Boris Berezovsky (businessman), by Wikipedia

Re: Boris Berezovsky (businessman), by Wikipedia

Postby admin » Tue Aug 28, 2018 9:44 pm

Let Them Eat Cake
by Linda Yablonsky at the LA MoCA gala
November 16, 2011

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Left: Artist Marina Abramović and Debbie Harry. Right: Jeffrey Deitch, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. (All photos: Linda Yablonsky)

WHEN TWO PROTEAN ARTISTS face off against each other, the confrontation can be titillating. So it went last week in Los Angeles, over the Museum of Contemporary Art’s annual artist-designed fundraiser, conceived this year by Marina Abramović. “The shit has hit the fan,” Abramović said on Thursday, when the leaked draft of a letter that choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer wrote, but hadn’t yet sent, to LA MoCA director Jeffrey Deitch went viral on the Internet.

Rainer was protesting Abramović’s plans for the gala, “An Artist’s Life Manifesto,” scheduled for Saturday, November 12. The “entertainment,” Rainer wrote, promised to exploit the young people Abramović was training to perform for such meager pay that it amounted to abuse by the rich. Their job was to either lie naked under plastic skeletons revolving on the $100,000 dinner tables, or poke their heads through the $50,000 and $25,000 table tops while turning themselves on lazy Susans and locking eyes with guests throughout the evening.

The prospect of this “grotesque spectacle,” the outraged Rainer wrote, reminded her
not of Abramović’s The Artist Is Present, the performance empress’s three-month-long sit at the Museum of Modern Art last year, or of her Nude with Skeleton from 2002, but of Pier Paolo Pasolini’s 1975 film Salò, where fascist sadists sexually abuse beautiful youths.



“Subjecting her performers to public humiliation at the hands of a bunch of frolicking donors is yet another example of the Museum’s callousness and greed, and Ms Abramović’s obliviousness to differences in context and to some of the implications of transposing her own powerful performances to the bodies of others,” Rainer wrote, suggesting that MoCA rename itself “MODFR, or the Museum of Degenerate Fund Raising.”

[x]
Left: Dealer Shaun Caley Regen with artist Sue Williams. Right: Artists Adam McEwen and Andrea Bowers.

But it was the contretemps, not the exploitation issue, that notched up the pre-gala buzz. On her Facebook page, one LA artist called Abramović “deluded” and hoped the performers would rebel. Another posted an article about Vanessa Beecroft’s 1998 invitational performance at the Guggenheim Museum, where nearly naked models had to stand for hours while tuxedoed swells stared at them and nobody cried abuse. Yet the controversy barely flickered to life among the artists and curators at Regen Projects’ Thursday night opening for Sue Williams’s sexually scatological paintings, while Abramović joined the frolickers at collector Eugenio López Alonso’s dinner for designer turned photographer Hedi Slimane. But Deitch took the bait and invited Rainer to a rehearsal on Friday. Abramović, though cooperative, was not pleased.

She was especially exercised by the letter’s allusion to fascism, when she had spent her life opposing everything that her parents, Communist Party heroes in the former Yugoslavia, stood for. The gala, I gathered, would be something like a reverse Occupy MoCA, where wealthy, overdressed patrons would be given white lab coats to “democratize” the proceeding. Five hundred people had auditioned to be the heads and nudes on the tables, knowing they would be paid only $150 for their several hours on display. Though the chosen performers had signed confidentiality agreements to ensure the event would come as a surprise, one of them had complained to Rainer and then quit.

At a prerehearsal gathering that turned into a pro-Abramović rally, Rainer appeared a bit shaken by how quickly her unsent letter had gone public, but sat quietly among the ninety performers while Abramović acknowledged her presence and addressed her complaints. The small fee was all the museum could pay, she said, adding that she was getting no fee at all. She was hiring young people not to take advantage but because it took stamina to get through one of her durational pieces. “I’m the idiot,” she said. “I’m sixty-five and still doing this!”

Their performance as gala centerpieces would not be easy, she said, but she was taking every precaution to protect them. Diners would be instructed not to feed them, touch them, talk to them, or disrupt their performance in any way. Guards would make sure they were unmolested, but if anyone wanted to leave, they could walk out at any time. “It’s an experiment,” said Abramović, “not an entertainment. There’s a huge risk of failure, but this is my work.” This was greeted by a tremendous cheer of support and the rehearsal went forward, with Rainer interviewing the performers one by one. “I wonder how she’d like it if I did that at one of her rehearsals,” Abramović sniffed later.

