Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and Associ

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 8:00 am

TAB 1. INSPECTOR GENERAL'S SURVEY OF THE CUBAN OPERATIONS; OCTOBER 1961

16 February 1962

MEMORANDUM FOR: Director of Central Intelligence

SUBJECT: Inspector General Survey of the Cuban Operation (dated October 1961)

It is my understanding that you have requested information concerning the distribution of the IG Survey of the Cuban Operation and the DD/P comments on it. At the time the report was written it was understood that copies of the report would be sent to the President's Board and consequently 20 copies were made. However, the only distribution made of the report is as follows:

Copy 1 - Mr. McCone - 21 November 1961
2 - DCI (Then Mr. Dulles) - 24 November
3 - DDCI (then Gen. Cabell) - 24 November
4 - DD/P (then Mr. Bissell) - 24 November
5 - IG (Mr. Kirkpatrick)
6 - On file in office of Acting IG (Mr. McLean)
7 - C/WH (Col. King) - 24 November
8 - Mr. Esterline (WH Division) via Col. King - 24 November
9 - On file in my office
10 - President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, via Mr. Earman at request of DCI, 18 January 1962
11 through 20 - On file in my office

Lyman B. Kirkpatrick s/

rcm
chrono
subj
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 8:01 am

TAB 2. MEMORANDUM OF TRANSMITTAL OF IG SURVEY OF THE CUBAN OPERATION TO MR. JOHN McCONE FROM INSPECTOR GENERA; 20 NOVEMBER 1961

20 November 1961

MEMORANDUM FOR: Mr. McCone

SUBJECT: Survey of the Cuban Operation

1. Presented herewith is a 150-page survey of the Cuban operation, together with the most important basic documents on the operation which are included in the five annexes. In this report we have not attempted to go into an exhaustive step by step inspection of every action in the operation. Nor have we tried to assess individual performance, although our inspection left us with very definite views. Rather, we have tried to find out what went wrong, and why, and to present the facts and conclusions as briefly as possible. This report has been double-spaced for ease in reading. The ten recommendations for corrective action start on page 148.

2. In conducting this survey we reviewed all of the basic files and documents, including all of the material prepared by the Agency for General Maxwell Taylor's Committee, as well as the minutes of that Committee which were made available to us. In addition, we conducted extensive interviews with all of the principal officers on the project from the DD/P on down, and made detailed memoranda for our files on all of these discussions; e.g., my meeting with the top three officers of the Branch reviewing the operation the week after the landing failed is reported in some 70 pages. Thus, while the analysis and conclusions presented herewith regarding the operation are those of the Inspector General, the bases for these conclusions are extensively documented in the files.

3. This, in my opinion, is a fair report even though highly critical. Unfortunately, there has been a tendency in the Agency to gloss over CIA's inadequacies and to attempt to fix all of the blame for the failure of the invasion upon other elements of the Government, rather than to recognize the Agency's weaknesses reflected in this report. Consequently, I will make no additional distribution of this report until you indicate whom you wish to have copies. In this connection, the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board has requested a copy in time for Mr. Coyne to give a brief report on it at their December 9 meeting. I will await your wishes in this regard.

/s/ Lyman Kirkpatrick
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick
Inspector General

Attachment
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 8:02 am

TAB 3. MEMORANDUM OF TRANSMITTAL OF IG SURVEY OF THE CUBAN OPERATION TO DCI FROM INSPECTOR GENERAL; 24 NOVEMBER 1961

TS: # 173040/Add.

24 November 1961

MEMORANDUM FOR: Director of Central Intelligence

SUBJECT: Report on the Cuban Operation

1. The report on the Cuban Operation, as is true of all Inspector General reports, was prepared under my personal direction and worked on by myself and my deputy, Mr. David McLean, as well as the three officers who did the principal collecting of information and preparation of the text: Messrs. _____, _____ and _____. The final editing was done by myself personally and the report represents the views of the Inspector General.

2. In preparing the report we had access to all of the material prepared by this Agency and submitted to the Taylor Committee, as well as the minutes of the Taylor Committee meetings, and a chance to see their final conclusions and recommendations. In addition to this we had all of the documentary material available in the WH Division, WH-4, and other staffs and divisions of the Agency who had cognizance of or prepared material for WH-4. These particularly included ONE, OCI and Staff D of the DD/P.

