Deputies Plead Guilty to Covering Up Assault Against Inmate’

The progress from Western colonial global expansion, and the construction of American wealth and industry on the backs of enslaved Blacks and Native peoples, followed by the abrupt "emancipation" of the slaves and their exodus from the South to the Northern cities, has led us to our current divided society. Divided by economic inequities and unequal access to social resources, the nation lives in a media dream of social harmony, or did until YouTube set its bed on fire. Now, it is common knowledge that our current system of brutal racist policing and punitive over-incarceration serves the dual purpose of maintaining racial prejudice and the inequities it justifies. Brief yourself on this late-breaking development in American history here.

Deputies Plead Guilty to Covering Up Assault Against Inmate’

Postby admin » Mon Aug 17, 2015 1:00 am

Deputies Plead Guilty to Covering Up Assault Against Inmate’s Brother
by Andrew Emett
June 2, 2015

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Two of the five deputies accused of brutally assaulting an inmate’s brother visiting the Men’s County Jail in Los Angeles have already pled guilty to criminal charges. Just another example of police brutality and deputies’ false reports.

Two Los Angeles sheriff’s deputies have agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges regarding a brutal assault against an inmate’s brother visiting the Men’s County Jail (MCJ). After the first deputy pled guilty earlier this year, a second deputy agreed to plead guilty last week to lying to FBI agents during an interview concerning the use force employed against a handcuffed visitor who was not resisting. Both deputies have also agreed to testify against their former colleagues if the prosecution calls on them at trial.

On February 26, 2011, Gabriel Carrillo attempted to visit his brother in MCJ when deputies discovered that Carrillo’s girlfriend, Griselda Torres, had brought a cellphone into the facility. When questioned by deputies, Torres admitted that both she and Carrillo had their cellphones with them. After confirming that he did have a phone, Carrillo asked Deputy Pantamitr Zunggeemoge, “What are you going to do, arrest me?”

According to the initial report, Carrillo was placed in handcuffs and escorted to a nearby break room. After deputies removed the handcuff from Carrillo’s right wrist to fingerprint him, he attacked the deputies and attempted to escape. The deputies claimed that Carrillo was intentionally spitting blood at them as they shot him in the face with pepper spray. They admitted to punching Carrillo several times to subdue him before placing Carrillo in restraints again.

But according to the recent plea agreements, Carrillo did not assault the deputies and was unable to resist arrest because his hands were cuffed while they were beating and pepper-spraying him on the floor. Carrillo filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department, and the district attorney later dropped the charges against him. The county paid Carrillo $1.2 million to settle the civil suit.

On December 9, 2013, the Justice Department unsealed five criminal cases against 18 Los Angeles sheriff’s deputies charged with illegally beating inmates and obstructing justice. One of the indictments charged a sergeant and four deputies with arresting or beating at least five MCJ visitors, including the Austrian consul general, between 2010 and 2011. Deputies Sussie Ayala, Fernando Luviano, Pantamitr Zunggeemoge, Noel Womack, and Sgt. Eric Gonzalez were charged with civil rights violations and covering up their use of unjustified force.

In one incident, the deputies left a man permanently disabled after breaking his arm and dislocating his shoulder. In another incident, the Austrian consul general and her husband were handcuffed and detained while visiting an MCJ inmate who was an Austrian national even though they had committed no crime and would have been immune to prosecution.

According to the indictment, the deputies’ supervisor, Sgt. Gonzalez, encouraged violence and reprimanded deputies for not using aggressive force against visitors who had “supposedly ‘disrespected’ these deputy sheriffs through the visitors’ words or conduct.”

Earlier this year, Deputy Zunggeemoge entered a guilty plea and admitted that Carrillo had been handcuffed during the entire beating. According to Zunggeemoge’s statement, his fellow deputies fabricated the story of Carrillo attacking them in order to justify their use of force. Although Zunggeemoge’s agreement remains sealed, he has agreed to testify against his former colleagues.

Last week, Deputy Womack agreed to plead guilty to lying to the FBI during the course of their investigation into the assault against Carrillo. While being interviewed last month, Womack told FBI agents that he didn’t know if Carrillo was handcuffed and asserted that physical force against Carrillo had been necessary. But after four years of lying, Womack finally admitted that Carrillo had been cuffed during the entire incident and had not been resisting while deputies beat and pepper-sprayed him. Womack has also agreed to testify against his former coworkers.

