Jared Lee Loughner's Mental State, by The Daily Beast

Living as we do in an assassinocracy, government by those who are left, it behooves us to think deeply on the topic of mass murder. For example, whenever a political assassination occurs, many witnesses are also dispatched to that realm from whence no testimony issues. The notion that murderers are merely evil is quite misleading. Most often, they are employed.

Re: Jared Lee Loughner's Mental State, by The Daily Beast

Postby admin » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:44 pm

Loughner Rants Sound Like Sovereign Citizen Beliefs
by Janet Novack, Forbes
1/12/11

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image

This courtroom drawing shows shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner in court on January 10, 2011 in Tuscon, Arizona. Clarence Dupnik, sheriff of Pima County who is in charge of the probe into the attack on Representative Gabrielle Giffords that left six dead, said the 22-year-old man gunman, who was arrested at the scene, 'has kind of a troubled past, and we're not convinced that he acted alone.' The gunman -- named by media as Jared Lee Loughner -- had a criminal past and was unstable but not insane, he told reporters, adding that the man was not talking to police officers in custody.

In his YouTube videos and postings on MySpace, alleged Arizona shooter Jared Lee Loughner echoed the bizarre beliefs of the extreme anti-government Sovereign Citizen movement. At least that’s the conclusion of JJ MacNab, who for more than a decade has tracked (and infiltrated online) the world of tax protesters and anti-government extremists.

In a post Monday on the mental health treatment and gun control gaps the case highlights, I wrote, “It’s hard to decipher any coherent views from Loughner’s You Tube ramblings.” Hard for me, that is. But MacNab, who I’ve known and respected for years, says Loughner’s weird references to “literacy” and “grammar” which mystify me, are Sovereign markers to her. “Sovereigns have their own set of complex cultural references and vocabulary, which they think that outsiders are just too stupid to understand,’’ she explains on her web site.

If MacNab is correct about Loughner, there are three important implications. First, finger pointing between left and right is off the mark in this case. “The world of Sovereign extremism exists outside of our traditional political spectrum, so labeling someone like Loughner a left-wing extremist or right-wing Teapartier doesn’t make any sense,” she writes.

In an interview Tuesday, MacNab explained that while the Sovereign movement has both white supremacist and tax protester roots, as it has spread (in large part over the Internet) it has also morphed. Newer and younger Sovereigns aren’t primarily white racists; some of the fastest growing Sovereign groups are African American and some Sovereigns even have left wing views. But like their predecessors, current Sovereigns consider the government illegitimate and embrace various bizarre and elaborate conspiracy theories, including that the government was involved in 9/11. (Loughner was reportedly a 9/11 truther.)

So what makes someone a Sovereign? The vast government conspiracy part is key says MacNab, who is writing a book on tax protesters and the Sovereigns. On her web site she writes: “A Sovereign believes that every individual has more rights and power than any government agency or political body, but that sinister forces behind the government have systematically suppressed this secret knowledge in order to better enslave us all as `subjects.’ Depending on the sovereign group, the conspiracy behind the government is run by rich bankers, the Federal Reserve, Jews, Zionists, the Pope, the Queen of England, or in one extreme case, shape-shifting reptiles.” Moreover, she says, Sovereigns have a fixation with words that can expose this conspiracy, which they blame for their various problems—with taxes, debts, ex-spouses, child protective services, and so on.

MacNab notes that not all tax protesters are full-blown Sovereigns and not all Sovereigns have troubles with the IRS. Some Sovereigns have mental problems, some don’t. Overall, she estimates there are 300,000 Sovereigns in the U.S. and she believes that number is growing.

The second implication, if Loughner subscribed to Sovereign beliefs: He could have a tougher time proving he’s not mentally competent to stand trial, is not criminally responsible for his alleged acts, or should receive a lesser punishment (for example, not the death penalty) because of mental illness.