3. As is noted particularly in our report, we did not go outside of the agency in any respect and tried to confine our inspection to only internal agency matters, except where reference had to be made to outside actions that affected the operation. In interviewing persons connected with this operation, we talked initially to three of the top officers in the operation, commencing with Mr. Esterline and Colonel Hawkins, and having our initial lengthy discussions with them within a week of the operation. We interviewed all of the appropriate supervisors in the DD/P, starting with the DD/P himself and including the A/DDP/A, Chief, WH, Chief WH-4, and some 130 other officers and employees directly involved in the operation. We kept extensive notes and material of all of these discussions which are documented in our files.

Lyman B. Kirkpatrick
Inspector General

cc: DDCI
DD/P
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:04 am

TAB 4. DDCI MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD CONCERNING RESTRICTED DISTRIBUTION OF IG'S REPORT ON CUBA; 28 NOVEMBER 1961

28 November 1961

MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD

General Cabell called Mr. Kirkpatrick to state that the fact of the IG's report on Cuba should be restricted on a must-need-to-know basis. No copies other than those that have been distributed to Mr. McCone, Mr. Dulles, General Cabell, Mr. Bissell, Colonel King, and Mr. Esterline will be distributed without authority of the DCI or DDCI.

This restriction also specifically applies to distribution to the President's Board of Intelligence Advisors, and Mr. Kirkpatrick so informed 27 November.

General Cabell has discussed holding this report tightly with Mr. Dulles and Mr. Bissell, and the latter is to pass on the guidance to Colonel King and Mr. Esterline. (Accomplished per report to DDCI 27 November.)

/s/ CPC
C. P. CABELL
General, USAF
Deputy Director
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:04 am

TAB 5. MEMORANDUM FOR THE DCI FROM IG, SUBJECT: REPORT ON THE CUBAN OPERATION; 1 DECEMBER 1961

1 December 1961

MEMORANDUM FOR: Director of Central Intelligence

SUBJECT: Report on the Cuban Operation

1. In our conversation on Friday morning, the first of December, you mentioned your concern that the Inspector General's Report on the Cuban Operation, taken alone, might give an erroneous impression as to the extent CIA is responsible for the failure of the operation. In my opinion the failure of the operation should be charged in order to the following factors.

a. An over-all lack of recognition on the part of the U.S. Government as to the magnitude of the operation required to overthrow the Fidel Castro regime.

b. The failure on the part of the U.S. Government to plan for all contingencies at the time of the Cuban operation including the necessity for using regular U.S. military forces in the event that the exiled Cubans could not do the job themselves.

c. The failure on the part of the U.S. Government to be willing to commit to the Cuban operation, as planned and executed, those necessary resources required for its success.

/s/ Lyman Kirkpatrick
Lyman B. Kirkpatrick
Inspector General
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:05 am

TAB 6. MEMORANDUM PREPARED BY DDCI, SUBJECT: THE INSPECTOR GENERAL'S SURVEY OF THE CUBAN OPERATION; 15 DECEMBER 1961

15 December 1961

SUBJECT: The Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation

To comment on the subject report in detail would result in a paper approaching in length, that of the survey itself. Such a commentary would have to deal in depth with the aim of the survey, its scope, and the method used in compiling it. Such a commentary would, at a large number of pages, be required to note inaccuracies, omissions, distortions, unsupported allegations, and many erroneous conclusions.

A detailed inquiry on the Cuban operation on elements other than clandestine tradecraft, has already been completed by the group headed by General Taylor. General Taylor's report was based on testimony by all the principal officers involved in the Cuban operation. The Inspector General's report is not based on complete testimony; some of its conclusions are in conflict with General Taylor's conclusions.

It is not clear what purpose the Inspector General's report is intended to serve. If it is intended primarily as an evaluation of the Agency's role, it is deficient. Neither Mr. Dulles nor I was consulted in the preparation of the Inspector General's report. As a result, there are many unnecessary inaccuracies.

The report tries to do both too much and too little.

