Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

When I was 14 years old, I heard Ralph Nader say that box cereal was less nutritious than the box it came in, and you'd get more nutrition out of tearing up the box and pouring sugar and milk over it, and eating that for breakfast. That's the kind of genius that Ralph Nader produces constantly, and why his ideas changed the world for Americans more than perhaps any political thinker of the late 20th century. He remains more relevant than virtually every other political thinker currently on the scene.

Re: Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

Postby admin » Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:47 am

APPENDIX I: STEVE COBBLE MEMO

To: The Sierra Club
From: Nader 2000
Date: July 21, 2000
Subject: "Pragmatic" Politics

This was Wednesday's headline, front page:

"Clinton/Gore Administration will not breach dams to save salmon."

Will this be Sunday's headline, inside page?

"As expected, Sierra Club endorses Gore."

The political result: the Sierra Club will be ignored the rest of the campaign; key environmental issues will be left off the agenda and out of the presidential debates, as Vice President Gore seeks to mollify and attract swing voters, while taking the "base" for granted; and the Sierra Club will gain the image of a special interest group that will subsume its core principles at the behest of the Democratic Party. In addition, of course, the Sierra Club will snub perhaps the greatest consumer, environmental, and anti-corporate activist in American history.

This is not "practical" politics. It is certainly not practical politics only three days after a major public insult, which the salmon decision is.

This is not the way to play even the insider game on behalf of the environment, much less the long-term, mass movement, change the anti-environmental-corporate-structure game. After all, in American politics, it's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease, not the go-along- to-get-along liberal interest group -- quiet politics only works for those with the big, big corporate money, behind closed doors.

Contrast that possible outcome of this weekend's meetings with the recent actions of President Hoffa and the Teamsters Union. When the Clinton-Gore administration rammed PNTR (Permanent Normal Trade Relations) with China down the throats of the labor and environmental movements, the Teamsters (along with the UAW) did not take this double- cross lightly.

Instead, President Hoffa announced that the Teamsters would reconsider their 1996 support of the Democrats. He then held a press conference with Ralph Nader, and announced that he supported Nader's inclusion in the presidential debates, as the only way to get fair trade issues discussed in front of the voting public.

The result: reams of press, lots of media attention, an enhanced reputation for independent action and standing up for their members of the Teamsters Union, and more focus on the trade question. That's practical politics.

The sad fact is that in modern politics, only when a candidate is fearful of losing your vote does he pay attention. We have a recent illustration of this principle -- the Clinton-Gore administration's late discovery of the Antiquities Act of 1906, when faced with an independent campaign by Ralph Nader and the Greens.

First used by Teddy Roosevelt, to save some of the most precious sites in the United States, the Antiquities Act of 1906 has since been used by president after president to set aside threatened lands.

In 1978, the last Democratic president, Jimmy Carter, saved 56 million acres in Alaska, by invoking the Antiquities Act seventeen times after Congress refused to set aside these lands from development.

Yet for the first three-and-three-quarters years of the Clinton-Gore administration, the Antiquities Act of 1906 was never applied. In 1993, zero acres were saved. In 1994, zero acres were saved. In 1995, zero acres were saved.

Yet in late 1996, just before the election, Bill Clinton appeared on the edge of the Grand Canyon, to announce his first-ever use of the Antiquities Act of 1906 to preserve the Grand Staircase -- Escalante in Utah -- a staged event obviously aimed more at neighboring California, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico than at Utah, where Democratic chances were nil.

Some noticed that there were Green Parties in those four states. And some noticed that Bill Clinton blamed Ralph Nader for losing Colorado in 1996, after winning it in 1992.

Still, in 1997, after the election, zero acres were saved. In 1998, the Antiquities Act was again never invoked. In 1999, zero acres once again.

Then Nader began to make it known that he was going to run in 2000, this time seriously. In January, the Clinton-Gore administration rediscovered the Antiquities Act of 1906, setting aside the Grand Canyon-Parashant and Agua Fria in Arizona, and the coast off California's shore.

In late February, Nader made an official announcement, promising to raise several million dollars, campaign in all fifty states, and qualify for the ballot in almost all the states. In April, the Giant Sequoia area became the latest land set-aside.

Nader broke the all-important 5 percent barrier in the national polls, the level that would make the Green Party a national political party, and began to poll very well along the West Coast. And then in June, the Clinton-Gore administration invoked the Antiquities Act once again for the Ironwood Forest in Arizona, Hanford Reach in Washington, the Canyons of the Ancients in Colorado, and the Cascade-Siskiyou in Oregon.

Notice the pattern: environmental conservation in swing states, personified by announcing the Utah set-aside in Arizona.

Notice the other, more basic pattern: years in which Nader is running, millions of acres are saved; years in which Nader is not running -- zero acres are saved.

This is' not an accident. Presidential politics in America is not about being nice and polite; it's not about nice rhetoric; it's about independent action, swing votes, and leverage. It's also about strength, not weakness.

To endorse Al Gore, alone, while snubbing Ralph Nader, only three days after the Clinton- ore administration committed its most recent environmental breach of trust would show weakness. (And how's that Ohio incinerator doing these days?)

Instead of defending salmon, the Sierra Club would be protecting Al Gore.

What other options are there?

• An endorsement of Ralph Nader. Obviously, Nader 2000 would prefer this option. Nader's work on Clean Air and Clean Water, consumer safety, fuel efficiency, and global trade has earned him the unparalleled respect of environmentalists around the world.
• A dual endorsement of Nader and Gore. This action would make it clear that voters who care about the environment have two champions in the race.
• A dual endorsement, by targeted state. In this option, the Sierra Club would recognize the value of a new political party founded on environmental principles, and led by a lifelong environmental leader. The Sierra Club would endorse both candidates, and then suggest to its membership -- by state, in late October -- which candidate to support. So, in California, where Gore is leading, the Sierra Club could suggest a Nader vote in November, to build the Green Party and create environmental leverage in the future. In Ohio, however, if the race is very close, the suggestion could be that Sierra Clubbers vote for Gore, to insure that the state's electoral votes do not go to Bush. Given the very sophisticated nature of the Sierra Club's polling and direct mail operations, this is not that difficult to do.
• A deferred endorsement, with a passionate public argument that Nader be included in the presidential debates, so that key environmental issues such as the globalization of trade will be heard. (This is essentially the Teamsters' action.) The Sierra Club could then decide on an endorsement after the debates, when it will be much clearer whether Nader's candidacy has caught on (like Ross Perot's), or not.

We would respectfully argue that the minimum response of the Sierra Club to this weekend's deliberations is a public declaration that Ralph Nader should be included in the presidential debates. Nader's four decades of public interest work on behalf of the earth and its people have earned him at least that amount of respect.

Indeed, there is nothing preventing the Sierra Club from holding a national debate of its own, inviting all the candidates, and at a minimum refusing to endorse any candidate who is afraid to show up and debate environmental issues in front of an environmental audience.

This option would show strength, and force all the political system to deal with the environmental issues that the major party candidates would rather just talk about.
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Re: Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

Postby admin » Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:47 am

APPENDIX J: WHAT I VOTED FOR, BY TIM ROBBINS

The Nation, August 6, 2001

In mid-June 2001 Tim Robbins spoke at the annual dinner of the Liberty Hill Foundation, which funds grassroots organizing in Los Angeles. In recognition of his politically engaged films and his activist commitments, the foundation gave him its Upton Sinclair Award. Following is an edited version of his remarks. -- The Editors

About a month ago in a New York theater, I was approached by an agitated older couple. "We hope you're happy now," they said. "With what?" I said, suspecting the answer they gave. "Your Nader gave us Bush." Now, this wasn't the first time since the election that I had been attacked by irate liberals who saw my support of Ralph Nader as a betrayal, as blasphemy, as something tantamount to pissing on the Constitution. Before the election, Susan [Sarandon] and I had been attacked in the op-ed pages of the New York Times; we'd received intimidating faxes from a leading feminist admonishing us for our support for Nader. A week before the election we'd gotten a phone call from a Hollywood power broker, who urged us to call Nader and ask him to withdraw from the race. If he did so, this mogul said, he would contribute $100,000 to the Green Party. I told him that no phone call from us would sway this man, that this. was not a politics of personal influence and deal-making, and that the Green Party probably wouldn't take his contribution. After the election I read an article in which a famous actor criticized supporters of Nader, calling them limousine liberals of the worst kind, unconcerned with the poor.

