Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

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CHRONOLOGY -- Life and work*

1904 Birth, in Figueres on 11th May, of Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dali, the son of Don Salvador Dali Cusi, a notary by profession, and his wife, Dolia Felipa Domenech. His childhood is passed between Figueres and Barcelona and in Cadaques, where his parents have a house. His involvement with the scenery of the whole Emporda region, and especially those parts of it near Figueres (Cadaques, Cap de Creus). is to be of fundamental importance both in his life and in his work. His first work, a landscape, is dated in 1910.

1914 Dali starts his secondary education at the Marist Brothers' school in Figueres and shows a precocious interest in painting, an interest which he discovers and nourishes at the home of the Pitxot family, friends of his parents. He begins to take an interest in Impressionism through the works of Ramon Pitxot (1872-1925), who exhibited at the Salon d'Automne in Paris with the Fauves and whose coloured etchings were enthusiastically praised by Apollinaire in his Chroniques d'art. Most of Dali's works of this period are oil paintings with landscapes of Cadaques and genre scenes of peasants and fishermen.

1918 His interest in Impressionist brushwork yields place to an overwhelming thirst for colour. He is now mainly drawn to the masters of l'art pompier, particularly Mariano Fortuny (1838-1874) and Modest Urgell (the Spanish Bocklin), but finally opts for pointillism. Meanwhile he studies drawing, engraving and painting with Juan Nufiez. On 2nd May of this year he shows some canvases for the first time, at a show of local artists' work held at the Teatre Municipal in Figueres. The Crepuscular Old Man is painted around this time.

1919 The review "Stadium," published by the Figueres Institut (state secondary school), begins to receive contributions from Dali. His regular articles on art are devoted to the painters he most admires (Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Durer, El Greco, Goya and Velazquez). The last-named is already in his eyes 'one of the greatest, perhaps the greatest of all, Spanish painters, and one of the first in the world.' He also contributes to the humorous review "El Senor Pancracio." His literary interests are also much in evidence by this time.

1921 Dali is enrolled in the San Fernando School of Fine Arts in Madrid, where he studies drawing, painting and sculpture. At the Students' Residence, where he lives, he meets Lorca, Bunuei and Eugenio Montes. The Disciplinary Council later decides to expel him from the School for a year, accusing him of inciting his fellow students to rebellion against the school authorities. Throughout this period he is influenced by Bonnard, the Italian Futurists and Eugene Carriere. He paints cubist canvases in his room and openly shows his opposition to the official teaching he receives. Around this time he paints Self-portrait with Raphael's Neck.

1922 In October of this year he shows eight of his works at the Galeries Dalmau in Barcelona. Paintings done at this time include Still Life with Fruit, Cadaques Seen from the Inside and The First Days of Spring.

In Paris Andre Breton, together with Picabia, Max Ernst and Man Ray, has formed the first Surrealist group.

1923 On returning to the School in May he is arrested for his anarchist tendencies and is imprisoned for 35 days in Figueres and Girona. His interest in Cubism grows (largely through the works of Juan Gris), as does the influence on him of the Italian Metaphysical School (Carlo Carra and Giorgio de Chirico), though this does not lead him to neglect the Pointillists. Works done at this time include Girls, Cubist Self-portrait and some landscapes of the countryside around Cadaques.

1924 He enrols in the School of Fine Arts again and resumes his relations with the most avant-garde groups there. Meanwhile, in Paris, Breton issues his first Surrealist Manifesto and the review 'La revolution surrealiste.'

1925 Lorca pays his first visit to Figueres and Cadaques. He reads Mariana Pineda to the Dali family, who are all delighted with it. November: first one-man show, at the Galeries Dalmau in Barcelona, which arouses Picasso's and Mira's interest in Dali. The critics do not fail to notice the repeated references to Ingres in the catalogue. Dalmau himself brings 'La revolution surrealiste' to Dali's notice. December: Dali embarks on a remarkable collaboration, which is to last until February 1929, with the Barcelona review 'L'Amic de les Arts.' Lorca writes his Ode to Salvador Dali. Among Dali's paintings of this year are The Barcelona Mannequin, Still Life with Mauve Moonlight and Large Harlequin with Small Bottle of Rum.

1926 With his sister and his aunt, Dali visits Paris and Brussels for the first time. His attention is wholly absorbed by Hieronymus Bosch, Brueghel and Vermeer (above all the last-mentioned). Among the people he visits in Paris is Picasso, who is impressed by the works Dali shows him. October: Dali is definitively expelled from the School of Fine Arts, after refusing to recognize his teachers' competence to examine him. Later in the year Mira visits him in Cadaques. December: second one-man show at the Galeries Daimau. The work that arouses most interest, among critics and public alike, is The Bread-basket.

1927 February: Dali joins the army to do his military service. June: first performance of Lorca's Mariana Pineda, presented by Margarida Xirgu and her company at the Teatre Goya in Barcelona, with decor and costumes by Dali. He spends the summer with Lorca and Regina Sainz de la Maza in Cadaques. There he writes his poem Saint Sebastian, which is published in 'L'Amic de les Arts' and later translated into Castilian by Lorca, who publishes it in the Granada review 'E\ Gallo.'

1928 LIuis Montanya, Sebasth\ Gasch and Dali issue the Yellow Manifesto:

'In the present manifesto we have eliminated courtesy of any kind from our attitude. All discussions with the representatives of contemporary Catalan culture -- artistically negative, though efficacious in other fields -- have proved useless. Tolerance or good manners lead to deliquescences and lamentable confusions of all sorts of values, to the most unbreathable spiritual atmosphere, to the most pernicious of influences. For instance: "La Nova Revista." Violent hostility, on the contrary, situates values and positions clearly, creating a hygienic spiritual state,' Thus begins the 'antiartistic' Manifesto, in which they denounce, among other things, 'the absolute lack of youth among our young people,' 'false period architecture,' 'decorative art that does not follow standardization' and 'the fear of new events, of words and of the risk of making a fool of oneself.'

He is influenced by Mira, Arp, Ernst and Tanguy. His most important works of this year include Anthropomorphic Beach, Putrefied Birds, Inaugural Gooseflesh and Naked Torso. October: three pictures by Dali are shown at the 27th painting exhibition of the Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh.

1929 Dali's second journey to Paris, in connection with the shooting of Bunuel's film, Un Chien Andalou. The painter's work on this film is of the first importance. Mira introduces him to the Surrealist group and he soon makes the acquaintance of Arp, Magritte and the art-dealer Camille Goemans, ' who in turn introduces him to Paul Eluard. Goemans and Eluard, accompanied by the latter's wife, Helena (Gala), visit Cadaques during the summer, after which Gala is never again to be separated from Dali, becoming his most constant counsellor and model. The showing of Un Chien Andalou causes a sensation while Dali is already working on L'Age d'Or, another film by Bunuel, in which his participation was considerably reduced in comparison with the earlier work. 20th November: Dali's first exhibition, presented. by Breton, at the Galerie Goemans in Paris. December: through an article by Eugenio d'Ors the Dali family are made aware of the existence of a print of the Sacred Heart on which is written: 'Sometimes I spit on my mother's portrait for pleasure.' This, in conjunction with the recent initiation of his liaison with Gala, provokes a break with his family. Dali is not to see his father again until his return from New York in 1948. In this year he paints Spectres of Two Automobiles, Portrait of Paul Eluard, Enlightened Pleasures, The Great Masturbator and The Lugubrious Game.

1930 Dali works on his canvas The Invisible Man, which he is to leave definitively unfinished three years later. At the same time he writes, illustrates and publishes The Visible Woman, which he dedicates to Gala. March: in exchange for a sum of money to be used for the purchase of a little fisherman's house in Cadaques (the one which successive extensions and alterations have transformed into his present home), Dali offers the Vicomte Charles de Noailles one of his pictures, to be chosen from among those done in the following year (the choice is to fall on William Tell in Old Age). July: 'Le Surrealisme au service de la revolution' publishes Reverie, one of Dali's most important texts. And 'Ediciones Surrealistas' publishes EI amor y la memoria. November: 10 works by Dali are shown in what should be regarded as the first Surrealist exhibition in the United States, which is held in Hartford. In Paris the reactions aroused by Bunuet's second film are so violent that the Commission de Censure finally forbids it to be shown (though it has already been authorized) December: publication of Dali's text L 'Ane pourri, in which he lays the foundations of his paranoiac-critical method. Of this method Breton and Eluard write: 'What Dali calls paranoiac-critical thought, which is a combination of dialectical and psychoanalytical thought, is the most admirable instrument that has as yet been proposed for passing through the immortal ruins the ghost-woman, with her face coated with verdigris, her mocking eye and her stiff ringlets, who is not only the spirit of our birth -- Le. the Modern Style -- but the abidingly more attractive phantom of Our evolution.' Dali begins to reflect on the problem of the double image. His Vertigo is painted in this period.

1931 The first of the three exhibitions which are to be held over the next three years at the Galerie Pierre Colle. Andre Lhote writes, in the 'Nouvelle Revue Francaise': 'His harmonies are those of the anatomical print, in which the blood reigns supreme.' Among the works shown is The Persistence of Memory. The statements he makes at this time about Catalan Art Nouveau are full of eulogies of Gaudi: 'The church of the Sagrada Familia is the first great achievement of Mediterranean Gothic. The sublime Gaudi, who visited the Cap de Creus as a boy, fed his art on memories of the rocks, soft and baroque, hard and geometrical, of that divine place.'