MacNab points, by way of example, to the January 2010 sentencing of Ed Brown, the Sovereign/tax protester who in 2007 holed up for months in his heavily armed rural New Hampshire home holding off U.S. Marshals who wanted to deliver him to prison to begin his sentence on tax charges. Before sentencing for the standoff, his lawyer requested a competency hearing for Brown. A Bureau of Prisons forensic psychologist explained to the judge (according to a transcript provided by MacNab and a report by MacNab who attended the hearing) that Wood’s beliefs, no matter how unusual, convoluted and false, weren’t delusional according to diagnostic standards, because they were also held by “a widespread subculture” — namely the Sovereign Citizen or Patriot movements. The judge found that Brown was competent (despite his belief that he was the target of a conspiracy and that others could hear his thoughts) and sentenced him to 444 months in prison, in addition to the 63 months he was already serving for his tax convictions.

The lesson, in layman’s terms, is that Loughner would be considered less crazy if he got his ideas from Sovereign sites on the Internet, as opposed to from voices only he could hear.

The third implication, if Loughner is a Sovereign: The public debate should be focusing on the ongoing threat to law enforcement officials and every day public servants, and not just threats to members of Congress and elected officials. Loughner allegedly killed six and wounded 14 others in what authorities believe was an assassination attempt against Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), who remains in critical condition with a head wound. But Sovereigns believe a vast army of government workers—not just elected officials—are in on the conspiracy. Loughner allegedly targeted Giffords. But police say he wrote both “Die, cops” and “Die, bitch” on a 2007 letter from Giffords found in his home.

In a long article on the Sovereigns MacNab wrote last year, she emphasized that most Sovereigns aren’t violent and promote their oddball views exclusively through paper–elaborate court filings, and letters to IRS and other government officials.

For example, actor Wesley Snipes, who began serving a three year sentence on tax charges last month, sent letters to the IRS advancing theories as to why the IRS was powerless to collect income taxes from him, including “that he was a `non-resident alien to the United States,’ that earned income must come from `sources wholly outside the United States,’ that a `taxpayer is defined by law as one who operates a distilled spirit Plant,’ and that the Internal Revenue Code’s taxing authority `is limited to the District of Columbia and insular possessions of the United States, exclusive of the 50 States of the Union,’’ according to a July appeals court decision. But there was never any suggestion in court that action hero Snipes, the vampire slayer of the Blade series, posed a danger to anyone outside the movies. Sometimes, when their arguments lose (as they almost always do), non-violent Sovereigns respond with still more paper–filing fake liens against judges’ real estate or phony 1099s designed to get their targets audited by the IRS.

But the Sovereigns who have become violent have acted out against all levels of government workers, not just elected office holders. In a report released last month, the Treasury’s Inspector General for Tax Administration concluded that security is now the most serious threat the IRS faces, as “attacks and threats against IRS employees and facilities have risen steadily in recent years.’’

In some cases, attacks linked to Sovereigns have been carefully planned out. “Sovereigns believe that they are part of some new American Revolution, and that violence is a necessary part of the revolutionary process,’’ MacNab wrote in her report last year. She noted that Oklahoma City federal building bomber Timothy McVeigh and tax protestor Joseph Stack, who flew his Piper plane into the IRS building in Austin last February, used such language.

In other cases, a routine confrontation with authority (say a traffic stop) has set off a violent outburst from a heavily armed Sovereign. MacNab points to what happened in West Memphis, Ark. last May, when Jerry Kane’s white mini-van was stopped. As he argued with police, his 16-year -old son, Joseph, emerged from the minivan with an AK-47 and killed the two outgunned police officers. The Kanes fled and died later in a shootout with police. In that case, the connections to the Sovereigns were clear: Jerry Kane was an active promoter of a Sovereign “redemption” scheme—a technique Sovereigns believe can free them from government controls.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 17163
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Jared Lee Loughner's Mental State, by The Daily Beast

Postby admin » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:45 pm

Accused Gunman Warned Of Brainwashing
by Simon Mann
Brisbane Times.com.au
HERALD CORRESPONDENT
12th January 2011

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


TUCSON: Online political ramblings of the man charged with the killings in Tucson bear a strong resemblance to the ideas of an extreme right-wing conspiracy theorist who believes the US government uses grammar to control people's minds.

