The Flying Dutchman, by Richard Wagner

That's French for "the ancient system," as in the ancient system of feudal privileges and the exercise of autocratic power over the peasants. The ancien regime never goes away, like vampires and dinosaur bones they are always hidden in the earth, exercising a mysterious influence. It is not paranoia to believe that the elites scheme against the common man. Inform yourself about their schemes here.

The Flying Dutchman, by Richard Wagner

Postby admin » Fri May 11, 2018 12:55 am

The Flying Dutchman (Der Fliegende Hollaender)
Libretto
Romantic Opera in Three Acts
by Richard Wagner
Metropolitan Opera

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ARGUMENT

ACT I.


A Norwegian brig is driven out of her course on the homeward voyage, and near the rockbound Norwegian Coast meets with the phantom ship of the “Flying Dutchman.” Daland, the captain of the Norwegian vessel, enters into a compact with the “Flying Dutchman” whose identity, however, is unknown to him, to give him a home and his daughter, Senta, for a wife, in consideration of the rich treasures stored away in the “Flying Dutchman’s” ship.

ACT II.

When the curtain rises, a bevy of Norwegian Girls, among whom are Daland’s daughter, Senta and her nurse Mary, are discovered turning their spinning wheels and singing a spinning song. A picture of the “Flying Dutchman” adorns the wall, and Senta, after singing a ballad sketching in incoherent, passionate strains, a story of the subject of the picture, solemnly vows that she will become the means of terminating the torment, to which the “Flying Dutchman” is subjected, and who can only be saved by a woman unwaveringly constant in her love. During the confusion which ensues upon this avowal, the father’s arrival is announced. In the time intervening between this announcement and Daland’s arrival, Erik, Senta’s lover, pleads for his love, and endeavors to persuade Senta that her infatuation for a phantom lover will lead to her irretrievable ruin; but to no avail. Daland arrives and presents the “Flying Dutchman” to his daughter. Senta accepts him as her affianced husband.

ACT III.

The curtain rises on the crew of the Norwegian brig singing a frolicking sailor song, and jesting with a bevy of girls, who bring them refreshments. The special object of their jest and fun (in which the girls also join), is the crew of the “Flying Dutchman,” whom they cannot persuade to join in their merry-making. They finally conclude that the crew of the neighboring ship must be dead, and the suspicion gains belief that the “Flying Dutchman” is playing one of his ugly tricks. The crew of the “Flying Dutchman” sing a fantastic song to which the Norwegian 3 sailors intently listen, and whose weird words they finally endeavor to drown in a song of their own. Erik pleads again with Senta, and the “Flying Dutchman” appears on the scene, and orders his crew to prepare for immediate departure, thinking Senta had proven as faithless and inconstant in the love she had vowed him, as the rest of womankind he had come in contact with. Senta, however, vows that she will be true to him, and even after the “Flying Dutchman” discloses his identity, she does not falter in her resolution. “Thine will I be, until death shall us part!” she passionately exclaims and the curtain falls.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

DALAND: A Norwegian Navigator
SENTA: His Daughter
ERIK: A Huntsman
MARY: Senta’s Nurse
THE MATE: Of Daland's Vessel
THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Sailors of the Norwegian Vessel.
The Crew of The Flying Dutchman.
Girls.

SCENE: THE NORWEGIAN COAST

ACT I.

SCENE I.

SAILORS.

Heigho! Heigho! Halloho!

DALAND.

No doubt! Full seven miles away
Drove us the storm at break of day
So near the port, and to be met
By adverse wind—’tis ’nough to fret!

MATE.

Ho! Captain!

DALAND.

On deck I am with you. How do things progress?

MATE.

Well, captain, we are in home waters.

DALAND.

’Tis Sandwyk beach, full well know I the bay.
Confound the luck! I saw my house; a welcome sight!
Senta, my child, I fancied in my arms I held,
When of a sudden changeth the wind,
And blew a gale, as if in league with Satan’s power;
But now the worst is past, and its fury
The storm hath spent in fitful blasts.
Well, boys, you’ve had to work with giant power,
And you may rest, now that past the danger;
And you, mate, you may take the watch for me;
There’s no danger now, still keep a sharp look-out!

MATE.

Rely on me! Good night, captain.

MATE.