It was not easy to support Nader. In no uncertain terms the message sent to us by colleagues and business associates was that our support of Nader would cost us. Will it? I don't know. After the election one of our kids was admonished in public by the aforementioned Hollywood mogul. And who knows what fabulous parties we haven't been invited to.

So, what to make of all this? As someone who has voted defensively in the past and at one time recognized all Republicans as evil incarnate, I completely understand the reactions of these people. I like these people. Eight years ago I would have said the same thing to me. But a lot has happened that has shifted the way I think. After talking with friends in Seattle after protests there, after going with Susan to Washington, D.C., and talking with activists at the IMF-World Bank protests, after talking with thirteen-year-olds handing out pamphlets on sweatshops outside a Gap on Fifth Avenue, after watching the steady drift to the right of the Democratic Party under Clinton, I have come to the realization that I would rather vote my conscience than vote strategically.

There is something truly significant happening today. A new movement is slowly taking hold on college campuses, among leftwing groups in Europe, and human rights groups throughout the world. The protests in Seattle in 1999, the IMF-World Bank protests in Washington, D.C., in 2000, and the continuing presence of agitation wherever corporate entities gather to determine global economic and environmental policies do not, as the media portray them, merely reflect the work of fringe radicals and anarchists. Such events arise out of a broad-based coalition of students, environmentalists, unions, farmers, scientists, and other concerned citizens who view the decisions made in these cabals as the frontline in the battle for the future of this planet. This is a movement in its infancy that I believe is as morally compelling as the early abolitionists fighting to end slavery in the eighteenth century; as important as the labor activists advocating workplace safety and an end to child labor in the early 1850s; as undeniable as the scientists who first alerted the American public to widespread abuse of our environment by corporate polluters. All of these movements met with overwhelming condemnation by both political parties, were ignored and then criticized by the press, while their adherents were harassed, arrested, and sometimes killed by police and other agencies of the government. But because of their tenacity, we were eventually able in this country to create laws that ended slavery and established a minimum wage, Social Security, unemployment insurance, environmental responsibility, and workplace safety.

Despite years of progress in our own country on all these issues, we now face a resurgence of child and slave labor, of unsafe working conditions, of sweatshops, and of wanton environmental destruction in the Third World wrought by the very same corporate ethos that resisted for years the progressive gains in the United States. In the interest of profit margins and economic growth, our corporations have reached out to the global economy and found a way to return to 1850 on all of these. issues. Enabled and emboldened by free trade and the protections granted by NAFTA, GATT, and the WTO, we have farmed these problems out to other countries. Amid our booming economy this is an uncomfortable concept to embrace. It certainly is not being written about in our official journals. But it is being shouted on the streets, and the protesters' arguments bear an incontrovertible moral weight. Ralph Nader was the only candidate to talk about these issues and to embrace this new movement as his own. That is why Susan and I voted for him.

Last year's election brought us to an important crossroads. The closeness of the race lifted a rock to expose the corrupt, manipulative, and illegal way in which elections are run in this country. Indeed, the election year's most surreal and humorous moment was when Fidel Castro offered to send observers to monitor our election. Aside from the obvious voter fraud in Florida, a brief spotlight was focused on the racist practices that have accompanied elections for years. Whether it's the roadblocks outside polling places in African-American voting districts or the disappearance of African-American names from voting registers, the ineffective and antiquated voting machines in low-income voting districts or the exposure of the Supreme Court as a partisan political institution, the picture is the same. Powerful people in the American ruling class fear democracy.

There was a time when I would have said that it is the "evil" Republicans who fear democracy. But the sad realization I have come to after the 2000 election, and after experiencing the reactions to our support for Nader, is that you can count the Democrats in that bunch, too. Not only do they fear democracy, but many in the Democratic Party elite fear, if not outright despise, idealism. I have lost a great deal of respect for a party that admonished its progressive wing, that had no tolerance for dissension in its ranks, and sought to demonize the most important and influential consumer advocate of the past fifty years. But we shouldn't be surprised. A similar reaction occurred earlier in this century when another leading advocate, Upton Sinclair, was running for governor of California. The power brokers of the Democratic Party did everything they could to isolate him. If they gave any support at all to his candidacy, it was halfhearted, while some even endorsed his Republican opponent, Frank Merriam. And the press? They demonized him, said he was anti-business, said he was an egomaniac. Sound familiar?

Most of the Nader supporters I met were the real deal, people who have dedicated their lives to advocacy. These were the people at the center of the struggle around controversial, difficult issues; their political engagement was way beyond and deserving of much more respect than that of many people who would wind up criticizing them.

The judgmental and patronizing attitude of those in the generation that fought to end the Vietnam War and work for women's rights is disappointing and discouraging, but understandable. But I am not of the opinion that Bill Clinton was the best this generation had to offer, and I would like to believe there is a dormant power still left in these progressives who have yet to acknowledge the importance of the new movement growing around them. I would like to believe that the children of the Vietnam era who protested that unjust war were concerned with more than self-preservation, with issues beyond not losing their lives to the war. I would like to believe that feminists -- recognizing which gender works predominantly in sweatshops and which gender is predominantly sold into slavery -- would acknowledge these issues as their own, and begin looking beyond reproductive rights as the only litmus test for a candidate. I would like to believe that higher ideals drive all of us, ideals that have to do with the world at large.

The young people who have helped launch a quest for an alternative party, one that will not compromise this planet's future for campaign donations from corporate sugar daddies, believe the Democratic and Republican parties are united on the major issues of our time. This new movement is a rejection of politics as usual, a rejection that has frightening implications when you consider the progressive community's reaction to it. Have we become our parents? Are we the Establishment? Are we now the status quo that so cynically rejects those with ideals and dreams, that says to the idealist that there is no room for that in this election, that one must vote strategically, that we can't afford our dreams, that we must accept the lesser of two evils? The couple in the theater, the op-ed columnist, the Hollywood mogul, and the actor beat their drums once every four years for their candidate and talk about their opponents as if their election will end civilization as we know it. This is a gay op-ed columnist who would not vote for the one candidate who unashamedly supported same-sex marriage; this is a mogul who would not be having any more sleepovers and private screenings in a Republican White House; this is an actor professing to care about the poor who couldn't seem to find his way to the picket line to support his own union's strike.

I don't respect armchair activists. I respect the kids outside the Gap who don't compromise. I'm not ready to cede their idealism and passion' and vision, to compromise their integrity for a Democratic Party that aspires to be centrist, for a Democratic Party that supports the death penalty, that dismantled the welfare system while increasing corporate welfare, that helped create the economic system that tears at the heart of the labor movement.

How embarrassing it must be for Democratic senators that the embodiment of political courage in this country is now a Republican from Vermont. Maybe it's time to stop demonizing people for their political affiliations and to follow the example of the man who risked his political future to follow the voice inside him. To reject politics as usual and follow our grassroots hearts; to form alliances in unlikely places.

It's a long struggle for justice. It is grassroots movements that create real change, and no grassroots movement ever got anywhere compromising its ideals. Real change won't happen at Washington cocktail parties or in the Lincoln Bedroom. It is arduous and messy, and takes relentless agitation. It took over a hundred years of advocacy to eliminate slavery, over a hundred years to put an end to child labor, and over a hundred years to establish the minimum wage. This movement is in its infancy, but it is alive and it's not going away. Its door is wide open to you. It's a frightening threshold to cross but an essential one.
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Re: Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

Postby admin » Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:48 am

APPENDIX K: EAST LIVERPOOL MEETING

On September 27, we went to meet with citizens at East Liverpool Ohio's junior high gymnasiuI11 who had a community experience with Al Gore's environmental record.