[x]
Left: LA MoCA chief curator Paul Schimmel with Susan Jenkins, LA MoCA's manager of exhibition programs. Right: LA MoCA trustees Eli and Edythe Broad and Maria Bell.

That night, at the MoCA annex in the Pacific Design Center, Deitch defended Abramović for curious guests attending the opening of Slimane’s “California Song” photographs. Slimane was invisible in the darkness of an installation that projected his high-contrast, magazine-ready portraits on a cube at the center of the black-box gallery. “Any pictures that large are going to look good,” groused one observer, before moving on to Adam McEwen’s debut at Gagosian in Beverly Hills.

Next morning, an e-mail from Rainer had her “revised” letter attached, this time with dozens of signatures from other artists and writers joining the protest. The gist of it was the same as before, though this time Rainer took special care to respect Abramović’s work while denouncing her use of live heads and women-only nudes as “decorative centerpieces” at the gala to come. She claimed that the performers at the rehearsal were all “young, beautiful, and white” (I saw many black, Latino, and Asian faces, along with several white, not all young). She admitted they appeared both “touching and somewhat comic,” but recoiled at the thought of them being subjected to “possible public humiliation and bodily injury” at the hands of those frolicking donors. “Their cheerful voluntarism says something about the pervasive desperation and cynicism of the art world,” she concluded, “such that young people must become abject table ornaments and clichéd living symbols of mortality in order to assume a novitiate role in the temple of art.”

She had a point, but perhaps she has never seen one of the benefits for the Watermill Center that Robert Wilson creates. Rainer told me that she never goes to openings and was unaware that such celebrity clusterfuck fund-raisers had become common practice, more or less out of necessity. As Abramović said at the rehearsal, “Kings, aristocrats, and popes used to be the supporters of art. Today, in Europe, governments do it. In this country, we have businessmen and they want to be entertained. I want to take a different approach.”

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Left: MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach with filmmaker Kenneth Anger and Jeffrey Deitch. Right: Collector Maja Hoffmann.

By 7 PM that evening, the museum on Grand Avenue was filling with a parade of patrons who seemed oblivious to the debate. In very short order, I came across last year’s gala artist, Doug Aitken, Americans for the Arts advocate Nora Halpern, Hammer Museum director Ann Philbin, actress Rosanna Arquette, Guggenheim Foundation deputy director Ari Wiseman, and artists Mark Bradford, Alex Israel, and Rosson Crow. The latter was on the arm of designer Jeremy Scott and decked out in a vintage yellow gown by Don Loper—“Lucille Ball’s favorite designer,” Crow was quick to point out. Strolling through the collection galleries, I came across former gala artist Francesco Vezzoli (in Prada) with model Shala Monroque (in Rodarte). “I’m happy that Marina can still raise controversy,” Vezzoli said. “I wish the same for me at her age.”

While Minnie Driver, Gwen Stefani, Will Ferrell, Kirsten Dunst, Pamela Anderson, and David LaChapelle walked the red carpet outside, burlesque artist Dita Von Teese (in Jean Paul Gaultier) and sometime filmmaker and jewelry designer Liz Goldwyn (in a vintage red dress) joined the crowd previewing “Naked Hollywood: Weegee in Los Angeles” and “Kenneth Anger: Icons,” a Hollywood Babylon showcase of Anger’s films and memorabilia, within. “We’re a very creative museum!” said chief curator Paul Schimmel, noting that the shows came on the schedule only recently, and giving the impression he wasn’t all that thrilled at their entry. (His sweeping, and historic, Pacific Standard Time show at MoCA’s Geffen Contemporary took years to pull together.) “You just gotta roll with the punches and all the changes,” he said.

Guards asked everyone to proceed to the humongous dinner tent outside, where one tenet of Abramović’s manifesto was projected over the entrance. “An artist should avoid falling in love with another artist,” it said. Under it, a group of the hired performers helped patrons into their lab coats, though some, like Crow, refused.

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Left: Rosanna Arquette. Right: Jerry Brown's table.

Inside, all thought of exploitation quickly faded, as the 769 guests, who included California governor Jerry Brown and Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as well as Beecroft, took their seats before the rotating heads and nudes-with-skeletons and dug into their food unfazed. (It was delicious.) Some people did hold the gaze of the heads; others winked and elicited forbidden giggles. After brief speeches by gala cochairs Eli Broad and Maria Arena Bell, and another by Deitch, who called Abramović and Deborah Harry, the evening’s main entertainment, “giants in their field,” Abramović took the stage to exhort everyone to keep on their lab coats for the sake of the experiment at hand. (Not all obeyed.) She went on to explain that it hadn’t been her idea, but the museum’s, to use only women as the nudes. Artists rarely made manifestos anymore, she said, referring to the gala’s title, adding that they were necessary in these troubled times to establish a “codex of moral and social behavior.”

John Baldessari and Meg Cranston seemed pleased to be seated ringside, where half-naked and very buff pallbearers periodically mounted the catwalk-like stage carrying a shrouded body on a bier. At trustee Wallis Annenberg’s front-and-center table, Governor Brown was smiling but seemed uncomfortable at the nude before him. “That’s a fake vagina, isn’t it?” asked collector Michael Ostin, refusing to believe that the woman on display did not have “some kind of enhancement.”

He was not the only doubter. During Serbian folk singer Svetlana Spajic’s performance of a haunting tune from Robert Wilson’s The Life and Death of Marina Abramović, someone at the table beside mine loudly expressed his displeasure to Broad Foundation curator Joanne Hyler, dealer Sara Watson, Creative Time director Anne Pasternak, and Schimmel. “This is offensive!” he shouted. “This is shit, not art. Who is she kidding? Jeffrey! Yo, Jeffrey! Stop this!” The source turned out to be artist Thomas Houseago, who evidently had imbibed more than his share of the “Rauschenberg Spirit” wines. He continued his diatribe during a reading by the performers of Abramović’s full manifesto (“An artist should not steal ideas from other artists; an artist should not make themselves into an idol . . . ”) before leaving his dinner partners in peace.

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Left: The Marina Abramović cake. Right: Performer Svetlana Spajic.

Once again, the pallbearers mounted the stage, only this time the person under the shroud was the platinum-haired Harry, who sang her first number from a reclining position on the bier before hopping off to do “Heart of Glass,” followed by a rousing “One Way or Another” that brought much of the cheering, camera phone–wielding audience to its feet. After her final number, two more shrouded bodies were brought onstage. Under them was dessert: two eerily lifelike cakes fashioned to look like Abramović and Harry by LA’s Rosebud Cakes and Raphael Castoriano’s Kreëmart organization. Wielding lethal-looking knives, Abramović joined Harry to cut out the hearts of each of their cakes to a shouting, astonished crowd.

Chaos followed, as guests fought over pieces cut by the bare-chested pallbearers. “I want the breast! Give me the vagina!” they screamed, hardly noticing that Tilda Swinton had arrived for photo ops, looking very much like David Bowie in his Thin White Duke phase. When it was all over, the cut-up cakes resembled mutilated bodies that made for a ghoulish sight.

A man I didn’t know accosted me. “Is it me or was this all about violence against women?” he asked. “It’s you,” I said. “Look at that cake!” he exclaimed. “It’s a horribly mutilated woman with knives in her chest. Doesn’t that bother you?” “It’s a cake,” I said. “It represents all the indignities women have suffered at the hands of men. It is women telling their own history.” Apparently, the point was lost on him. “It’s disgusting,” he replied. I asked his name, which he declined to give. “I’m in the social register!” he growled, brushing past me to let Deitch know that this violence against women would result in the withdrawal of funding from the museum.


“Don’t be afraid of art!” Deitch said, when the man stormed off. “Wow,” he added a moment later. “That was intense.” In the end, the gala raised $2.5 million.

— Linda Yablonsky

[x]
Left: Gwen Stefani and Debbie Harry. Right: Artist Francesco Vezzoli.

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Left: Marina Abramović cuts the cake. Right: Debbie Harry enters.

Image Image [x]
Left: Artist Vanessa Beecroft. Right: Artist Rosson Crow and designer Jeremy Scott.

[x]
Left: Artists John Baldessari and Meg Cranston. Right: Gemma Ponsa Salvador and Doug Aitken.

[x]
Left: Dealer Sam Orlofsky with curator Chistine Kim and art consultant Sandy Heller. Right: Dita Von Teese with filmmaker Liz Goldwyn.

[x]
Left: ForYourArt's Bettina Korek with artist Alex Israel. Right: Curators Douglas Fogle and Franklin Sirmans.

[x]
Left: Artist Billy Al Bengston with Wendy Al. Right: Artist Mark Bradford.


Image [x]
Left: Collector Dasha Zukhova with photographer Rachel Chandler. Right: LAXART director Lauri Firstenberg.

[x]
Left: Artist Ryan Trecartin. Right: Collectors Liz Swig and Richard Chang.

[x]
Left: Dealers Sarah Watson and Brent Sikkema. Right: Artist Walead Beshty.

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Left: The Debbie Harry cake. Right: Tate Modern curator Jessica Morgan with dealer Tim Blum.
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Re: Boris Berezovsky (businessman), by Wikipedia

Postby admin » Wed Aug 29, 2018 5:35 am

Shalva Chigirinsky
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 8/28/18

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Shalva Chigirinsky is a Jewish Russian businessman operating in real estate and oil sectors.

Early life and education

Shalva Chigirinsky was born in 1950 in Kutaisi. He graduated from the Moscow Medical Academy.[1]

Career

In 1987, he emigrated to Spain and later to Germany, where in 1989, he became a co-founder of the real estate development company STT Group.[1] In 1990s in became a major shareholder of Sibir Energy, a London-listed Russian oil company. In 2009, the company sued Chigirinsky for at least US$325 million for a failed bid to sell his real estate assets to the company.[2] He faces several other lawsuits in different jurisdictions.[3] His stake in the company was taken over by Sberbank, pledged as loan collateral.[4] There is an investigation concerning alleged tax evasion by Chigirinsky.[2]

Personal life

Chigirinsky is divorced and has six children.[1] He and the mother of four of his children, Tatiana Panchenkova, divorced in 2009. She testified in a Connecticut court that he beat her for more than ten years.[5]

References

1. "Shalva Chigirinsky". Forbes. 2008-03-05. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
2. Katya Golubkova (2009-07-17). "Moscow eyes bigger Sibir stake amid shareholder probe". Reuters. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
3. Dmitry Sergeev (2009-08-24). "Russia's VTB says wins lawsuit against Chigirinsky". Reuters. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
4. Dmitry Sergeev (2009-08-24). "Sibir Energy secures $200 mln loan from Sberbank". Reuters. Retrieved 2009-09-13.
5. "Russian oligarch's ex-wife tells Connecticut court he 'brutally beat her for more than a decade and caused her to suffer a miscarriage'". Daily Mail. London.

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Russian oligarch's ex-wife tells Connecticut court he 'brutally beat her for more than a decade and caused her to suffer a miscarriage'
by Lydia Warren
PUBLISHED: 12:24 EDT, 6 February 2013 | UPDATED: 13:17 EDT, 6 February 2013

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Oil magnate Shalva Chigirinsky, 62, and the mother of his four children, Tatiana Panchenkova, 48, divorced in 2009

She was 'hospitalised many times after beatings' and eventually decided to sue him after 'he threatened to kill her at their daughter's birthday party'

Chigirinsky made his billions in oil but was rocked during 2008 downturn


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The ex-wife of a billionaire Russian oligarch has testified that he brutally beat her for more than ten years - once even causing her to suffer a miscarriage.

Shalva Chigirinsky, 62, grinned as his ex-wife Tatiana Panchenkova, 48, told a Connecticut court how he threw her out of their Moscow home while she was pregnant with their first child in 2001.

'I don't understand what's so funny here,' snapped Panchenkova, who was married to the real-estate and oil magnate until 2009. Both now live in Greenwich, Connecticut.

She described 10 alleged beatings, including one that caused her to suffer a miscarriage.

'I suffered as a mother, I suffered as a woman,' Panchenkova said. 'I was hospitalised on a number of occasions. I was threatened that I’d be destroyed, killed, taken out if I contacted the police.

Panchenkova, who has four children with Chigirinsky, said that on one occasion she woke to find him trying to suffocate her with a pillow, the New York Post reported.'

She said that the following day he told his lawyer that he wanted to kill his wife, 'but didn't know how to dispose of the body'.


Panchenkova said that the abuse continued even after they divorced and she eventually decided to sue her former husband after an outburst their daughter's 11th birthday party last year.

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'Abused': Tatiana Panchenkova, pictured right with Marina Mecik, told a Connecticut court about 10 alleged instances of physical abuse at the hands of her ex-husband

'In the presence of the children he said he was going to kill me,' she said. 'Called me garbage, a b****. He said he would create a miserable life for me every day.'

The testimony was part of her attempt to force her ex-husband to set aside $2.5 million for any damages she wins when the suit goes to trial, the Post reported.