An Alabama civil rights group, the Southern Poverty Law Centre, said messages posted by Jared Loughner resembled the thoughts of David Wynn Miller, 62, a retired tool and die welder from Milwaukee who claims to have ''a billion followers''.

The director of the centre's intelligence unit, Mark Potok, said Mr Loughner's YouTube rant that ''the government is implying mind control and brainwash on the people by controlling grammar'' reflected Mr Miller's views.

''The idea weirdly enough of controlling grammar, of somehow the government using grammar to control the people, is an idea that exists on the radical right,'' Mr Potok said, nominating Mr Wynn as its primary advocate.

Questions about Mr Loughner's state of mind have led inquiries into why the 22-year-old allegedly marched on a small kerbside political gathering on Saturday morning and shot 20 people at point blank range. The attack killed six people and left the local congresswoman, Gabrielle Giffords, apparently the prime target, critically wounded after a bullet passed through her brain.

Neighbours reported seeing Mr Loughner in recent days wandering about with an increasingly strange look in his eyes, an image that appeared to have been captured in a mugshot released by police to coincide with his first appearance in court on Monday.

So far, he has been charged with two counts of murder, two of attempted murder and one count of the attempted assassination of a member of Congress.

Mr Loughner, who arrived in court in leg irons and handcuffs and dressed in a light-brown prison uniform, is being represented by Judy Clarke, who defended the Oklahoma bomber Timothy McVeigh, who was executed for killing 168 people in 1995.

Ms Clarke has also helped a number of infamous defendants avoid death sentences, including the Unabomber, Theodore Kaczynski; the Atlanta Olympics bomber, Eric Robert Rudolph; and a South Carolina woman, Susan Smith, who drowned her toddlers.

As prayer vigils were being held for the victims in Tucson and on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, attended by representatives and congressional staff, a portrait was emerging of a disturbed young man who had been ejected from community college and isolated by his antisocial behaviour.

Debate is raging over whether America's increasingly vitriolic political rhetoric may have been a catalyst for the attack, but no conclusive evidence of such a link has yet surfaced, nor of a clear motive for the shooting.

Democrats were keen to point the finger at conservative Republicans, but a local Tea Party activist, Trent Humphries, rejected accusations that Mr Loughner's politics dovetailed with those of the grassroots movement. Nor was he on any Tea Party mailing lists.

''I don't think his ideology is anything coherent,'' said Mr Humphries, a co-founder of the Tucson branch of the Tea Party. ''I just think he was a very, very disturbed individual.''

Mr Miller, who has invented his own form of grammar called ''truth language'', also denounced the alleged killer, though he agreed with his anti-government sentiment. He told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that Mr Loughner could have visited his website but he did not know him and he was ''obviously disturbed''.

Ms Giffords had written to a friend in Kentucky the night before the shooting, discussing how to ''promote centrism and moderation''.

The email congratulated Kentucky's Republican Secretary of State, Trey Grayson, on his new position at Harvard University.

''After you get settled, I would love to talk about what we can do to promote centrism and moderation,'' she wrote.

Barack Obama, who with his wife, Michelle, paused for a minute's silence outside the White House on Monday, planned to travel to Tucson today to meet survivors and emergency crews.

Aides said that the President was telephoning the families of the victims and had reached the parents of Christina-Taylor Green, 9, and the family of Gabe Zimmerman, 30, an aide to Ms Giffords.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 17163
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Jared Lee Loughner's Mental State, by The Daily Beast

Postby admin » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:45 pm

'Messiah-Like Figure' Is Doing Own Harvesting
by Natasha Wallace
Sydney Morning Herald.com.au
15th January 2011

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Image
''Truth language'' … David Wynn Miller teaches courses and disrupts courts.