1932 The Persistence of Memory (also known as The Soft Watches) arouses enormous curiosity among New York gallery-goers on the occasion of its first showing, in a group exhibition at the Julien Levy Gallery. The success of Dali's works in the United States has only just begun and is to reach unsuspected heights. July: his book Babaouo, in which he expounds his conception of the cinema, is published in Paris. October: Dr Jacques Lacan publishes his thesis De la psychose paranoiaque dans ses rapports avec la personnalite. Works painted during this year include The Birth of Liquid Desires, Portrait of the Vicomtesse de Noailles and Atmospheric Fried Eggs. He also does illustrations for Breton's Le revolver a cheveux blancs.

1933 Dali signs a contract with Albert Skira (to whose review, 'Minotaure,' he is to contribute several articles, among those published being The paranoiac-critical interpretation of the obsessive image of Millet's Angelus), undertaking to do forty etchings as illustrations for Lautreamont's Les Chants de Maldoror. June: at the Galerie Pierre Colle he shows his Gala and Millet's Angelus. Writing of this exhibition in 'Beaux Arts,' Georges Hilaire says: 'As against imaginative painting, he prefers the detailed, eatable anecdote, the "objective randomness" of dreams, "object-actions" (... ) This paranoiac possesses the spirit of geometry. Dali is obsessed by the idea of fineness. It is his ambition to restore "academic fineness" as -one of the properest means of channelling the "proximate deliria of rational exactitude.''' November: first one-man show at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. December: Dali exhibits at the Galeria d'Art Catalonia in Barcelona.

1934 At the Salon des Independants Dali shows The Enigma of William Tell and The Cannibalism of Objects. The Julien Levy Gallery in New York presents his collection of drawings and engravings illustrating Lautreamont's Les Chants de Maldoror. The 42 etchings commissioned by Albert Skira are presented at the Quatre Chemins bookshop in Paris in the month of June. Dali has spent over a year op them. 20th June: exhibition at the Galerie Jacques Bonjean. Writing of this show in 'Art et Decoration,' Louis Cheronnet says: '( ... ) and to paint all this Dali dreams that he possesses the brush of Millet or that of Meissonier. The most admirable feature of the business is that, in appearance, he manages to succeed.' October: the Catalonia bookshop in Barcelona presents a personal exhibition of Dali's works which, according to Alfred Barr, 'stirs up the effervescence of a rapidly expanding Surrealist group.' At the painting exhibition of the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh Dali is awarded an Honourable Mention for Enigmatic Elements in a Landscape. At the Zwemmer Gallery in London he has his first One-man show in Britain. November: Gala and Dali, on board the Champlain, arrive in New York for the first time. On the 21 of this month an exhibition of his work opens at the Julien Levy Gallery -- an exhibition which, in the words of 'The Sun,' is 'fashionable, very controversial and difficult.' December: in a letter to a friend, Dali talks about his arrival in America: 'Apart from suffering from an enormous inferiority complex, the people here do not understand very well, which obliges them to confront phenomena with a great amount of good will, unlike the pretentious, ironic self-sufficiency you so often find among the Paris critics.' 18 December: Dali gives a lecture to an audience of two hundred people at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, in the course of which he says for the first time: 'The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad.' Paintings of this year include: The Spectre of the Libido, Atavistic Traces after the Rain, Spectre of Vermeer which can be used as a Table, Atmospheric Skull Sodomizing a Grand Piano.

1935 January: Dali gives a lecture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York under the title Surrealist paintings and paranoiac images, in which he defines his paranoiac-critical method in the following words: 'To tell the truth, I am nothing but an automaton recording, without judging and as exactly as possible, the dictates of my subconscious: my dreams, the hypnagogic images and visions, and all those concrete, irrational manifestations of the obscure, sensational world discovered by Freud (... ). The public must take their pleasure from the limitless resources of mysteries, enigmas and anguish that such images offer to the subconscious of the viewers... ' February: Gala and Dali leave New York, after attending the fancy-dress ball given in their honour by Caresse Crosby (Dali dressed as a shop-window, with a little drawer-brassiere, and Gala wearing a dress of red cellophane, with a celluloid doll and lobsters). December: after illustrating Bluard's book, Nults Partagees, Dali publishes The conquest of the irrational (the work in which he further defines his paranoiac-critical method: 'Spontaneous method of irrational knowledge, based on the critical-interpretative association of the phenomena of delirium') in Paris and New York; in the latter city the 'American Weekly' also publishes a series of his drawings, presented as Surrealist impressions of the city. At this time, too, he illustrates Tristan Tzara's book, Grains et issues, and participates in the Surrealist exhibition in Tenerife, sponsored by 'Gaceta de Arte' and Oscar Dominguez, a singular episode in the history of Surrealism in Spain. In an article published in 'Cahiers d'Art' (Nos. 7-10), under the title of Les Pantoufles de Picasso, he applies the paranoiac-critical method to literature for the first time: Picasso and the contemporary political and cultural world appear in a text by Sacher-Masoch, Les Pantoufles de Sapho, with minimal modifications introduced by Dali.

1936 May: the Surrealist exhibition of objects presented at the Galerie C. Ratton, in Which Dali participates with his monument to Kant and the aphrodisiac jacket, marks the 'officialization' of a new expression of Surrealism. June: apart from his contributions to the review 'Minotaure,' Dali continues to publish important articles in 'Cahiers d' Art,' an example being his Honneur d l'objet. He also illustrates a poem by Edward James, who is a buyer of Dali's most important works up to 1938. 4th December; one month after his arrival in New York, his photograph appears on the front cover of 'Time.' 15 December: Dali exhibits at the Julien Levy Gallery again and, after this, in a collective show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York entitled 'Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism.' Among the works painted during this year are The Great Paranoiac, Couple with their Heads Filled with Clouds, The Chemist from Figueres who is not Looking for Anything at All, Geological Justice, Solar Table and Soft Construction with Cooked Beans (Premonition of the Spanish Civil War).. After the victory of the' Popular Front in Februiuy, General Franco's military rebellion marks the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. Lorca is murdered in Granada.

1937 Dali's interest in the Marx Brothers grows, and he paints a portrait of Harpo, as also some drawings for a film which is never made; March: he publishes an article entitled Je defie Aragon, in which he says: 'The authentic laboratory in which we carry out the systematic exploration of the unknown "regions' of the human spirit is "surrealism." Why not use it, then, to experiment on something -- the history of art -- to which it would lend itself fairly well?' After participating in a collective exhibition at the Jeu de Paume ('Origin and development of Independent International Art'), he flees from the war and settles in Italy, where with Edward James, at whose home he is .staying, he improves his acquaintance with the Renaissance and the Baroque. He is later to publish his paranoiac poem The Metamorphosis of Narcissus, while at the same time collaborating with Elsa Schiaparelli on designs for hats, materials and dresses. Notable among the works painted during this period are Metamorphosis of Narcissus, Dream and Cannibalism in Autumn.

1938 January: he participates with his Rainy Taxi in the Surrealist exhibition at the Galerie des Beaux-Arts in Paris. In London he is introduced to Freud by Stefan Zweig; this introduction leads to some portraits of the psychiatrist, in which Dali compares his skull with a snail. He does a goblet in engraved crystal for Steuben Glass. Throughout this period his studio has two branches: the residences of Lord Berner and of Coco Chane!, in Rome and Paris respectively. He also collaborates with Coco Chanel on several ballet designs for the Ballets de Montecarlo. Among the canvases painted during this period are Spain and The Infinite Enigma.

1939 Dali travels to New York again, for an exhibition of his work at the Julien Levy Gallery which opens on 21 March. The impression produced by this show is described in 'Life' as follows: 'No exhibition has been so popular since Whistler's Portrait of the Artist's Mother was shown in 1934. The crowds gazed. open-mouthed... ' Some days earlier Dali has broken a window in the Bonwit Teller department store. Most of the reviews of this show express curiosity about the presence of telephones in many of Dali's works. He signs a contract with the New York World's Fair, undertaking to execute a personal creation to be entitled The Dream of Venus -- though on account of his differences with the sponsors Dali would have preferred Nightmare of Venus. Later, when his plan to put a fish's head on Botticelli's Venus is prohibited, he publishes his 'Declaration of the independence of the imagination and of man's right to his own madness', in which he says: 'The human condition is defined through the enigma and the simulacrum, which are corollaries of these vital facts: sexual instinct, consciousness of death, physical melancholy engendered by the time-space notion'. November: the first paranoiac ballet, Bacchanal (Venusberg), is performed at the Metropolitan Opera House, with music by Wagner, choreography by Massine, and scenery by Dali. In the autumn Gala and Dali return to Europe and settle in Arcachon. As from this year Dali's activities are to leave Surrealism completely. The Spanish Civil War ends with the victory of General Franco.

1940 Dali begins to take an interest in Max Planck's quantum theory. In the face of the imminent Nazi invasion he leaves Europe again and settles, first, in Caresse Crosby's house in Virginia. Gala's organizing abilities come very much to the fore -- according to Anais Nin, a fellow guest at the time and very soon the whole house revolves around Dali. He later settles in Pebble Beach, California. Among the works painted in this period are Slave-market with Invisible Bust of Voltaire and The Face of War. Dali is to remain in the United States until 1948.