She filed the civil-court complaint in October, saying she suffered 'a decade of brutal and barbaric physical, psychological and emotional abuse perpetrated' by Chigirinsky.

Georgian-born Chigirinsky was once one of Russia's richest men, with an estimated net worth of $1.6 billion in 2007, according to Forbes.

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Wealthy: Panchenkova, who lives in this $10 million home in Greenwich, divorced the oil magnate in 2009

He studied medicine in Moscow before starting a real estate business in the 1980s. He went on to make his billions in oil and real estate businesses - but was rocked by the 2008 financial meltdown.

It is not his first brush with the courts.

After falling in trouble with his creditors, in December 2011, a Moscow district court ordered Russia's federal tax agency to collect approximately 15 million rubles ($475,000) in tax arrears from him.

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Judge ends Russian oligarch’s bitter custody battle with bizarre ruling
by Lorena Mongelli
New York Post
August 19, 2016 | 1:50am

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

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Tatiana Panchenkov and former husband Shalva Chigirinsky
Douglas Healey (2)


The nasty, years-long child custody battle between a Russian oligarch and his ex-wife came to an end Thursday — as a Connecticut judge bizarrely ordered the warring parents to come to future court appearances bearing photos of their kids.

Oil and real-estate tycoon Shalva Chigirinsky and Tatiana Panchenkova have been too interested in bickering with each other rather than worrying about the well-being of their four children, Stamford Superior Court Judge Thomas Colin said.

“The parents are unfortunately occupied by their dislike and distaste of each other,” the judge said.

On Wednesday, he said that the kids — 8-year-old twins and daughters ages 15 and 9 — are “somewhere on their [parents’] mind but not at the top of that list.”

Colin ordered the parents to prominently display two family photos in the courtroom at subsequent family court hearings.

During a two-day hearing, the judge noted the kids have lived under a shroud of “distrust, hatred, anger and a lust for revenge” thanks to their parents’ four-year custody fight, marred by wild allegations of sex abuse and arrests. “It is a scary place for them,” Colin said.

As part of the joint-custody settlement that was reached, Chigirinsky can see his kids on alternating weekends and Wednesdays after school.

The billionaire must replace his Russian nanny with one who speaks English and have nanny cams installed in his Greenwich home.

He’ll also undergo “reunification therapy” with his 9-year-old daughter, whom he’s been charged with abusing. That case is still pending.

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Shalva Chigirinsky is not a pedophile, but can still become bankrupt
The court in the United States closed the scandalous case of Shalva Chigirinsky. Now the businessman will focus on the lawsuits to Viktor Rashnikov in Cyprus. If he loses them, then the scandalous businessman will face bankruptcy.
The Moscow Post
06.02.2017

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Court of the US state of Connecticut closed the criminal case against Russian businessman Shalva Chigirinsky. Businessman accused of committing "illegal acts" in relation to a 16yo person with possible bodily harm. The prosecution withdrew the accusation.

While the US Supreme Court considered this serious accusation, Shalva Chigirinsky was busy in court, too, but only in Cyprus. Apparently, the courts on two fronts were too much for the businessman, since he lost the last round of the Cyprus lawsuit. It should be noted that Shalva Chigirinsky asked the Cypriot court to arrest the property for a total amount of USD 90 million belonging to the head of Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works Viktor Rashnikov and his partner Nader Nader. It is about selling a stake in Chigirinsky's Russia Tower in the "Moscow City": the businessman argues that the transaction was carried out at a lower price.

First, the requirement was satisfied, however, the respondent party was not called to the court: this practice is common in Cyprus. But when Rashnikov's side presented their evidence, it was found out that the previous decision to arrest the head of MMK's assets was made on the basis of distorted information. Experts believe that the businessman in dire need of funds, and is just trying to "tear off money" from Rashnikov and Nader, using all available methods. But to defend his innocence in a US court and try to win back a large sum, for the Cypriot court it was not easy.

In January this year the Court of Limassol considered that the demand of Shalva Chigirinsky had no ground and, moreover, an application for seizure of property contained a lot of errors. The arrest of Rashnikov's assets was removed. Persons familiar with the situation believe that Chigirinsky intends to focus on "squeezing" of money from the head of MMK. But first it was necessary to cover the high-profile case on charges of illegal sexual acts against a minor.

