National Security Decision Directive No. 130

National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Wed May 24, 2017 12:42 am

US International Information Policy: National Security Decision Directive No. 130
by Ronald Reagan
March 6, 1984

UNCLASSIFIED

SECRET

90930

THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON
March 6, 1984

NATIONAL SECURITY DECISION DIRECTIVE NUMBER 130

US International Information Policy

International information is an integral and vital part of US national security policy and strategy in the broad sense. Together with the other components of public diplomacy, it is a key strategic instrument for shaping fundamental political and ideological trends around the globe on a long-term basis and ultimately affecting the behavior of governments.

While improvements have been made in US international information programs and activities over the last several years, there is a need for sustained commitment over time to improving the quality and effectiveness of US international information efforts, the level of resources devoted to them, and their coordination with other elements of US national security policy and strategy. The role of international information considerations in policy formulation needs to be enhanced, and wider understanding of the role of international information should be sought within the Executive Branch as well as with the Congress and the public.

The fundamental purpose of US international information programs is to affect foreign audiences in ways favorable to US national interests. Such programs can only be credible and effective by respecting accuracy and objectivity. At the same time, the habits, interests, expectations and level of understanding of foreign audiences may differ significantly from those of the domestic American audience, and require different approaches and emphases in the selection and presentation of information. While US international information activities must must be sensitive to the concerns of foreign governments, our information programs should be understood to be a strategic instrument of US national policy, not a tactical instrument of US diplomacy. We cannot accept foreign control over program content.

International Information Strategy

Essential to a successful global information strategy is recognition of the diversity of the audiences the US seeks to address. Beyond the obvious differences among Western, Communist country and Third World audiences, there are significant ideological and cultural differences within countries and regions and between elites, key opinion sectors, and the general population. Programming must be more effectively differentiated to reach these audiences. The critical importance of elites in the formation of public opinion must be recognized. At the same time, intensified efforts must be made to address the general population in areas where government control of elite communications is strict. Specific information themes and strategies outlined in the study accompanying this directive should serve as the general basis for US international information programming.

International Radio Broadcasting

International radio broadcasting is the US Government's most effective means of communicating the truth directly to the peoples of the world. Improvement in the US international broadcasting effort must continue to enjoy the highest priority. National Security Decision Directive 45 affirmed the essentials of existing US policy relative to US international broadcasting and, among other things, authorized a major, long-term program of modernization and expansion, approved revised guidance for determining languages and broadcast hours, and called for a major effort to overcome jamming of US broadcasts and ameliorate its effects. A review of implementation of NSDD 45 should be undertaken by the Senior Planning Group. Such a review should include a revision of current language guidance, to include recommendations concerning the possible initiation of new language services. It should also incorporate reports on programming policy and objectives relating to international audiences of the Radio in the American Sector of Berlin and our Armed Forces Radio and Television Service.

Other International Information Instruments

Several other instruments of international information merit special attention and long-term planning and development.

More systematic thought needs to be given to the opportunities offered by international television broadcasting. A conceptual study should be undertaken of technical and political options for US international television broadcasting over the next several decades.

In the area of publications, steps should be taken to reconstitute as a major ongoing program support for publishing and disseminating abroad books and other publications. This includes strengthening a working partnership between the USG and the private sector to make available broad serious works on American or Western institutions and principles.

In addition to the traditional instruments of international information, new technologies (particularly in the area of audio and video tape cassettes) have created new instruments whose potential should be explored.

It is important to recognize that information disseminated by private and commercial organizations is likely to have special credibility with many audiences. A high priority should be placed on improving liaison and cooperation with, and support of, appropriate private sector information efforts.

An interagency study in support of US objectives relative to the free flow of information and the potential of new communications technologies should be carried out under the auspices of the Senior Planning Group. Special attention shall be given as to how to overcome barriers to information flow and how to utilize communications technologies to penetrate closed societies.

Information and Communications Assistance

Strategically targeted information and communications assistance to other nations can contribute significantly to achieving US objectives. It should be recognized as an integral part of US international information activities. A study should be undertaken by the Senior Interagency Group on International Communications and Information Policy to define the role and contributions of the various agencies involved and to develop a long-term strategy in this area.