On the one hand, it attempts to describe the processes of national security policy-making as though this were a process in logical deduction like working problem in geometry. According to the Inspector General's account, firm propositions should be laid down in writing and in advance from which correct conclusions as to proper actions must inevitably be drawn. In this respect the report goes far beyond an analysis of the Agency's role, and it is not accurate. It tries to do too much.

On the other hand, the report treats the preparations for the April landings as if these were the only activities directed against Castro and his influence throughout the hemisphere and the world. It chooses to ignore all other facets of the Agency's intelligence collection and covert actions program which preceded, accompanied, and have followed the landings in April of 1961. Thus, it does too little.

The report misses objectivity by a wide margin. In unfriendly hands, it can become a weapon unjustifiably to attack the entire mission, organization, and functioning of the Agency. It fails to cite the specific achievements of persons associated with the operation and presents a picture of unmitigated and almost willful bumbling and disaster.

In its present form, this is not a useful report for anyone inside or outside the Agency. If complete analysis beyond that already accomplished by General Taylor and his group is still required, then a new kind of report is called for, -- a report with clear terms of reference based on complete testimony. Such a report could concentrate on clandestine tradecraft, an asset for which the Agency remains uniquely responsible.

/s/ C.P. Cabell
C. P. Cabell
General, USAF
Deputy Director
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:05 am

TAB 7. AN ANALYSIS OF THE CUBAN OPERATION BY THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR (PLANS), CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY; 18 JANUARY 1962

DD/P-2-0779

February 23, 1962

MEMORANDUM FOR: Assistant to the DCI, Mr. Chapin

SUBJECT: Return of Available Copies of "An Analysis of the Cuban Operation by the Deputy Director (Plans)," TS #181884.

1. Transmitted herewith are all the completed copies available to us of subject document. Included are copy 5 and copies 7 through 20.

2. To confirm our original understanding: Copies 1, 2, and 3 went to the DCI on 18 January; copy 4 went to Mr. Dulles on 18 January; copy 6 went to the Inspector General on 19 January; and copies 21 through 25 are unassembled, with the pieces residing in the DD/P Registry. We will destroy these latter materials if you have sufficient copies without assembling the last five.

ROBERT W. KING
Assistant to the DD/P

Attachments: As stated

*DD/P Registry (Margaret Porter) advised that these copies were being destroyed.

rcm
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:05 am

TAB 8. LETTER TO DR. JAMES R. KILLIAN, JR. CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT'S FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE BOARD, FROM DCI, TRANSMITTING THE IG SURVEY AND THE DD/P ANALYSIS OF THE CUBAN OPERATION; 19 JANUARY 1962

19 January 1962

Dr. James R. Killian, Jr.
Chairman, President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board
297 Executive Office Building
Washington 25, D.C.

Dear Mr. Killian:

Attached is copy of the CIA Inspector General's "Survey of Cuban Operations" together with comments thereon by General C. P. Cabell, Deputy Director of CIA and "Analysis of The Cuban Operation" by Deputy Director (Plans). This latter report is intended as a comment on the Inspector General's report.

As you readily understand, I am not in a position to render a personal opinion concerning the validity of the IG's report or the statements by the DDCI and the DDP because I was not in CIA at the time. However it is my personal opinion as a result of examinations I have made of this operation after the fact that both the report and the rebuttals are extreme. I believe an accurate appraisal of the Cuban effort and the reasons for failure rest some place in between the two points of view expressed in the reports.

I believe it is safe to say the failure of the Cuban operation was Government-wide and in this respect the Agency must bear its full share (though not the entire) responsibility.

For this reason I would recommend that your board, in reviewing the Inspector General's Survey also review the comments and analysis of the DDCI and the DD/P.

Yours very truly,

/s/ John A. McCone
John A. McCone, Director

Attachments: As stated
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:06 am

TAB 9. MEMORANDUM FOR DEPUTY DIRECTOR (PLANS), FROM C. TRACY BARNES, SUBJECT: SURVEY OF CUBAN OPERATION; 19 JANUARY 1962

19 January 1962

MEMORANDUM FOR: Deputy Director (Plans)

SUBJECT: Survey of Cuban Operation

1. My work in support of your "Analysis of the Cuban Operation" gave me an unusual opportunity to study with care the document which caused the Analysis to be written, namely, the "Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation, October 1961."