For Terri Swearingen, a registered nurse and organizer with the Tri-State Environmental Council, Al Gore's double-talk regarding the location of the giant WTI incinerator provoked dozens of demonstrations and litigation starting in 1992. That was the year when Al Gore campaigned in East Liverpool by the Ohio River and lambasted the incinerator, then under construction. He said it was "unbelievable" to have such a polluting facility in a flood plain, only four hundred yards from an elementary school. "We'll be on your side for a change," he declared, adding that "the Clinton-Gore administration is going to give you an environmental presidency to deal with these problems."

To Swearingen and many residents of East Liverpool, who don't want their families living with daily levels of dioxin, mercury, lead, arsenic, and other toxins, Gore gave them the clear impression that this incinerator would not be given an operating permit. We have supported the people of East Liverpool for several years and understood their subsequent indignation at what they believed was an outright betrayal by Clinton-Gore. It started with Clinton's environmental adviser, Katie McGinty, who met on January 8, 1993, with President George Bush's environmental chief, William Reilly, to discuss transition matters. According to Swearingen, who spoke with him in 1997, Reilly later told McGinty about a number of pending decisions that he, as a courtesy, offered to hold over until the new administration came into office. The test burn permit application by WTI was one of them. McGinty gave him to understand that he could go ahead and issue it. He did and the Clinton administration would soon be saying that their hands were tied by the previous Bush decision.

As Swearingen kept saying, "A lot of days we see the plumes blowing right into the school."

At the junior high gathering, I called on Gore to honor his commitments of 1992 and the subsequent mass of evidence that made his early incredulity over the incinerator's site more urgent. Although I preceded this call with a letter to Gore, there was never any answer, other than a staffer saying to the press that Gore was waiting for a report from the EPA's independent ombudsman. Lo and behold, in mid-October, the ombudsman, Robert J. Martin, reported that the Swiss-owned incinerator was "neither protective of human health and the environment nor of public safety" and recommended that it be shut down for a minimum of six months to allow more reliable testing of health risks. Still, there was no support by Gore for the exposed people of East Liverpool right through Election Day.

The politically-well-connected WTI corporation, which has escaped accountability for its violations and hazards, has a debt to pay the people and children who have had to breathe its emissions. A shutdown order should include, I added, a two-year severance pay for its employees, on whose backs and health it has made sizable profits.

Alonzo Spencer, a retired steel worker and head of the group Save Our Country, opposing the incinerator, said of Gore: "I don't think it's too much to ask to hold a politician to his promise. A man is as good as his word." Well put, about a man who every day told Americans that he "will fight for the people, not the powerful."
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Re: Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

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SUGGESTED READING

Alinsky, Saul D. Rules for Radicals: A Practical Primer for Realistic Radicals. Vintage Books, 1971.

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Bullard, Robert D. Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color. Sierra Club Books, 1994.

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Goodwyn, Lawrence. The Populist Moment: A Short History of Agrarian Revolt in America. Oxford University Press, 1978.

Green, Mark, Michael Calabrese, et al. Introduction by Ralph Nader. Who Runs Congress? Viking Press, 1979.

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Wachsman, Harvey F., and Steven Alschuler. Lethal Medicine: The Epidemic of Medical Malpractice in America. Henry Holt, 1993. Wallach, Lori, and Michelle Sforza. Whose Trade Organization?: Corporate Globalization and the Erosion of Democracy. Public Citizen Inc., 1999.

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Woolhandler, Steffie, M.D. Ida Hellander, M.D. and David Himmelstein, M.D. Bleeding the Patient: The Consequences of Corporate Healthcare. Common Courage Press, 200l.

Wylie, Jeanie. Poletown: Community Betrayed. University of Illinois Press, 1989.

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A variety of worthwhile information can be found on the following Web pages:

www.citizenworks.org
www.citizen.org
www.essential.org

Magazines/Publications

The Amicus Journal
The Atlantic Monthly
Consumer Reports
Harper's
The Hightower Lowdown
In These Times
Mother Jones
Multinational Monitor
The Nation
The Progressive
The Progressive Populist
Rachel's Environmental & Health News
The Washington Monthly
The Workbook

The following two publications regularly have numerous feature articles on corporate abuses:

Business Week
Wall Street Journal
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Re: Crashing the Party, by Ralph Nader

Postby admin » Mon Aug 10, 2015 7:49 am

INDEX

abortion, 244, 249-50, 255-56, 280
ACLU, 15, 222
ACORN, 87, 89
Act Up, 52-53, 102
Acton, Jay, 214
Adair, Bill, 198
Adams, John, 314
Andrews, Wyatt, 83
Advocate, 177
Affigne, Tony, 113
AFL-CIO, 32, 144, 194-97, 242, 260
African Americans, 87, 273, 283, 288-
89, 298
AFSCME Local 1108, 194·
agriculture, 165, 166, 168-9, 188,
192, 201, 207, 311, 329
agribusiness, 44, 168, 201, 252,
338
black farmers, 94
airlines, 113, 152-53, 300
Alaska, 129-31, 339
Allen, Mike, 7-8
Allred, Gloria, 12-13
Amato, Theresa, xiv, 64, 99, 187,
240, 291, 293-94, 341
America Needs a Raise, 194-95
American Bar Association, 123
American Enterprise Corporation, 29-
30
American Medical Association
(AMA), 45, 315
American Prospect, The, 237, 301
American Public Health Association,
67
Anderson, John, 158, 170-71, 211-12,
248-49, 287, 320
Anderson, Ray, 336
Anheuser-Busch, 58, 159
Antiquities Act of 1906, 352
AOL-Time Warner, 91, 157, 180
Appalachia, 110, 258, 339
Appleseed Foundation, 160, 324
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 246,
261
Arendt, Hannah, 253
Associated Press (AP), 112, 128, 134,
165, 168, 179, 198
Association of Trial Lawyers of
America, 262-65
AT&T, 58, 157
Atlanta Constitution, 90
Atlanta, Georgia, 90-91
Atlantic Monthly, 229
Austin, Texas, 240-41
automobiles,
fuel efficiency, 14, 96, 330
industry, 18, 192, 236, 328
insurance, 46, 135
pollution, 14
safety, 14, 19, 25, 45, 116
Aviation Consumer Action Project,
72, 153, 300, 324