International Information Policy in Peace and War

In view of the importance of psychological factors in maintaining the confidence of allied governments and in deterring military action against US national interests, and in order to be prepared for the immediate and effective use of psychological operations (PSYOP) in crisis and wartime, it is vital that the Armed Forces maintain a strong and active international information capability. Revitalization and full integration of PSYOP in military operations and planning should be a high priority of the Department of Defense. In order to employ PSYOP effectively and economically, a set of national guidelines and a funded program will be established and roles and relationships of the agencies that are involved will be defined. The Department of Defense is directed, with appropriate interagency coordination and in accordance with national law and policy, to participate in overt PSYOP programs in peacetime. The SPG should take the lead in developing coordinated interagency plans, including the utilization of DOD capabilities, for international information activities in support of national security objectives. Crisis and wartime conditions impose special requirements on US international information activities. In wartime or during crises (which may be defined as periods of acute tension involving a threat to the lives of American citizens, or the imminence of war between the US and other nations), US international information elements should be ready to initiate special procedures to ensure policy consistency, timely response and rapid feedback from the intended audience. Appropriate agencies should review and, as necessary, develop procedures for their operations during crises.

International Information: Functional Requirements

Research on public opinion, media reaction, and cultural factors needs to be substantially improved and more fully coordinated and applied to US information activities. The proposed Foreign Opinion Research Advisory Group (FORA) is hereby approved, and agencies should seek funding for it as required.

There is an urgent requirement for more extensive and sophisticated training of USG personnel in the international information environment, and in substantive and technical requirements of effective international and intercultural communication. Agencies should review their existing training programs and augment them as necessary. In the area of career development, a special effort should be made by all agencies to develop career tracks which encourage qualified individuals to remain in the field of international information.

The lack of adequate resources devoted to international information remains a problem of fundamental importance. All Executive departments with significant activities in the international or national security areas should comprehensively review their participation in and support of US international information activities, with a view both to increasing resources devoted to this area within current allocations and establishing clear requirements for future budgetary submissions.

There is a need to enhance the role of international information considerations in the national security policy process. Wherever appropriate, major national security policy studies and decision documents should include an assessment of the impact of policy options or decisions on foreign opinion and on the international information environment generally.

In order to generate the public consensus that is essential to support of a vigorous international information effort, agencies will review current mission statements and other existing policy declarations and revise them as necessary to reflect the guidance provided by this directive and the accompanying study. Other activities in support of this objective should be pursued by the involved agencies on a coordinated basis.

Ronald Reagan
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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 4:12 am

Memorandum for the Chairman, Special Planning Group, Public Diplomacy
by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger
February 4, 1985

4601
TOP SECRET
THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
WASHINGTON, THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
February 4, 1985
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

MEMORANDUM FOR THE CHAIRMAN, SPECIAL PLANNING GROUP, PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

SUBJECT: NSDD 130 Tasking

In your 4 April 1984 memorandum supplementing Presidential tasking in National Security Decision Directive 130, you requested from the Department of Defense recommendations for a national structure and policy guidelines for the conduct of psychological operations. On 20 July 1984, pursuant to your tasking, I recommended, in considerable specificity, the establishment of a National Psychological Operations Committee and the approval of national guidelines for the conduct of military psychological operations. Subsequently, in order to meet the intent of NSDD 130, this department issued a directive that requires the armed forces to conduct overt, strategic psychological operations in peacetime and I ordered the development of a departmental master plan that will serve as a blueprint for the revitalization of our military psychological operations.

Actions within the Defense Department to satisfy the requirements laid down in NSDD 130 are well in train. It is now necessary that the remaining provisions of NSDD 130 with respect to psychological operations be implemented fully. A national organizational framework and national policy guidelines, as provided for in NSDD 130, within which military psychological operations can be conducted most effectively in support of U.S. objectives, are required. Therefore, I urge the speedy approval of my recommendations of last July. This approval can provide the impetus to the rebuilding of a necessary strategic capability, focus attention on psychological operations as a national -- not solely military -- instrument, and ensure that psychological operations are fully coordinated with public diplomacy and other international information activities.