A man who may have inspired Jared Lee Loughner in Arizona is a regular visitor to Australia, writes Natasha Wallace.

HE targets the most vulnerable - people fighting custody disputes and bankruptcy proceedings - as well as Aboriginal communities pushing land rights claims.

David Wynn Miller, an American, rakes in hundreds of thousands of dollars in just a few weeks teaching his ''truth language'' or ''syntax language'' at seminars across Australia.

He has disrupted several court cases in NSW, including one recently in Lismore in which a man was about to go on trial in the NSW District Court on serious child sexual assault charges.

While a jury waited to be empanelled in November, the accused, John Jarrett, repeatedly told the court, on Miller's advice, that the indictment was ''not written in the correct sentence structure communication syntax language'' and thus the case should be struck out.

Lawyers from the Aboriginal Legal Service stepped in but several hours later Jarrett was ordered to undergo psychiatric testing. The trial is yet to proceed.

The 30-odd ''law students'' with Miller in the public gallery - all of whom had been at his six-day, $1400 course on the Gold Coast - hailed it a victory. Lawyers present, including the barrister Jarrett had sacked, were stunned.

''The impression I got is [Miller is] doing it all the time … he's creating a great following,'' the barrister, Sam Di Carlo, says. ''This guy should be reported.''

Miller, 62, a retired tool and die welder, is based in Milwaukee and claims to have invented his own language in 1988, based on mathematics and maritime law. He calls the English language a ''fiction''. He writes in capital letters, with an abundance of punctuation, and calls himself the ''king of Hawaii''.

The Los Angeles Times reported this week that Jared Lee Loughner, the man charged after last weekend's shootings in Tucson, Arizona, was believed to have been inspired by Miller's teachings because of a recent series of YouTube rants he filmed about governments using grammar to control the population. Miller says this is ''ridiculous''.

Authorities have been dealing with Miller's courtroom antics in Canada and the US for more than a decade but he has more recently set his sights on Australia and New Zealand.

In 2001, the Miami Herald reported that Miller had been banned from entering Canada for two years after several cases in which judges had jailed people for contempt of court after they had attempted to use his ''truth language'' to defend tax evasion charges.

Last July and August he toured 10 Australian cities and regional centres including Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart, Perth and Brisbane.

He barged into a Family Court matter in Sydney last year in which a couple were fighting the Department of Community Services for custody of several of their children, and attempted to file 40 pages of gobbledegook.

The couple had spent more than $2000 to fly their barrister from Brisbane to Sydney for a session with Miller. ''They were convinced that Wynn Miller had all the magic solutions,'' said the barrister, who did not want to be named. ''[Miller's teaching] was the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard in my life.''

When DOCS returned the children to the parents two weeks later, Miller's followers lauded him.

The NSW Land and Environment Court last April endured almost two hours of Miller's ravings on grammar and maritime law.

''I'll give you a little secret,'' he told Justice Malcolm Craig. ''Every word that starts in the English language with a vowel, a, e, i, o and u, and followed by two consonants is a word that means no contract … All paper is a vessel in sea of space …''

Miller was representing an engineer, Masood Falamaki, whose long property battle with Wollongong City Council has left him bankrupt.

In December 2009, Miller unsuccessfully applied to the Federal Magistrates Court to appear as an expert witness on ''syntax fraud'' for Falamaki.

The Federal Magistrate Michael Lloyd-Jones dismissed Miller and his supporters as a ''linguistic cult''.

Falamaki is reported to have paid Miller $5000 and says ''people like David Wynn Miller are challenging the judiciary'.

No other people are brave enough to do that.''

Gary Jackson, 52, says the Gold Coast seminar he attended was ''probably the best money I've ever spent''. He says the class of about 40 consisted of people who had travelled from Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and North Queensland, including about six who had lost their houses.