In tempest’s roar, on the wide sea,
My girl, I think of thee!
The gale, ah, well! it came from the South,
Lucky for thee and me!
My girl, if it hadn’t Southwind been,
I wouldn’t see thee again!
Ah! come and blow, my Southwind fair,
Else waits my love in vain.
Hohohe! Jolohe! Heigho! heigho! heigho

On Southland’s coast, in far off land,
My girl, I thought of thee!
All o’er the main, from tropic coast,
A gift I brought for thee;
My love I bring a golden toy—
Come, Southwind, blow again!
Southwind, thou art a lovely boy,
If thou wilt blow again.
Hoho! ho! jolohe! heigho!

SCENE II.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

The time is up, and to Eternity’s tomb consign’d
Another seven years! Disgusted is the main,
And throws me on the strand. Ah! sea so proud,
Thy waves, ere many days are past, I’ll ride again.
What of thy scorn with my torment in the balance weigh’d?
The rest which on land I seek, oh! never
Shall I find; for to the ocean waves
My destiny is bound, until the last wave
Ceases to flow, and evaporates into air.
How often into deepest abyss of the sea
Have I thrown my ship and hapless me;
But, alas! the death I sought I never found.
Where yawns the grave for ship and sailor,
I drove my ship to craggy rock,
But not was watery grave my lot.
Where sails the pirate’s dreaded craft,
Have oft I waited for bloody strife;
“Now,” thus I challenged, “show thy pluck,
My ship with treasures rich is freight’d;”
But he, the sea’s barbarian son,
In horror did he cross himself, and take to flight.
For me no grave! For me no death!
Such damnation’s inflexible law.
I ask thee, heavenly angel mine,
Who my salvation’s condition hath secur’d,
Was I the foot-ball of thy caprice,
When the way to salvation thou didst show to me?
Ah! vain the hope, vain as is my prayer!
Faith hath taken wings, and soar’d to other worlds.
But one hope now remains,
But one hope I cherish!
Though the globe still sails through space,
It, too, must end its course some day.
Last day of Earth, oh! judgment day,
Thou wilt end my misery.
When comes the day, the dreaded day,
That solves Life’s great mystery?
When the sea gives up its dead,
Then will my requiem be said!
Die out, ye stars, in heaven’s dome,
Father above, oh, call me home!

(Chorus.)

Father above, oh, call us home!

SCENE III.

DALAND.

Ho! Heigho! Mate! Heigho!

MATE.

Nothing there, nothing!
Ah! come and blow, thou Southwind fair,
My girl—

DALAND.

You see nothing, and I thought that sharp lookout you’d keep.
There lies a ship! Answer me: How long did you sleep?
MATE.
Damnation! Pardon, captain! Who’s there? Who’s there?

DALAND.

Seems to me they are just as lazy dogs as we.

MATE.
Answer, ye! whence and whither, and what’s your flag?

DALAND.

Cease your questioning! methinks I see the captain—
Ye! holo! ye o’er there; whence and whither?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

From far I come. In such dreadful weather.
Will you deny me anchorage safe?

DALAND.

God forbid! the mariner knows full well hospitality’s worth. Who are you?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Dutch.

DALAND.

Be welcome then! I perceive the storm
Drove you, too, to this craggy shore;
I fared no better; but a few miles distant
Is my home. Almost within its charm’d circle,
I had to change my course. But, say,
Whence do you come? Has damage sustained your ship?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

My ship is sound, and wind and tempest proof.
Storm and adverse wind, in league,
Keep me away from the shore;
How long? How should I know it still,
When count I keep not any more?
I cannot tell the scenes I saw,
Nor name the ports I sought to reach;
The only scene I long to see,
I cannot find—my native beach!

And now, my friend, come take me home,
Give me shelter and give me rest.
My ship is freighted with treasures rare,
Choose thou the rarest, take the best—
Thy humble roof, oh, let me share!

DALAND.

How strange this sounds. Can I believe such tale?
It will seem that thine is a strange fate.
If I can serve thee, thou wilt find me ready;
But, may I ask, what does thy ship contain?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

The rarest of treasures I’ll show thee,
Gold and pearls and precious stones;
See how they glitter! Is the price
Ample, and does it compensate
For hospitable roof?

DALAND.

What! Is it possible? These treasures!
Who has riches enough to outweigh their value?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

I told thee how to repay for these treasures all;
I give them for the shelter of a single night.
Still what thou seest but small portion is
Of the riches stored in my ship’s hold.
Of what value all these treasures? No wife I have,
Nor child, and my native land I’ll never reach
All my riches shall be thine, as the price
I pay with all my heart for the home I crave.

DALAND.

What must I hear?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Hast thou a daughter?

DALAND.

I have, and dear she is to me.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Then give her unto me for wife.

DALAND.

My child shall be his; why should I delay,
When great is the wealth that will be my part?
The bargain is good, I’ll close it this day,
’Ere yet he might change his mind, and depart;
I will give him my child to be his bride,
So she will be a rich man’s happy wife;
A fool if such good offer I denied,
It’s the best bargain I made in my life.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

No heir, no child, no wife are given me,
And no earthly joy have ever I known;
Fate, relentless through all eternity,
Wildly pursues me like a hunted fawn.
Whenever I can reach my home again,
What shall I do with all my riches rare?
The terms are good; let us close the bargain,
And my ship’s whole cargo shall be thy share.

DALAND.

Truly, stranger, a pretty daughter I call mine,
With filial love she is attached to me;
She is my pride, the best of all I have,
And I feel for her as only a father feels.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

For the father she may always cherish filial love.
If true to him, true she will be to him she weds.

DALAND.

While jewels and pearls are costly things,
The costliest still is a loving wife.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

And she shall be mine?

DALAND.

My word I pledge to thee,
Thy fate has won my heart; thou’rt lavish;
Thus must be he who weds my daughter,
And if less rich thou wert, no other would I choose.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Thanks! Will I see thy girl ere sinks the day to rest?

DALAND.

With change of wind we set our sails homeward;
Once on shore, and if my daughter suits thee, then—

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Then she will be mine—my angel she shall be.
When out of torment’s iron hold,
I long to see salvation near,
I cling—for so have I been told—
To one hope still remaining dear.
May still I hope—I cannot pray—
That pity feel might angel-wife?
Then will I praise this happy day,
When o’er, at last, this woeful strife.
Though hope has died, and left no trace,
I hope again for joy and grace.

DALAND.

When from the South it blew a gale
That drove me to this rocky shore,
I did at first my fate bewail;
But now I wail and grieve no more.
I praise the wind that drove me here,
For here I met a lucky fate,
For here I found a treasure dear:
A rich man with my child to mate!
He who with treasure sails the sea,
Shall welcome to my daughter be!

MATE.

Southwind! Southwind!
Come, Southwind, blow again!

SAILORS.

Heigho! Heigho! Heigho!

DALAND.

We are lucky, indeed; for good is the wind,
And smooth as a sea of glass is the sea;
Let us weigh the anchors without delay,
And set sail for the sheltering port.

SAILORS.

Heigho! ho! Heigho! ho! ho!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

You sail ahead, if it so pleases you,
The wind is good, but fatigued are my men;
I’ll give them rest, and then I follow.

DALAND.

But if the wind should change?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

’T will blow from the South, be assured.
My ship sails fast, and will reach you soon.

DALAND.

As you say, so it be.
Farewell! And my child, will you see her this day?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

This day I shall see her.

DALAND.

See how swell in the wind the sails!
Hallo! Hallo! Be up and doing, boys!

SAILORS.

In tempest’s roar, on the wide sea,
My girl, I think of thee!
The gale, ah, well! it came from the South—
Lucky for thee and me!
My girl, if it hadn’t Southwind been,
I wouldn’t see thee again!
Ah! come and blow, my Southwind fair,
Else waits my love in vain.
Hohohe! Johohe! heigho! heigho!

ACT II.

SCENE I.

GIRLS.

Hum and buzz! What cheerful sound!
Turn round the wheel, quick, quick, quick!
Spin the golden thread around!
Hum and buzz like magic trick!
My love sails o’er stormy sea,
And thinks of me,
His own sweetheart.
Pray, O pray, for him and me,
That storm depart,
Fair wind his part!
Spin and spin
The wheel around,
Hum and buzz
With cheery sound!

MARY.

See, how quick they turn the wheel!
Must be for love they for him feel.

GIRLS.

Thou mustn’t speak! While floats our song
On airy wings, please hold thy tongue!

MARY.

Then sing your song the life-long night!
But, Senta! child, thou art so quiet.

GIRLS.

Hum and buzz! What cheerful sound
Turn round the wheel, quick, quick, quick!
Spin the golden thread around!
Hum and buzz like magic trick!
My love sails o’er stormy sea,
On Southland’s coast
He seeks for gold.
Pray, O pray, that I may boast,
And share his gold.
And now behold
How turns the wheel
With cheery sound,
While sure I feel
For home he’s bound!

MARY.

Thou bad child, thou, if thou wilt not spin,
Thou ne’er the gold thy love brings shalt win.

GIRLS.

Why should she spin and work as we?
Her love not sails o’er stormy sea,
Her love’s a huntsman gay and bold,
He brings her game instead of gold.

MARY.

Look at her! Always before the picture!
Senta, art thou to dream away thy young life,
Contemplating this portrait?

SENTA.

Thine the blame!
From thee his history I learned—
Poor man he!

MARY.

May God protect thy young life!

GIRLS.

What! what’s this! listen well!
She sighs for him, this pale man.

MARY.

Her head will be turned, God knows!

GIRLS.

This a simple picture’s power shows.

MARY.

All my scolding is in vain,
Come, Senta, be a good child.

GIRLS.

Not does she mind thee; she’s in love,
A bad affair this will be,
You know how jealous ERIK is,
Why! he’ll be apt to act quite rash,
And, blinded by his jealousy, shoot
His rival hanging on the wall.

SENTA.

Cease this talk, you foolish things,
Or angry I will be.

GIRLS.

Hum and buzz! What cheerful sound!
Turn round the wheel, quick, quick, quick!
Spin the golden thread around!
Hum and buzz like magic trick!

SENTA.
Enough, now, of this spinning song
It hums and buzzes in my ear;
If I must join your busy throng,
Then sing the song I hold so dear.

GIRLS.

Tired we are; sing it for us.

SENTA.

For me it is too long;
Why can’t Mary sing the song?

MARY.

Heav’n forbid! ’tis no time to jest,
Leave The Flying Dutchman at rest.

SENTA.

Why not sing it now as well?
Come, girls, I will sing you the song,
That you may hear how relentless fate
Ever and ever pursueth this man.

GIRLS.

Give us the song!

SENTA.

Be quiet and listen.

GIRLS.

The wheels at rest!

MARY.

Not mine! I turn my wheel quick, quick!

SENTA.

Heigho! ho! heigho! ho! heigho! ho!
There sails a ship o’er the deep main,
With blacken’d mast and crimson’d sail,
On deck you see the man of pain,
His eyes so dark, his face so pale.
Huzza! Listen the wind! Heigho! Heigho! heigho! ho!
Huzza! See the sails spread! Heigho! heigho!
Huzza! She leaps and leaps, from wave forever, evermore!
But he can be saved, this captain so pale,
If woman’s heart in her mission not fail!
But when will he find this woman so rare, this woman so rare?
Pray for the man at sea,
That woman true to him be!
Around a cape he once would sail,
And thus it was that he did hail:
“I’ll sail, I’ll sail, I’ll sail evermore!”
Huzza! Satan, he heard him hail! ho! heigho!
Huzza! Satan took him by his word! ho! heigh!
Huzza! And damned he! His ship, she leaps from wave to wave forever, evermore!
But that he might be saved, this captain so pale,
An angel points to woman’s heart without fail.
Oh! that he may soon find this woman so rare, this woman so rare!
Pray for the man at sea
That woman constant be!
Once in seven years he sought,
Still love for gold he ne’er bought!
Once in seven years he tried,
Still woman constant he ne’er spied!
Huzza! Spread the sails! heigho! ho!
Huzza! the anchor weigh! heigho! ho!
Huzza! False Love! Woman frail! leap, ship—leap from wave to wave forevermore!

GIRLS.

Where, oh, where is the woman so rare,
His love to win, his treasures to share?

SENTA.

Mine this mission be! My love thy salvation shall be!
Angel above, oh! bring to me
The pale man sailing o’er the sea!

MARY AND ALL THE GIRLS.

Heaven help us! Senta! Senta!

ERIK.

Senta! Senta! think of me who owns thy love!

GIRLS.

Erik, help, help! Her head is turned.

MARY.

My brain, it reels, it reels!
I’ll tear the picture into shreds,
As soon as her father returns.

ERIK.

The father! he’s coming!

SENTA.

My father, does he come?

ERIK.

His ship is sailing round the rock.

MARY.

Be up and doing, girls, and put the house in order.

GIRLS.

See them land! let us greet them!

MARY.

Easy, my beauties! in the house you’ll stay,
The crew quite hungry they’ll be
Coming from the stormy sea.
Set the table without delay,
Fill the glasses on the tray.

SCENE II.

ERIK.

Stay, Senta, stay! one moment stay!
End my torment, end it quick,
Pity, pity my despair!

SENTA.

Erik, thy despair I not comprehend.

ERIK.

Tell me, SENTA, tell me true what’s to become of me?
Thy father comes; ere hence he sails again,
He will accomplish what oft he did contemplate.

SENTA.

And what did he contemplate?

ERIK.

Choose a man for thee, a man for thee;
But little I call mine save this trusty rifle;
It will weight quite lightly in the scale,
And thy father will reject my suit.
When then my heart strong comfort needs
Say, Senta, say, who for me pleads?

SENTA.

Why discuss this question now? let me go
To welcome home the father.
If not on board his daughter he does see,
Quite angry he will be.

ERIK.

Why thus evade me?

SENTA.

To the ship I must go.

ERIK.

My presence does not please thee?

SENTA.

Let go, I say, let go!

ERIK.

Do not evade me now,
For great it is my grief,
But one word more, then go!
Let me ask, and answer give:—
When this heart strong comfort needs,
Will it Senta be who for me pleads?

SENTA.

Why doubt my heart, why doubt my love,
Why doubt my devotion’s faith and strength?
Why now these thoughts that give but pang,
Why this suspicion all at once?

ERIK.

Thou knowest well that gold is all thy father careth for,
And he that can offer riches will wed his daughter sure.
These the thoughts that fill my heart with grief,
And then, Senta, thou, too, addest to my anguish.

SENTA.

I? And how?

ERIK.

Thy worship for that picture—

SENTA.

This picture?

ERIK.

’Tis a strange infatuation which—

SENTA.

Why should I not feel sympathy?

ERIK.

And the song you love to sing.

SENTA.

Child am I, and know not what I sing. Say, ERIK, dost a song thou fear, a picture?

ERIK.

Thou art so pale, and hence my fear.

SENTA.

Why should I not sympathize with the poor man’s fate?

ERIK.

Why not rather feel sympathy with my deep grief?

SENTA.

Enough of this! Thou hast no grief;
But dost thou know the pale man’s horrid fate,
And dost thou feel how anguish wrung
The look he casts at me in wild despair?
His fate, relentless, bitter fate,
’Tis a pang that wrings my heart.

ERIK.

Alas! alas my dream will then come true!
May God protect thee! Thou art in Satan’s power.

SENTA.

What is it that so frightens thee?

ERIK.

Listen, Senta, listen well!
A dream it was—let warning voice it be!
The rock that overhangs the sea
Was my bed, and dreaming, I fancied
I saw the waves roll in and out,
And heard the billows’ ceaseless roar.
Near the shore a ship I saw,
And strange to tell, for strange the sight:—
Near and nearer two seamen approached,
And one, well I knew his face, thy father was—

SENTA.

And who was the other, pray?

ERIK.

Ah, too well only did I know him,
Dressed in black in contrast strong to his pale face—

SENTA.

And dark and sad his eye—

ERIK.

Yes, black as jet his eye.

SENTA.

And I? Where was I?

ERIK.

Fleet as a fawn, startled in fear,
I saw thee rush toward the beach
To bid thy father welcome home,
But scarce arrived, I saw thee kneel
At the feet of the pale man accursed.

SENTA.

And he gently drew me to his breast.

ERIK.

He folded thee to his treacherous heart,
And thou with fervor wild, unbridled,
Returnest kiss for kiss impassionate.

SENTA.

And then? What then?

ERIK.

He took thee on board his shadowy ship.

SENTA.

He longs for me! I’ll follow him,
And if in the attempt perish I should.

ERIK.

Horrid ’tis! I see it clear,
My dream, my fearful dream spoke true.

SENTA.
Where, oh where is the woman so rare,
His love to win, his treasures to share?

SCENE III.

DALAND.

Home again, my child, my darling!
But how is this? No kiss for me?
Why! ’tis a cool reception, sure.

SENTA.

Welcome home, my father! But say, speak quick,
Who is this stranger that comes with thee?

DALAND.

Welcome bid him with all thy heart!
Many a year he sails the sea,
No home is his, no kin his part,
Though rich he is as rich can be.
To him his native land is lost,
And home he seeks, a new home dear;

Come, Senta, come, be thou the host,
And welcome bid the stranger here!
And you, my new-found friend, say true,
Does she suit to be your wife?
Why should I praise what’s only true
And will be blessing all your life?
And thou, my child, be good and true
Give him thy hand and hold him dear,
And, SENTA, thou wilt never rue
That I have brought thy husband here.

See the golden things I’ve brought—
Quite worthless trifles when compar’d
With the riches in his vessel’s hold.
And all his treasures will be shar’d,
All his diamonds and all his gold,
With thee, my child, if thou wilt say
That thou wilt bless him with thy love,
And be his wife without delay;
Wed him, SENTA, give him thy love!
I leave thee now alone, my child,
To speak to him as bids thy heart;
I trust in thee, my darling child—
Think how happy will be our part.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Like to a vision, seen in days long by gone,
This maiden’s face and form appear:
What I have sought thro’ countless years of sorrow
Am at I last beholding here!
Oft ’mid the torment of my night eternal,
Longing I gaz’d upon some being fair!
But I was driv’n by Satan’s pow’r infernal
On my dread course, in anguish and despair!
The glow that warms my heart with strange emotion,
Can I, accurs’d one, call it love’s devotion?
Ah! no, ’tis yearning blest repose to gain,
That such an angel might for me obtain!

SENTA.

And am I sunk in wondrous depths of dreaming?
Is this a vision which I see,
Or am I now set free from long delusion?
Has morning truly dawned on me?
See, there he stands, his face with sorrow clouding—
He tells me all his mingled hope and fear;
Is it the voice of sympathy that cheats me?
As he has oft in dreams, so stands he here!
The sorrow which within my breast is burning—
Ah, this compassion, what dare I call it?
Thy heart is longing after rest and peace,
And thou at last through me shall find release.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Wilt thou, thy father’s choice fulfilling,
Do what he said? Say, art thou willing?
Wilt thou, indeed, thyself forever give me?
Shall I in truth, a stranger, thus be blessed?
Say, shall I find the time of sorrow ended—
In thy true love my long-expected rest?

SENTA.

Whoe’er thou art, where’er thy curse may lead thee,
And me, when I thy lot mine own have made—
Whate’er the fate which I with thee may share in,
My father’s will by me shall be obey’d.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

So full of trust? what? canst thou in thy gladness,
For these my sorrows deep compassion know?

SENTA.

Unheard-of sorrows! would I joy might bring thee!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

How sweet the sound that breaks my night of woe!
Thou art an angel, and a love angelic
Can comfort bring to one like me.
Ah, if redemption still be mine to hope for,
Heaven, grant that she my savior be!

SENTA.

Ah, if redemption still be his to hope for,
Heaven, grant that I his saviour be!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Ah, thou, the certain fate foreknowing,
Which must indeed with me be borne,
Wouldst not have made the vow thou madest—
Wouldst not to be my wife have sworn!
Thou wouldst have shuddered ere devoting,
To aid me, all thy golden youth—
Ere thou hadst woman’s joys surrendered,
Ere thou hadst bid me trust thy truth?

SENTA.

Well know I woman’s holy duties;
O hapless man, be thou at ease!
Leave me to fate’s unbending judgment—
Me, who defy its dread decrees.
Within the secret realm of conscience
Know I the high demands of faith:
Him, whom I chose, him I love only,
And loving e’en till death!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

A healing balm for all my sorrows
From out her plighted word doth flow.

SENTA.

’Twas surely wrought by pow’r of magic
That I should his deliv’rer be.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Hear this! Release at last is granted!
Hear this, ye mighty:
Your power is now laid low!
Star of misfortune, thou art paling!
Hope’s glorious light now shines anew!
Ye angels, ye who once forsook me,
Aid now my heart, and keep it true!

SENTA.

Here may a home at last be granted,
Here may he rest, from danger free!
What is the power within me working?
What is the task it bids me do?
Almighty, now that high Thou hast raised me,
Grant me Thy strength, that I be true!

DALAND.

Pardon my intrusion; my men quite impatient will be,
On each arrival home we have a frolic,
And this time, I hope, it will be a marriage feast.
Say, Senta, child, art thou inclined to wed my friend?

SENTA.

Here my hand to the man of the sea:—
Unto death I will faithful be.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Gladly she gives her fond heart to me,
And ended is now my misery.

DALAND.

May happiness forev’r be your part!
To the feast now with joyous heart!

ACT III.

SCENE I.

Chorus of Norwegian Sailors.

The sea! the sea! the open sea!
The blue, the fresh, the ever free!
Heigho! ho! heigho!
It runneth the earth’s wide region round!
Heigho! heigho!
It plays with the clouds; it mocks the skies,
Or like a cradled creature lies,
Heigho! ho! heigho!
We’re home again, home again!
Heigho! heigho!
Home again! home again!
Heigho! heigho!
Home again the sailor boy,
He his lassie’s only joy!
Let us quaff the golden wine!
Let us drink, drink, drink!

GIRLS.

See! how wildly they dance a jig
On deck their safely-anchored brig.

SAILORS.

Ho, girls, you mustn’t go away!

GIRLS.

We’ll fill the glasses on the tray.
Your neighbor, too, must have his share
Of golden wine and woman’s care.

MATE.

Yes, you must give those boys a share
Of golden wine and your own care.

SAILORS.

They keep so quiet.

MATE.

A strange sight!
No sailors on deck and no light!

GIRLS.

Ho, sailors, ho! shall we bring light,
And make your ship look bright?

SAILORS.

Don’t awake them; they are sleeping still.

GIRLS.

Ho! sailors! ho! give answer us!

MATE AND SAILORS.

Ha! ha! they are dead, indeed.
No meat and drink they will need.

GIRLS.

Sailors, ho! you are lazy boys,
Don’t care for frolic and joys.

MATE AND SAILORS.

They watch the treasures in the hold,
They guard the gems and stones and gold.

GIRLS.

Come, neighbors, come and have your share
Of golden wine and woman’s care.

MATE AND SAILORS.

They quaff no wine, they sing no song;
They must be dead ever so long.

GIRLS.

Are there no sweethearts on the strand
Awaiting you from foreign land?

SAILORS.

Ah, well! their sweethearts on the strand
Died while they were in foreign land.

GIRLS.

Ho! sailors! ho! don’t be lazy boys!
Come, partake of our frolicking joys!

SAILORS.

Come and join in our frolicking joys!

GIRLS.

They quaff no wine, they sing no song!
They must be dead ever so long.

SAILORS.

You’ve heard of the Flying Dutchman, perhaps,
And this must be one of his ugly traps.

GIRLS.

Then leave them alone, leave them at rest;
’Tis really no time for such jest.

SAILORS.

How long, how long are you at sea?
Quite a pretty crew you must be.

GIRLS.

They quaff no wine, they sing no song;
They must be dead ever so long.

SAILORS.

Have you no letter, no message to send
To great grandfather or other old friend?

GIRLS.

Ah, well! they have no loved ones on the strand;
Their sweethearts died while they roamed in foreign land.

SAILORS.

Ho! sailors, ho! hoist the sails, quick, quick!
And show us the Flying Dutchman’s trick.

GIRLS.

They hear us not, so let them rest;
They might revenge this sport and jest.

SAILORS.

We’d better leave the dead at rest,
And return to our sport and jest.

GIRLS.

Then drink you the wine your neighbor declines.

MATE AND SAILORS.

Come on board our safely-anchored brig,
And join us dancing a jolly jig.

GIRLS.

Plenty o’ time for dance and sport,
Now that safely you’re in port.

SAILORS.

Hurrah! We have enough for all.
Good neighbors, thanks to you!

MATE.

Boys, fill your goblets to the brink,
Let us have a jolly old drink.

SAILORS.

Hal-lo-ho-ho!
Good neighbors, you can speak at least!
Come, wake up, and join our feast!
Steersman, leave the watch!
Steersman, come to us!
Ho, hey, hey, ha!
See the sails are in! Anchor fast!
Steersman, come!

We have often watch’d ’mid howling storm;
We have often drunk the briny wave:
Watching takes to-day a fairer form—
Good and tasty wine our sweethearts let us have!
Hus-sas-sa-hey!

CHORUS OF THE CREW OF THE "FLYING DUTCHMAN."

Yo-ho-ho! Ho! oh!
Huissa!
To the land drives the storm.
Huissa!
Sails are in! Anchor down!
Huissa!
To the bay hurry in!

Gloomy captain, go on land,
Now that seven long years have flown,
Seek a faithful maiden’s hand!
Faithful maiden, be his own!
Joyful, hui!
Bridegroom, hui!
Winds be thy wedding song,
Ocean rejoices with thee!
Hui! Hark! He pipes!
What! captain, hast thou returned?
Hui! Spread the sails!
And thy bride, say, where is she?
Hui! Off to sea!
As of old,
No good fortune for thee!
Ha-ha-ha!
Blow, thou storm wind, howl and blow!
What care we how fast we go?
We have sails from Satan’s store,
Sails that last for evermore—ho-hoe!

Chorus of the Norwegian Sailors.

What a song! Are they ghosts?
How I fear! Let them hear!
All unite in our song.
Steersman, leave the watch! etc.

SCENE II.

ERIK.

What must I hear! what must I see!
Oh, God above! how can this be!

SENTA.

Ask me not! No answer I can give.

ERIK.

Eternal God! no doubt prevails! ’tis true!
An evil power has ensnared thee,
Infatuation strange possesses thee;
Thou wilt break this loving heart!
Thy father, ha! the bridegroom he did bring;
I know him well: I fear’d what might befall!
Yet thou—amazing!—has given him thy hand
When scarce across the threshold he had come.

SENTA.

No further! Cease! I must!

ERIK.

Oh, this obedience, blind as thy act!
Thy father’s hint thou failest not to follow;
A single blow crushes my loving heart!

SENTA.

No more! No more may I see thee,
Nor think of thee: higher calls are mine!

ERIK.

What higher calls? Thy highest is to render
What thou didst vow to give to me—love eternal.

SENTA.

What love eternal did I vow to give?

ERIK.

Senta! O Senta! deniest thou?—
Is that fair day no more by thee remember’d,
When from the vale thou call’d’st me to the height,
When fearlessly over rugged peaks I clamber’d,
And gather’d for thee many a wild flow’r bright?
Remember’st, as on rocky summit standing,
Thy father’s ship we saw ride on the tide?
We watch’d the sails with favor’d breeze expanding,
Did he not thee unto my care confide,
Thy arm so sweetly round my neck entwining,
Didst pledge thy love anew, how happy both!
Did’st press my hand, as on my breast reclining,
Say, was not that, indeed, the sealing of thy troth?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Lost to me, forever lost!
Salvation will not come to me!

ERIK.

What must I see?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Senta, fare thee well!

SENTA.

Stay, oh, stay! Desist ’ere it is too late.

ERIK.

Senta, Senta, what art thou doing?

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

To the sea! back to the sea!
To the sea for all eternity!
Thou hast broken faith,
Not can I be saved!
Farewell! Thy ruin I’ll not be.

ERIK.

Horrid! This diabolical glance!

SENTA.

Desist! desist! thou must not go!

(The Flying Dutchman gives a shrill signal on his whistle, and hails his crew.)

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Hoist the sails once more,
Bid the shore farewell forevermore!

SENTA.

Doubt not my faith!
Act thou not rash!
Desist! desist!
In faith I’ll keep
What I’ve promised.
Act thou not rash!
Hold on! hold on!

ERIK.

What must I hear! what must I see!
Oh, God above! how can this be!
Senta, Senta,
Thou wilt perish!
Come to me! oh, come to me!
Thou art in Satan’s power!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Learn now the doom from which I save thee!
Mine is a cruel, horrid fate;
Tenfold death would preferable be!
Woman alone from my curse can rescue me,
Woman who true unto death will be.

I have thy vow of constancy,
But not in the Eternal’s presence;
This from cruel fate will save thee;
For those who break their vow to me,
Damned in all eternity will be!

Thou shalt be saved, thou only!
Farewell, farewell! for all eternity
My curse will cleave to hapless me!

ERIK.

Help! help quick! Save, oh save her!

SENTA.

No mystery to me
Is thy identity!
I know thy fate,
Thy cruel fate;
It’s not too late:—
I’ll be thy mate!
For all eternity
Saved thou shalt be
By woman’s constancy!

ERIK.

Save, oh, save her!

MARY.

What must I see!

DALAND.

Oh, God, what must I see!

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Thou know’st not my identity,
It is to thee a mystery.
Know’st thou this ship with spectral light?--
The Flying Dutchman I am called.

CREW OF THE FLYING DUTCHMAN.

Heigho! ho! heigho!

MARY, ERIK, DALAND.

Senta, Senta, art thou raving?

SENTA.

Be cheerful thy mind, be joyous thy heart!
Thine will I be until death shall us part!

(She casts herself into the sea. The Dutchman’s ship, with all her crew, sinks immediately. The sea rises high, and sinks back in a whirlpool. In the glow of the sunset are clearly seen, over the wreck of the ship, the forms of SENTA and the Dutchman, embracing each other, rising from the sea, and floating upwards.)

THE END.

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