1941 He has very successful exhibitions at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York and the Dalzell Hatfield Gallery in Los Angeles. He now begins a prolific collaboration with the photographer Philippe Halsman, which is to end only with the latter's death in 1979. June: Dali finishes editing his Secret Life, which is to be published in New York in 1942. October: first night of the ballet Labyrinth at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. It has a libretto, scenery and costumes by Dali and choreography by Massine, and is based on a plot taken from the myth of Theseus and Ariadne. In collaboration with the Duke of Verdura, Dali creates his first jewels; the most notable are Ruby Lips, Spider in its Web and Royal Heart, as well as The Persistence of Memory in gold, enamel and diamonds. Breton in one of his works writes about Dali: 'Despite an undeniable talent for putting himself across, the stamp of Dali, ill-served by an ultra- retrograde technique (the return to Meissonier), is discredited by a cynical indifference to the media employed for communication, has for some time now been showing signs of panic and has not as yet saved itself, apparently, except by organizing its own vulgarization.'

1942 The retrospective show organized by the Museum of Modern Art of New York is transferred in succession to eight other cities in the United States. Dali's relations with the world of photography are to have very fruitful results.

1943 Dali becomes an accepted member of New York society and does a great many portraits of rich Americans for the Knoedler Gallery. He decorates Helena Rubinstein's flat with large murals (Nude on the Plain of Roses) and constructs Mae West's face 'for use as a drawing-room.' It is during this year that he paints Geopolitical Child Observing the Birth of the New Year.

1944 His theatrical activities are now greatly intensified and among works of his actually staged are The Chinitas Cafe. Sentimental Colloquy (based on a poem by Verlaine) and Mad Tristan. He starts work on illustrations for many books, among them Maurice Sandoz's Memoires Fantastiques and his own Hidden Faces. He paints Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate a Second before Awakening.

1945 The explosion of the atom bomb at Hiroshima inspires Dali to begin his 'nuclear' or 'atomic' period. He works with Alfred Hitchcock on the dream sequences in Spellbound. He writes the first number of the 'Dali News.' In this year, too, he paints Apotheosis of Homer, Three Apparitions of Gala's Face and Galarina.

1946 Dali and Walt Disney begin to work out an idea for a cartoon film to be called Destiny, which comes to nothing in the end. He illustrates Shakespeare's Macbeth and does covers for several magazines, such as 'Vogue' and 'Etcetera,' as well as for Billy Rose's book, Wine, Women and Words. He paints The Temptations of St Anthony.

1947 Dali illustrates an edition of the Essays of Montaigne and has a one-man show at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Later he has one at the Bignou Gallery in New York. At the same time the tenth number of his review, 'Dali News,' comes out.

1948 Before sailing for Europe, to settle down in Portlligat for good, he illustrates 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship, Shakespeare's As You Like It and Benvenuto Cellini's exuberant Vita. November: Dali exhibits at the Galleria l'Obelisco in Rome on the occasion of Luchino Visconti's production of As You Like It, for which Dali does the scenery and costumes. Dali is now entering on a new phase, in which he will have no point of contact with the postwar avant-garde but will, on the contrary, seek inspiration in the great themes of western tradition.

1949 He designs the scenery for Strauss's Salome at Covent Garden. A religious character now makes its appearance in Dali's work. His interest in harmonic and geometric theory grows, and he eagerly studies Luca Pacioli's De divina proportion-e. He is granted an audience by Pope Pius XII. November: he returns to New York. Breton continues to accentuate the breach between them through various writings, such as the second-edition note to the passage he devotes to Dali in his Anthologie de I'Humour noir. This is the year in which Dali paints Atomic Leda, for the execution of which he needs the intervention of a mathematician.

1950 January: in New York Dali publishes a Memorandum, by way of reply to the book written by his sister, Anna Maria. November: first night of Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio at the Teatro Maria Guerrero in Madrid, with scenery, and costumes by Dali. His Madonnas of Portlligat are shown at the Carstairs Gallery in New York. He also illustrates Maurice Sandoz's La limite. Besides. numerous drawings inspired by religion or mythology, he paints Landscape of Portlligat and Dali at the Age of Six, when he Thought he was a Girl, Lifting the Skin of the Water to see a Dog Sleeping in the Shade of the Sea.

1951 April: Dali finishes the editing of the Mystical manifesto. June: exhibition at the Galerie A. Weil in Paris. September: Gala and Dali dress up as seven-metre-high giants to attend the ball given by Carlos de Beistegui at the Palazzo Labia in Venice. They are accompanied by Christian Dior, in identical costume. December: Dali arrives in New York. In the course of this year he has painted his Christ of St John of the Cross and Raphaelesque Head Bursting.

1952 Dali explains the elements of his nuclear mystique in the course of a tour that takes him to seven cities in the United States; at the same time he announces for the future, thanks to this new nuclear art, an Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. May: he writes Authenticity and falsehood, an article in which he violently declares his opposition to 'socialist realism.' He presents the work entitled Assumpta Corpuscularia Lapislazulina at the Carstairs Gallery. Throughout this period Dali's attention is divided between his 'mystical nuclear art' and the 102 watercolours that constitute the series entitled La Divina Commedia, illustrating Dante's work. Also in this period he paints the Nuclear Cross and Galatea of the Spheres.

1954 A major retrospective of Dali's work is presented in Rome (Palazzo Pallavicini), Venice and Milan successively. On the occasion of a press conference Dali emerges from a 'metaphysical cube' to inform the public of his 're-naissance.' The fruit of his close collaboration with the photographer Philippe Halsman, the book entitled Dali Moustache, is now finished and later published. Dali and Robert Descharnes start shooting the film Histoire prodigieuse de la dente//iere et du rhinoceros, the montage of which is soon under way. The Discurso sobre la figura cubica of Juan de Herrera, architect of the Escorial, gives Dali the guide-lines he needs for the painting of his Crucifixion ('Hypercubic Body'). Throughout this period he also spends much time on paindng the Rhinoceros Disintegration of Phidias' Illusus. His obsession with the rhinoceros' horn (constructed in accordance with a perfect logarithmic spiral) is by now quite evident.

1955 May: Dali uses his paranoiac-critical method to interpret Vermeer's The Lacemaker at the Vincennes Zoo. December: he arrives at the Sorbonne in his white Rolls Royce, previously filled with cauliflowers, to give a lecture on 'Phenomenological aspects of the paranoiac-critical method.' During this period he paints The Last Supper (which is to be bought for the Washington Gallery collection) and the Paranoiaccritical study of Vermeer's Lacemaker.

1956 Dali has an interview with Franco in the Palace of El Pardo. Publication of his treatise on modern art, Les cocus du vieil art moderne. In an article entitled Will Dali murder modern art? published in 'Arts' (12-9-1956), Alain Jouffroy writes: 'Everything Salvador Dali says or does, and almost everything he paints, has at least the merit of annoying, disturbing and irritating all those who think that modern art has its laws and its limits, and who do not intend to have their convictions questioned (...). For twenty-five years now Dali's work has been going against the stream of everything that is called "painting" and tending to the devaluation of what has formed contemporary taste: Cubism, Abstract Art, Expressionism (...). He does not conceal but, on the contrary, proclaims his deep-felt desire to murder Modern Art. We should not be deceived, however, by the humorous, delirious tone of his proposals. Dali is serious, profoundly serious, and that absolutely First-rate intelligence that he was recognized as having by A. Breton in 1936 has been pressed into the service of a destructive activity at the expense of the prestige of "modern art.'" July: retrospective of Dali's work at the Casino of Knokke-le-Zoote, Belgium. December: using rhinoceros horns, he does one of the lithographs for his Don Quixote series in a street in Montmartre, under the eyes of the lithographer Charles Sortier and an astonished public. Another of the lithographs for this series is done by means of ink-filled eggs. In this period he paints the following works: Rhinoceros Gooseflesh, Living Still Life and Zurbanin's Skull.

1957 The fifteen lithographs of the Don Quixote series are presented to the public at the Musee Jacquemart-Andre in Paris.

1958 Throughout this and the following year Dali continues to explore the painting of the past (especially the work of Velazquez) and the religious and historical themes of western civilization. He also initiates his 'optical' art, incessantly seeking all sorts of optical effects and illusions, and at the same time begins to talk about Heisenberg's 'Cosmic Glue.' 8th August: Dali and Gala are married religiously at the 'Chapel of the Angels' in Montrejic, Spain. November: Dali is presented -- by the Cuban ambassador in Paris -- with the Medaille a la QuaUte Francaise for his illustrations of Don Quixote. December: exhibition at the Carstairs Gallery. In this period he paints Saint James the Great, The Dream of Columbus (also called The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus), Ear with Madonna, Velazquez Painting the Infanta Margarita, Surrounded by the Lights and Shadows of Her Own Glory and Virgin of Guadalupe.

1959 Dali visits Pope John XXIII. Olivier Merlin, in 'Paris Match' (16·5-1959), says of this visit: 'At the beginning of the month Dali was granted an audience by the Pope in the Vatican and informed him of his latest great project: a cathedral containing all the symbols of a united Christianity: Orthodox, Catholic, Protestant (...). It will be built, they say, 30 centimetres from the ground on a pear-shaped ball representing the true shape of the earth, as; it has been revealed to us by the American satellite "Vanguard (...)" For Salvador Dali this pear shape represents various symbols: the Resurrection in the Middle Ages, the power of development, the prefiguration of the ecumenical council and the moral unity of the world.' After some lectures given in London and Paris, plans for a review ('Rhinoceros') with Skira and the magnificent execution of some of the plates intended to illustrate the Apocalypse of Saint John, at the Crystal Palace in December Dali presents the Ovocipede, a revolutionary means of transport consisting of a hollow plastic sphere with room for one passenger. He later does illustrations for Pedro Antonio de Alarcon's Three-cornered Hat.

1960 February: private presentation in New York of his work The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. May: the Surrealists write the article We don't ear it that way, against Dali's participation in an international exhibition of Surrealism in New York. December: presentation, at the Carstairs Gallery in New York, of Dali's Ecumenical Council (done in the quantified realism technique, according to which the quantum of action is 'no more than the non-figurative experiences that the abstracts may have contributed to the great tradition'). He starts work on The World of Salvador Dali with Robert Descharnes. Meanwhile his interest in Mariano Fortuny is renewed, finding concrete expression in The Battle of Tetuan. Also in this period he paints Gala Nude from Behind Looking in an Invisible Mirror and Hyperxiological Sky.

1961 First performance, in Venice, of the Ballet de Gala, with Ludmilla Tcherina (scenography, settings and costumes by Dali choreography by Maurice Bejart) and Scarlatti's The Spanish Lady and the Roman Gentleman. The 'Drawing-room of the Egg' is the latest of the rooms added to Gala and Dali's house in Portlligat; it is entirely Gala's creation and is dedicated to the myth of Leda.

1962 From now on Dali tends increasingly to concentrate on, and summarize, different themes and techniques of his past career, which he examines and works out again, echoing both the results of American Pop Art and the most recent technical and scientific discoveries (Crick, Watson and Wilkins are awarded the Nobel prize for their research on deoxyribonucleic acid, the 'molecule of life'). October: he finishes The Battle of Tetuan and shows it in Barcelona, alongside Fortuny's famous picture of the same name. Robert Descharnes publishes his monograph Dall de Gala, which is presented in December; on this occasion Dali uses 'oscillograms' in signing copies, so that the recipient of each dedication may measure the exact degree of the bond between the painter and himself. In this year he paints the Christ of the Valles.

1963 Exhibition of Dali's most recent works at the Knoedler Gallery in New York. Publication of his book The Tragic Myth of Millet's Angelus, written in 1933, the original of which had been mislaid. It is very favourably received by the press. He paints Portrait of his Dead Brother and GalassdellaidesossiribonucJeica, and Crick and Watson's double spirals, models of molecular structure, begin to appear in his work.

1964 Dali is decorated with the Grand Cross of Isabella Catolica. May: publication of Diary of a Genius. July: 'Playboy' publishes a long interview with Dali in which he explain.s the meaning of his soft watches: 'The soft watches constitute, moreover, a prefiguration of Christ, for they resemble the cheese with which I was obsessed: Dali has realized that the body of Christ is like a cheese. But Dali is not the only one who is of this opinion. The first to realize it was St. Augustine, who compared the body of Christ to piles of cheese. All I have done is to re-introduce the concept of cheese in the body of Christ. In the Holy Communion the body and the blood are symbolized by the bread and wine. In the same way in my work the soft watches, like soft cheese, are the presence of the body of Christ.' He also explains the meaning of the rhinoceros and the crutches. September: a major retrospective show of Dali's work in Tokyo, organized by the 'Mainichi Newspaper. '

1965 The Gallery of Modern Art in New York offers the public the most important of all Dali retrospectives held to date, including for the first time pictures from Reynold Morse's private collection. December: the Knoedler Gallery presents Dali's latest work, his 'best work to date,' according to his own statement. This is pop-op-yes-yes-pompier, also known by the name of The Station at Perpignan. The Albin Michel publishing house is to sign a contract with Dali by the terms of which the painter undertakes to write, for the Lettre ouverte collection, an Open letter to Salvador Dali. He also. does a series of 100 watercolours intended to illustrate the Bible and a series. of pen-and-ink drawings for Las Metamorfosis Eroticas. He begins to develop an interest in holography and three-dimensional art. Among the works painted during this period are The Apotheosis of the Dollar and Gala contemplating Dali in a State of Weightlessness over his Work of Art Pop-op-yes-yes-pompier.

1966 He designs an envelope for the United Nations on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the World Federation of United Nations Associations, and a sundial which is later placed on No. 27 in the rue Saint Jacques, Paris. During this summer Jean Cristoph Avery begins making Portrait mou avec du lard grille, shown on French television in 1972. 'Le Monde' publishes an interview with Dali, in which he gives the reason behind this Portrait: 'Soft on account of the attraction Salvador Dali feels towards soft things (life is soft, and everything living; everything that is hard is inert, dead). With bacon because there are a lot of pigs in the film, for the pig is the softest of animals, the most eatable. Salvador Dali believes himself to be a pig; he says that it is the only animal that charges straight at ghosts and deliria.' During this year and the following one Dali paints The Tunny Catch, one of his most important pictures.

1967 November: Dali presents The Tunny Catch at the Hotel Meurice, on the occasion of an exhibition in homage to Meissonier, which includes works by Meissonier himself, Neville, Moreau, etc. In the same hotel Dali gives a lecture on Karl Marx to the pupils of the E.S.S.E.C. He also carries out two design commissions: for Puiforcat he designs a pack of cards and for Air India an ashtray, the main motif of which is a swan being transformed into an elephant. In the same month he receives an honorary doctorate from the Academie de la Fourrure.

1968 May: publication of Les Passions selon Dali, a book written by Dali and Louis Powell. Later this year the book Doll de Draeger is published and is launched at a big party in the Draeger atelier. The 'events of May' in France give Dali occasion to write a pamphlet entitled My cultural revolution, in which he highlights opposition to bourgeois culture as a virtue and speaks of the need to add a modicum of libido to anti-pleasure organizations like UNESCO and of the possibility of turning that 'home of super-tedium' into a true erogenous zone under the auspices of St Louis, the first man to legislate on matters of venal love. He ends with the famous words: 'Wherever the cultural revolution passes, the fantastic is sure to spring up.' During this and the following years he is to do several sculptures in glass, such as Cyclops, Fleur du Mal and What Matters is the Rose, while gathering notes for his book The Art of History.

1969 Publication of Las Metamorfosis Eroticas, one of the high points of his paranoiac-critical method. July: Dali writes a special report for 'Paris Match' on Paris and Barcelona, an interesting passage in which says: 'So Dali sees in Gaudi an antidote to the most baneful poison of our age: Le Corbusier. According to him, the architecture of the future will not be either clinical or functional in the style of the Protestant Le Corbusier. It will be "soft, hairy," like that of Gaudi, Catholic, Apostolic and Roman.' He works on commercial posters for the firms of Perrier (on the theme of thirst) and Lanvin chocolates. December: he is invited to be the guest of honour at an 'Articled Lawyers' Conference' in France, the theme proposed being: 'If an artist attributes the merit and originality of his work to the paranoiac state in which he considers himself to exist, has he grounds for bringing an action for libel against a journalist who has maintained in an article that the said artist's career is the soundest possible proof of moral health?' On being asked how Dali conducted himself after his introductory contribution (he arrived very late, accompanied by a bizarre and ambiguous retinue), the secretary of the conference, Philippe Bern, replies: 'Well, he listened attentively to the speeches. But to return to his introductory contribution, I may tell you that it was longer than anyone expected. He proclaimed himself "an anarchist, a monarchist and an enemy of the consumer society," ending rather unexpectedly by declaring that, "since eloquence is quite impossible in any language but Catalan, the language of Ramon Llull," he felt he should recite a "genetic" poem in that language. So he recited a poem in Catalan which nobody understood -- but, it must be admitted, in tones worthy of Sarah Bernhardt.' It is at this time that he paints the Portrait of Gala.

1970 The exhibition held at the Knoedler Gallery at the end of 1969 arouses great interest in the American press. DaIi announces the forthcoming creation of the Dali Museum in Figueres and at the same time proposes the establishment of a Museum of Surrealist Objects, to which he would donate fifty exhibits of his own. He does six posters for the French Railways and signs copies of the book Dali por Dali de Draeger at the newly-opened shop Brummel du Printemps. November: the Boymans-van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam organizes the first of the major Dali retrospectives to be held in Europe, including the E.F.W. James Collection. Dali continues to explore three-dimensional art and studies the work of the Dutch painter Gerard Dou, a contemporary of Vermeer, in whose canvases he discovers double (Le. 'stereoscopic') images. It is at this time that he begins to work with a Fresnel lens to create such images. He finally completes his painting Hallucinogenous Bullfighter and the Death Mask of Napoleon in ormolu. He works on the preliminary project for the Dali Museum in Figueres with the Spanish architect Emilio Perez Pinero.