Jackson, who turned to Miller after his house was repossessed last year, says Miller is helping him prepare a breach of contract case in the Queensland Supreme Court using ''syntax language''.

''I would back David Wynn Miller any day rather than one of those snaky solicitors,'' he said.

There are concerns, however, within the Aboriginal community about Miller's influence.

''He's trying to suck us into this quantum language stuff as well because he's going around the place and representing people in court,'' says the veteran Aboriginal rights campaigner Michael Eckford.

One activist, Mark McMurtrie, is listed on court documents as also representing Falamaki.

McMurtrie told the Herald: ''I am neither a student nor supporter of [Miller's] language and law. As a sovereign tribal man of this continent I view his ramblings as relevant to my people.''

Colleen Lloyd, an American who was a partner of Miller's for five years, told the Herald she came under his spell ''during a vulnerable time when I was suffering mercury poisoning and extreme poverty''.

She says people followed him like a ''messiah-like figure''.

Miller's response to several questions via email was mostly incomprehensible. When asked about his Brisbane course next month, which costs $1800 for six days, he wrote (in capital letters): ''When people ask questions on the 'deed of trust' as the trustee and cross-subject-questions, I give them the operational-answers that may help for them to do their own 'learning-search'.

When asked if he had ever been refused a visa to Australia, he wrote: ''No, I hold casino cards and gamble all over the country.'' Regarding the Aboriginal community, he said he was helping ''originees'' to claim back land.

The flyer for the Brisbane course says: ''If you learn how to syntax your contracts you will learn self security. Protect yourself from being harvested.''

This material is subject to copyright and any unauthorised use, copying or mirroring is prohibited.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 17163
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Jared Lee Loughner's Mental State, by The Daily Beast

Postby admin » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:47 pm

Syntax Error
The Good Word
by Karen Stollznow
The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry
February 2, 2011

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Correct language is not so correct...

In an effort to understand the January 2011 shootings in Tucson, Arizona, the media took an interest in the online presence of the accused, Jared Lee Loughner. He had posted a series of YouTube videos in which he made some unorthodox claims about language. These ramblings included, “The government is implying mind control and brainwash on the people by controlling grammar. You control your English grammar structure.”1

This brought to light the beliefs of conspiracy theorist David Wynn Miller, the inventor of Correct Language. Miller devised Correct Language as a method of writing and speaking while navigating the legal system that supposedly “protects people from the government.”

Although it appears his theories were influential to Loughner’s ideology, Miller has not been implicated in the murders. Let’s leave aside Loughner and take a closer look at David Wynn Miller, who prefers to be known as Judge :David-Wynn: Miller.

Judge :David-Wynn: Miller

Miller is a retired tool and die welder, but in his own words he is an educator, ambassador, postmaster, legal scholar, plenipotentiary-judge, the king of Hawaii, and a genius. Miller claims he was crowned king of Hawaii in 1996 after turning Hawaii into a verb.2 The bizarre story of how he became a “genius” is shared testimonial-style on his website :David-Wynn: Miller Quantum and Syntax Language Truth Seekers:

[At age 25] David had a kidney disorder that required surgery however the doctor scheduled to operate on the day of surgery was unavailable, and at the last minute was replaced by a Korean doctor who had never operated on any human before, a complete novice. To cut a long story short, the Korean doctor read David’s chart incorrectly and surgically removed both kidney’s including the adrenal glands - David died on the operating table.

In the Morgue the nurse assisting the autopsy noticed David’s heart, which at this stage was lying on the outside of his body on his chest unsevered, incredulously the heart began to beat! He came back from the dead? Well, yes he did with an IQ of 200 .......go figure.