2. My consideration of the Survey has forced me to reach certain conclusions which I feel that I must record. I do so in writing because these conclusions are, in my opinion, of sufficient significance to demand the discipline of a written expression. Moreover, I feel that those who disagree with me should have the opportunity to direct any replies that they may choose to make to specific identifiable comments.

3. I may say that my decision to write this memorandum was reached with considerable reluctance and only after long deliberation. The deciding factor was my belief that the suggestions for action in paragraph 6 below are worthwhile and should be submitted. They would have been meaningless without the reasons set forth in the earlier paragraphs. The views expressed are, needless to say, exclusively mine.

4. In my opinion the I.G. Survey is most unfortunate for three reasons:

a. It is an incompetent job. The authors never understood the problems with which they were dealing and failed to express their views with any precision or proper use of relevant facts.

b. It is biased. Basically relevant evidence on vital issues was not only left out but never even mentioned. The Survey undertook only to present those items which suggested failures or inadequacies. These items, however, are not fully depicted so that a false picture was given. Admittedly, an I.G. must expose fault but it is also his job to do so accurately.

c. It is malicious, or, to put it alternatively, it is intentionally biased. Admittedly, this is a serious charge and is, at best, merely a statement of opinion. I can only say that I hold such opinion firmly. In my view it could be supported solely on the basis of the Survey's total omission in many places of significantly relevant evidence. Such omissions are so excessive and one-sided as to substantiate the conclusion that they must have been intentional. In addition, however, I would like to mention four other points:

1) The fact that the inspectors, in making their investigation, omitted any discussions of their findings with the senior officers responsible for the project. Although, technically, the I.G. can accurately state that he talked to the DD/P and the then A/DDP/A about the Survey, the fact is that these discussion were exceedingly brief and covered none of the real issues in the Survey. The AC/DPD was not spoken to at all. The Security Officer of WH/4 was not spoken to at all. Other senior officers, such as C/WH and C/WH/4, were never given an opportunity to express their views in relation to statements in the Survey.

2) Some officers with whom the inspectors had discussions felt after they had a chance to see the Survey, that it did not impartially express the information which they had provided and left out much of the relevant information given. Moreover, some officers have reported that the attitude of the inspectors and their line of questioning indicated a desire to obtain facts or views to support judgments already formed. Opinions contrary to these judgments were not only disregarded but resisted.

3) The distribution of the final Survey was so peculiar and contrary to normal practice that it raises an inference of intended partiality. The method of distribution is known and will not be repeated here. It might be added that there were other facts with respect to the distribution of the Survey worthy of mention. C/WH/4 was called one day and asked if he wanted to read the Survey. He said that he would like to do so but since both C/WH and DC/WH were away he could not leave since he was Acting Chief of the Division. Particularly, he could not meet the requirements of the offer which were that he would only have an hour from the time of the telephone call to see the Survey (including travel time) since it then had to be sent to the printer. Why the urgency was so great is not clear. As far as is known, only one individual outside of the I.G. Staff saw the Survey in final or substantially final form before it was distributed, namely, an officer who was the Chief of Operations for WH/4 during the project. Why he was selected instead of one of his superiors who was connected with the project is not known.

4) Since this particular operation, without question, involved more political interest and dynamite than any in which the Agency has ever participated, there was every reason for following regular procedures meticulously. In addition to the distribution point mentioned above, it seems relevant to wonder how Dr. Killian and the Attorney General knew of the Survey's existence so as to request a copy.

5. I should say that, whatever the appearance of the foregoing, I have not been trying to I.G. the I.G. The information reported came to me unsolicited and in the normal course of my work with you and your Analysis. Maybe there is additional evidence of importance, but I have not looked for it and do not plan to do so.