Babbitt, Bruce, 259
Baker, Russ, 181-82
ballot access, 47, 74-76, 93, 126,
128, 183
Baltimore, Maryland, 282-89
Barber, Benjamin, 267-68
Barber, James David, 158, 162-63
Barker, Kim, 205
Barlett, Donald L., 179
Baron, Fred, 262, 265
Beatty, Warren, 54-55, 72-73
Beaty, Anita, 91
Becker, George, 193, 261-62
Begala, Paul, 278-79, 292
Begley, Ed, Jr., 67
Benjamin, Medea, 97, 309
Benning, Annette, 54, 73
Berke, Richard L., 144, 233
Berkowitz, Harry, 68, 120
Biafra, Jello, 148, 212, 320
Bingaman, Jeff, 259
Birch, Elizabeth, 257
Blackwelder, Brent, 58, 62, 144--45,
257
Blankenship, Kim, 83
Bloomberg Radio, 221
Blumenthal, Sidney, 108
Blyer, Jennifer, 198
Bollier, David, 312
Bond, Julian, 285
Bonior, David, 112
Bonk, Keiko, 135
Booth, William
Boston Globe, 83, 179
Boston, Massachusetts, 208-10
Boxer, Barbara, 232
Bradley, Bill, 59, 61, 69, 142, 145,
257
Bradley, Ed, 174, 293
Brandeis, Louis, xii, 124-25, 203-4,
312, 328, 337
Bridges, Tyler, 93
Broder, David, 165, 172, 180, 294
Broder, John, 8
Brokaw, Tom, 181
Brookings Institution, 274
Brower, David, 45, 97-98, 291-92,
320, 336
Brown, Janet, 238
Brown, Jerry, 42, 68-69, 78
Brown, Sherrod, 108
Browne, Jackson, 142
Brownstein, Ron, 49
Buchanan, Pat, 74, 164, 168, 177,
182, 226, 228, 275
budget
deficits, 24, 68
surplus, 234, 238
Burns, Arthur, 21
Burrell, Tom, 94
Burton, Phil, 22, 111, 243
Bush, George (Sr.), 41, 43, 159
Bush, George W., 1-2, 59, 61, 80,
100, 189
agricultural policy, 201
campaign spending, 242
debates, 220, 229, 232-37
education in Texas, 115
environmental issues, 141-42
first months of term, 306
language at sixth-grade level, 86
media coverage, 163-64, 169-70,
175, 177-81, 272
polls, 290
similarities to Gore, 244-48, 278
superficial issues, 272-75, 278-89
Supreme Court, 249-50
talk shows, 175-76
Texas Rangers, 80
trade issues, 144
Bush, Prescott, 209
Bush-Cheney ticket, 89, 96
business
small, 84, 125
socially responsible, 16, 89, 151
Business Roundtable, 21-22
Business Week, 113, 129, 177, 204,
239

Caddell, Pat, 45, 136
Cahn, Edgar and Jean, 68, 320, 336
California, 117, 153-54, 164, 170,
183, 241
California League of Conservation
Voters, 291
California Nurses Association, 48,
143, 193, 241, 268, 348
Camden, New Jersey, 4
Camejo, Peter, 292, 320
campaign finance reform, 38, 45, 54,
66, 126, 182, 201, 242, 249,
256, 302, 318
campaign, Nader 2000
fund-raising, 46, 65-66, 68-70, 7374,
78, 86, 89, 103, 106, 111,
116, 119-20, 126, 129, 135
grassroots, 38
speeches, 39, 77, 86, 113, 127, 148-
52, 186~90, 201-3, 215
staff, xiv
supporters, 111, 125, 142
volunteers, 38, 86, 114, 138-40,
320-23, 341-43
See also New Hampshire Primaries,
rallies
Cantwell, Maria, 207-8, 304
Capitol Hill News Service, 68, 324
Carper, Jean, 71
Carter, Jimmy, 21-22, 29, 55, 72,
158, 171, 211, 248, 296-97,
302, 352
Carville, James, 292
Cayetano, Ben, 135
Center for Auto Safety, 299, 324
Center for Health, Environment and
Justice, 145
Centers for Disease Control (CDC),
25
Chavez, Cesar, 92, 207
Chen, David, 215, 217-18
Cheney, Dick, 3, 85-86
Chicago Sun-Times, 256
Chicago Tribune, 210-11, 213
Chicago, Illinois, 210-13
children, xiii, 5, 91, 101, 118-19,
122, 153-54, 157, 319, 329
Children's Defense Fund, 100
China, trade relations, 106, 112, 352
Chomsky, Noam, 148, 172, 321
Christian Science Monitor, 230-31
Chrysler Corporation, 83-85, 236
Church, Frank, 29
Cicero, 150, 335
Citigroup, 251, 301
citizen groups, xiii, 20-21, 30, 36, 37,
56, 83, 93, 141, 187, 238, 288,
324-26
Citizens Against Stadium Subsidies, 82
citizenship, 41, 43, 135, 317
civic celebrities, 97, 286
civil justice system, 119, 141, 191,
262-66, 319
civil liberties, 11, 28, 30, 44, 312
Civil Rights Commission, 297
civil rights, 20, 28, 30, 102, 286, 296-
97, 312
Civil War, xiii-xiv
Clarke, Jim, 13
Claybrook, Joan, 27, 57, 121
Clinton administration, 4-5, 51, 10
closing flurry of regulations, 305
corporate agenda, 245
environmental record, 45, 58, 80,
144-45, 172-73, 245, 306-7
industrial hemp, 132-33
pesticides, 96
record assessment, 338-40
scandals, 245
telecommunications legislation, 161
tort deform, 245, 263
trade, 112, 199
Clinton, Hillary, 44-45, 215, 285,
293
Clinton, William Jefferson, 3, 30, 33,
44-53, 100, 117, 137, 159
campaigning, 39, 41, 299
Gennifer Flowers, 41
1992 victory, 44
welfare reform, 70
Clinton-Gore ticket, 46, 96
Coal Mine Safety Act, 192
Cobb-Hunter, Gilda, 107
Cobble, Steve, xiv, 57, 257-59, 321,
341, 351-54
Cockburn, Alexander, 178
Coelho, Tony, 23, 142-43
Cohen, Ben, 16, 142, 321
Cohen, Stephen, 121
Cold War, 252
Cole, Johnetta, 336
Collins, Gail, 198
commercialism, xi, xiii, 152, 156,
190, 202, 254, 298, 315
Commission on Presidential Debates
(CPD), 58-59, 63, 158-61, 220-39, 295
Committee for the Study of the
American Electorate, 304
Commoner, Barry, 142, 171, 212,
321, 336
Communications Act of 1934, 157
Community Development Financial
Institutions, 88 .
Concord Principles, 38, 42
Congress, 4, 30, 36, 42, 251-52
Black Caucus, 62
corporate buyout, 7
dissatisfaction with, 42
pay raise, 34
Republican controlled, 49
Congressional committees
House Budget Committee, 51
House Ethics Committee, 9
House Progressive Caucus, 32, 302
Senate Commerce Committee, 20
Senate Judiciary Committee, 266
Coniff, Ruth, 126
Conn, Steve 99, 131, 341
Connally, John, 21
Connecticut, 117-20
conservatives, 28, 131
Constitution, xiii, 151
Consumer Product Safety
Commission, 14
Consumer protection law, 21-22, 302
consumers, 20, 22, 27, 50, 122, 207,
302, 319
Conyers, John, 102, 285-86
Cooper, Marc, 178
corporate
accountability, 100
CEO compensation, 92
crime, xi, 87, 216, 235, 302, 319,
327
government, xii, 304, 327
influence, 12, 20, 24, 53, 116
lobbying, xi, 21, 44, 88, 106, 253,
264, 305
mergers, 50, 106, 109, 156-57,
161, 168, 173, 191
power, xii-xiv, 20-22, 28-29, 33,
36-37, 50, 63, 80, 86, 105, 109,
118, 123, 141, 161, 168, 179,
189, 194, 204, 221, 239, 244-45, 251, 268, 302, 308, 315
prisons, 11, 30, 319
welfare, xi-xii, 6, 10, 13, 44, 46,
50-51, 78, 80-85, 90, 96, 110,
113, 123-25, 141, 185, 319,
327, 330
corporations, 4, 19, 21, 29-30, 32,
44, 50, 53, 58, 70, 83-85, 91,
97, 123-24, 156-57, 159, 168,
176-77, 180, 184, 190, 200-1,
216, 236, 251-52, 276-77, 282,
286, 300-1, 308
charters, xiii, 123-25
least popular, 16
corporatization, xiii, 29, 227
Cox, Robert, 257
Coyle, Julie, 83
credit cards, 177
credit unions, 88, 109
criminal justice, 1, 117, 319
Cronkite, Walter, 181
C-Span, 64, 180-81, 203
Culture of Contentment, The, 197
Cuomo, Andrew, 87
Curry, Bill, 49
Cutler, Mimi, 72