The doctors put him back together again, including his perfectly healthy kidney, alive, however now he has 6 times the amount of endorphins you and I have, and so the saga continued.3


The resurrectional, Mensa-worthy, endorphin-packed Miller also promotes “health products.” He sells “zappers” for people and their pets that “wake up your immune system FAST.” These low-voltage frequency generators were popularized by (naturopathic doctor) Hulda Clark, author of The Cure for All Diseases. It is claimed that zappers kill parasites, bacteria, viruses, and cancer. In short—you guessed it—“all diseases.” These devices, which supposedly encourage “self health,” are dangerously promoted as an inexpensive and pro-active alternative to visiting a medical doctor.

Miller’s website is a sanctuary for conspiracy theorists and promotes (mis)information about chemtrails, cancer cures, UFOs, government exposés, the New World Order, the 2012 “catastrophe,” and the “truth” about vaccinations, aspartame, fluoride, and 9/11. But his specialty is his own product, Correct Language.

Correct Language

Miller developed an interest in language and the law following an unsuccessful custody suit (or sixty-seven).

In 1982 David appeared in court self represented for custody of his children. He lost 67 times, exasperated he said to the Judge “If I say white, you say black. If I say black, you say white. I can’t ever win!” the Judge replied “That is correct David, you can’t win in this court” David retorted “So this is all about Language and how it is interpreted” With a wry smile the Judge replies “That is right David, has there ever been a war over a mathematical problem?” As the Judge stood to leave the room David responds “So if I could prove that Language had a mathematical interface, I would win?” the Judge turns around, faces David and says “You’re a smart man David, you’ll figure it out” and leaves.4


Miller concluded that the world’s governments and legal systems are deceptive and that “The English Language Has Been Deliberately Modified to Enslave Us!” He embarked on a search for a method to circumvent deception in language, spending a reputed 59,000 hours studying historical linguistics, the evolution of language. He concluded that the world’s languages are all fiction: “Tirelessly researching Language globally, on the 6th of April 1988 [Miller] cracked the code. His research took him back 8500 years prior, when it became apparent this was the beginning of Language being bastardised.”

These claims are not substantiated, but it seems that Miller believes that linguistic evolution is a form of corruption and further believes that he has identified a time where there was some sort of pure language. Trying to “fix the language,” he created Correct Language, also known as Quantum Language, Syntax Sentencing, or the Mathematical Interface for Language. Miller reports that Correct Language is “based on mathematics and maritime law” because “Earth is a vessel in a sea of space.”

After a Messiah-like resurrection, superhuman levels of endorphins, sixty-seven court hearings, and 59,000 hours of research, you might be thinking that Miller’s method is hyperbole, but it is based in altering the syntax, punctuation, and even spelling of English.

If You Thought Legalese Was Bad…

Miller’s other website, :JUDGE: DAVID-WYNN: MILLER, is written entirely in Correct Language. The site includes pages of examples and features a Quantum Dictionary of his interpretations of legal definitions. It also provides information about scams, secrets, a global faith, UFO sightings, and a woman who falsely claims to be Miller’s wife. But the most striking feature of the website is its syntax and the fact that the typing is often in bolded all-capitalized letters.

Miller claims “there is no ambiguity in Quantum Language,” but the writing and speech style is incomprehensible. Here is a typical example of his incoherent, obsessive-compulsive text:

FOR THE CORRECT-SENTENCE-STRUCTURE-COMMUNICATION-SYNTAX-LANGUAGE-CLAIMS OF THESE STYLES IS WITH THE CLAIM OF THE COPYRIGHT/COPYCLAIM WITH OF READING AND WRITING AND SPEAKING WITH A MATHEMATICAL-QUANTUM-SYNTAX OF THE FACTS-AS-FACTS WITH THE NOW-TIME.5


This stuff makes legalese look like a Little Golden Book.

Miller states that the goal of Correct Language is “To educate the planet and put an end to the harvesting of the people, through the Fraudulent conveyance of Language!” He even claims his “truth language technology” can end wars and bring consensus to religion. In Correct Language he explains this as “for the stopping-claims of the Theft, Cheating, Fraud, Slavery and War.”