1971 Formal opening of the Dali Museum in Cleveland (Ohio), consisting largely of the Reynold Morse Collection. He dedicates a set of chessmen, made from casts of teeth and fingers, to Marcel Duchamp; at the same time he does work for various magazines, such as 'Vogue' and 'Scarab.' He also does the preliminary studies for the ceiling of the Museum in Figueres. Meanwhile he is becoming more and more interested in holography, and this interest increases still further when Dennis Gabor is awarded the Nobel prize for his work on lasers. Gabor is to advise Dali on the preparation of three holographical compositions in the course of the following year. November: important exhibition of engravings, entitled 'Homage to Durer,' at the Galeria Vision. Publication of Oui!, the first anthology of texts written by Dali.

1972 Exhibition of holograms at the Knoedler Gallery in New York. Robert Hughes, writing in 'Time,' describes this initiative as pseudoscientific and says: ' ... Dali has simply used a new medium to transmit his old mannerisms.' August: Salvador Dali announces the donation of all his works to the Spanish State (meaning all the works that belong to him, whether painted by him or not). He does illustrations for Boccaccio's Decameron.

1973 At the Hotel Meurice Dall presents his first Chronohologram. April: the Knoedler Gallery opens a 'Dalinian Holographic Room'. Publication of Dix recettes d'immortalite and, for the first time in French, of Visages occultes and Comment on devient Daff. Draeger publishes Les diners de Gala. 22nd June: presentation at the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris of Andre Malraux's Roi, je t'attends a Babylone, with 14 illustrations by Dali, published by Albert Skira.

1974 Publication of 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship. March: retrospective at the Stael Museum in Frankfurt-am-Main. Publication of Comment on devient Dali. Of this book Didier Lecoin writes, in 'Les Nouvelles Litteraires' (18-3-1974): 'A beautiful book. False and sincere at the same time. A book on two levels, a concerto for two voices.' 28 September: opening of the Dali Museum-Theatre in Figueres; besides a varied exhibition of Dali's genius, it possesses works by Ernst Fuchs, Arno Breker and Antoni Pitxot. At this time, too, he paints Ruggiero Freeing Angelica, Transformation, Anchorite, Figure from Behind, Explosion of Faith in a Cathedral, Angels Contemplating the Ordination of a Saint and Battle of Clouds.

1975 January: presentation in Avoriaz of the first part of the film Voyage en Haute Mongolie, made by Dali. Exhibition, sponsored by Nikkon, of photographs by Robert Descharnes and Marc Lacroix on the theme of 'Dali, paranoiac-critical method, objective randomness and third dimension,' the photographs having been taken following initiatives of Dali himself.

1976 October: Dali deposits a copy of his book L 'Alchimie des Philosophesat the National Library in Paris. In the same month the review 'Sauvage' publishes, under the title Les Mandalas (ie Dali, a conversation with the painter which may be considered one of the most incisive talks with Dali ever published.

1977 May: a retrospective show of Dali's work at the 22nd Salon de Montrouge. November: Francois Petit presents The Station at Perpignan in Paris, together' with a selection of the artist's earlier and more recent works.

1978 April: at the Guggenheim Museum in New York Dali presents his first hyper-stereoscopic work: Dali Lifting the Skin of the Mediterranean to show Gala the Birth of Venus. May: Dali is elected a foreign associate member of the Academie Francaise des Beaux- Arts. July: Dali initiates conversations with the writer Ignacio Gomez de Liana on the Museum-Theatre of Figueres, interpreted in the light of what is known of Giulio Camillo's Theatre of Memory and Ramon Llull's Combinatorial Wheels. In the course of these conversations, which are prolonged in succeeding years, Dali's famous picture The Persistence of Memory is interpreted as the paradigm of the Golden Fleece. August: King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia of Spain, with their son, the Prince of Asturias, visit the Museum-theatre of Figueres accompanied by Dali and his wife. September: Dali is presented with the Gold Medal of Figueres. December: on the occasion of an exhibition in homage to Claude Lorrain at the Hotel Meurice, Francois Petit presents Dali's Hand Drawing Back a Golden Fleece in the Shape of a Cloud to show Gala the Naked Dawn very, very far behind the Sun. At this period Dali also paints The Harmony of the Spheres, Cybernetic Odalisque, Lunar Pierrot, The Christ of Gala and In Search of the Fourth Dimension, which he concludes in the following year.

1979 May: at the Hotel Meurice Dali receives from Louis Weiler the academician's sword, designed by the artist himself. On the following day, under the dome of the Institut de France, he reads his Academy admission speech, entitled Gala, Velazquez and the Golden Fleece. Among other subjects, he speaks of the ADN, Heisenberg, Leibnitz, Descartes, R. Thorn, Eugenio Montes and the Theatre of Memory. December: opening of a retrospective show of Dali's work and of its setting, La kermesse heroique, specially designed for the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. The pictures Raphaelesque Hallucination and The Pentagonal Sardana are painted at this time.

1980 Spring: another major retrospective of the work of Salvador Dali is held at the Tate Gallery in London. October: Dali delivers at the Zarzuela Palace in Madrid his portrait of the King of Spain, to which he has given the title The Dream Prince, a singular work done in a blend of various techniques: surrealism, hyper-realism, cybernetics, anamorphism, etc. In this year, too, he paints The Gay Horse, now in the Museum of Figueres, a picture full of expressiveness and dramatic force, in which one sees some offal with flies and the Emporda countryside.

1981 Dali recovers slowly from an illness contracted in New York during the winter, which is aggravated by the weariness that is the result of the intensely active life led by the artist over the last few years. August: he is visited at his house in Portlligat by King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia of Spain, who express their concern about his health and their hope that he will live many years longer to work for Spain. September: Dali, ever more retired from social life in his Portlligat house, pays a visit to the Museum-Theatre in Figueres and resumes his artistic activities with the themes of the Llullian Wheels and the Golden Fleece.

1982 In his retreat in the Emporda he paints several pictures which represent a fresh working-out of some themes of his own and of others taken from Velazquez and Michelangelo. February: opening of an exhibition entitled 'The literary cycles of Salvador Dali' in the Tiepolo Room of the Caja de Ahorros (Savings Bank) of Madrid. March: formal opening of the Dali Museum of St. Petersburg (Florida), founded by Reynold and Eleanor Morse. The Honourable Jordi Pujol, President of the Autonomous Government of Catalonia, personally presents Dali with the gold medal of that Government.

Gala is twice sent to hospital in Barcelona. 10 June: death of Gala, the artist's companion, muse and model for over fifty years. In a private ceremony on the following day her mortal remains are buried in the grounds of the castle of Pubol, near the village of La Pera in the province of Girona. 16 June: at Pubol Dali receives a special visit from the delegate of the Spanish Government in Catalonia, Senor Rovira Tarazona, who in the King's name gives him the credential of the awarding of the Grand Cross of the Order of Carlos III, the highest decoration of the Spanish State. On the same afternoon he is visited by the Director General of Fine Arts, Senor Perez de ArmiMn, and the Assistant Director General of Plastic Arts, Senora Beristain, for the signing of the protocol for the great anthological exhibition of Dali's work which is to be held in Barcelona and Madrid in the coming months. The signatories to this protocol on Dali's side are Antoni Pitxot, Robert Descharnes, Miquel Domenech and Ignacio Gomez de Liana.

The last pictures painted by Dali in the months of May and June are The Three Glorious Enigmas of Gala and Rome. In the first we see, in a flat, grey landscape with tinges of iridescent colours and reflections, three objects repeated in the form of a Gaudi balustrade or like prehistoric megaliths, which in fact correspond, as double-images, to three outlines of Roman heads at an angle of ninety degrees. In the second picture this motif is accompanied by another of a sacrificial type which is related to the theme of Martyr, the unfinished tragedy on which Dali has been working for several years. On July 10 Dali voluntarily decides to retire to the castle of Pubol, on account of his illness and his state of dejection. Here he continues his painting activities until he finally gives them up early in 1983.

1983 On April 15 the King and Queen of Spain open the anthological exhibition '400 works by Salvador Dali, from 1914 to 1983' at the Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid. The same exhibition, now including Corpus hypercubus and four oil paintings from the Reynolds Morse collection, is presented in Barcelona on July 10 at the Royal Palace of Pedralbes, and opened by Jordi Pujol, President of the Generalitat, and Javier Solana, Minister of Culture.

1984 On March 27 the official opening of the Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation takes place in Figueres. The act is presided over by Jordi Pujol, President of the Generalitat. Early in the morning of August 30 Dali suffers burns from a fire that breaks out in his bedroom in the castle of Pubol. He is taken to a hospital in Barcelona the Pilar Clinic, where surgeons operate on him. During is period of convalescence he is visited by a number of personalities, among them the President of the Generalitat. Doctor Garda Sanmiguel, in charge of the medical team treating the artist, decides to install a naso-gastrical probe so that Dall might be properly fed. On October 17 Dali is transferred to the Torre Galatea in Figueres, where major alterations have been carried out in order to house him.

1985 On March 28 the members of the Honorary Committee of the Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation are received by the King and Queen of Spain. Dali's collaborators deliver the following message from the painter: 'Your Majesties, Spain is a bloody thorn; the King, a sublime crown of Spain. Saint Teresa and Nietszche believed that if a work is to become eternal, it must be written in blood. Our blood and Gala's.'