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 4:35 am

Memorandum for Dr. Stearman, National Security Council
by Alfred H. Paddock, Jr., Colonel, U.S Army, Director for Psychological Operations
March 25, 1986

SECRET
OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301-2000
25 Mar 1986
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

MEMORANDUM FOR DR. STEARMAN, NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

SUBJECT: PSYOP Committee

As per our last discussion, attached is a draft charter for an additional committee which would report to the SPG in the NSDD-77 mechanism. This would constitute one track of the dual track approach suggested by Dr. Ikle. The other track would be a PSYOP committee reporting to the PCG. Dual membership on both committees by a few individuals should assist in the coordination of PSYOP programs.

I believe that the draft charter affords a degree of generalization similar to the charters of the existing NSDD-77 committees, thus hopefully will allow us to move past the line-by-line haggling over more comprehensive terms of reference during previous meetings. At the same time, the charter clearly places the responsibility for defining peacetime PSYOP activities on the committee, as well as for providing appropriate interagency coordination and policy guidance for the participation of DoD in such activities -- as specified in NSDD-130.

Since both Gerry Helman and Phil Arnold have asked for more illustrative examples of DoD's participation in peacetime PSYOP, I proposed that DoD present a briefing on PSYOP programs supporting our foreign policy objectives in Central America. From our perspective, the best time to present such a briefing would be the period 14-25 April. This briefing, plus discussion of the draft PSYOP committee charter, would constitute the agenda for our next meeting.

Alfred H. Paddock, Jr.
Colonel, U.S Army
Director for Psychological Operations

Attachment
a/s

cc. Mr. Alderman - DUSD
Mr. [DELETE] - ODUSD
Mr. [DELETE] - ODUSD
Col. [DELETE] -- 33 POD

CLASSIFIED BY DIR, PSYOP
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***

Psychological Operations Committee: This committee will be chaired by a representative of the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs. A senior representative of the Department of Defense will serve as vice chairman of the Committee. This group will be responsible for planning, coordinating and implementing psychological operations activities in support of United States policies and interests relative to national security. The committee will provide the focal point for interagency coordination of detailed contingency planning for the management of national information assets during war, and for the transition from peace to war. It will coordinate interagency information assets and develop national policy guidance to respond to the operational needs of military commanders during crises. It will formulate and define the nature of overt psychological operations activities in peacetime, and provide appropriate interagency coordination and policy guidance for the participation of the Department of Defense in these programs, as directed by NSDD-130. The committee shall be empowered to make recommendations and, as appropriate, to direct the concerned departments and agencies to implement psychological operations strategies in support of key policy objectives, and to insure that these strategies complement US public diplomacy and international information activities.

To implement NSDD 130, a Psychological Operations Committee (POC) will be created consisting of representatives from Defense, State, CIA, USIA, and other agencies when required. This Committee will be chaired by designated representatives of the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs.

NSDD 130 stressed the importance of psychological factors in maintaining the confidence of allied governments and in deterring military action against U.S. national interests. In order to employ psychological operations (PSYOP) effectively and economically, the POC shall establish national PSYOP guidelines, and define the roles and relationships of the agencies involved in PSYOP. NSDD 130 further stated that in order to be prepared for the immediate and effective use of PSYOP in crisis and wartime, it is vital that the Armed Forces maintain a strong and active international information capability; therefore, the POC shall ensure that the Department of Defense gives high priority to the revitalization and full integration of PSYOP in military operations and planning, and to promoting a funded PSYOP program.

Crisis and wartime conditions impose special requirements on U.S. international information activities. The POC shall seek to ensure that in wartime or during crises (which may be defined as periods of acute tension involving a threat to the lives of America citizens or the imminence of war between the U.S. and other nations), U.S. international information elements are ready to initiate special procedures to ensure policy consistency, timely response and rapid feedback from the intended audience. The agencies represented on the POC should review and, as necessary, develop procedures for their operations during crises.