6. The significance of the foregoing is to provide the reasons for the main purpose of this memorandum, i.e., the submission of the following recommendations for action.

a. The DCI should resolve to his own satisfaction the conflicts on major issues between the I.G.'s Survey and your Analysis. Since both these documents are internal to the Agency, there is no Agency position on the Cuban operation unless the conflicts are resolved. In view of the importance of and the continuing interest in the operation at high levels of the Government, an Agency position seems essential. Such a position is also important for the future.; The operation is bound to be studied for various reasons and there should be an Agency position at least as to what happened, what were the mistakes and what were the lessons. Moreover, the DCI, having assumed office after the operation was thoroughly finished, has every reason for wanting to have some definitive findings and conclusions.

b. If the DCI agrees with a. above each recipient of the Survey and Analysis (and it is understood that they will only be distributed together) should be advised of the fact that such an Agency position is being sought. This might help to avoid independent conclusion is outside of the Agency being reached first.

c. The following requirements should be imposed on all future I.G. surveys at least on any aspects of the DD/P area of responsibility.

1) No survey shall be undertaken without specific written terms of reference approved by the DCI.

2) The DD/P shall be satisfied that in each future survey covering any portion of his area of responsibility the I.G. or his staff will interview at least all officers having had responsibility for any part of the activity inspected by the I.G. and prior to the distribution of the survey the DD/P and each such officer will be given an opportunity to express his views on points included in the Survey. Obviously the I.G. need not accept these views. Such procedure, however, will save an enormous amount of time required to answer surveys such as the Cuban one which fail to present a full factual picture regardless of the conclusions reached.

7. I am addressing this memorandum to you as my immediate superior. I hope, however, that you will agree with my request that the memorandum be passed to the DCI for his consideration. I do not, of course, ask that you associate yourself with it or any part of it merely because you transmit it.

/S/C.T.B.

C. TRACY BARNES

Original & 1 - DD/P
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

Re: Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation and As

Postby admin » Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:06 am

TAB 10. MEMORANDUM FOR MR. C. TRACY BARNES FROM LYMAN B. KIRKPATRICK REFERENCING BARNES' 19 JANUARY MEMORANDUM; 22 JANUARY 1962

22 January 1962

PERSONAL & CONFIDENTIAL

MEMORANDUM FOR: Mr. C. Tracy Barnes

Dear Tracy:

Thank you for your courtesy in sending me a copy of your memorandum of 19 January concerning the Inspector General's Survey of the Cuban Operation. I do hope that Dick forwards it to the DCI, and I am enclosing a copy of this note to you in case you wish to send a copy to Dick.

I have not had time to study your memorandum, or even in fact do more than glance at the DD/P analysis in view of the meeting with the President's Board all day Friday and the fact that I am going to be away all this week. However, I will make the following comments. Needless to say, I completely disagree with your statement that it is an incompetent job. I feel that it is competent and I believe that the more than one file cabinet drawer full of background documents will prove its competence. I do not believe that it is biased. We made it very clear at the start of the report that it would only deal with inadequacies and failures and would not purport to be a thorough analysis of the operation.

Most of all I object most strongly to your third observation, namely that it is malicious and intentionally biased. I have asked the men who did this survey to review your memorandum and comment on the reasons you believe that it is biased. I should perhaps acknowledge that more time should have been spent with you or Bissell, but inasmuch as this devolved on me, if there is a fault, it is mine personally. But to imply that for some reason, unknown to me, that we would slant this report is an unfair comment. You apparently feel there was something unusual in the distribution of the final report. The only thing unusual in it was that we had two Directors at the time, and Mr. McCone having asked for it received it as he was leaving for the West Coast on the day before Thanksgiving and everybody else got their copies on the day after Thanksgiving. Your concern as to how the President's Board and the Attorney General knew of the survey's existence can be answered very simply. In 1956 the President's Board in writing advised all agencies that all inspector general reports should be forwarded to them automatically. I don't believe it was a week after the Cuban operation that the direct question came from that Board as to whether an inspection was going to be done to which an affirmative reply was given. The Attorney General's source I do not know.

Finally, as far as to what should be done next, you and Dick should know that at the conclusion of my discussion with the President's Board I urged that a group, or individual, who had not in any way been associated with the operation be charged with taking the Taylor Report, our report and your comments and all background material and writing a truly national and detailed report. I believe that would be a far better solution than trying to develop a CIA position, which really is not very practical inasmuch as there were so many outside factors affecting this operation.

/s/ Kirk

Lyman B. Kirkpatrick
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 24270
Joined: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:21 am

PreviousNext

Return to Declassified Documents

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron