsoever about what really happened. Yet, the Minister of the Interior in Paris ordered the Nice public authorities to destroy the video evidence and not to release it. So all we have is a very grainy inconclusive video taken by a person allegedly married to a former Mossad intelligence officer. This person turns out to be the same person who provides the only video of an attack in Germany.

The bridge attack in London is overwhelming with the lack of any evidence. We simply get an official story. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPIAp2sDzTc

Sandy Hook is famous for the one bereaved parent, but there were allegedly scores of dead children. Where are the other parents? Aren’t they bereaved?

If these terror events are real, it is a simple matter for the media to ask questions, to investigate, and to give the public the facts. But the media never does. The media only repeats the official story without checking it.

In other words, the facts are whatever the government says they are. So what is the purpose of the media?

No purpose except to be a trumpet for the government.

The official stories of the Murrah office building bombing and 9/11 are now enshrined in memorials, the purpose of which is to make a lie the truth.

For insouciant Americans this works.

The original source of this article is Global Research
Copyright © Dr. Paul Craig Roberts, Global Research, 2017

____________________________

Resume of Brig. Gen. Partin USAF (ret.)

BENTON R. PARTIN
8908 Captains Row
Alexandria, Virginia 22308
(703) 780-7652
Biographical Notes

Thirty one years active duty in the Air Force. Progressively responsible executive, scientific and technical assignments directing organizations engaged in research, development, testing, analysis, requirements generation and acquisition management of weapons systems. Assignments from laboratory to the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

Personal contributions made in the fields of research and development management, weapon system concepts, guided weapons technology, target acquisition aids, focused energy weapons, operations research and joint service harmonization of requirements. Retired as a Brigadier General.

White House appointed Special Assistant to the Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration. Personally designated to prepare the White Paper on the Federal Aviation Administration for the 1989 Presidential Transition Team. This included development of policy initiatives on FAA/USAF joint use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), operational life for commercial aircraft, antiterrorism, airport and airway capacity, requirements in the FAA acquisition process and FAA leadership and management development.

Military Command Pilot and Command Missleman with 4000 hours (37 combat.)

Education: B.S. Chemical Engineering; M.S. Aeronautical Engineering; Ph.D. Candidate, Operations Research & Statistics (Academics Completed.)

Publications/TV

Sino-Soviet Conflict. Competition and cooperation: Risks in Force Structure Planning A Reduced Upper Limit for Sequential Test Truncation Error. Frequent TV Talk Shows on the Voice of Freedom.

Honors: Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit thrice, Distinguished Graduate - Air War College

Community Affairs:

Chairman, United States Defense Committee

Member of the Board, In Touch Missions International

Member of the Board, Front Line Fellowship

Founding Chairman of the School Board, Engleside Christian School

Washington Representative for the Association of Christian Schools

International (1981-1983)

Chairman Fairfax County Republican Party (1982-1986)

Lifelong Professional Challenge: Continuing studies and analyses to anticipate and forecast the future course of world military/political/economic transforming processes.

____________________________

General Ben Partin Speaks About Oklahoma City and Waco
June, 1998



USAF Brig. General Ben Partin (Ret.) address the Wallace Institute on the Oklahoma City bombing, the Waco massacre, and world communism in Santa Clara, California in June 1998.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 4:53 am

Edward T. Ned Caton -- Obituary
by The Virginian Pilot
November 23, 2014

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Virginia Beach - Edward T. (Ned) Caton, 86, was born April 7, 1928 at Leigh Memorial Hospital in Norfolk and died there on November 18, 2014 He was the son of the late Minnie Frances Murphy Caton and Edward T. Caton, Jr. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Patricia (Patsy) Ackiss Caton of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and his three children, Christopher Edward Caton of Virginia Beach, Virginia, Leigh Anne Caton Vincent and her husband Branch (Chip) W. Vincent, III of Southern Shores, North Carolina and John Murphy Caton of Cape Charles, Virginia. He is further survived by five grandchildren, Patricia Karoline (Karly) Caton of Virginia Beach, Virginia, Caton Elizabeth Vincent, Benjamin Branch Edward Vincent, Anna Leigh Downs Vincent and David Ackiss Vincent of Southern Shores, North Carolina.

Ned attended Larchmont Elementary School and was graduated from Maury High School in Norfolk, Virginia, Class of 1946. He spent a brief time in Miami Beach, Florida working as a lifeguard. After returning to Norfolk, he worked for Norfolk newspapers until June 1947. Ned lifeguarded at the Cavalier Beach Club for the summer of 1947 and for the next 2-3 years and also waited tables at Trafton Chalfonte, a small resort hotel on the oceanfront in Virginia Beach.

Ned attended and was graduated from the University of Virginia, Class of 1951, with a B.S. in Commerce. After graduating from UVA, he attended the United States Coast Guard Officers' Candidate School (OCS) in New London, Connecticut and was commissioned as an Ensign. Thereafter he was stationed in Portsmouth, Virginia on the buoy tender "Jonquil" and later on the buoy tender "Mistletoe". He remained active in the Coast Guard Reserves for many years.

In 1953, Ned enrolled in law school at the University of Virginia where he joined the distinguished law fraternity Phi Delta Phi and was graduated in February 1956. He was admitted to the Virginia State Bar in February 1956 and began practicing law in Virginia Beach immediately thereafter.

Ned married Patsy Ackiss on April 7, 1956 and were married for 58 years.

Ned was very active in the Virginia Beach community. He was a member of the American Legion Post in Ocean View, a representative to Boy's State, received a Beautification Award for the renovation of an old beach cottage which became his law office on Pacific Avenue for over 50 years. He was a member of the Exchange Club, a member of the JayCees and the Ruritan Club. In 1967, The JayCees awarded him Young Man of the Year in Virginia Beach. Ned was a member of Virginia Beach United Methodist Church. He served on the Virginia Beach City Council of the small City of Virginia Beach from 1958 to 1965. Ned was involved in and prepared the preliminary charter to merge the City of Virginia Beach with the larger Princess Anne County which became the City of Virginia Beach as we know it today. As a result of this merger, Virginia Beach became a city on January 1, 1963. Ned was also a member of the Princess Anne Country Club where he enjoyed the men's group and tennis.