Miller’s nonsensical “language” is an artificial dialect of English that employs the vocabulary of English, including its syntax words. It contains the grammatical terms of English, but it does not apply the same grammar. In other words, Correct Language uses the same words but in a different word order.

Features of Correct Language include the capitalization of all letters at times and either the capitalization of all nouns (as is used in German) or of some nouns for emphasis. Miller believes that only nouns have legal meaning. Miller occasionally uses definite articles before nouns, e.g., “the math” (as is used in French). He defies the traditional structure of English by beginning each sentence with a prepositional phrase, usually “for the.” He also uses punctuation differently, especially hyphens and colons, which he includes in proper names. In Miller’s own words:

The reason I use a full colon and a hyphen in my name, the first full colon, which is full colon David, it means for the David hyphen Wynn. That’s my given name, and it’s also a noun, because it uses a prepositional phrase. ... Because I use prepositional phrases, through punctuation, which is classified as hieroglyphics, which makes me a life, l-i-f-e. Now, when you don’t punctuate your name ... David is an adjective, Wynn is an adjective, Miller is a pronoun. Two adjectives are a condition of modification, opinion, presumption, which modifies the pronoun, pro means no on noun. So therefore, I’m not a fact. I’m a fiction.6


“David Wynn Miller,” however you want to type it, is a proper noun.

Miller prefers to use sentences that contain more than thirteen words. He deliberately misspells words; this is reminiscent of numerology, whose proponents believe that names have power and that altering their spelling can attract luck. It’s like feng shui for language. But if Correct Language is so effective, why is Miller’s main website written in standard U.S. English?

Judgment Day

The “Plenipotentiary Judge” claims the main application for Correct Language is as a technical language for use in the legal system, mostly as a form of legal defense: “[Correct Language] arms us with the knowledge/power to have all our words, especially in contracts or any legal documentation inarguably correct! Quantum Language is the technology that will raise global consciousness which has been suppressed by Western Society!”7

Miller is known as a “common law guru,” and he presents himself as an amateur attorney. He offers consultations and makes court appearances with clients, charging one hundred dollars per hour (with a minimum of three hours). However, the courtroom is no place for his cryptic code. Examples of his legal advice include: Words that start with vowels and are followed by two consonants means “no contract.” When colons and hyphens are used in a name, they magically transform an individual into an object; therefore, you are no longer taxable.

With their tax-free guarantee, his techniques have been seized by clients accused of financial crimes—mostly tax evasion, bank fraud, and mortgage scams. Miller targets the most vulnerable sections of society, including people embroiled in custody disputes and bankruptcy proceedings and communities pursuing land rights claims.8

Unsurprisingly, all of the cases in which Miller has provided counsel have been woefully unsuccessful. A naturopath in Calgary went to jail for contempt of court for addressing a judge in Miller’s Correct Language.9 On Miller’s advice, a woman accused of child abuse claimed her “sovereignty group,” the Hawaiian Kingdom Government (i.e., King Miller), had declared her innocent. She was sentenced to prison anyway.10 A client in Australia was coached to argue that “the indictments were ‘not written in the correct sentence structure communication syntax language’ and thus the case should be struck out.”11 This case resulted in the magistrate ordering that the defendant undergo psychiatric assessment. Miller’s proponents labeled this a victory.

We Can’t Handle the Truth

For his troublemaking, Miller has been refused entry to Canada twice,12 but he still conducts seminars in Australia and the United States. He charges $200 per seminar and offers Quantum Trust and Gold Certificates (whatever they are) for a mere $3,000. His website boasts:

The knowledge David has to impart is mesmerising, if you have ever been in a Seminar room with :David-Wynn: Miller there is something incredible going on Metaphysically. On one hand there is definitely a feeling of calmness, safety, knowingness and spirituality however on the other hand the information is factual, precise, astonishing and enlightening. A very powerful and uplifting combination giving answers of how we can live in harmony with honesty and integrity. If you would like to find out more about the above and be part of shifting the dynamics of this planet, you need to listen to :JUDGE: David-Wynn: Miller.


