Goethe's Theory of Colours

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Goethe's Theory of Colours

Postby admin » Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:11 am

Goethe's Theory of Colours
Translated from the German with Notes by Charles Lock Eastlake, R.A., F.R.S.
1840

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"Cicero varietatem proprie in coloribus nasci, hinc in aliennum migrare existimavit. Certe non alibi natura copiosius aut majore lascivia opes suas commendavit. Metalla, gemmas, marmora, flores, astra, omnia denique quae progenuit suis etiam coloribus distinxit; utvenia debeatur si quis in tam numerosa rerum sylva caligaverit."
[Google translate: "Cicero varied colors in the spring, both against the aliennm to move goods. Obviously it is not the wildness of their resources to the other parts of the nature of the time recommended to be more abundantly or in a greater. Metals, precious stones, marble rocks, the flowers, the stars, and in fact all the colors of the things that has distinguished the it provoke evidence of their own; utvenia due, if any, in the woods are so numerous caligaverit."]
-- Celio Calconini


Table of Contents: [PDF HERE]

• Translator’s Preface
• Preface to the First Edition of 1810
• Directions for Placing the Plates
• Introduction
• Part I: Physiological Colours
• I. Effects of Light and Darkness on the Eye
• II. Effects of Black and White Objects on the Eye
• III. Grey Surfaces and Objects
• IV. Dazzling Colourless Objects
• V. Coloured Objects
• VI. Coloured Shadows
• VII. Faint Lights
• VIII. Subjective Halos
• Pathological Colours – Appendix
• Part II: Physical Colours
• IX. Dioptrical Colours
• X. Dioptrical Colours of the First Class
• XI. Dioptrical Colours of the Second Class – Refraction
• Subjective Experiments
• XII. Refraction without the Appearance of Colour
• XIII. Conditions of the Appearance of Colour
• XIV. Conditions under which the Appearance of Colour increases
• XV. Explanation of the foregoing Phenomena
• XVI. Decrease of the Appearance of Colour
• XVII. Grey Objects displaced by Refraction
• XVIII. Coloured Objects displaced by Refraction
• XIX. Achromatism and Hyperchromatism
• XX. Advantages of Subjective Experiments – Transition to the Objective
• Objective Experiments
• XXI. Refraction without the Appearance of Colour
• XXII. Conditions of the Appearance of Colour
• XXIII. Conditions of the Increase of Colour
• XXIV. Explanation of the foregoing Phenomena
• XXV. Decrease of the Appearance of Colour
• XXVI. Grey Objects
• XXVII. Coloured Objects
• XXVIII. Achromatism and Hyperchromatism
• XXIX. Combination of Subjective and Objective Experiments.
• XXX. Transition
• XXXI. Catoptrical Colours
• XXXII. Paroptical Colours
• XXXIII. Epoptical Colours
• Part III: Chemical Colours
• XXXIV. Chemical Contrast
• XXXV. White
• XXXVI. Black
• XXXVII. First Excitation of Colour
• XXXVIII. Augmentation of Colour
• XXXIX. Culmination
• XL. Fluctuation
• XLI. Passage through the Whole Scale
• XLII. Inversion
• XLIII. Fixation
• XLIV. Intermixture, Real
• XLV. Intermixture, Apparent
• XLVI. Communication, Actual
• XLVII. Communication, Apparent
• XLVIII. Extraction
• XLIX. Nomenclature
• L. Minerals
• LI. Plants
• LII. Worms, Insects, Fishes
• LIII. Birds
• LIV. Mammalia and Human Beings
• LV. Physical and Chemical Effects of the Transmission of Light through Coloured Mediums
• LVI. Chemical Effect in Dioptrical Achromatism
• Part IV: General Characteristics
• The Facility with which Colour appears
• The Definite Nature of Colour
• Combination of the Two Principles
• Augmentation to Red
• Junction of the Two Augmented Extremes
• Completeness the Result of Variety in Colour
• Harmony of the Complete State
• Facility with which Colour may be made to tend either to the Plus or Minus side
• Evanescence of Colour
• Permanence of Colour
• Part V: Relation to Other Pursuits
• Relation to Philosophy
• Relation to Mathematics
• Relation to the Technical Operations of the Dyer
• Relation to Physiology and Pathology
• Relation to Natural History
• Relation to General Physics
• Relation to the Theory of Music
• Concluding Observations on Terminology
• Part VI: Effect of Colour with Reference to Moral Associations
• Yellow
• Red-Yellow
• Yellow-Red
• Blue
• Red-Blue
• Blue-Red
• Red
• Green
• Completeness and Harmony
• Characteristic Combinations
• Yellow and Blue
• Yellow and Red
• Blue and Red
• Yellow-Red and Blue-Red
• Combinations Non-Characteristic
• Relation to the Combinations to Light and Dark
• Considerations derived from the Evidence of Experience and History
• Aesthetic Influence
• Chiaro-Scuro
• Tendency to Colour
• Keeping
• Colouring
• Colour in General Nature
• Colour of Particular Objects
• Characteristic Colouring
• Harmonious Colouring
• Genuine Tone
• False Tone
• Weak Colouring
• The Motley
• Dread of Theory
• Ultimate Aim
• Grounds
• Pigments
• Allegorical, Symbolical, Mystical Application of Colour
• Concluding Observations
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