NSDD 130 also directs the Department of Defense, with appropriate interagency cooperation and in accordance with national law and policy, to participate in PSYOP programs in peacetime. Department of Defense participation in other international information activities shall continue to be under the SPG which should take the lead in developing coordinated interagency plans, including the utilization of DOD capabilities, for such activities in support of national security objectives. When appropriate and required, the POC shall work with the SPG in coordinating PSYOP with other international information activities.

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 4:45 am

Establishing of a Psychological Operations Committee
by John M. Poindexter
July 31, 1986

4601
SECRET
THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON
July 31, 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF STATE
THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
THE DIRECTOR OF CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE
CHAIRMAN, JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF
ADMINISTRATOR, AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
DIRECTOR, UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY
CHAIRMAN, BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

SUBJECT: Establishing of a Psychological Operations Committee

To implement NSDD 130, a Psychological Operations Committee (POC) will be created consisting of representatives from Defense, State, CIA, USIA, and other agencies when required. This Committee will be chaired by designated representatives of the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs

NSDD 130 stressed the importance of psychological factors in maintaining the confidence of allied governments and in deterring military action against U.S. national interests. In order to employ psychological operations (PSYOP) effectively and economically, the POC shall establish national PSYOP guidelines, and define the roles and relationships of the agencies involved in PSYOP. NSDD 130 further stated that in order to be prepared for the immediate and effective use of PSYOP in crisis and wartime, it is vital that the Armed Forces maintain a strong and active international information capability; therefore, the POC shall ensure that the Department of Defense gives high priority to the revitalization and full integration of PSYOP in military operations and planning, and to promoting a funded PSYOP program.

Crisis and wartime conditions impose special requirements on U.S. international information activities. The POC shall seek to ensure that in wartime or during crises (which may be defined as periods of acute tension involving a threat to the lives of American citizens or the imminence of war between the U.S. and other nations), U.S. international information elements are ready to initiate special procedures to ensure policy consistency, timely response and rapid feedback from the intended audience. The agencies represented on the POC should review and, as necessary, develop procedures for their operations during crises.

NSDD 130 also directs the Department of Defense, with appropriate interagency cooperation and in accordance with national law and policy, to participate in PSYOP programs in peacetime. Department of Defense participation in other international information activities shall continue to be under the SPG which should take the lead in developing coordinated interagency plans, including the utilization of DOD capabilities, for such activities in support of national security objectives. When appropriate and required, the POC shall work with the SPG in coordinating PSYOP with other international information activities.

John M. Poindexter

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 4:52 am

First Meeting of the Psychological Operations Committee (POC)
by Rodney B. McDaniel, Executive Secretary, National Security Council
September 2, 1986

6269
SECRET
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506

September 2, 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR NICHOLAS PLATT, Executive Secretary, Department of State
JAMES F. LEMON, Executive Secretary, Department of Defense
JOHN H. RIXSE, Executive Secretary, Central Intelligence Agency
JOHN BITOFF, Executive Assistant to the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
RICHARD MEYER, Executive Secretary, Agency for International Development
LARRY R. TAYLOR, Chief of the Executive Secretariat, U.S. Information Agency
BRUCE PORTER, Executive Director, Board for International Broadcasting

SUBJECT: First Meeting of the Psychological Operations Committee (POC)

The first meeting of the Psychological Operations Committee (POC) will be on September 10, 1986, at 2:00 p.m., in Room 208 of the Old Executive Office Building. As this will be an organizational meeting, we have allotted two hours for the session. Two representatives from each participating agency are invited to attend. Please give the office of Walter Raymond (395-6900) the names of those who will be attending from your agency no later than COB, Friday, September 5.

The following will be the meeting's agenda:

Central America

• DOD Presentation on Programs in Support of SOUTHCOM

• Discussion of the Above Presentation

o How can other POC agencies support and complement DOD programs in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama.

Developing National PSYOPS Guidelines

• A briefing on DOD's response to NSDD 130

• Establishing a Subcommittee to prepare recommendations on:

o roles, missions, and relationship of agencies in formulating and implementing a national PSYOPS PROGRAM

o Organization of national PSYOPS ASSETS:

 Bureaucratic structure for PSYOPS in crises and wars.