It is possible that it was completed by agreement of the former spouses. The scandal initially looked like an attempt of Shalva Chigirinsky and his ex-wife Tatiana Panchenkova, who divorced in 2009, to divide the family assets upon divorce. The case featured two older daughters of the former spouses. It is curious as to why the prosecutor's office, on finding Chigirinsky not guilty, at the same time withdrew the charge in respect of Panchenkova? The woman was accused of committing acts "entailed the risk of harm to minors and their moral decay." The prosecution believes that Tatiana Panchenkova deliberately manipulated daughters, with the aim to stir up hatred for their father.

But on the same day when the prosecution against Chigirinsky was withdrawn, the prosecution against Panchenkova also ended. Persons familiar with the situation reminded that the former spouses had been dividing their assets for eight years after the divorce. During it, both parties showered each other with mutual recriminations. In particular, Chigirinsky accused Panchenkova of stealing jewels worth $100 million, and the ex-wife tried to prove in a Moscow court that she never recieved 354 million rubles promised her at the divorce. The same sources make the assumption that the former spouses decided to conclude a peace treaty, in a sense. What were the conditions, if the assumption is correct, we can only guess. But it is believed that the businessman had to abandon the judicial war on two fronts because he started to lose one.

"Robin Hood" saves himself

If the famous Robin Hood took away valuables from the rich and gave to the poor, than Shalva Chigirinsky as the evil tongues say, is making every effort to take away quite a fortune from the rich for his own self. Not that back in time, Shalva Chigirinsky and Victor Rashnikov on parity started to build an ambitious project, Russia Tower, a Moscow skyscraper, which was to become the capital's tallest building. However Chigirinsky faced serious financial problems. The businessman sold the property and moved to the United States. He could not for a long time sell his share in the Tower, as nobody wanted to buy it because the skyscraper, then as now, existed only on paper.

Finally, the share of Chigirinsky was bought by Viktor Rashnikov. Experts say that the seller for a not very liquid asset received the highest possible price. But the seller claimed that the head of MMK actually paid very little. For the sake of extortion of money from Nader and Rashnikov, Shalva Chigirinsky as the evil tongues say, even reconciled with his younger brother, Alexander Chigirinsky, if money can be regarded as the goal of reconciliation.

The problem is that Chigirinsky Jr is also unlucky in the courts.

The Chigirinsky brothers against Rashnikov

Last fall Chigirinsky brothers, who had not contacted each other for a long time before, suddenly hit Rashnikov with lawsuits. But if the claim of Chigirinsky Sr. concerned the Moscow-City Russia skyscraper which was never built, his younger brother was planning to cash in on a ready object. Initially, Evolution skyscraper in Moscow-City were to be built by Snegiri belonging to Alexander Chigirinsky and Inteko belonging to the wife of former Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov, Elena Baturina. However, in 2010 the businesswoman decided to leave the project.

In the same year Baturina sold 50 per cent stake in the project to Viktor Rashnikov for 37 million dollars. For the construction of Evolution, the MMK owner took out a loan, the project was finished and sold. According to rumors, the price amounted to a billion dollars. Net profit amounted to 267 million dollars, of which 50% came to the accounts of the Chigirinsky's entities, while the other half was transferred to City Palace, which Rashnikov and Chigirinsky Jr. owned jointly.

Representative of Rashnikov, Snapbox Holdings, appealed to the Russian arbitration, but the case was lost. Surprisingly, the Cyprus court, which Rashnikov addressed with the same demands, immediately arrested Rashnikov's assets worth $170 million as the claim security. However, Chigirinsky Jr. filed a lawsuit, too. He argues that during the deal with Inteko, the price of 37 million dollars, was strongly undervalued and demanded US $127 million.

However, in the autumn of last year, Alexander Chigirinsky withdrew his claims. Those familiar with the situation say that the claim was withdrawn because of its apparent unreasonableness.
But actually it changes nothing: Chigirinsky Sr. was "plucked" by the former wife, and the last asset that remained from the former business empire of brothers is Snegiri, which is now owned by Chigirinsky Jr., may soon go to the new owner.Aand after all the debts of the company all this time only grew: the parent company of Snegiri registered in Cyprus, ceased to disclose its accounts after 2013. Even then, the debt burden of the asset was estimated at $470 million.

However, the brothers' plans to capitalize on Viktor Rashnikov failed. One barely escaped 30 years in prison on charges of "sexual activities" in relation to a minor, the other is about to lose his last asset. It is possible that Shalva Chigirinsky will make a last attempt "to live beautifully" at the expense of the head of MMK. However, this option may also fail miserably.
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