Ned also served in the Virginia House of Delegates from 1966 to 1968 and in the Virginia Senate from 1968 to 1972. After leaving the legislature, he was appointed to the Virginia Beach School Board and served until the early 1980's. He also was appointed as a Commissioner in Chancery for the Virginia Beach Court System.

The family will receive friends on Sunday, November 23, 2014 at H. D. Oliver Funeral Apts., Laskin Road Chapel from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. A funeral service will be celebrated on Monday, November 24, 2014 at the Virginia Beach United Methodist Church at 19th and Pacific Street in Virginia Beach at 11:00 AM.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Virginia Beach United Methodist Church, the Virginia Beach Rescue Squad, 740 Virginia Beach Blvd. Virginia Beach, Virginia 23451 or the Noblemen, 2681 Production Road, Suite 105, Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454. Online condolences may be made at hdoliver.com.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:05 am

Retired Virginia Beach Police Chief loses battle with cancer
by Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police & Foundation (VACP)
May 19, 2009

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The VACP is saddened to report that Retired Virginia Beach Chief Charles R. Wall passed away Monday night, May 18, 2009, after a courageous battle with cancer. Chief Wall served as President of the VACP from August, 1996 – August, 1997.

Funeral services will be held Friday, May 22 in Virginia Beach.

Chief Wall retired from the Virginia Beach Police Department in August of 1999, after 18 years of dedicated service, and, along with his wife, Marion, lived in Virginia Beach. During his long law enforcement career, beginning in 1958, Chief Wall served as the Chief of Police for Morgantown, WV, Rockville, MD, and Washington Township, NJ. Chief Wall also served as a staff consultant for the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP.) Under his leadership the Virginia Beach Police Department received its first national accreditation in 1987, at that time being one of only 25 cities nationwide to achieve this distinction. During his tenure, the Police Department was one of the first City departments to implement a microcomputer local area network, E-911 emergency telephone reporting that displays a caller’s telephone number and address, and became the first municipality to use both mobile and portable KDT technology in a public safety operation. Chief Wall continued the expansion of the 800MHz radio system, the Department’s Automated Fingerprint Identification System was recognized as one of the best in the Commonwealth, established the Fourth Precinct in the Kempsville area and a police substation in Creeds, established the Selective Enforcement Team to apprehend drunk drivers, and implemented the Family Trauma Unit to investigate sexual and physical assault cases involving children and family members. During his tenure as Virginia Beach’s Police Chief, Chief Wall was responsible for establishing Crime Solvers and the Mounted Patrol. He was a proponent of community policing, school resource officers, and increasing training standards for all officers. In 1981, when he became Police Chief, the Virginia Beach Police Department’s sworn complement was 397. By the time he retired in 1999, Chief Wall commanded 777 sworn officers. During that time, the Department was aggressive in pursuing federal funding for sworn personnel, and was one of the first departments in the nation to be awarded grant funds through the U. S. Department of Justice COPS Office in 1993 for 28 officers. Grants totaling more than $8 million for about 120 officers were awarded for additional sworn personnel under his tenure as chief. Under his watch, Part I crimes dropped from 56.3 crimes per 1,000 population to 38.5 crimes per 1,000 population. From 1986 – 1997 Chief Wall served on the Board of Directors of Crime Stoppers International, Inc. Following his retirement, he remained an active Board Member of Virginia Beach Crime Solvers. In memory of Chief Wall, Virginia Beach police officers will have their badges draped through the day of his memorial service. There will be two viewing sessions on Thursday, May 21, from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. and from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m., at Smith and Williams Funeral Home, 4889 Princess Anne Road, Virginia Beach. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, May 22, at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of the Ascension located at 4853 Princess Anne Road, Virginia Beach. A graveside service will follow at Colonial Grove Memorial Park, Princess Anne and Dam Neck Roads. The family has asked that, in lieu of flowers, donations be made to Virginia Beach Crime Solvers, Inc.

Virginia Beach Crime Solvers, Inc. Dan Edwards, Treasurer 1513 Beachview Drive, Virginia Beach 23464

Cards of sympathy may be sent to:

Mrs. Marion Wall C/O The Virginia Beach Police Department 2509 Princess Anne Road, Building #11 Virginia Beach, VA 23456
Please keep Chief Wall and his family in your thoughts and prayers.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:19 am

Deputy Chief William T. Dean - Operations Division
by vbgov.com [Virginia Beach]
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Deputy Chief William (Bill) T. Dean commands the Operations Division. He began his career with the Virginia Beach Police Department in February 1986. He is from Ocala, Florida later moving to Athens, Georgia and then Poolesville, Maryland as his family followed the policing career of his father. He is married, with an adult son.

Deputy Chief Dean has served our community as a police officer in several capacities including Precinct Uniformed Patrol and as a Special Investigations Detective assigned to the Criminal Intelligence Unit, participating in joint investigations with the Drug Enforcement Agency, the United States Customs Service, and as a Task Force Agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In a supervisory capacity, he has served in the Operations Division as a Patrol Sergeant, a Patrol Lieutenant, and as Command Duty Captain. In the Investigative Division, he has served as a Detective Sergeant in the Domestic Violence and Missing Persons Unit, and most recently as the Captain, and Commanding Officer of the Detective Bureau. Deputy Chief Dean has also served the Department in the Professional Standards Division as an Internal Affairs Lieutenant, Freedom of Information Act Coordinator, Accreditation Manager, and Training Director. He has also held ancillary duties as the Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator, and the Police Liaison to the Virginia Beach Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative.​​

Deputy Chief Dean earned his Associates Degree in General Studies from Montgomery Community College, Germantown Maryland, Bachelors of Science Degree in Criminal Justice and his Master of Public Administration Degree from Old Dominion University, earning several academic distinctions. He is also a graduate and class president of the University of Virginia and Virginia State Police National Criminal Justice Command College, a graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum's Senior Management Institute for Police, and the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police West Point Leadership Program. Deputy Chief Dean was instrumental in the development of the Virginia Beach Police West Point Leadership Course, serving at various times as a class coordinator and instructor. He is an Assessor for the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) and a past president of the Virginia Association of CALEA Accreditation Professionals.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 6:29 am

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/18/17

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The Right Honourable
The Earl of Dunmore
PC
Sir Joshua Reynolds - John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore - Google Art Project.jpg
Governor of the Province of New York
In office
1770–1771
Monarch George III
Preceded by Sir Henry Moore
Succeeded by William Tryon
Governor of the Province of Virginia
In office
1771–1775
Monarch George III
Preceded by Lord Botetourt
Succeeded by Patrick Henry (as Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia)
20th Royal Governor of the Bahamas
In office
1787–1796
Monarch George III
Preceded by James Edward Powell
Succeeded by John Forbes
Personal details
Born 1730
Taymouth, Scotland
Died 25 February 1809 (aged 78–79)
Ramsgate, Kent, England
Nationality British

Lord John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore and 4th Viscount of Fincastle, PC (1730 – 25 February 1809), generally known as Lord Dunmore, was a Scottish peer and colonial governor in the American colonies and The Bahamas. He was the last British Governor of Virginia.[1]

Lord Dunmore was named governor of the Province of New York in 1770. He succeeded to the same position in the Colony of Virginia the following year, after the death of Norborne Berkeley, 4th Baron Botetourt. As Virginia's governor, Dunmore directed a series of campaigns against the trans-Appalachian Indians, known as Lord Dunmore's War. He is noted for issuing a 1775 document (Dunmore's Proclamation) offering freedom to any slave who fought for the Crown against the Patriots in Virginia. Dunmore fled to New York after the Burning of Norfolk in 1776, and later returned to Britain. He was Governor of the Bahama Islands from 1787 to 1796. Dunmore was the last royal governor of Virginia.

Family and early life

Murray was born in Tymouth, Scotland, the eldest son of William Murray, 3rd Earl of Dunmore, by his marriage to Catherine Nairne; he was a nephew of John Murray, 2nd Earl of Dunmore. In 1745 both Murray, then only 15, and his father joined the ill-fated Rising of "Bonnie Prince Charlie" (Charles Edward Stuart), and the young Murray was appointed as a page to Prince Charles. The second Earl, his uncle, remained loyal to the Hanoverians .

After the Jacobite army was defeated at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, William Murray was imprisoned in Tower of London and his family was put under house arrest. By 1750, William Murray had received a conditional pardon. John Murray was now aged twenty and joined the British Army. In 1756, after the deaths of his uncle and father, he became the fourth Earl of Dunmore.

In 1759 Dunmore married Lady Charlotte, a daughter of Alexander Stewart, 6th Earl of Galloway. Their daughter Lady Augusta Murray later became an unwanted daughter-in-law of King George III, when she married his son Prince Augustus Frederick without the consent of the King. The Dunmores had another daughter close to her age, Lady Catherine Murray, and soon after they landed in Virginia they had another child, Lady Virginia Murray. Their daughter Lady Susan Murray (1768–1826) had three husbands and children by each: first Joseph Tharp, heir to a Jamaica sugar fortune; second John Drew, son of the Chichester banker John Drew; and finally a clergyman in Ireland, the Reverend Archibald Edward Douglas.

Colonial governor of New York

Dunmore was named the British governor of the Province of New York from 1770 to 1771. Soon after his appointment, in 1770, Virginia's governor, Norborne Berkeley, 4th Baron Botetourt (Lord Botetourt) died, and Dunmore was eventually named to replace him.[2]

Colonial governor of Virginia

Dunmore's War

Dunmore became royal governor of the Colony of Virginia on 25 September 1771 . Despite growing issues with Great Britain, his predecessor, Lord Botetourt, had been a popular governor in Virginia, even though he served only two years before his death. As Virginia's colonial governor, Dunmore directed a series of campaigns against the Indians known as Lord Dunmore's War. The Shawnee were the main target of these attacks, and his avowed purpose was to strengthen Virginia's claims in the west, particularly in the Ohio Country, but as a byproduct it was known he would increase his own power base. Some even accused Dunmore of colluding with the Shawnees and arranging the war to deplete the Virginia militia and help safeguard the Loyalist cause, should there be a colonial rebellion. Dunmore, in his history of the Indian Wars, denied these accusations.[3]

Battle for control

Lacking in diplomatic skills, Dunmore tried to govern without consulting the House of Burgesses of the Colonial Assembly for more than a year, which exacerbated an already tense situation.[4]

When Dunmore finally convened the Colonial Assembly in March 1773, which was the only way he could deal with fiscal issues to financially support his war through additional taxation, the burgesses instead first resolved to form a committee of correspondence to communicate their continued concerns about the Townshend Acts and Gaspee Affair to Great Britain. Dunmore immediately postponed the Assembly. Many of burgesses gathered a short distance away at the Raleigh Tavern and continued discussing their problems with the new taxes, perceived corruption and lack of representation in England. When Dunmore reconvened the Assembly in 1774, the burgesses passed a resolution declaring 1 June 1774 a day of fasting and prayer in Virginia. In response, Dunmore dissolved the House.

The burgesses again reconvened as the Second Virginia Convention and elected delegates to the Continental Congress. Dunmore issued a proclamation against electing delegates to the Congress, but failed to take serious action.[5] In March 1775, Patrick Henry's "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech delivered at St. John's Episcopal Church in Richmond helped convince delegates to approve a resolution calling for armed resistance.[6]

In the face of rising unrest in the colony, Dunmore sought to deprive Virginia's militia of military supplies. Dunmore gave the key to the Williamsburg magazine to Lieutenant Henry Colins, commander of HMS Magdalen, and ordered him to remove the powder, provoking what became known as the Gunpowder Incident. On the night of 20 April 1775, royal marines loaded fifteen half-barrels of powder into the governor's wagon, intent on transporting it down the Quarterpath Road to the James River and the British warship. Local militia rallied, and word of the incident spread across the colony.