Daley, William, 142-43
Dallas Morning News, 8-9
Dangermond, Jack and Laura, 71
dark-horse candidates, 42
Dao, James, 198, 257
Davis, Bob, 16
Dean, Howard, 126
death penalty, 13, 15, 30
debates, 58, 61, 80, 100, 117, 120,
141, 158-60, 175, 177-79, 182-
83, 190, 199, 211, 213, 215, 220-39, 242, 248, 259, 294
audience, 233, 236
criteria for inclusion, 228
editorials on, 230
format, 224
ignored issues, 208, 235
past examples, 232, 234
superficiality, 234-6
See also Commission on Presidential
Debates
Debt, The: What America Owes to
Blacks, 287
DeFazio, Peter, 33
defense, 120, 319
DeFranco, Ani, 142, 214, 217, 299,
310
DeLay. Tom, 9
democracy, 40, 141, 203
strengthening of, xi-xii, xiv, 79,
107, 125, 203, 313, 317
"gap," xiii, 56, 64, 326, 328, 333
See also citizen groups
Democratic Leadership Council
(DLC), 13, 246, 260, 303
Democratic National Committee, 7,
33-34, 159, 242
Democratic Party, xi, 21, 23-35, 105,
136, 207
campaign funding, 34
campaign finance reform, 8
convention, 1, 6-10, 12-16
corporate influence, 20, 53, 200
death of the New Deal, 23
decay of, 23-24, 27-28, 42, 207,
245-46, 270, 287, 292, 301-4
issues ignored by, 14
judicial nominations, 266
labor, 143
liberalism, in, 28
"New Democrats," 44
platform, 12, 14
Progressive Caucus, 12
See also major political parties
demonstrations, 3, 10-11, 15, 89, 94,
130
DeMoro, Rose Ann, 48, 143, 321
Department of Agriculture, 36, 94,
133, 169, 201, 305
Department of Defense, 53, 108
Department of Health and Human
Services, 2S2
Department of Justice, 50
Department of Labor, 36
Department of the Interior, 36, 275-76
Department of the Treasury, 36, 66,
224, 305
Department of Transportation, 45
deregulation, xii, 32, 45, 97, 113,
119, 277, 308
DeRosa, Mike, 119
Dershowitz, Alan, .250
Detroit Free Press. 191
Detroit News, 191
Deutsch, Peter, 111
Difference, The, 26-27
Disney, 157
Dodd, Chris, 119, 122
Dogs Are Smarter than Republicans,
33-34
Dole, Bob, 47-48, 70, 161, 227
Donahue, Phil, 64, 121-23, 142-43,
175-76, 197-203, 205, 209, 213-15,
244, 250, 255, 286, 299,
320
Donaldson, Sam, 277
Dorgan, Byron, 169
Dorsey, Michael, 62, 71, 96, 257-59
double-talk, 8, 16, 189
Douglas, William O., xii, 328
Douglass, Frederick, 18, 207
Drucker, Peter, 312
drugs, 1, 5
war on, 30, 316
Dugger, Ronnie, 148
Dukakis, Michael, 28, 229, 273,
293
Duran, Richard, 336
Duster, Troy, 214, 321, 336

Earth Day, 96-99
Earth in the Balance, 235-36, 276
Earth Island Institute, 292
Easton, Nina, 254
economic boom, 14, 19, 37, 49, 92
stagnation in spite of, 5, 37, 189
economic justice, 16, 49. See also
wealth disparities
economic yardsticks, 19, 151, 329-31
Economist, The, 113
Edelman, Peter, 252, 268
Edison, Southern California, 32, 97
education, 1, 68, 118, 202
standardized tests, 115, 255, 273
Edwards, John, 263
Ehrenreich, Barbara, 92, 142, 321
Eisenhower, Dwight, 305
election results, 129, 241, 261, 290,
294
write-in ballots, 38, 43
electoral college, 46-47
electoral reform, 296-97
Ellner, Peter, 120
empowerment, 33, 38, 40, 209
energy, 21, 27, 96, 131
conservation, 96, 190, 259, 306
crisis, 21
deregulation, 32, 119, 308
environment, 1, 14, 20, 28, 45, 58,
80, 96-97, 107, 130, 132, 141-42,
144-45, 172-73, 188, 235-37,
245, 257-59, 273, 306-7. See
also logging; pollution; toxics
environmental groups, 58, 62, 95-96,
144-45, 257-59, 261, 291-92,
306, 308
environmental justice, 62
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA), 14
ERISA law, 192
Eskew, Carter, 263-64
Everglades, 275-76

Fahrenkopf, Frank, 59, 224, 226
Fallows, Jim, 229
Falwell, Jerry, 122
Fannie Mae, 286
Farm Aid, 168-69
Federal Aviation Administration, 36,
153, 300
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC), 156, 161-62, 239
Federal Election Commission (FEC),
47, 65-66, 69, 147, 227, 229-30
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission (FERC), 308
Federal Reserve, 21, 36, 49-50, 88,
231, 305
Federal Trade Commission, 22
Feingold, Russ, 69, 181, 232, 302
Feinstein, Diane, 97
Feinstein, Mike, 48, 77, 135
Fellmeth, Robert, 154, 321
Fenway Park, 80, 82
Ferrell, Will, 175
Financial Control Board, 168, 283
Finkbeiner, Carlton, 83-85
Firestone, 282
First Amendment, 15, 122
Florida, 275-76, 282
elections, 296-97
Foley, Tom, 22, 34
Food and Drug Administration (FDA),
22, 36
Forbes, 29-30
Ford Motor Co., 58, 123, 159, 236,
282
Ford, Gerald, 21, 297
foreign policy, 108
Forth Worth Star-Telegram, 174
Fortune magazine, 92
Frank, Barney, 102
Frankel, Dave, 132
Freedom to Farm Act, 169, 301
Freeman, David, 259
Friedan, Betty, 255
Friends of the Earth, 58, 62, 144-45,
257, 291
Frumkin, Leo and Sherry, 135

Galbraith, John Kenneth, 72, 197-98,
301
Gallagher, Dorothy, 92
Garcia Hernandez, Cesar, 138-39
Gardner, Beth, 112
Gardner, Christine, 39
Gardner, John, 336
Garrett, Lila, 13, 135
Gaskin, Steve, 90, 148
Gates, Jeff, 269, 312, 321, 328, 336,
341
GATT, 52-53, 170, 278, 319. See
also trade issues; WTO
gay and lesbian rights, 102, 122,
205
General Electric, 21, 157, 184, 308
General Motors, 19, 190, 200, 236,
300
General Services Administration, 36
genetic engineering, 11, 37, 58
Geoghegan, Tom, 70
Gephardt, Dick, 111-12, 307
Germond, Jack W., 39
Gerrit, Greg, 113
get-out-the-vote (GOTV), 198, 240
GI Bill of Rights, 29
Gibbs, Lois, 87, 145, 293, 321, 336
Gingrich, Newt, 34-35, 49
Glaser, Rob, 69, 164
Glickman, Dan, 169
Global Exchange, 15, 97
global warming, 37, 57, 69, 306
globalization, 10, 15, 69, 95, 124,
253
Glover, Danny, 286-87, 321
Goeke, Annie, 146, 286
Going Negative, 275
Goldfarb, Lou, 85
Goodman, Amy, 3-4
Goodwin, Richard N., 116-17, 142
Gore, AI, 2, 8, 30, 59, 61-62, 80, 95,
143, 189, 205, 211
acceptance speech, 16
African American vote, 285-89
agricultural policy, 201
AIDS, 52
campaign spending, 242
conservative voting record, 253
debates, 220, 229, 232-37
environmental issues, 14, 141-42,
172-73, 235-37, 257-59
on gay rights, 102
Green Party impact on, 104, 171,
183, 243-44, 257-62, 267-70,
279
insincerity, 52
labor, 260
language at eighth-grade level, 86
losing the election himself, 136
media coverage, 163-64, 169-170,
175, 177-81, 185, 272
meeting with Nader, 51-52
polls, 290
response to Nader 2000, 103
scare tactics, 145, 242-43, 256,
260, 262, 268, 280, 285
similarities to Bush, 244-48, 278
superficial issues, 272-75, 278-89
Supreme Court, 247, 249-50
talk shows, 175-76
tort deform, 265
trade issues, 144
as vice president, 51-53
Gore, Al, Sr., 67
Gore-Lieberman ticket, 89, 102-3,
106
Gorton, Slade, 304
Gossett, William, 123
Graham, Don, 169
Granny D (Doris Haddock), 201,
321
Greater Seattle American Postal
Workers, 194, 206
Green Party, xiii-xiv, 202-3
Association of State Green Parties,
147, 286
Campus Greens, 296, 309
convention, 48, 65, 146-53
federal matching funds, 204
growth of, 293-94
1996 election, 45-46
nonvoter recruitment, 294-95
state and local races, 294
starting small, xiv
Ten Key Values, 147, 294, 344-47
Greene, Wade, 69-70
Greenberg, Stan, 261, 299
Greenspan, Alan, 49-50, 88
Greider, William, 24, 176, 307
Grossman, Richard, 123-25, 336
Grossman, Steve, 33
Gruenstein, Peter, 68, 131, 244
Guinier, Lani, 267-68
Gurnstein, Josh, 128

Hager, Rob, 79
Hagler, Graylan, 286
Halberstam, David, 72
Hamm, Lawrence, 285
Hammond, Darrell, 61-62, 175, 237
Hancock, John, 314
Harper, Ben, 214
Harper's, 107, 301
Harr, Dan, 174
Harrelson, Woody and Laura Louie,
132-33, 135
Harriman doctrine, 299
Harrington, Michael, 6, 92
Hart, Gary, 72
Hartford Courant, 174
Hatch, Orrin, 253, 266, 268
Hawaii, 129, 131-33, 135
Hawken, Paul, 336
Hayden, Tom, 12-13
Hayes, Denis, 95
health care, 12, 20, 44, 147, 230
HMOs, 12, 45, 48, 180, 189, 191,
193, 338
patients' rights, 2
prescription drug benefit, 2
universal, 14, 44-45, 48, 61, 68,
91, 182, 190, 196, 212, 216, 318
health, 1, 118
Hechler, Ken, 109
hemp, industrial, 132-35, 190
Henderson, Hazel, 336
Hentoff, Nat, 247
Heraclitus, 317
Heritage Foundation, 29-30
Hewitt, Don, 173
Hightower, Jim, 67, 79, 103, 142,
147, 176, 206, 241, 269-70, 287-
88, 320
Hill, Julia Butterfly, 97
Hillsman, Bill, 108-9, 177, 276, 293
Hispanic; Americans, 273, 283
Hock, Dee, 336
Hoffa, Jimmy, Jr. 143-44, 193, 196,
352
Hollywood, 7
Holmes Norton, Eleanor, 137
homelessness, 5, 12, 87, 90, 91
Honeywell, 70
Hoover, Herbert, 156
Hotchkiss, Ralf, 269
Hudson, Paul, 300
Huffington, Ariana, 9
Hughes, Langston, 287
Humphrey, Hubert, 201
Hunger, Frank, 264
Hunt, Al, 222

identity politics, 103
IMF (International Monetary Fund),
89, 339
Imus, Don, 145-46, 177-78
In These Times, 180, 198
infectious diseases, 25, 108, 235256,
285, 319
INS, 30
Interdenominational Ministerial
Alliance, 117
Interface Corporation, 98
Internet, 128, 277
Ireland, Patricia, 260-61
Isabel, Lonnie, 181
It's the Media, Stupid, 157
Ivins, Molly, 180, 273

Jackson, Jesse, 45, 102, 144, 250-53
Jackson, Jesse, Jr., 228, 251
Jackson, Michael, 178
Jackson, Mississippi, 93
James, William, 317
Jefferson, Thomas, xii, 18, 37, 132,
206, 314, 328
Jeffords, Jim, 208, 266
Jenkins, Holmes, 298
Jennings, Peter, 181
Jerry Jasinowski, 44
Johnson, Gary, 316
Johnson, Lyndon, 6, 19, 22, 112
Johnson, Nicholas, 269-70, 321,
336
Johnston, William R., 184
Jordan, Vernon, 137
Judis, John B., 105, 267
justice
historical struggles for, xii, 18, 28,
86, 150, 188, 210, 217, 253
systemic, 48
versus charity, 5, 91-92, 210

Kafoury, Greg, 186-87, 213, 342
Kairys, David, 160, 233, 322
Kakutani, Michiko, 299
Kanjorski, Paul, 111
Kaplan, Rebecca, 78
Karmazin, Mel, 156
Kasem, Casey, 142, 322
Kasich, John, 232
Kearns Goodwin, Doris, xi
Kelber, Harry, 200
Kemp, Jack, 70
Kennard, William, 161
Kennedy, Robert F., Jr., 171, 247
Kerrey, Bob, 236
Kerry, John, 259, 278-79
King, Jonathan, 116
King, Larry, 54, 73, 278
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 92, 207, 253
Kirk, Paul, 59, 222, 224, 226
Kirkland, Lane, 194
Kluckhohn, Clyde, 313
Knight, Peter, 264
Knight, Phil, 129
Knowles, Tony, 130
Koppel, Ted, 279-80
Kovel, Joel, 59
Kovic, Ron, 281-82, 322
Kozol, Jonathan, 16
Kraft, Robert, 81
Kreindler, Lee, 300
Krugman, Paul, 171
Kucinich, Dennis J., 12-13
Kuttner, Robert, 112-13, 237
Kyung Kim, Eun, 198

L.A. Press Club, 77
La Follette, "Fighting Bob," 107
labor
endorsements, 144, 192-94, 205-6
laws, xi, 23, 28, 31-32, 139, 143,
151, 192, 278, 302, 318
leaders, 58, 105-6, 127, 191-96,
260-62
lobbying, 23
unions, 13, 23, 32, 37, 65, 68, 70,
78, 105-6, 127, 131, 139, 143-44,
147, 160, 184, 191-97, 200,
206, 210, 242, 260-62, 269-70
weakening of, 31-32, 193-97
Labor Educator, The, 200
Labor Party, 147, 196, 270
LaDuke, Winona, xiv, 48, 56, 95, 187-
88, 201, 204, 255, 293, 309
Lakota Nation Journal, 134
Lamb, Brian, 180-81
Lane, Ambrose R., Sr., 167
Lapham, Lewis, 178
Lauer, Matt, 183
Lauerman, Kerry, 198
Lazio, Rick, 215
League of Conservation Voters, 145,
261
League of Women Voters, 1, 158, 223-
24
Leahy, Patrick, 266
Leaven House, 4
Legal Services for the Poor, 68
Lehrer, Jim, 63, 233-36
Lena, Jay, 175
Lerner, Michael, 108, 322
Letterman, David, 175
Levin, Gerald, 157-58, 180
Lewis, Anthony, 171, 246
Lewis, Jake, 172, 240
Lewis, Peter, 70
Lewis, Sinclair, 81
liberals, 13, 28, 105, 244, 266, 288,
299-300
Libertarian Party, 74
Lieberman, Joseph, 16, 55, 119, 191,
246, 259, 263-64
Lincoln, Abraham, xii-xiv, 163, 314,
328
Lintilhac, Crea, 126
living wage, 5, 13, 91, 119, 135, 194,
318
Lodge, Terry, 84
Loeb, Nackey, 43
logging, 97, 128, 130, 141-42, 188
Los Angeles Times, 77, 129, 153,
179, 218, 251
Lott, Trent, 44, 49, 253
Louisiana, 93-94
Love, Jamie, 52-53
Lovins, Amory and Hunter, 259, 336
Lowe, Rob, 175
Lydon, Christopher, 177-78

