Alchemical Studies, by C.G. Jung

That's French for "the ancient system," as in the ancient system of feudal privileges and the exercise of autocratic power over the peasants. The ancien regime never goes away, like vampires and dinosaur bones they are always hidden in the earth, exercising a mysterious influence. It is not paranoia to believe that the elites scheme against the common man. Inform yourself about their schemes here.

Re: Alchemical Studies, by C.G. Jung

Postby admin » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:13 am

3. MERCURIUS AS FIRE

256 Many treatises define Mercurius simply as fire.1 He is ignis elementaris,2 noster naturalis ignis certissimus,3 which again indicates his "philosophic" nature. The aqua mercurial is is even a divine fire.4 This fire is "highly vaporous" (vaporosus).5 Indeed, Mercurius is really the only fire in the whole procedure.6 He is an "invisible fire, working in secret." 7 One text says that the "heart" of Mercurius is at the North Pole and that he is like a fire (northern lights).8 He is, in fact, as another text says, "the universal and scintillating fire of the light of nature, which carries the heavenly spirit within it." 9 This passage is particularly important as it relates Mercurius to the lumen naturae, the source of mystical knowledge second only to the holy revelation of the Scriptures. Once more we catch a glimpse of the ancient role of Hermes as the god of revelation. Although the lumen naturae) as originally bestowed by God upon his creatures, is not by nature ungodly, its essence was nevertheless felt to be abysmal, since the ignis mercurialis was also connected with the fires of hell. It seems, however, that the alchemists did not understand hell, or its fire, as absolutely outside of God or opposed to him, but rather as an internal component of the deity, which must indeed be so if God is held to be a coincidentia oppositorum. The concept of an all-encompassing God must necessarily include his opposite. The coincidentia) of course, must not be too radical or too extreme, otherwise God would cancel himself out.10 The principle of the coincidence of opposites must therefore be completed by that of absolute opposition in order to attain full paradoxicality and hence psychological validity.

257 The mercurial fire is found in the "centre of the earth," or dragon's belly, in fluid form. Benedictus Figulus writes: "Visit the centre of the earth, there you will find the global fire."11 Another treatise says that this fire is the "secret, infernal fire, the wonder of the world, the system of the higher powers in the lower."12 Mercurius, the revelatory light of nature, is also hellfire, which in some miraculous way is none other than a rearrangement of the heavenly, spiritual powers in the lower, chthonic world of matter, thought already in St. Paul's time to be ruled by the devil. Hell-fire, the true energic principle of evil, appears here as the manifest counterpart of the spiritual and the good, and as essentially identical with it in substance. After that, it can surely cause no offence when another treatise says that the mercurial fire is the "fire in which God himself burns in divine love."13 We are not deceiving ourselves if we feel in scattered remarks of this kind the breath of true mysticism.

258 Since Mercurius is himself of fiery nature, fire does not harm him: he remains unchanged within it, rejoicing like the salamander.14 It is unnecessary to point out that quicksilver does not behave like this but vaporizes under heat, as the alchemists themselves knew from very early times.

________________

Notes:

1. Aurora consurgens II, in Art. aurif., I, p. 212; Dorn, "Congeries Paracelsicae," Theatr. chem., 1(1659), p. 502; Mylius, Phil. ref., p. 245.

2. "Via veritatis," Mus. herm., p. 200.

3. "Tractatus aureus," ibid., p. 39.

4. "Aquarium sapientum," ibid., p. 91.

5. Ibid., p. 90.

6. "There is no fire in all the work save Mercurius" ("Fons chymicae veritatis," ibid., p. 803).

7. "Metall. metamorph.," ibid., p. 766.

8. "At the Pole is the heart of Mercurius, which is the true fire, in which is the resting place of his Lord, sailing through this great sea" ("Introit. apert.," Mus. herm., p. 655). A somewhat obscure symbolism!

9. "Aquarium sap.," ibid., p. 84.

10. This is a purely psychological explanation having to do with human conceptions and statements and not with the unfathomable Being.

11. Figulus, Rosarium novum olympicum, Pars I, p. 71. This is the "domus ignis idem Enoch." Cf. "Paracelsus as a Spiritual Phenomenon," supra, par. 186.

12 "Ignis infernalis secretus ... mundi miraculum, virtutum superiorum in inferioribus systema" ("Introit. apert.," p. 654).

13. "Ignis in quo Deus ipse ardet amore divino" ("Gloria mundi," p. 246).

14. "For it is he who overcomes the fire, and is himself not overcome by the fire, but rests in it as a friend, rejoicing in it" (Geber, "Summa perfectionis," De alchemia, cap. LXIII, p. 139).
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Re: Alchemical Studies, by C.G. Jung

Postby admin » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:15 am

4. MERCURIUS AS SPIRIT AND SOUL

259 If Mercurius had been understood simply as quicksilver, there would obviously have been no need for any of the appellations I have listed. The fact that this need arose points to the conclusion that one simple and unmistakable term in no way sufficed to designate what the alchemists had in mind when they spoke of Mercurius. It was certainly quicksilver, but a very special quicksilver, "our" Mercurius, the essence, moisture, or principle behind or within the quicksilver -- that indefinable, fascinating, irritating, and elusive thing which attracts an unconscious projection. The "philosophic" Mercurius, this servus fugitivus or cervus fugitivus (fugitive slave or stag), is a highly important unconscious content which, as may be gathered from the few hints we have given, threatens to ramify into a set of far-reaching psychological problems. The concept swells dangerously and we begin to perceive that the end is nowhere in sight. Therefore we would rather not tie this concept prematurely to any special meaning, but shall content ourselves with stating that the philosophic Mercurius, so dear to the alchemist as the transformative substance, is obviously a projection of the unconscious, such as always takes place when the inquiring mind lacks the necessary self-criticism in investigating an unknown quantity.

260 As has already been indicated, the psychic nature of the arcane substance did not escape the alchemists; indeed, they actually defined it as "spirit" and "soul." But since these concepts -- especially in earlier times -- were always ambiguous, we must approach them with caution if we want to gain a moderately clear idea of what the terms spiritus and anima meant in alchemical usage.
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Re: Alchemical Studies, by C.G. Jung

Postby admin » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:22 am

A. MERCURIUS AS AN AERIAL SPIRIT

261 Hermes, originally a wind god, and his counterpart the Egyptian Thoth, who "makes the souls to breathe,"1 are the forerunners of the alchemical Mercurius in his aerial aspect. The texts often use the terms pneuma and spirilus in the original concrete sense of "air in motion." So when Mercurius is described in the Rosarium philosophorum (fifteenth century) as aereus and volans2 (winged), and in Hoghelande (sixteenth century) as tolus aereus el spirilualis)3 what is meant is nothing more than a gaseous state of aggregation. Something similar is meant by the poetic expression serenilas aerea in the Ripley Scrowle,4 and by the same author's statement that Mercurius is changed into wind.5 He is the lapis elevalus cum vento (the stone uplifted by the wind).6 The expressions spirituale corpus7 and spiritus visibilis) tamen impalpabilis8 (visible yet impalpable spirit) might also mean little more than "air" if one recalls the aforementioned vapour-like nature of Mercurius, and the same is probably true even of the spiritus prae cunctis valde purus9 (pre-eminently pure spirit). The designation incombustibilis10 is more doubtful, since this was often synonymous with incorruptibilis and then meant "eternal," as we shall see later. Penotus (sixteenth century), a pupil of Paracelsus, stresses the corporeal aspect when he says that Mercurius is "nothing other than the spirit of the world become body within the earth."11 This expression shows better than anything else the contamination-inconceivable to the modern mind -- of two separate realms, spirit and matter; for to people in the Middle Ages the spiritus mundi was also the spirit which rules nature, and not just a pervasive gas. We find ourselves in the same dilemma when another author, Mylius, in his Philosophia reformata,12 describes Mercurius as an "intermediate substance" (media substantia), which is evidently synonymous with his concept of the anima media natura13 (soul as intermediate nature), for to him Mercurius was the "spirit and soul of the bodies."14

_______________

Notes:

1. This characteristic of Mercurius is stressed in Aurora consurgens II, in Art. aurif., I, pp. 146 and 190: "He makes the nostrils [of the foetus] in the fifth month."

2. Rosarium, pp. 252, 271.

3. Theatrum chemicum, I (1659), p. 169.

4. 16th cent. British Museum, MS. Add. 10302.

5. Ripley, Opera, p. 35.

6. "Tractatus aureus," Mus. herm., p. 39.

7. Rosarium, p. 282.

8. Basilius Valentinus, "Practica," Mus. herm., p. 404.

9. "Introit. apert.," ibid., p. 654.

10. Rosarium, p. 252.

11. Theatr. chem., 1(1659), p. 600.
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Re: Alchemical Studies, by C.G. Jung

Postby admin » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:30 am

B. MERCURIUS AS SOUL

262 "Soul" represents a higher concept than "spirit" in the sense of air or gas. As the "subtle body" or "breath-soul" it means something non-material and finer than mere air. Its essential characteristic is to animate and be animated; it therefore represents the life principle. Mercurius is often designated as anima (hence, as a feminine being, he is also called foemina or virgo), or as nostra anima.15 The nostra here does not mean "our own" soul but, as in aqua nostra, Mercurius noster, corpus nostrum, refers to the arcane substance.

263 However, anima often appears to be connected with spiritus, or is equated with it.16 For the spirit shares the living quality of the soul, and for this reason Mercurius is often called the spiritus vegetativus17 (spirit of life) or Spiritus seminalis.18 A peculiar appellation is found in that seventeenth-century forgery which purports to be the secret book of Abraham le Juif, mentioned by Nicolas Flame! (fourteenth century). The epithet is spiritus Phytonis (from [x], 'to procreate,' [x], 'creature,' [x], 'procreator,' and Python, the Delphic serpent), and is accompanied by the serpent sign: [x].19 Very much more material is the definition of Mercurius as a "life-giving power like a glue, holding the world together and standing in the middle between body and spirit."20 This concept corresponds to Mylius' definition of Mercurius as the anima media natura. From here it is but a step to the identification of Mercurius with the anima mundi,21 which is how Avicenna had defined him very much earlier (twelfth to thirteenth century). "He is the spirit of the Lord which fills the whole world and in the beginning swam upon the waters. They call him also the spirit of Truth, which is hidden from the world."22 Another text says that Mercurius is the "supracelestial spirit which is conjoined with the light, and rightly could be called the anima mundi."23 It is clear from a number of texts that the alchemists related their concept of the anima mundi on the one hand to the world soul in Plato's Timaeus and on the other to the Holy Spirit, who was present at the Creation and played the role of procreator ([x]), impregnating the waters with the seed of life just as, later, he played a similar role in the obumbratio (overshadowing) of Mary.24 Elsewhere we read that a "life-force dwells in Mercurius non vulgaris, who flies like solid white snow. This is a spirit of the macrocosmic as of the microcosmic world, upon whom, after the anima rationalis, the motion and fluidity of human nature itself depends."25 The snow represents the purified Mercurius in the state of albedo (= spirituality); here again matter and spirit are identical. Worth noting is the duality of soul caused by the presence of Mercurius: on the one hand the immortal anima rationalis given by God to man, which distinguishes him from animals; on the other hand the mercurial life-soul, which to all appearances is connected with the inflatio or inspiratio of the Holy Spirit. This fundamental duality forms the psychological basis of the two sources of illumination.

_______________

Notes:

12. P. 183.

13. P. 19.

14. P. 308.

15. "Tractatus aureus," Mus. herm., p. 39.

16. Mylius, Phil. ref., p. 308: "(Mercurius est) spiritus et anima corporis." The same in Ventura, Theatr. chem., II (1659), p. 282, and in "Tractatus Micreris," ibid., V (1660). p. 92.

17. Aegidius de Vadis. ibid., 11 (1659), p. 106.

18. Philaletha, "Metall. metamorph.," Mus. herm., p. 766.

19. Abraham Eleazar, Uraltes Chymisches Werck, pp. 29ff. "Phyton is the life of all things," p. 34.
 
20. Happelius, "Aphorismi Basiliani," Theatr. chem., IV (1659), p. 327.
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