1986-1987. He remains practically isolated, the only people with access to him being his medical team and his closest collaborators, who are entrusted with the task of informing the public about everything concerning the artist. Despite his pacemaker, Dali suffers two more heart attacks during this period.

1988 In November his condition worsens and on the 28th of the month he is rushed to the Quiron Clinic, Barcelona. In hospital, Dali is visited by the King, to whom he gives a book of poems written by himself. He recovers sufficiently to be back in the Torre Galatea for Christmas.

1989 He suffers another heart attack, as a result of which he dies on January 23 in a Figueres clinic. He is embalmed and buried beneath the dome of the Dali Museum-Theatre.


_______________

Notes:

* I wish to thank Juan Jose Herrera for the assistance he has given me in drawing up this Chronology.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

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INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS

1. Crepuscular Old Man. 1917-1918. Oil on canvas with sand. 50 x 30 cm. Ramon Pitxot Soler Collection. Barcelona.

2. Grandmother Anna Sewing. C. 1917. Oil on sackcloth, 46 x 62 cm. Dr Joaquin Vila Moner Collection, Figueres (Girona).

3. Self-portrait of the Artist at his Easel in Cadaques. C. 1919. Oil on canvas, 27 x 21 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. 51. Petersburg, Florida.

4. Portrait of Jose M. Torres. C. 1920. Oil on canvas, 49.5 x 39.5 cm. Museum of Modern Art, Barcelona.

5. Portrait of the Cellist Ricard Pitxot. 1920. Oil on canvas, 61.5 x 49 cm. Antoni Pitxot Soler Collection. Cadaques.

6. Self·portrait with Raphael's Neck. 1920-1921. Oil on canvas, 47 x 30 cm. Private collection. Spain.

7. Self-portrait. 1921. Oil on cardboard, 47 x 30 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

8. The Liane Beach at Cadaques. 1921. Oil on cardboard, 63 X89 cm. Peter Moore Collection, Paris.

9. Cadaques. 1922. Oil on canvas, 60.5 X82 cm. Montserrat Dali de Bas Collection, Barcelona.

10. The First Days of Spring. 1922-1923. India ink and watercolour on paper, 21.5 x 14.5 cm. Private collection.

11. Bathers at El Liane. 1923. Oil on cardboard, 72 x 103 cm. Jose Encesa Collection, Barcelona.

12. Port Alguer. 1924. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

13. Anna Maria (the artist's sister). 1924. Oil on canvas. Senora de Carles Collection, Barcelona.

14. Crystalline Still Life. 1924. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Private collection.

15. Venus with Amorini. 1925. Oil on wooden panel, 26 x 23 cm. Private collection.

16. Port Alguer. 1925. Oil on canvas, 36 x 38 cm. Private collection.

17. Seated Girl from Behind (Anna Maria). 1925. Oil on canvas, 108 x 77 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.

18. Girl Standing at the Window (his sister, Anna Maria). 1925. Oil on canvas, 103 x 74 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.

19. Bay of Cadaques. 1925. Oil on canvas, 40 x 52 cm. Private collection.

20. Cala Nans, Cadaques, Embellished with Cypresses. 1925. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm. Enric Sabater Collection, Palafrugell (Girona).

21. Portrait of the Artist's Father. 1925. Oil on canvas, 104.5 x 104.5 cm. Museum of Modern Art, Barcelona.

22. Cliff (also known as Woman Sitting on the Rocks. The landscape is that of Cap Norfeu, in the vicinity of Cadaques). 1926. Oil on wooden panel, 26 x 40 cm. Marianna Minota de Gallotti Collection, Milan.

23. The Bread-basket. 1926. Oil on wooden panel, 31.7 x 31.7 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

24. The Girl with the Curls (The Girl from the Emporda). 1926. Oil on plywood, 51 x40 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

25. Painting with Sailor. C. 1926. Belitz Collection, New York.

26. Cubist Self-portrait. 1926. Gouache and collage, 105 x 75 cm. Private collection.

27. Venus and Sailor (homage to Salvat-Papasseit). 1926. Oil on canvas, 216 x 147 cm. Gulf American Gallery, Inc, Miami.

28. The Barcelona Mannequin. 1927. Oil on wooden panel, 198 x 149 cm. Private collection, New York.

29. Senicitas. 1926-1927. Oil on wooden panel, 63 X 47 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.

30. Still Life. 1927. Oil on canvas, 199x 150 cm. Private collection.

31. Amoeba Face. 1927. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Private collection.

32. Honey is Sweeter than Blood. 1927. Formerly in the collection of Mile Coco Chanel. Garcia Lorca called this picture The Forest of the Objects. The work's original title is taken from a phrase spoken by Lidia Nogues.

33. The Putrefied Donkey. 1928. Oil on wooden panel, 61 x 50 cm. F. Petit Collection, Paris.

34. Inaugural Gooseflesh. 1928. Oil on canvas, 75.5 x 62.5 cm. Ramon Pitxot Soler Collection, Barcelona.

35. Portrait of Paul Eluard. 1929. Oil on cardboard, 33 x 25 cm. Private collection.

36. The First Days of Spring. 1929. Oil and collage on wooden panel, 49.5 x 64 cm.

37. Spectre of the Afternoon. 1930. Oil on canvas, 46 x 54 cm. San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California.

38. Vertigo or Tower of Pleasure (detail). 1930. Oil on canvas, 60 x 50 cm.

39. Premature Ossification of a Station. 1930. Oil on canvas, 31.5 x 27 cm. Private collection.

40. Bleeding Roses (detail). 1930. Oil on canvas, 75 x 64 cm. J. Bounjon Collection, Brussels.

41. First Portrait of Gala. 1931. Oil on cardboard, 14 x 9 cm. Albert Field Collection, New York.

42. The Persistence of Memory (The Soft Watches). 1931. Oil on canvas, 26.3 x 36.5 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

43. Gradiva Finds the Anthropomorphous Ruins. 1931. Oil on canvas, 65 x 54 cm. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Lugano-Castagnola, Switzerland.

44. Shades of Night Coming Down. 1931. Oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

45. Agnostic Symbol. 1932. Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.1 cm. The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.

46. Partial Hallucination. Six Apparitions of Lenin on a Piano. 1931. Oil on canvas, 114 x 146 cm. Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris.

47. Meditation on the Harp. 1932-1934. Oil on canvas, 67 x 47 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

48. The Invisible Man. 1929-1933.Oil on canvas, 143 x 81 cm. Private collection.

49. Babaouo. 1932. Wooden box with painted glass panes, 25.8 x 26.4 x 30.5 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

50. The Phantom Wagon. 1933. Oil on wooden panel, 19 x 24.1 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

51. Gala and Millet's Angelus Preceding the Imminent Arrival of the Conical Anamorphoses. 1933. Oil on plywood, 24 x 18.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

52. Millet's Architectural Angelus. 1933. Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

53. Masochistic Instrument. 1933-1934. Oil on canvas, 62 x 47 cm. Private collection.

54. Gala with Two Lamb Chops Balanced on her Shoulder. 1933. Oil on plywood, 31 x 39 cm. Private collection.

55. Archaeological Reminiscences of Millet's Angelus. 1933-1935. Oil on wooden panel, 31.7 x 39.3 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

56. The Spectre of Sex-appeal. 1934. Oil on wooden panel, 18 x 14 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

57. Enigmatic Elements in a Landscape (detail). 1934. Oil on wooden panel, 61.5 x 58.5 cm. Sulzberger Collection, Paris.

58. Weaning from the Food Chair. 1934. (Notice that the landscape of Portlligat is inverted in this work). Oil on wooden panel. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

59. Apparition of My Cousin Carolineta on the Beach at Roses (detail). 1934. Oil on canvas, 73 x 100 cm. Martin Theves Collection, Brussels.

60. The Ship. 1934-1935. Oil on canvas, 29.5 x 22.5 cm. Private collection.

61. Atavistic Traces after the Rain. 1934. Oil on canvas, 65 x 54 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

62. Portrait of Gala or Gala's Angelus. 1935. Oil on canvas, 32.4 x 26.7 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

63. The Rider of Death. 1935. Oil on canvas, 65 x 53 cm. F. Petit Collection, Paris.

64. Perspectives. 1936. Oil on canvas, 65 x 65.5 cm. Kunstmuseum, Basel. Emmanuel Hoffman Foundation.

65. The Anthropomorphic Chest of Drawers. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 25.4 x 43.1 cm. Kunstsammlung Nordheim-Westfalen, Dusseldorf.

66. The Chemist from Figueres who is not .Looking for Anything at All. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 30 x 56 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

67. White Calm. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 41 x 33 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

68. Soft Construction with Cooked Beans (Premonition of the Spanish Civil War). 1936. Oil on canvas, 100 x 99 cm. The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.

69. Women with Flowers for Heads Finding the Skin of a Grand Piano on the Beach. 1936. Oil on canvas, 54x65 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

70. Geological Justice. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 11 x 19 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

71. The Great Paranoiac. 1936. Oil on canvas, 62 x 62 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

72. Solar Table. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 60 x 46 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

73. Cannibalism in Autumn, 1936-1937. Oil on canvas, 65 x 65.2 cm. Tate Gallery, London.

74. Lighted Giraffes. 1936-1937. Oil on wooden panel, 35 x 27 cm. Kunstmuseum, Basel. Emmanuel Hoffman Foundation.

75. The Dream. 1937. Oil on canvas, 50 x 77 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

76. The Enigma of Hitler. 1937. Oil on canvas. Private collection.

77. The Invention of Monsters. 1937. Oil on wooden panel, 51.2 x 78.5 cm. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago.

