MOLEHUNT: THE SECRET SEARCH FOR TRAITORS THAT SHATTERED TH

"Science," the Greek word for knowledge, when appended to the word "political," creates what seems like an oxymoron. For who could claim to know politics? More complicated than any game, most people who play it become addicts and die without understanding what they were addicted to. The rest of us suffer under their malpractice as our "leaders." A truer case of the blind leading the blind could not be found. Plumb the depths of confusion here.

Re: MOLEHUNT: THE SECRET SEARCH FOR TRAITORS THAT SHATTERED

Postby admin » Wed Nov 04, 2015 4:46 am

Part 4 of 5

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Clare Edward Petty in Helsinki in 1981 in front of a statue of the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. A member of the CIA's Special Investigations Group that conducted the search for penetrations, Petty concluded that James Angleton himself was the Soviet mole.

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THE SOVIETS: Yuri Ivanovich Nosenko as a young KGB officer before he defected to the CIA in Geneva early in 1964. This photograph, obtained by the author, is the first ever published of Nosenko. A photograph identified as Nosenko and widely distributed by wire services when the KGB officer defected was actually of another member of the Soviet disarmament delegation, V. V. Shustov.

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Ado!f G. Tolkachev is arrested by agents of the KGB in 1985. For almost a decade, during the Carter and Reagan administrations, Tolkachev was Washington's most valuable spy in the Soviet Union. But an overly suspicious CIA had turned him away three times. The Soviets announced his execution in !986.

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Yuri Loginov, code name AEGUSTO, the KGB "illegal" who passed information to the CIA for six years in the 1960s. When the CIA's Soviet division and Angleton became persuaded that he was a plant, Loginov was betrayed by the agency, arrested in South Africa, and forced to return to the Soviet Union. Later defectors said he had been executed.

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The first published photograph of Aleksei Isidorovich Kulak, code name FEDORA, the KGB officer at the United Nations in New York who became a legend of the Cold War. Over a period of sixteen years, FEDORA passed Soviet secrets to the United States. J. Edgar Hoover considered him his best spy and the FBI paid him $100,000. The CIA did not trust him.

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The first published photograph of TOPHAT, Dmitri Fedorovich Polyakov, another famous FBI source in New York. The Soviets announced that TOPHAT, an officer of the GRU, Soviet military intelligence, had been caught and executed for espionage on March 15, 1988.

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THE AGENCY: During the era of the mole hunt, Richard M. Helms ran the CIA's clandestine directorate and then served as CIA director. A strong supporter of counter-intelligence chief James Angleton, he defended the need for a mole hunt. The possibility of a Soviet spy inside the CIA, Helms said, was "one of the real nightmares" he faced as director.

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CIA director William E. Colby fired Angleton in 1974.
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Re: MOLEHUNT: THE SECRET SEARCH FOR TRAITORS THAT SHATTERED

Postby admin » Wed Nov 04, 2015 4:48 am

Part 5 of 5

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George T. Kalaris, James Angleton's successor as CIA chief of counterintelligence. Kalaris commissioned a massive, secret study of the mole hunt and of several controversial spy cases. The mole hunt investigated 120 CIA officers as suspected Soviet spies, destroyed the careers of innocent agency employees, paralyzed the CIA's operations around the globe, and, in its wake, damaged U.S. counterspy operations to the present day.

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The roots of the mole hunt reached back to the 1950s, when Edward Ellis Smith, the first CIA man sent to Moscow, was sexually compromised by his maid, a KGB agent. KGB agents forced Smith to meet with them. The CIA fired Smith and hushed up the scandal.

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Former CIA station chief Cleveland C. Cram conducted the six-year, classified study of the Counterintelligence Staff and the mole hunt that filled twelve volumes, each 300 to 400 pages long.

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TRIUMPH: Peter Karlow gets his medal. In a secret ceremony at CIA headquarters in 1989, Peter Karlow receives the Intelligence Commendation Medal from Richard Stolz, then the chief of the agency's clandestine operations, who inscribed the photo. Congress passed the "Mole Relief Act" again for Karlow, who received close to half a million dollars in damages from the CIA, and this medal.

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Certificate was signed by CIA director William H. Webster.

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The CIA citation that accompanied Karlow's medal recognized his "devoted service to the Central Intelligence Agency."

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At the party on K Street after the ceremony at CIA headquarters, among those who showed up to congratulate Karlow was former CIA director Richard Helms, right. As deputy director for operations in 1963, Helms did not intervene to prevent Karlow's dismissal.

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David Wise is America's leading writer on intelligence and espionage. He is coauthor of The Invisible Government, a number one bestseller that has been widely credited with bringing about a reappraisal of the role of the CIA in a democratic society. He is the author of The Spy Who Got Away, The American Police State, and The Politics of Lying, and coauthor with Thomas B. Ross of The Espionage Establishment, The Invisible Government, and The U-2 Affair. Mr. Wise has also written three espionage novels, The Samarkand Dimension, The Children's Game, and Spectrum. A native Nw Yorker and graduate of Columbia College, he is the former chief of the Washington bureau of the New York Herald Tribune and has contributed articles on gover
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