However, it seems that his seminars are opportunities for Miller to engage in conspiracy mongering. He teaches his bewildered audience that 9/11 was an “inside job,” and he claims that MasterCard runs the United States economy and the United States Postal Services rules the world.13 Miller calls his adherents the “Universal Postal System.” Now we know why he calls himself the “postmaster.”

The End of the World As We Know It

In Miller’s typical exaggeration, he reports that he has over one billion adherents to his theories. In truth he has just a small band of loyal followers, most of whom probably feel they have little to lose by trying Miller’s system.

It seems unlikely that Correct Language will catch on in the legal system or in daily use. However, Miller claims that on April 6, 2012, “Quantum Language will be established in mainstream society globally.”14 Correct Language won’t be around for long, though, if Miller’s other predictions are correct and the world ends in 2012.

_______________

References

1. Peter Walker. 2011. Gabrielle Giffords shooting: Gunman linked to grammar ‘judge.’ Guardian UK. Available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/ja ... -extremist. Accessed January 12, 2011.

2. Mark Potok. Full colon Miller. Southern Poverty Law Center. Available at http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/i ... lon-miller. Accessed January 10, 2011.

3. :David-Wynn: Miller Quantum and Syntax Language Truth Seekers. Available at http://www.davidwynnmiller.com/about.html. Accessed January 12, 2011.

4. :David-Wynn: Miller Quantum and Syntax Language Truth Seekers. Available at http://www.davidwynnmiller.com/about.html. Accessed January 12, 2011.

5. :JUDGE: DAVID-WYNN: MILLER. :Communication-Methods- Available at http://dwmlc.com/dwm/pages/category.php?category=1. Accessed January 12, 2011.

6. Mark Potok. Full colon Miller. Southern Poverty Law Center. Available at http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/i ... lon-miller. Accessed January 10, 2011.

7. http://www.davidwynnmiller.com/index.html. Accessed January 12, 2011.

8. ‘Messiah-like figure’ is doing own harvesting. Brisbane Times. Available at http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/world/m ... 19r9v.html. Accessed January 20, 2011.

9. Susan Hagan. 2001. Canadian tax dodgers confuse courts. The Canadian Press (October 14). Available at http://www.cyberclass.net/miller2.htm. Accessed January 12, 2011.

10. Jim Dooley. 2009. Child abuser sent to prison to await Hawaii sovereignty appeal. Honolulu Advertiser (January 22). Accessed January 20, 2011.

11. ‘Messiah-like figure’ is doing own harvesting. Brisbane Times. Available at http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/world/m ... 19r9v.html. Accessed January 20, 2011.

12. Susan Hagan. 2001. Canadian tax dodgers confuse courts. The Canadian Press (October 14). Available at http://www.cyberclass.net/miller2.htm. Accessed January 12, 2011.

13. Mark Potok. Full colon Miller. Southern Poverty Law Center. Available at http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/i ... lon-miller. Accessed January 10, 2011.

14. http://www.davidwynnmiller.com/index.html. Accessed January 12, 2011.

Karen Stollznow is an author and skeptical investigator with a doctorate in linguistics and a background in history and anthropology. She is an associate researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, and a director of the San Francisco Bay Area Skeptics. A prolific skeptical writer for many sites and publications, she is the “Good Word” Web columnist for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, the “Bad Language” columnist for Skeptic magazine, a frequent contributor to Skeptical Inquirer, and managing editor of CSI’s Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice. Dr. Stollznow is a host of the Monster Talk podcast and writer for the Skepbitch and Skepchick blogs, as well as for the James Randi Educational Foundation’s Swift. She can be reached via email at kstollznow[at]centerforinquiry.net.
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 17163
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am


Return to Mass Murderers

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron