Rape Culture: 20 More Signs, by Nation of Change Staff

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Rape Culture: 20 More Signs, by Nation of Change Staff

Postby admin » Sun Mar 08, 2015 8:22 am

RAPE CULTURE: 20 MORE SIGNS
by Nation of Change Staff
March 7, 2015

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Rape culture is the minimal media coverage and lack of independent inquiry and rarely talking about how to improve it. Here are 20 signs rape culture is taking over American society.

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Rape Culture: vaginahurt ointment, Popehat.com, by Tara Carreon


Rape culture is the “don’t drink because you could end up in a bad situation” lecture being given to women who are the victims of crimes, not the men who commit them.

Rape culture is talking about rape and having someone say, “Yeah, it’s happened to everyone you know.”

Rape culture is not having a discussion about pornography comprising 30 percent of Internet traffic.

Rape culture is rarely talking about how to improve many video games that objectify females, despite significant research by gamers like Anita Sarkeesian.

Rape culture is gamers threatening critics with rape and feminists with killing because, you know, the dehumanization of women in video games has no affect on them.

Rape culture is having a porn actor, Gemma Massey, say in her BBC Three documentary, “Porn: What’s the Harm?” that the thought of an 11-year-old boys watching her films is “quite disturbing,” adding, “I think people need to understand it’s not real [sex]. It’s not how I would have sex at home at all.”

Rape culture is not talking about how pornography is causing erectile dysfunction in young men and changing their sexual preferences.

Rape culture is GQ having accused rapist, Kobe Bryant, on the March 2015 magazine’s cover, along with “Are You Man Enough for the Men’s Rights Movement?,” which documents men who have mostly abandoned positive masculinity (this in the same issue as a “Letter from the Editor” that celebrates acceptance of gay marriage).

Rape culture is that GQ article including, without comment, an assertion that a woman just “wanted to be raped,” men speaking furiously about the consequences they faced for harassing and assaulting females, a man discussing whether the age of consent should be 12.3 or 12, a man telling a journalist she “shouldn’t put her hand on a man’s knee if she doesn’t want to have sex with him” and a man recounting the time he warned his daughter who had just been raped that “if she pressed charges, he would disown her.”

Rape culture is most pornography representing numerous, severe violations of affirmative consent—the behavior standard now in SUNY schools and California colleges (with lawmakers pushing for high school education).

Rape culture is GQ’s, “My Hardcore Obsession,” which documents extreme brutal violence against women, being advertised as their most popular article for about a week in January.

Rape culture is a huge percentage of songs played on the radio for teens and young adults that involve drinking alcohol, doing drugs, or having sex inspired solely by desire.

American rape culture is “Blurred Lines” being played widely in America, but banned in UK colleges.

Rape culture is no national conversation about rape on TV, or in movie entertainment, like the pervasive rape scenes in “Game of Thrones,” which include child molestation, incest and gang rape.

Rape culture is not talking about potentially more men being victims than women because of prison conditions despite the Prison Rape Elimination Act passing unanimously in 2003.

Rape culture is when those who threaten violence against female journalists are rarely investigated or prosecuted because of technological complexities, or a lack of urgency, but quick action is taken when mostly male police departments are believed to be at risk of violence.

Rape culture is ascribing assaults to “a few bad apples” although 6 out of every hundred collegiate women killed, 36 of each 100 men would never be compared to spoiled fruit.

Rape culture is the minimal media coverage and lack of independent inquiry into Operation Death Eaters charges, including sex with minors by rich and powerful leaders.

Rape culture is when former Vanderbilt football player, Brandon Vandenburg, watches, photographs and encourages multiple men to sexual assault a woman he dated and then his lawyer blaming it on “culture” and “peer pressure.”
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