Confrontation with the Hanover militia

The Hanover militia, led by Patrick Henry, arrived outside of Williamsburg on 3 May. That same day, Dunmore evacuated his family from the Governor's Palace to his hunting lodge, Porto Bello in nearby York County.[7] On 6 May, Dunmore issued a proclamation against "a certain Patrick Henry... and a Number of deluded Followers" who had organised "an Independent Company... and put themselves in a Posture of War."[6]

Dunmore threatened to impose martial law, and eventually retreated to Porto Bello to join his family. Dislodged by the Virginia rebels and wounded in the leg,[8] on 8 June, Dunmore took refuge on the British warship HMS Fowey in the York River. Over the next months, Dunmore sent many raiding parties to plunder plantations along the James, York and Potomac rivers, particularly those owned by rebels. The raiders exacerbated tensions, since they not only stole supplies, they also encouraged slaves to rebel. In December, Washington commented "I do not think that forcing his lordship on shipboard is sufficient. Nothing less than depriving him of life or liberty will secure peace to Virginia, as motives of resentment actuate his conduct to a degree equal to the total destruction of that colony."[8]

Dunmore's Proclamation

Dunmore is noted for Dunmore's Proclamation, also known as Lord Dunmore's Offer of Emancipation. Dated 7 November 1775, but proclaimed a week later, Dunmore thereby formally offered freedom to slaves who abandoned their Patriot masters to join the British. Dunmore had previously withheld his signature from a bill against the slave trade.[4] The proclamation appeared to respond to the legislature's proclamation that Dunmore had resigned his position by boarding a warship off Yorktown nearly six months earlier. However, by the end of the war, an estimated 800 to 2000 escaped slaves sought refuge with the British; some served in the army, though the majority served in noncombatant roles.[9][10]

Dunmore organized these Black Loyalists into his Ethiopian Regiment. However, despite winning the Battle of Kemp's Landing on 17 November 1775, Dunmore lost decisively at the Battle of Great Bridge on 9 December 1775. Following that defeat, Dunmore loaded his troops, and many Virginia Loyalists, onto British ships. Smallpox spread in the confined quarters, and some 500 of the 800 members of the Ethiopian Regiment died.[11]

Final skirmishes and return to Britain

On New Year's Day in 1776, Dunmore gave orders to burn waterfront buildings in Norfolk from which patriot troops were firing on his ships. However, the fire spread. The city burned, and with it any hope that Dunmore's loyalists could return to Virginia.[12] Dunmore retreated to New York. Some ships of his refugee fleet were sent south, mostly to Florida.[13] When he realized he could not regain control in Virginia, Dunmore returned to Britain in July 1776. Dunmore continued to draw his pay as the colony's governor until 1783, when Britain recognized American independence.

From 1787 to 1796, Dunmore served as governor of the Bahamas. is tenure as governor, the British issued land grants to American Loyalists who went into exile. The sparse population of the Bahamas tripled within a few years. The Loyalists developed cotton as a commodity crop, but it dwindled from insect damage and soil exhaustion. In addition to slaves they brought with them, the loyalist planters' descendants imported more African slaves for labour.

Peerage

Dunmore sat as a Scottish representative peer in the House of Lords from 1761 to 1774 and from 1776 to 1790.

Death

Dunmore died on 25 February 1809 in Ramsgate in Kent.[14] He was succeeded in the earldom by his eldest son, George.[15] The Countess of Dunmore died in 1819.

Legacy

Dunmore County, Virginia, formed in 1772, was named in his honour. However, as the American Revolution got underway, the citizens changed its name to Shenandoah County in 1778.
Lake Dunmore in Salisbury, Vermont, was named after him in 1773, since he had claimed ownership of the area while he was Governor of New York.[16]
Porto Bello, the hunting lodge of Lord Dunmore, still stands on the grounds of Camp Peary in York County, Virginia. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Access to the base is highly restricted, so the structure is not available for public viewing.
The Dunmore Pineapple was built in 1761 before he left Scotland. The building is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and is leased to the Landmark Trust who use it to provide holiday accommodation. The gardens are open to the public year-round.
Dunmore Street in Norfolk, Virginia, was named for him. It is said that the naming of Dunmore Street was not to honour the ex-governor, but to celebrate the place in Norfolk where he had last set foot.
The borough of Dunmore in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, is named after Dunmore Park in Scotland, location of the Dunmore Pineapple.
Lord Dunmore Drive in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
Dunmore Town, Harbour Island, North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

References

1. http://www.thepeerage.com/p10852.htm
2. Dunmore Biography.
3. Roosevelt, Theodore (1889). [1], Chapters VIII "Lord Dunmore's War" and XI "The Battle of the Great Kanawha", passim.
4. b PBS org
5. "Proclamation".
6. Red Hill Archived 26 November 2012 at the Wayback Machine..
7. Kibler, J. Luther (April 1931). "Numerous Errors in Wilstach's 'Tidewater Virginia' Challenge Criticism". William and Mary Quarterly. 2nd Ser. 11 (2): 152–156. doi:10.2307/1921010. JSTOR 1921010.
8. Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John, eds. (1900). "Dunmore, John Murray". Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography. New York: D. Appleton.
9. Lanning, Michael Lee (2005). African Americans in the Revolutionary War. Citadel Press. p. 59. ISBN 0-8065-2716-1.
10. Raphael, Ray (2002). A People's History of the American Revolution: How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence. Harper Collins. p. 324. ISBN 0-06-000440-1.
11. Stephanie True Peters (2005). Smallpox in the New World. Marshall Cavendish. p. 43.
12. Guy, Louis L. jr. bad link as of 12/16/12 --no independent access to Norfolk Historical SocietyCourier (Spring 2001)
13. Pybus, Cassandra Jefferson's Faulty Math: The Question of Slave Defections in the American Revolution Archived 10 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine. William and Mary Quarterly vol. 62 no. 2 (2005)- subscription or bad link as of 12/16/12
14. BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX OF FORMER FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH 1783 – 2002 (PDF). The Royal Society of Edinburgh. July 2006. ISBN 0 902 198 84 X.
15. Lowe, William C. "John Murray, fourth earl of Dunmore (ca. 1730–1809)". Encyclopedia Virginia/Dictionary of Virginia Biography. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
16. Zaremba, Robert E. and Danielle R. Jeanloz, Around Middlebury (Arcadia Publishing, 2000), p. 95.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 8:56 pm