78. Spain. 1936-1938. Oil on canvas, 91,8 x 60.2 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

79. Metamorphosis of Narcissus, 1937. Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 78.2 cm. Tate Gallery, London.

80. Transparent Simulacrum of a False Image. C. 1938. Oil on canvas, 73.5 x 92 cm. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y.

81. Impressions of Africa (detail). 1938, Oil on canvas, 91.5 x 117.5 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

82. Palladian Corridor with a Dramatic Surprise, 1938. Oil on canvas, 75 x 104 cm. Segialant Anstalt,

83. Beach with Telephone. 1938. Oil on canvas, 73 x 92 cm. Tate Gallery, London.

84. The Image Vanishes. 1938. Oil on canvas, 55.9 x 50.8 cm. Private collection.

85. The Infinite Enigma. 1938. Oil on canvas, 114.5 x 146.5 cm. Private collection.

86. Slave-market with the Apparition of the Invisible Bust of Voltaire. 1940. Oil on canvas, 46.5 x 65.5 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.

87. Spider of the Afternoon. Hope! 1940. Oil on canvas, 41 x 51 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

88. Soft Self-portrait with Grilled Rasher of Bacon. 1941. Oil on canvas, 61 x 50.8 cm. Private collection.

89. The Eye of Time. 1941. Jewel-watch. The Owen Cheatham Foundation,

90. Jewel (gold, rubies and pearls). 1941. The Owen Cheatham Foundation.

91. Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee around a Pomegranate a Second before Awakening. 1944. Oil on wooden panel, 51 x 41 cm. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Lugano-Castagnola; Switzerland.

92. Half a Giant Cup Suspended with an Inexplicable Appendage Five Metres Long. 1944-1945. Oil on canvas. 50 x 31 cm. Private collection, Basel.

93. The Bread-basket. 1945. Oil on wooden panel, 37 x 32 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

94. Design for the film Spellbound, starring Ingrid Bergman and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 1945.

95. Portrait of Picasso in the Glory of the Sun. 1947. Oil on canvas, 64.1 x 54.7 cm. Private collection, New York.

96. Interatomic Balance of a Swan's Feather. 1947. Oil on canvas, 77.5 x 96.5 cm. Private collection.

97. The Three Sphinxes of Bikini. 1947. Oil on canvas, 30 x 50 cm. Galerie Petit, Paris.

98. Atomic Leda. 1949. Oil on canvas, 60 x 44 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

99. First study for the Madonna of Porlligat. 1949. Oil on-canvas, 48.9 x 37.5 cm. Marquette University Committee on the Fine Arts, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

100. Dali at the Age of Six, when he Thought he was a Girl, Lifting the Skin of the Water to see a Dog Sleeping in the Shade of the Sea. 1950. Oil on canvas, 80 x 99 cm. Comte Francois de Vallombreuse Collection, Paris.

101. Landscape of Portlligat. 1950. Oil on canvas, 58 x 78 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

102. Raphaelesque Head Bursting. 1951. Oil on canvas, 44.5 x 35 cm. Stead H. Stead Ellis Collection, Somerset.

103. Christ of St. John of The Cross. 1951. Oil on canvas, 205 x 116 cm. Art Gallery, Glasgow.

104. The Angel of Portlligat. 1952. Oil on canvas, 58.4 x 78.3 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

105. Galatea of the Spheres. 1952. Oil on canvas, 64 x 54 cm. Private collection.

106. Portrait of Gala with Rhinocerotic Symptoms. 1954. Oil on canvas, 39 x 31.5 cm. Private collection.

107. Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory. 1952-1954. Oil on canvas, 25 x 33 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

108. Crucifixion ('Hypercubic Body'). 1954. Oil on canvas, 194.5 x 124 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Chester Dale Bequest.

109. The Last Supper. 1955. Oil on canvas, 167 x 268 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Chester Dale Bequest.

110. Rhinocerotic Gooseflesh. 1956. Oil on canvas, 93 x 60 cm. Bruno Pagliai Collection, Mexico.

111. Saint Helen in Portlligat. 1956. Oil on canvas, 31 x 42 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

112. Living Still Life. 1956. Oil on canvas, 125 x 160 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse, Loaned to The Salvador DaB Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

113. Meditative Rose. 1958. Oil on canvas, 36 x 28 cm. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Grant Collection, New York.

114. Sistine Madonna (detail). 1958. Oil on paper, 223 x 190 cm. Henry J. Heinz II Collection, New York,

115. Velazquez Painting the Infanta Margarita, Surrounded by the Lights and Shadows of Her Own Glory. 1958. Oil on canvas, 153 x 92 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse, Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

116. The Dream of Columbus. 1958-1959. Oil on canvas, 410.2 x 284.8 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

117. Virgin of Guadalupe. 1959. Oil on canvas, 130 x 98.5 cm. Alfonso Fierro Collection, Madrid.

118. Gala Nude From Behind Looking in an Invisible Mirror, 1960. Oil on canvas, 42 x 32 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona)

119. Birth of a Divinity. 1960. Oil on canvas, 36 x 26 cm. Mrs. Henry J. Heinz II Collection, New York.

120. The Battle of Tetuan. 1962. Oil on canvas, 308 x 406 cm. David Nahmad Collection, Milan.

121. Salvador Dali in the Act of Painting Gala in the Apotheosis of the Dollar, in which One may also Perceive to the Left Marcel Duchamp Disguised as Louis XIV, behind a Curtain in the Style of Vermeer, which is but the Invisible though Monumental Face of the Hermes of Praxiteles. 1965. Oil on canvas, 400 x 498 cm. Peter Moore Collection, Cadaques (Girona).

122. The Station at Perpignan. 1965. Oil on canvas, 295 x 406 cm. Ludwig Museum, Cologne.

123. The Tunny Catch. 1966-1967. Oil on canvas, 304 x 404 cm. Paul Ricard Foundation, Bandol, France.

124. Cosmic Athlete. 1968. Oil on canvas. Zarzuela Palace (Spanish National Trust), Madrid.

125. Hallucinogenous Bullfighter. 1969-1970. Oil on canvas, 400 x 300 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

126. Hour of the Monarchy. 1969. Oil, diameter 3 metres. Ceiling in the Palacete Albeniz, Montjui'c, Barcelona. Property of the Town Hall of Barcelona.

127. Op Rhinoceros. 1970. Special plastic invented by Dali, 14.5 x 18 cm. Private collection.

128. Unfinished Stereoscopic Picture. 1973-1974. Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

129. Ruggiero Freeing Angelica. 1974. Oil on canvas, 350 x 200 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

130. Gala Looking at the Mediterranean Sea. 1974-1976. Oil on canvas, 240 x 182 cm. Martin Lawrence Collection.

131. Soft Monster in Angelic Landscape. 1977. Oil on canvas. Vatican Museum.

132. In Search of the Fourth Dimension. 1979. Oil on canvas, 122.5 x 246 cm. Private collection.

133 & 134. The Palace of the Wind (Ceiling of the First Floor in the Dali Museum-Theatre in Figueres). Oil on five canvases fastened to the ceiling. Central canvas: 255 x 840 cm. Side canvases: 8.4 and 11 m. at the base and 1.70 m. in height. Joining canvases: 5.75 and 2.3 m. at the base and 1.3 m. in height.

135. Patio-Garden of the Dali Museum-Theatre in Figueres. Opened on 28 September 1974. In the foreground, a sculpture by Ernst Fuchs.

136. The Road of the Enigma. 1981. Oil on canvas, 140 x 94 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

137. La Pieta. 1982. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

138. Othello Dreaming Venice. 1982. Oil on canvas, 100 x 90 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

139. The Three Glorious Enigmas of Gala. 1982. Oil on canvas, 130 x 120 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 5:50 am

SIGNATURE

Image
Dali's Signature
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 5:58 am

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Judgment of Paris, 1950. Drawing in India ink, 62.2X76.5 cm. Countess Guerrini Moraldi Collection, New York.

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Cannibalism of Objects. 1937. Ink and gouache on paper, 63.5 x 48.2 cm. Edward James Foundation, West Dean, England.

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Postcard that turns into a Picasso-like woman's head

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Paranoiac Face. 1935. 62 x 80 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

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Study for "The Outskirts of the Paranoiac-critical City." 1935. Ink and pencil on paper, 32.5 x 2- cm. E. F. W. James, Esq. Collection, West Dean, England.

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Portrait of Freud (illustration for The Secret Life of Salvador Dali). Ink on paper. Private collection.

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Crepuscular Old Man. 1917-1918. Oil on canvas with sand, 50 x 30 cm. Ramon Pitxot Soler Collection, Barcelona.

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Grandmother Anna Sewing. C. 1917. Oil on sackcloth, 46 x 62 cm. Dr. Joaquin Vila Moner Collection, Figueres (Girona).