MacArthur, Douglas, 305
MacArthur, Greg, 293
MacAteer, Davitt, 132
MacDonald, Craig, 80
MacGregor Burns, James, 336
Machinists Union, 160
Madison Square Garden, 213-18,
299
Madison, James, 314
Madison, Wisconsin, 106-7
Magnuson, Warren, 20, 29
Maher, Bill, 175, 299
Maine, 127-28
major political parties (Democrats and
Republicans)
convergence of, xii, 15, 27-28, 37,
40-41, 44, 56, 80, 83, 105,
126, 142, 167, 189, 212, 215,
231, 243, 251, 267, 298, 303-4,
335 .
differences between, 170, 246-47,
266, 301
Mander, Jerry, 67, 322
Marcus, Ruth, 7
Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, 132. See
also hemp, industrial
Marshall, Thurgood, 253
Massachusetts, 115-17, 124
MasterCard "priceless" ad, 176-77,
276-77
Mauney, Fred "the Phoenix, " 139
Mayer, Carl, 38, 41, 290, 343
Mazzochi, Tony, 147, 196-97, 270,
336
Mbeki, Thabo, 52
McCaffrey, Barry, 132-33
McCain, John, 59-61, 73, 179, 183,
282, 293, 302
McCarthy, Dan, 144, 191-92, 322
McCarthy, Eugene, 42
McCollum, Bill, 228
McDougal, Mark, 186-87, 213
McEntee, Gerald, 196
McGinty, Katie, 244
McGovern, George, 29, 37-38
McIntyre, Robert, 336
McKeown, Kevin, 135
McVay, Kay, 143, 322
media, 19, 25, 27, 32, 54, 59, 79, 86,
104, 111, 116, 122, 127, 145-46,
155-185, 213-14
editorials, 169-72, 178, 248, 250
editorial boards, 90, 93, 104, 111,
129, 146, 164-65, 170
"gap, " 64
interviews, 112, 119, 131, 140,
176, 253
investigative reports, xi, 9, 56, 179,
216
lack of coverage, 10, 63-64, 77,
131, 135, 163-65, 169, 180, 300
lack of substance, 55, 62, 104, 178,
185
newsworthiness standards, 31, 162,
164, 172, 226
nightly news, 161
progressive, 177-78
photo opportunities, 1, 100, 155,
174-75, 183
regular coverage, 19, 59, 127, 174,
241
reporters, 3, 9
self-censorship, 165, 180
sound bites, 3, 39, 148, 178, 183,
218, 240, 279
See also radio, television ads,
television networks, television
news
Medicaid, 20, 26, 28
Medicare, 20, 26, 28, 203, 302, 318
Mendenhall, Frances, 138
Menino, Tom, 82
Merck, 53
Meyerson, Harold, 267
Mfume, Kweisi, 285
Miami Herald, 93
Michaels, Lorne, 175
Michelman, Kate, 261
Michigan, 106, 199-200
Microsoft case, 50
middle class, 70, 89, 249
Milbank, Dana, 165-66, 225-26, 303
Miller, Carol, 79, 95
minimum wage, 49, 90, 93, 106, 216,
260, 329
Ministers Against Global Injustice, 15
Minneapolis Star Tribune, 203
Minneapolis, Minnesota, 201-5
Mintz, Morton, 181, 239
Mirkarimi, Ross, 78-79, 292
Mirror for Man, 313
missile defense, 13
Moberg, David, 198
Moffet, Toby, 242, 244
Mondale, Walter, 25-27, 201
Monks, Robert, 336
Mooney, Lauren, 139
Moore, Michael, 142, 197-202, 212,
215, 287-88, 299, 322
Morris, Dick, 44, 47, 258
Morrison, Alan, 191
Moses, Danny, 292
Moses, Yolanda, 336
Mother Jones, 180
Motor Vehicle and Highway Safety
Acts, 19
Moynihan, Daniel P., 172, 298
Ms. magazine, 254, 256
muckrakers, 18
Mugar, Carolyn, 168
Muir, John, 18
Murdoch, Rupert, 157
Murkowski, Frank, 131
Murray, Bill, 214
Murrow, Edward R., 156
Musselman, Jim, 299
Myerson, Dean, 146

NAACP, 285
Nader v. Allegheny Airlines, 153
Nader, Rose, 152, 209
"Nader's Neighbors, " 84
NAFTA, 41, 70, 80, 124, 143-45,
170, 319. See also trade issues
NARAL, 261
NASA, 36
Nation, The, 113, 121, 162, 177,
180, 271, 301
National Association of Broadcasters,
161
National Association of
Manufacturers, 44, 306
National Chicano Moratorium
Committee, 15
National Clearinghouse on Hazardous
Waste, 87,
National Environmental Protection
Act (NEPA), 13
National Highway Transportation
Safety Administration, 45
National Institutes of Health (NIH),
53
National Labor Relations Board, 23
National Organization for Women,
260
National Press Club, 177, 226, 277-
78, 301
National Rainbow Coalition, 251
national security, xi
Native American rights, 99, 132, 134,
188, 256
Natural Resources Defense Council,
32
Navasky, Victor, 121
Nelson, Gaylord, 29
Nelson, Willie, 111, 142, 168, 322
New England Patriots, 81
New Hampshire, 123-25
1992 primaries, 38-43, 46-47
1996 primaries, 60--62, 197
New Mexico, 127
New Republic, The, 105, 247, 303
New York City, 213-18
New York Daily News, 145, 242
New York Observer, 238
New York Stock Exchange, 184-85
New York Times, 8, 10, 30-32, 47,
59, 63, 78, 92, 112, 128, 144,
146, 162, 164-65, 169-72, 17879,
181, 185, 198, 215, 226,
233, 246-47, 248-50, 257, 260,
288-89, 298-99
New York, 117
Newman, Nancy, 224
Newman, Paul and Nell, 120-21, 124
Newsday, 181
Newsforchange.com, 198
Newsweek, 177
Nichols, John, 271
Niebuhr, Reinhold, 253
Nieves, Evelyn, 78
Nixon, Richard M., 13-14, 21
No More Throwaway People, 68
Noble, Lawrence, 229-30
"none-of-the-above" (NOTA), 38-40
North Carolina, 107
nuclear power, 216, 259

O'Neill, Tip, 24, 40
Obey, David, 169
Occidental Petroleum, 11
Occupational Safety and Health
Agency (OSHA), 13, 36, 71, 13031,
192, 196, 243, 260, 262, 305
oil industry, 68, 130, 131, 173
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers
Union, 196
Oregon, 129
Oreskes, Michael, 63, 128
Organization for Competitive
Markets, 169, 201, 325