 Inventory of personnel and technical assets.

Rodney B. McDaniel
Executive Secretary

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 5:17 am

Establishment of a Psychological Operations Committee
by Craig Alderman, Jr., Deputy, Department of Defense
September 2, 1986

SECRET
OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301-2000
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

2 September 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR DIRECTOR, JOINT STAFF

SUBJECT: Establishment of a Psychological Operations Committee

On 31 July 1986, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs established an interagency Psychological Operations Committee to implement NSDD-130, U.S. International Information Policy. The Committee will be co-chaired by the Senior Director for Intelligence Programs, Vince Canestraro, of the NSC staff. We anticipate that regular participants in the Committee will be Assistant Secretary-level representatives from Defense, State, CIA, and USIA. The Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Policy) will be the OSD representative.

The purpose of this memorandum is to request that the JCS provide an appropriate representative for this Committee and to ask that the Army's 4th Psychological Operations Group prepare a series of information briefings for meetings of the Committee. These briefings normally should be no longer than 30 minutes in duration. They are intended to both inform the Committee and to focus its deliberations on key agenda items.

The first briefing requested is on the overt peacetime U.S. military PSYOP program in the USSOUTHCOM area of responsibility. The briefing, which will be presented during the initial meeting of the Psychological Operations Committee on 10 September 1986, should focus on the objectives and organization of the program, progress to date, and future plans. Some illustrative examples of the utilization of PSYOP by friendly regular military forces, particularly in El Salvador, would be useful.

Subsequent briefings requested, in approximate order of sequence, will focus on the Republic of Phlippines, Project TOUCHSTONE, contingency planning for war, crisis response, psychological exploitation of military exercises, and Project NIAGARA FALLS. Details on these briefings will be coordinated with your staff. The OSD point of contact is Colonel Alfred H. Paddock, Jr., Director of Psychological Operations (x55692).

Craig Alderman, Jr.
Deputy

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 5:19 am

The Psychological Operations Committee Gets Under Way
by Walter Raymond, Jr., Vincent M. Cannistraro, William L. Stearman
October 1, 1986

7131
SECRET
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506
[National Security Advisor has seen]

October 1, 1986

INFORMATION

MEMORANDUM FOR JOHN M. POINDEXTER

FROM: WALTER RAYMOND, JR.
VINCENT M. CANNISTRARO
WILLIAM L. STEARMAN

SUBJECT: The Psychological Operations Committee Gets Under Way

The Psychological Operations Committee (POC), which you recently authorized, had its first meeting on September 10. The report on the meeting at Tab I provides a description of how the POC will function.

The POC will be operating on two levels. A Planning Sub-Committee (PSC) will plan POC agendas and will also be responsible for developing PSYOPS guidelines and for inventorying and assessing USG technical and human PSYOPS assets (except for those of CIA). The POC will, at each meeting, focus on an area of operations (e.g., Central America, Afghanistan, Philippines) and will review and approve PSC recommendations and reports.

We are confident that the POC will at last provide the mechanism we have needed to focus and to coordinate interagency PSYOPS efforts and are satisfied that it has gotten off to a good start.

cc. Peter Rodman
Ron St. Martin
Ken Kissell

Attachment

Tab I PSYOPS Report

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 5:30 am

PSYOPS Operations Committee
by Walter Raymond, Jr., Vincent M. Cannistraro, William L. Stearman
November 4, 1986

7996
SECRET
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506

INFORMATION

November 4, 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR JOHN M. POINDEXTER

FROM: WALTER RAYMOND, JR.
VINCENT M. CANNISTRARO
WILLIAM L. STEARMAN

SUBJECT: PSYOPS Operations Committee

Attached at Tab I is a memorandum summarizing the second PSYOPS Committee meeting. We focussed this meeting on the Philippines in an effort to get the Department of Defense more engaged in the nation-building/civic action program in that country. The next step will be a tightly drafted outline of a PSYOPS Plan which we will send to that Embassy for its comment. The POC was alerted both by Dick Childress and State over the extreme sensitivities of a PSYOPS plan at a time when there is serious tension within the Government of the Philippines. We will be seeking Steve Bosworth's counsel regarding how to raise the plan for approval with the Government of the Philippines after we have an agreed program.