With their trial scheduled to begin on June 16, so far two of the five deputies have already pled guilty to criminal charges. In addition to the beating, Sgt. Gonzalez has also been accused of covering up the incident by comparing each of the deputies’ false reports and ensuring consistency with their lies.
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Re: Deputies Plead Guilty to Covering Up Assault Against Inm

Postby admin » Tue Dec 01, 2015 8:38 pm

L.A. Deputies Sentenced to Prison for Jail Beating
by Andrew Emett
December 1, 2015

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


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Former L.A. deputies and a sergeant face criminal charges in the case of Gabriel Carrillo, a man unjustly beaten after attempting to visit his brother in prison. Several of those charged face prison time.

Two former Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies were sentenced to prison on Monday after their colleagues testified against them for viciously beating the handcuffed brother of an inmate unconscious and attempting to cover up the abuse. Their sergeant was sentenced to eight years in prison earlier this month for violating the jail visitor’s civil rights and ordering his deputies to falsify their arrest reports.

On February 26, 2011, Gabriel Carrillo attempted to visit his brother, who was an inmate at Men’s Central Jail (MCJ) in Downtown Los Angeles. When Deputy Sussie Ayala discovered that Carrillo’s then-girlfriend, Griselda Torres, had brought a cellphone into the facility, Torres admitted that both she and Carrillo had their cellphones on them. After confirming that he did have a phone, Carrillo asked Deputy Pantamitr Zunggeemoge, “What are you going to do, arrest me?”

According to Zunggeemoge’s testimony, the deputy cuffed Carrillo’s hands behind his back and escorted him to a nearby break room, while Deputy Ayala placed Torres in handcuffs and followed them. Zunggeemoge slammed Carrillo into a refrigerator before patting him down and lifting his cuffed arms in order to inflict more pain. As Carrillo continued to mouth off to the deputies, Ayala called for backup on her radio.

When deputies Fernando Luviano, Noel Womack, and Sgt. Eric Gonzalez arrived, Zunggeemoge left the room to run Carrillo’s name through a criminal database. Zunggeemoge returned to find Luviano roughing up Carrillo. Instead of de-escalating the violence, Zunggeemoge rushed into the room and helped Luviano smash Carrillo’s face against the ground.

After losing consciousness, Carrillo awoke to find Luviano and Zunggeemoge repeatedly punching and kicking him in the face, back, and legs as the other deputies watched. Carrillo developed trouble breathing after Luviano pepper-sprayed him in the face. Instead of administering medical treatment, Zunggeemoge punched Carrillo twice in the face.

Following the incident, Sgt. Gonzalez ordered Zunggeemoge and the other deputies to write false statements in their reports accusing Carrillo of attacking them while only one of his hands was cuffed during fingerprinting. In their incident reports, Gonzalez and his deputies falsely asserted that Carrillo had attempted to take a swing at them with his free hand, resulting in the deputies using force to restrain him.

But according to testimony from deputies Zunggeemoge and Womack, Carrillo’s hands were cuffed behind his back throughout the entire incident. Photographs taken by Torres, who is now married to Carrillo, revealed deep bruises around both of his wrists after the beating. Carrillo was charged with assaulting the deputies, but the district attorney later dropped the charges against him. The county ended up paying Carrillo $1.2 million to settle a civil lawsuit against the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

On December 9, 2013, the Justice Department unsealed five criminal cases against 18 Los Angeles sheriff’s deputies charged with illegally beating inmates and obstructing justice. Included in those indictments were criminal charges against former deputies Sussie Ayala, Fernando Luviano, Pantamitr Zunggeemoge, Noel Womack, and Sgt. Eric Gonzalez. The deputies were charged with civil rights violations and covering up their use of unjustified force.

Earlier this year, Zunggeemoge pleaded guilty to misdemeanor counts of conspiracy and deprivation of rights after finally admitting that Carrillo had been handcuffed during the entire beating. He faces up to two years in prison.

In May, Womack confessed to going along with the fabricated story for four years and lying to FBI agents investigating the incident. Womack pleaded guilty to a felony charge of lying to federal officials and faces up to five years in prison. According to their plea agreements, both Womack and Zunggeemoge are barred from returning to law enforcement.

Along with Womack and Zunggeemoge, deputies Ayala and Luviano were relieved of duty without pay in January 2014. Gonzalez left the department in May 2013. On June 24, Gonzalez, Ayala, and Luviano were convicted of violating Carrillo’s civil rights and writing false reports to cover up the jail beating.

Earlier this month, Gonzalez was sentenced to eight years in prison for his failure in leadership. After determining that Ayala had instigated the chain of events, U.S. District Judge George King sentenced her to six years in prison on Monday. Immediately following Ayala’s sentencing, Judge King ordered Luviano to serve seven years in prison.

In October, a federal grand jury indicted a sixth deputy in relation to the jail beating. On October 30, former Deputy Byron Dredd pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to violate civil rights and two counts of making false reports. Dredd has been ordered to stand trial on December 22.
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