Former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Kelso Leaves Legacy of Service, Integrity
by navy.mil
America's Navy
From Naval History and Heritage Command
6/24/2013

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WASHINGTON (Sept. 21, 1991) An official U.S. Navy portrait of the 24th Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Frank B. Kelso II. The photo is dated Sept. 21, 1991. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jon Blosser/Released)

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Adm. Frank Kelso II, 79, former Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), died Sunday, June 23, 2013, following injuries sustained from a fall earlier in the week.

Kelso, a native of Fayetteville, Tenn., served as Chief of Naval Operations from June 29, 1990 until April 23, 1994.

As the Chief of Naval Operations and throughout his career as a naval officer, Kelso was renowned for his intelligence, integrity and upstanding character.

"Adm. Kelso was a submariner, an accomplished commander, and an unmatched leader known for his intelligence and integrity. The thoughts of the 900,000 Sailors, Marines and civilians who make up the Department of the Navy go out to our fallen shipmate and his family. Semper Fortis," said Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus.

"Adm. Frank Kelso's bold leadership and innovative thinking guided the Navy through times of war and significant draw-down at the end of the Cold War. The ability to cut against the grain and find new and creative solutions for the Navy are what set Admiral Kelso apart from his peers. It was his strength of character and sure-fire integrity that ensured his success as a former CNO and to a higher degree solidified the formidable legacy of a great life that Admiral Frank Kelso leaves behind. It was an honor to have served with him and we are a better Navy due to his leadership and faithful commitment to our Sailors, civilians and their families," said U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert.

Kelso eventually returned to live in Fayetteville, Tenn., in 2003, a decade after retiring from the Navy.

He was the third of three submariners in a row who served as CNO in in the 1980s and '90s. As CNO he led the Navy in a period of significant drawdown of U.S. naval forces in the wake of the end of the Cold War and the ballyhooed "peace dividend." Concurrently, he oversaw the introduction of new platforms and systems that improved capabilities, including precision strike operations. The nation persistently called on the naval capabilities throughout his tour, starting with Operation Desert Storm.

As CNO, he also oversaw revolutionary changes within the OPNAV staff and profoundly changed the means by which the Navy processed and made decisions. In keeping with joint staff practices, he changed "OP" codes to "N" codes, and the staff was reorganized to align with a "Napoleonic" arrangement used by both the Army and the Joint Staff. In a period of dramatic change, he helped to transform not merely the organization, but also the processes by which information could be shared and considered. He is credited with dramatically changing the means by which more informed decisions could be made by the Navy.

Kelso was a strong advocate for the integration of women, particularly in the wake of the 1991 Tailhook Convention during which numerous incidents of sexual assault and harassment were found to have occurred.

During his tour as Commander of the Navy's Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea, members of the Palestine Liberation Front hijacked the cruise ship Achille Lauro and had killed a disabled passenger. When their demands were not met, they negotiated safe refuge and were flown towards Tunisia aboard an Egyptian commercial airliner. The plane was intercepted by U.S. Navy F-14 Tomcats and forced to land in Sigonella, Sicily, where the hijackers were arrested and later tried for murder.

In March of 1986 the U.S. initiated a series of 'Freedom of Navigation' exercises in the Gulf of Sidra that challenged Libyan leader's Col. Muammar al-Qadhafi "line of death" that spanned the Gulf of Sidra. Then Vice Adm. Kelso deployed elements of Task Force 60 including America (CV 66), Coral Sea (CV 43), and Saratoga (CV 60) with upward of 250 aircraft and 26 ships and submarines across the line and triggered Libyan action. Ultimately naval aircraft completed 1,546 sorties in support of the successful operation.

Then in April of that year, following additional terrorist attacks sponsored by al-Qadhafi, the U.S. launched Operation El Dorado Canyon-attacks against Libyan military targets. Under Kelso, U.S. aircraft attacked three target areas near Tripoli. Jets also bombed the al-Jamahiriyyah barracks and Benina Airfield, both near Benghazi.

Kelso got his start in public school and the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1952. Following graduation in 1956, he served in the cargo ship USS Oglethorpe (AKA 100) before attending Submarine School in 1958. On completion of training, he was assigned to the submarine USS Sabalo (SS 302) before returning to Submarine School for nuclear power training in January 1960. He then served one year in the Nuclear Power Department at the school. Subsequent tours included the pre-commissioning crew of the nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Pollack (SSN 603), Engineering Officer aboard USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) and Executive Officer of USS Sculpin (SSN 590).

From January 1969 to August 1971, Kelso served as Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Nuclear Power School in Bainbridge, Md. Following tours included Commanding Officer, USS Finback (SSN 670); Staff of Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; and Commanding Officer, USS Bluefish (SSN 675). Adm. Kelso was then assigned as Executive Assistant to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command and U.S. Atlantic Fleet and Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic from September 1975 to July 1977.

He served as Commander, Submarine Squadron SEVEN until reporting as Division Director, Submarine Distribution Division in the Naval Military Personnel Command, and Section Head of the Submarine Programs Section in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Personnel and Training) in September 1978.

He was selected for promotion to the rank of rear admiral in February 1980.

Upon selection for flag rank, Admiral Kelso served as Director, Strategic Submarine Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and then was assigned as Director, Office of Program Appraisal, Office of the Secretary of the Navy. On February 8, 1985, Adm. Kelso became Commander 6th Fleet and NATO Commander Naval Striking Force and Support Forces Southern Europe. On June 30, 1986, Adm. Kelso was promoted to admiral and assumed the duties of Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Admiral Kelso became Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic and Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command on November 22, 1988. He became the Navy's 24th Chief of Naval Operations on June 29, 1990.

Adm. Kelso has been awarded the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal (three awards), Legion of Merit (four awards), Meritorious Service, Navy Commendation and Navy Achievement Medals.

He is survived by his second wife, Georgeanna, his four children and numerous grandchildren. Landess McCown, his first wife of 56 years, passed away in 2012.

Kelso, who would have been 80 on July 11, 2013, will be buried in Fayetteville in the historic Rose Hill Cemetery on Saturday.

Complete text of statements from Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert on the passing of Adm. Kelso is available at http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=75026
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:06 pm

NATO Defense College
by ndc.nato.int
Last updated: 27 Feb. 2017 17:00
Accessed: 12/19/17

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NATO DEFENSE COLLEGE MISSION

In response to Strategic Guidance issued to the NATO Defense College (NDC) by the North Atlantic Council and the Military Committee (MC123/9), The Mission of the NATO Defense College is to:

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NDC Logo

* The mission of the NDC is to contribute to the effectiveness and cohesion of the Alliance by developing its role as a major centre of education, outreach and research on transatlantic security issues.

To foster forward and creative strategic thinking on the key issues facing the Alliance, the NDC:

a. Provides senior-level education and brings together senior-level military and civilian officials to interact on NATO issues in a unique, diverse and multicultural setting while cultivating multi-national consensus-building and providing opportunities for multinational networking;

b. Engages in comprehensive outreach in support of Alliance strategic objectives;

c. Conducts strategic security studies and research in support of the Alliance's wider goals.

The scope of activities is to include:

a. The Alliance's shared values and interests, current and prospective missions, politico-military concepts, policies, organization and working methods;

b. The potential risks to the security of the Alliance and its members;

c. NATO's transformation, including defence planning and resource management;

d. The political, security, defence and socio-economic systems and interests of the Allies and their co-operation partners; their capabilities, limitations and prospects in international relations, particularly in the fields of defence and security; and their cultural diversity;

e. The role of, and interaction with, other key security-related international organizations;

f. Cooperation and regional security efforts of the Alliance;

g. Academic research, policy support and discussions on security issues;

h. Practice in the English and French languages;

i. The involvement of Partnership for Peace (PfP), Istanbul Cooperation Initiative (ICI), and Mediterranean Dialogue (MD) countries, as well as those partners across the Globe (PatG)1 with a partnership programme with NATO;

j. Cooperation with other similar NATO and NATO nations' national military and civilian education and research institutions and think-tanks, as well as with institutions from partners, Non-NATO entities (NNEs)2, private companies, universities, think-tanks and other academic bodies.

_______________

Notes:

1 Within this document, “partners” refers to Partnership for Peace (PfP), Mediterranean Dialogue (MD), Istanbul Cooperation Initiative (ICI) countries, as well as those partners across the globe (PatG) with a partnership programme with NATO, unless otherwise stated.

2 In accordance with MC 0458/3, NNEs include International Organizations (IO), Governmental Organizations (GO) of non-NATO nations, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO), Non-NATO Multinational forces, Host Nations (when the host nation is not a NATO nation), Contractors on operations, exercises and transformational activities, and Non-NATO countries that do not meet the “partners” criteria as defined in footnote 1.

******************************

WHO'S WHO
Last updated: 12 Dec. 2017 13:57

The Commandant

The Commandant ensures that NDC fulfills its mission to contribute to the effectiveness and cohesion of the Alliance by developing its role as a major centre of education, study and research on transatlantic issues. The Commandant is responsible to the Military Committee, but her responsibilities and powers authorize her to communicate with NATO agencies, NATO members’ national authorities, academic institutions, such as the PfP Consortium, and individuals as appropriate. The Commandant may also liaise with non-NATO national bodies for the purpose of programs approved by the North Atlantic Council, such as the Mediterranean Dialogue.

Lieutenant General Chris Whitecross

The Commandant


Last updated: 07 Nov. 2017 16:38

Welcome to the NATO Defense College! This is indeed a unique institution. For 60 years the College has been training and educating leaders, both military and civilian, who have gone on to work at NATO Headquarters and its Commands, as well as in the related diplomatic and military fields in their respective nations. Our strategic-level courses ensure that our graduates have a firm grasp of the new challenges that may affect our future security. Furthermore, our method of instruction helps graduates develop the human interoperability skills that are necessary to function successfully in a multinational environment.

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Lieutenant General Chris T. Whitecross

Outreach is one of our key specialities and the College is now part of a recognized defence network that extends to over 50 nations. Nations participating in the Partnership for Peace (PfP) and Mediterranean Dialogue (MD) programs have benefited from having representatives attend our extended Senior Course and shorter Modular Short Courses and Integrated Partnership Orientation Courses. In the spring of 2005 we had our first representative from Iraq attend NDC and in the fall of 2005 we welcomed our first Course Members from the Istanbul Cooperation Initiative nations to the College.

Furthermore the Secretary General characterized NDC as "...an indispensable part of the new NATO". He concluded his remarks by saying, "More than ever, we need military men and women with keen political instincts and considerable diplomatic skills. More than ever, we require military and civilians gifted with the talent of improvisation, able to communicate in several languages, able to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances. And more than ever, we need people who are geared to cooperation with colleagues from other countries, whether they are from Allied or Partner countries. We also need what has been referred to as human interoperability - officers who think alike, officers who share the same fundamental ideas and who are not just able, but actually pre-disposed, to finding new approaches to new problems".

Lieutenant General Chris Whitecross, Royal Canadian Air Force, NDC Commandant


The DEAN

The Dean is responsible for the quality of the academic program, oversight of the curriculum and advice on academic policies. In this role he oversees the Academic Planning and Policy Division, the Academic Operations Division, the Research Division and the Middle East Faculty. He assists the Commandant on a variety of issues and initiatives and represents the Commandant during her absences. The Dean cultivates and maintains close relationships with Allied Command Transformation and NATO HQ to insure that guidance on academic, policy and strategic issues will be coordinated and reflected in curriculum planning and development.

BrigGen (ret.) František Mičánek

The DEAN

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 10:56

Ladies and gentlemen,

Welcome to the world of academic operations and research. This world has been built step by step by many previous Deans, Heads of Academic Divisions, Faculty Advisors and researchers who, for more than 60 years, have carefully and gradually created the current NDC curriculum.

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BrigGen (ret.) František Mičánek

Our College is a truly exceptional educational institution, delivering high-level lifelong education opportunities for both military and civilian personnel to be prepared for NATO and other international organizations appointments. What makes the NDC unique, compared to national defence universities and colleges, is a commitment to the original 1951 vision of General Eisenhower, combined with a number of modern features:

* Continuous re-identification of up-to-date and relevant topics from all domains of the field of international security studies – political, military, technological, legal, social, economy and environmental. Many of these reflect recommendations given by MC, IMS and ACT. They are regularly reviewed, thanks to a very complex system of evaluation and feedback from Course Members, NDC Anciens and the NDC Academic Advisory Board;

* Wide implementation of modern and highly efficient methods and modes of learning enabling Course Members to share personal experience, discuss their reflective observation from lectures delivered by world class scholars, reach abstract conceptualization, learn how to build consensus and validate acquired theoretical knowledge through active experimentation and exercises.

* High percentage of active engagement of Course Members. They work in committees in a purely international, socially rich environment, taken out of their national professional and cultural comfort zones and repeatedly intellectually challenged by the NDC academic staff and keynote speakers. The quality to which greatest importance is attached is not military rank or seniority, but level of holistic strategic thinking, dedication to teamwork, depth and strength of arguments used in discussion, as well as informal leadership, and last but not least cultural and ethical awareness;

* Significant investment of financial and human resources to ensure that teaching (and, above all, learning) is optimized by cutting edge technology. Our NDC academic portal not only provides all necessary information and data for staff, Anciens and Course Members, but also supports ADL and sharing of research publications, as well as other electronic sources prepared either by our Research Division or by our superb NDC Knowledge and Learning Centre;

* Permanent identification of new avenues for cooperation with other academic institutions, enhancing the pooling and sharing of resources dedicated to lifelong education.

The conditions and characteristics of the international security arena change and evolve continuously. So do we. Through its courses and related activities, the NDC is – and will continue to be – an excellent platform for promoting greater dialogue across cultures, religions and ideologies. We will continue to uphold and develop the academic heritage of our predecessors, in order to build and further reinforce trust among nations, helping overcome mental barriers and ensuring that any misunderstandings or misperceptions based on insufficient cultural awareness can be placed in an appropriate perspective. In other words, our academic programmes will seek to capitalize on the transformative power of education.

But be aware these gigantic tasks cannot be completed by faculty of the NDC alone. We need the continuing support of all NATO member states and partner nations; we need to be able to count on your trust, and your full understanding of the sheer complexity of our challenge.

Let me express my own personal belief, that we may have common understanding. All of this work is done in conviction that education is the only force capable to shape our destiny. Science and historically-obtained knowledge recognize no boundaries, and must be shared for the sake of peaceful future coexistence of all humankind.

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you – and see you in Rome!

The Dean

~ UNITATEM ALENTES ~ FOR UNITY WE STRIVE ~


The Director of Management

The Director of Management (DoM) is the principal advisor to the Commandant on management issues. He is responsible for general operations, maintenance and coordination with the Host Nation regarding College facilities. The spectrum of activity of the DoM is comprised of general management, personnel, administration, information technology, security, logistics and support issues. He may act on behalf of the Commandant within this sphere of activity upon the direction of the Commandant or during his absence.

Brigadier General Mario Ramponi

The Director of Management

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 10:56

The Director of Management (DoM) is the principal advisor to the Commandant on management issues.

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Brigadier General Mario RAMPONI

He is responsible for general operations, maintenance and coordination with the Host Nation regarding College facilities. The spectrum of activity of the DoM is comprised of general management, personnel, administration, information technology, security, logistics and support issues.

He may act on behalf of the Commandant within this sphere of activity upon the direction of the Commandant or during his absence.

Brigadier General Mario Ramponi, Italian Army,
NDC Director of Management


The Head of the Academic Operations Division

The Head of the Academic Operations Division (DAO) is responsible to the Dean and Commandant for the delivery of the Senior Course and associated short courses (Modular Short Course (MSC), Integrated Partners’ Orientation Course (IPOC), and NATO Executive Development Programme (NEDP)). The DAO has direct responsibility for the Faculty Advisors Group, the Academic Programmes Branch, the Academic Field Studies Branch and the Linguistic Services Section.

Brigadier General David Pincet

The Head of the Academic Operations Division

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 11:32

The Head of the Academic Operations Division (DAO) is responsible to the Dean and Commandant for the delivery of the Senior Course and associated short courses (Modular Short Course (MSC), Integrated Partners’ Orientation Course (IPOC), and NATO Executive Development Programme (NEDP)). The DAO has direct responsibility for the Faculty Advisors Group, the Academic Programmes Branch, the Academic Field Studies Branch and the Linguistic Services Section.

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Major General Pascal VALENTIN

Brigadier General David Pincet, French Air Force, Head of the Academic Operations Division


The Head of the Academic Planning and Policy Division

The Division Head Academic Planning and Policy reports to (and, when necessary, deputizes for) the Dean. He directs and coordinates the activities of the Curriculum Planning Branch, the Academic Policy Branch and the Library and Knowledge Centre.
Supported by the Academic Planning and Policy Division, he is responsible for the preparation of the long-term programme for all academic courses and activities, as well as for the development, evaluation and revision of the academic objectives and curricula for all courses, including the academic material, educational methods and Faculty training. Among these courses are the six-month Senior Course, several short Modular Short Courses and the Generals, Flag Officers and Ambassadors’ Course.

Brigadier General Heinz Josef Feldmann

The Head of the Academic Planning and Policy Division

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 11:32

The Division Head Academic Planning and Policy reports to (and, when necessary, deputizes for) the Dean. He directs and coordinates the activities of the Curriculum Planning Branch, the Academic Policy Branch and the Library and Knowledge Centre.

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Brigadier General Heinz Josef Feldmann

Supported by the Academic Planning and Policy Division, he is responsible for the preparation of the long-term programme for all academic courses and activities, as well as for the development, evaluation and revision of the academic objectives and curricula for all courses, including the academic material, educational methods and Faculty training. Among these courses are the six-month Senior Course, several short Modular Short Courses and the Generals, Flag Officers and Ambassadors’ Course.

He oversees and coordinates preparations for the Conference of Commandants of National Defence Colleges and Institutes, the International Week in Kyiv (a one-week on-site course) and the Academic Advisory Board, as well as implementing follow-on actions stemming from them.

Finally, he acts as the Executive Secretary to the NATO Defense College’s Academic Advisory Board.

Brigadier General Heinz Josef Feldmann, German Army, Head of the Academic Planning and Policy Division


The Head of the Research Division

The Research Division Head is responsible for the planning, organization and execution of the NDC’s research and outreach programme.

He develops the annual research plan, budget, and policies for the Research Division, oversees ongoing projects, and supervises and coordinates the activities of the Division personnel, including managing the various fellowship programmes.

Dr Jeffrey A. LARSEN

The Head of the Research Division

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 11:33

The Research Division Head is responsible for the planning, organization and execution of the NDC’s research and outreach programme.

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Jeffrey A. LARSEN Research Division Director

He develops the annual research plan, budget, and policies for the Research Division, oversees ongoing projects, and supervises and coordinates the activities of the Division personnel, including managing the various fellowship programmes.

He is a member of the NDC Academic Council, Command Group, Civil Staff Association, and multiple other College committees.

He represents the NDC in international fora, creates and maintains a network of connections with international institutions and the think tank world, and develops close relations with NATO Headquarters, NATO agencies and military commands.

Jeffrey A. Larsen, PhD, Division Head Research


The Director of the Middle East Faculty

The Director, who is responsible for the activities carried out by the Middle East Faculty, provides guidance for the academic courses it organizes: the NATO Regional Cooperation Course and the Senior Executive Regional Conference. He leads the MEF in a broad spectrum of related activities, making an important contribution to the College mission.

Colonel Filippo Bonsignore

The Director of the Middle East Faculty

Last updated: 07 Nov. 2017 10:42

The Director, who is responsible for the activities carried out by the Middle East Faculty, provides guidance for the academic courses it organizes: the NATO Regional Cooperation Course and the Senior Executive Regional Conference. He leads the MEF in a broad spectrum of related activities, making an important contribution to the College mission.

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Colonel Filippo BONSIGNORE

He cultivates and maintains close relations with Mediterranean Dialogue (MD) and Istanbul Cooperation Initiative (ICI) countries, as well as with Partners from the broader region of the Middle East.

Reporting to the Director, the MEF staff contributes to the growing popularity of the Faculty’s courses and other activities.

Colonel Filippo Bonsignore, Italian Army, Director of the Middle East Faculty


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THE HISTORY

Last updated: 10 Oct. 2017 11:30

NDC History (Excerpt from NDC Chronicle Book)

Main Dates

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NDC Building in NDC Building in Paris

The idea of a NATO Defense College originated from General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first Supreme Allied Commander Europe, who identified very early on the need for a new international institution with a unique educational mission.

On 19 November 1951, the NATO Defense College opened its doors to Course 1 in Paris.

In 1966, France withdrew from the Alliance's integrated military structure and the College moved to Rome where it continues to fulfil its mission.

On 10 September 1999, the new College building, twice the size of the old one, was inaugurated in the Military City of Cecchignola, 2 km. from the former site.

On 25 September 2001, the NATO Defense College celebrated its 50th Anniversary and hosted the 48th Annual Conference and Seminar of the Association of Anciens.

In 2009, the NATO Defense College celebrated the 60th Anniversary of NATO and the College's 10th year in Cecchignola.

In 2011, the NATO Defense College celebrated its 60th Anniversary: "60 Years Educating Leaders".

In 2016, the NATO Defense College celebrated its 65th Anniversary and the College's 50th year in Rome: "50 Year in Rome, 65 Years Serving NATO".
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Wed Dec 20, 2017 12:37 am

Louis H. Buehl III, Lieutenant General, United States Marine Corps
by arlingtoncemetery.net
Accessed: 12/19/17

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Louis H. Buehl III died at Bethesda Naval Medical Center on October 5, 1988 after having suffered a stroke. He was 56 and held the number-three job in the Marine Corps since October 1987. He was outranked only by the Commandant and the Assistant Commandant.

He was a combat veteran of the Vietnam War and had served as Commanding General of the Marine Base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, as Deputy Chief of Staff for Reserve Affairs and as Senior Military Assistant to William H. Taft IV, Deputy Secretary of Defense. He was a native of Pittsburgh, was a graduate of Miami University. He won the first of his three stars in April 1982 when he assumed command of the 1st Marine Brigade at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.

He is buried in Section 7-A of Arlington National Cemetery, near the Memorial Amphitheater and the Tomb of the Unknowns.

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BUEHL, LOUIS H III
United States Marine Corps
DATE OF BIRTH: 09/18/1932
DATE OF DEATH: 10/05/1988
BURIED AT: SECTION 7A SITE 107
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
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