Attachment

Tab I Memorandum for the Record

cc: Dick Childress

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***

SECRET
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20506

INFORMATION

October 31, 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR RODNEY B. MCDANIEL

FROM: WALTER RAYMOND, JR.
VINCENT M. CANNISTRARO
WILLIAM L. STEARMAN

SUBJECT: Psychological Operations Support for the Philippines

The second meeting of the PSYOPS Committee took place on October 24. DOD provided a detailed presentation of the kinds of things that they could undertake if a PSYOPS plan were approved. This largely focussed on a range of civic actions supportive of the overall effort to overcome the insurgency. There is considerable concern about the sensitivities of any type of a PSYOPS program given the political situation in the Philippines today. Nevertheless, it was the unanimous agreement of the Committee that a plan should be developed and sent to the field for their input. The tasker at Tab I is designed to set that process in motion.

RECOMMENDATION

That you sign the tasker at Tab I.

Approve

Dick Childress concurs.

Attachment

Tab I Tasker

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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 5:42 am

Interim Executive Summary: Project NIAGARA FALLS
by Craig Alderman, Jr., Deputy
November 20, 1986

RECEIPT FOR CLASSIFIED MATERIAL
TO: Mr. Walter Raymond
National Security Council (NSC)
Old Executive Office Bldg, Wash DC
Number: D162871

Description of Material being Trasferred (Do Not Enter Classified Info): MEMORANDUM ON PROJECT NIAGARA FALLS

UNCLASSIFIED UPON REMOVAL OF CLASSIFIED ENCLOSURE(S)
2/15/12

***

SECRET
THE UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301-2000

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

20 November, 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE FOR INTERAMERICAN AFFAIRS

SUBJECT: Interim Executive Summary: Project NIAGARA FALLS

As you requested during the In-Progress-Review briefing by the 4th Psychological Operations Group on the psychological operations plan to help bring about democratization of Nicaragua, I am forwarding the executive summary of the plan as completed so far (TAB A).

Progress toward completion continues to be on track, and planning will be finished in early December. A briefing and executive summary on the complete plan will be available at that time.

Craig Alderman, Jr.,
Deputy

Attachment
a/s

cc:

NSC: Walter Raymond
Vincent Cannestraro

CIA: DDO/CATF
DDO/PPS

CLASSIFIED BY: USD (P)
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***

SECRET
THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20301-5000
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

DJSM 2008-86
19 November 1986

MEMORANDUM FOR THE DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR POLICY

Subject: Follow-on Actions for Project NIAGARA FALLS

1. In response to your memorandum* of 14 November 1986, enclosed is the Executive Summary for Project NIAGARA FALLS, forwarded through the Army from the 5th Psychological Operations Group.

2. I believe this summary provides the requisite information for presentation before the Inter-Agency Group on Nicaragua.

3. The Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff will continue to assist your staff, as necessary, to ensure completion of this important project.

P.F. CARTER, JR.
Vice Admiral, USN
Director, Joint Staff

Enclosure
a/s

Reference:
* DUSD (P) memorandum, 14 November 1986, "Follow-on Actions for Project NIAGARA FALLS"

Classified by Director, Joint Staff
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Re: National Security Decision Directive No. 130

Postby admin » Thu May 25, 2017 5:51 am

SI MEETING

1. Objective = To secure the support of Socialist and Social Democratic Parties for US objectives and policy; or at least to prevent them from opposing US policy.

2. Means = What has been US strategy (brief summary), 2 tracs, but limited activity.

3. What has been gained?

4. What have been the costs?

-- resources
-- politically

5. What can be achieved in the future? Estimated timetable.

6. With what costs?

(a) resources
(b) politically

[ILLEGIBLE]
US efforts: Ledeen, Gershman
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