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Self-portrait of the Artist at his Easel in Cadaques. C. 1919. Oil on canvas, 27 x 21 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse, Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Portrait of Jose M. Torres. C. 1920. Oil on canvas, 49.5 x 39.5 cm. Museum of Modern Art, Barcelona.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:00 am

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Portrait of the Cellist Ricard Pitxot. 1920. Oil on canvas, 61.5 x 49 cm. Antoni Pitxot Soler Collection, Cadaques.

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Self-portrait with Raphael's Neck. 1920-1921. Oil on canvas, 47 x 30 cm. Private collection, Spain.

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Self-portrait. 1921. Oil on cardboard, 47 x 30 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).

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The Llane Beach at Cadaques. 1921. Oil on cardboard, 63 x 89 cm. Peter Moore Collection, Paris.

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Cadaques. 1922. Oil on canvas, 60.5 x 82 cm. Montserrat Dali de Bas Collection, Barcelona.

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The First Days of Spring. 1922-1923. India ink and watercolour on paper, 21.5 x 14.5 cm. Private collection.

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Bathers at El Llane. 1923. Oil on cardboard, 72 x 103 cm. Jose Encesa Collection, Barcelona.

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Port Alguer. 1924. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona)

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Anna Maria (the artist's sister). 1924. Oil on canvas. Senora de Carles Collection, Barcelona.

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Crystalline Still Life. 1924. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Private collection.

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Venus with Amorini. 1925. Oil on wooden panel, 26 x 23 cm. Private collection.

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Port Alguer. 1925. Oil on canvas, 36 x 38 cm. Private collection.

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Seated Girl from Behind (Anna Maria). 1925. Oil on canvas, 108 x 77 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:00 am

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Girl Standing at the Window (his sister, Anna Maria). 1925. Oil on canvas, 103 x 74 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.

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Bay of Cadaques. 1925. Oil on canvas, 40 x 52 cm. Private collection.

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Cala Nans, Cadaques, Embellished with Cypresses. 1925. Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm. Enric Sabater Collection, Palafrugell (Girona)

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Portrait of the Artist's Father. 1925. Oil on canvas, 104.5 x 104.5 cm. Museum of Modern Art, Barcelona.

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Cliff (also known as Woman Sitting on the Rocks. The landscape is that of Cap Norfeu, in the vicinity of Cadaques). 1926. Oil on wooden panel, 26 x 40 cm. Marianna Minota de Gallotti Collection, Milan.

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The Bread Basket. 1926. Oil on wooden panel, 31.7 x 31.7 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

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The Girl with the Curls (The Girl from the Emporda). 1926. Oil on plywood, 51 x 40 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Painting with Sailor. C. 1926. Belitz Collection, New York.

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Painting with Sailor. C. 1926. Belitz Collection, New York.

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Venus and Sailor (homage to Salvat-Papasseit). 1926. Oil on canvas, 216 x 147 cm. Gulf American Gallery, Inc., Miami.

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The Barcelona Mannequin. 1927. Oil on wooden panel, 198 x 149 cm. Private collection, New York.

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Senicitas. 1926-1927. Oil on wooden panel, 63 x 47 cm. Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art, Madrid.

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Still Life. 1927. Oil on canvas, 199 x 150 cm. Private collection.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:00 am

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Amoeba Face. 1927. Oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm. Private collection.

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Honey is Sweeter than Blood. 1927. The work's original title is taken from a phrase spoken by Lidia Nogues.

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The Putrefied Donkey. 1928. Oil on wooden panel, 61 x 50 cm. F. Petit Collection, Paris.

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Inaugural Gooseflesh. 1928. Oil on canvas, 75.5 x 62.5 cm. Ramon Pitxot Soler Collection, Barcelona.

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Portrait of Paul Eluard. 1929. Oil on cardboard, 33 x 25 cm. Private collection.

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The First Days of Spring. 1929. Oil and collage on wooden panel, 49.5 x 64 cm.

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Spectre of the Afternoon. 1930. Oil on canvas, 46 x 54 cm. San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California

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Vertigo or Tower of Pleasure (detail). 1930. Oil on canvas, 60 x 50 cm.

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Premature Ossification of a Station. 1930. Oil on canvas, 31.5 x 27 cm. Private collection.

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Bleeding Roses (detail). 1930. Oil on canvas, 75 x 64 cm. J. Bounjon Collection, Brussels.

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First Portrait of Gala. 1931. Oil on cardboard, 14 x 9 cm. Albert Field Collection, New York.

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The Persistence of Memory (The Soft Watches). 1931. Oil on canvas, 26.3 x 36.5 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

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Gravida Finds the Anthropomorphous Ruins. 1931. Oil on canvas, 65 x 54 cm. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Lugano-Castagnola, Switzerland.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:00 am

Image
Shades of Night Coming Down. 1931. Oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Agnostic Symbol. 1932. Oil on canvas, 54.3 x 65.1 cm. The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.

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Partial Hallucination. Six Apparitions of Lenin on a Piano. 1931. Oil on canvas, 114 x 146 cm. Musee National d'Art Moderne, Paris.

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Meditation on the Harp. 1932-1934. Oil on canvas, 67 x 47 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.

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The Invisible Man. 1929-1933. Oil on canvas, 143 x 81 cm. Private collection.

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Babaouo. 1932. Wooden box with painted glass panes, 25.8 x 26.4 x 30.5 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

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The Phantom Wagon. 1933. Oil on wooden panel, 19 x 24.1 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

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Gala and Millet's Angelus Preceding the Imminent Arrival of the Conical Anamorphoses. 1933. Oil on plywood, 24 x 18.8 cm. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.

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Millet's Architectural Angelus. 1933. Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

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Masochistic Instrument. 1933-1934. Oil on canvas, 62 x 47 cm. Private collection.

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Gala with Two Lamb Chops Balanced on her Shoulder. 1933. Oil on plywood, 31 x 39 cm. Private collection.

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Archaeological Reminiscences of Millet's Angelus. 1933-1935. Oil on wooden panel, 31.7 x 39.3 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.

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The Spectre of Sex Appeal. 1934. Oil on wooden panel, 18 x 14 cm. Dali Museum-Theatre, Figueres (Girona).
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:01 am

Image
Enigmatic Elements in a Landscape (detail). 1934. Oil on wooden panel, 61.5 x 58.5 cm. Sulzberger Collection, Paris.

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Weaning from the Food Chair. 1934. (Notice that the landscape of Portlligat is inverted in this work). Oil on wooden panel. Collection: Mrs. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum. St. Petersburg, Florida.

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Apparition of My Cousin Carolineta on the Beach at Roses (detail). 1934. Oil on canvas, 73 x 100 cm. Martin Theves Collection, Brussels.

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The Ship. 1934-1935. Oil on canvas, 29.5 x 22.5 cm. Private collection.

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Atavistic Traces After the Rain. 1934. Oil on canvas, 65 x 54 cm. Perls Galleries, New York.

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Portrait of Gala or Gala's Angelus. 1935. Oil on canvas, 32.4 x 26.7 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

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The Rider of Death. 1935. Oil on canvas, 65 x 53 cm. F. Petit Collection, Paris.

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Perspectives. 1936. Oil on canvas, 65 x 65.5 cm. Kunstmuseum, Basel. Emmanuel Hoffman Foundation.

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The Anthropomorphic Chest of Drawers. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 25.4 x 43.1 cm. Kunstsammlung Nordheim-Westfalen, Dusseldorf.

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The Chemist from Figueres who is not Looking for Anything at All. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 30 x 56 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

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White Calm. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 41 x 33 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

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Soft Construction with Cooked Beans (Premonition of the Spanish Civil War). 1936. Oil on canvas, 100 x 99 cm. The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.

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Women with Flowers for Heads Finding the Skin of a Grand Piano on the Beach. 1936. Oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm. Collection: Mr. and Mrs. A. Reynolds Morse. Loaned to The Salvador Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida.
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Re: Dali, by Ignacio Gomez de Liano

Postby admin » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:01 am

Image
Geological Justice. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 11 x 19 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

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The Great Paranoiac. 1936. Oil on canvas, 62 x 62 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

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Solar Table. 1936. Oil on wooden panel, 60 x 46 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

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Cannibalism in Autumn. 1936-1937. Oil on canvas, 65 x 65.2 cm. Tate Gallery, London.

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Lighted Giraffes. 1936-1937. Oil on wooden panel, 35 x 27 cm. Kunstmuseum, Basel. Emmanuel Hoffman Foundation.

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The Dream. 1937. Oil on canvas, 50 x 77 cm. Edward F. W. James Collection, Sussex.

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The Enigma of Hitler. 1937. Oil on canvas. Private collection.

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The Invention of Monsters. 1937. Oil on wooden panel, 51.2 x 78.5 cm. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago.

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Spain. 1936-1938. Oil on canvas, 91.8 x 60.2 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

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Metamorphosis of Narcissus. 1937. Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 78.2 cm. Tate Gallery, London.

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Transparent Simulacrum of a False Image. C. 1938. Oil on canvas, 73.5 x 92 cm. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y.

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Impressions of Africa (detail). 1938. Oil on canvas, 91.5 x 117.5 cm. Boymans-van Beuningen Museum, Rotterdam.

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Palladian Corridor with a Dramatic Surprise. 1938. Oil on canvas, 75 x 104 cm. Segialant Anstalt.
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