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), 97
PACs (political action committees),
32, 178
Paine, Thomas, 18, 206
Panetta, Leon, 232
Paper Plantation, The, 128
Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical and
Engineering Workers, 270
Parker, Major General, 108
Parks, Rosa, 286
Passacantando, John, 57
Paul, Ron, 228
Peace Action, 15
peace waging, xi, 16, 190, 201, 280,
317-19
Pennsylvania, 4
Pentagon. See Department of Defense
Pentel, Ken, 201
People's Debate Commission, 160,
213
People's History of the United States,
A, 209
Permanent Normal Trade Relations,
144
Perot, Ross, 48, 159, 178, 226-28,
230-31, 278, 282
Peterson, Esther, 22
Pfizer, 53
pharmaceutical industry, 45, 93
prices, 52, 62, 67
research budgets, 53
Philadelphia Inquirer, 145
philanthropy, 1, 17
Philip Morris, 58, 159
Pierce, Jan, 144, 342
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, 134
Planned Parenthood, 261
plutocracy, 40, 328
police brutality, 148, 284
political reform, xii, 57, 79, 127, 136,
188, 219, 239, 309
politics
candidates, 56
consultants, 2, 5, 44
corruption by money, xiii, 1, 3-4, 68,
10-11, 23-24, 36, 60, 65,
106, 110, 119, 146, 173, 178,
190, 199, 207, 225, 242, 259,
268-69, 273-75 287, 293, 301,
306, 327
egos, 55, 72, 249
local, 40, 86, 99, 210
"one-party rule, " 9, 34, 130
promises, 40
record vs. rhetoric, 102, 117-18,
180, 194, 216, 245, 252, 260,
267, 306, 317
slogans, 9, 100
strategy, 44, 67, 95, 103, 117, 137,
144, 155, 181, 183, 186, 242,
257, 261, 272, 274, 305
Pollina, Anthony, 126-27, 322
polls, 16, 43, 46, 59, 63, 85-86, 103-
4, 119, 122, 159, 162, 164, 182,
186, 218, 226-27, 237, 272,
279, 290
pollution, 80, 98, 131-32, 160, 273-
74. See also toxics
Portland, Oregon, 186-90
Pope, Carl, 95-96, 259
Pouillon, Nora, 243, 322
poverty, xi, 1, 5-6, 10, 16, 20, 68,
80, 87, 89, 92, 118, 153-54,
166, 190, 216, 252, 274, 314,
317-18
predatory lending, S, 88, 110
Powell, Lewis, 20-21
powerlessness, 12, 39, 40, 199, 204
Price, Sol, 266-67
prisons, 80, 216
privatization, xii, 227
progressive politics, 44, 54, 131, 242,
244, 246, 251, 262, 267, 269,
292, 300, 302-3, 307
Progressive Review, 167
Progressive, The, 126, 162, 177, 180,
198, 301
public assets, xi, xiii, 49, 71, 131, 150,
156, 239, 241, 277, 312, 315
Public Citizen, 57, 143, 147, 299
Global Trade Watch, 192, 325
Litigation Group, 191, 325
Public Interest Research Groups
(PIRGs), 126, 187, 325
public needs, 81-82, 185

Quinn, Jack, 264

racism, 20, 61, 94, 101-2, 198, 251,
284
environmental, 62
redlining, 89, 101
radio, 3, 47, 108, 161, 177-78, 195,
283
Raines, Howell, 172
Raitt, Bonnie, 142, 323
rallies, 12, 46, 78, 89, 114, 116, 160,
167, 186-91, 197-219, 240, 269,
271, 280-88, 309. See also
campaigning
RAND Institute for Civil Justice, 263
RAND research group, 273-74
Rapoport, Bernard, 266-67
Raskin, Jamin, 277, 286
Raskin, Marcus, 101, 323
Raspberry, William, 298
Rather, Dan, 181, 232
Rayburn, Sam, 112
Reagan Democrats, 26
Reagan, Ronald, 23-27, 55, 125, 158,
171, 211, 248, 255-56
Reaganites, 30
Recio, Maria, 174
Red Sox, 80, 82
Redford, Robert, 257
Redstone, Sumner, 156
Reed, Ralph, 165
Reform Parry, 48, 159, 275
regulation
by business, 25
by government, 20
See also deregulation
Reich, Robert, 50, 219, 245, 302
Reid, Harry, 103, 144, 206, 208
religious leaders, 15, 117
reprisals, 265, 269, 292, 299-300
Republican National Committee, 159,
224, 242
Republican Party, xi, 105
campaign finance reform, 8
convention, 2-4, 6-10
corporate interests, 20
Eisenhower Republicans, 50
primaries, 59-61
See also major political parties
"Republicrats," 32
Resenbrink, John, 127-28, 291, 323
Revolutionary War, 28, 199
Rhode Island, 113-14
Ribicoff, Abraham, 19
Richard, john, xiv, 33
Riddle, Sam, 137
Ridge, Tom, 74-75
Riley, George, 71
Ritch, Massie, 77
Robbins, Mike, 184
Robbins, Tim, 142, 214, 299, 323,
355-60
Roberts, Cokie, 277
Roberts, Jim, 112, 164
Robertson, Rueben, 153
Robinson, Randall, 15, 285, 287-88,
320
Rockefeller, Alida, 69-70
Roe v. Wade, 249, 255-56, 261-62,
267
Rolling Stone, 214
Roosevelt, Franklin, 28, 93, 267, 279-80,
301, 328, 349-50
Roosevelt, Theodore, xii, 28, 245,
328, 352
Rosen, Frank, 193
Rosendahl, Bill, 241
Rosenfeld, Arthur, 259
Rosenfield, Harvey, 46, 308
Rosenthal, Abe, 172
Ross, Mike, 82
Rothschild, Matthew, 38, 107, 178,
198
Rowe, Jonathan, 312
Rowland, john, 81
Rubin, Robert, 50
Ruckus Society, 11
Russell, Mark, 303
Russert, Tim, 61, 111, 174-75, 255-56, 282
Ryan, Dick, 123

Sacramento, California, and SMUD,
96
Sadlowski, Ed, 196
Salon.com, 198, 214
San Jose Mercury News, 231
Sanders, Bernie, 33, 125-27
Santa Clara v. Southern Pacific
Railroad, 124
Sarandon, Susan, 111, 142, 176, 214-15,
256, 299, 320, 355-56
Saturday Night Live, 61-62, 175,
237, 273
savings and loan collapse, 31, 252
Sheff, Elizabeth Horton, 118
Schieffer, Bob, 177, 293
Schmidt, Steve, 147
Schram, Martin, 182-83
Schroeder, Pat, 22
Schwartz, Victor, 264
Sealander, Robert, 177
Seattle Times, 205, 231
Seattle, Washington, 205-8
Seeger, Pete, 142, 323
Seldes, George, 172
Seligman, Joel, 222
Sellers, Gary, 71, 243-44
Senn, Deborah, 207
Service Employees International
Union, 260, 269
shadow conventions, 9-12, 16
Shallal, Andy, 89
Sharpton, Al, 283
Sheinbaum, Betty and Stanley, 135
Shepard, Steve, 204
Shields, Mark, 63, 218, 232
Shriver, Maria, 2
Shrub, 180, 273-74
Sierra Club, 62, 95-96, 145, 257-59,
291-92, 351-54
Sifry, Miczh, 178
Simon, Roger, 9, 299
Simpson, Alan, 121
Slack, Warner, 121
slavery, 28, 287, 289
Smashmouth, 225-26
Smith, Patti, 142, 209, 214, 216-17,
288, 310
Smith, Roger, 200
Smith, Wesley, 152, 343
Social Security, 2, 165, 302
solutions, xiv, 136, 150, 181, 213,
301, 313, 316, 318
Sony, 157
Soren, Tabitha, 48
Soros, George, 91
South Africa, 52, 171
South Carolina, 107
Spence, Gerry, 121-22, 323
sports teams, 78, 80, 82
Squitieri, Tom, 174, 198
St. Louis Dispatch, 146
St. Paul Pioneer Press, 231
St. Petersburg Times, 198
Standard Oil Company, 124
State Department, 52
Steele, James B., 179
Steinem, Gloria, 102, 253-57, 260
Stephanopolous, George, 227
Stern, Andrew L., 260, 269-70
Stevens, Ted, 130-31
Stilp, Gene, 42
street crime, 5
students, 129, 139-40, 167, 183, 194,
217, 280, 295, 309, 311
Supreme Court, 20-21, 121, 247, 249-50, 255-
56, 278, 280
sweatshops, 11, 15, 95, 129, 194
Sweeney, John J., 194-96, 260

Taft, Robert, 29
Taft-Hartley Act, 31-32, 139, 151,
192, 278, 318
taxing undesirables, 190
taxpayer funding, 4, 6, 137,
256
Teamsters Union, 131, 143-44,
160, 193-94, 174, 196, 206,
352, 354
telecommunications, 44, 50, 252, 301
television ads, 32, 34, 40, 48, 108-9,
157, 161, 176-77, 183, 218,
241, 267, 275-77, 293
television networks, 10, 292
ABC, 63, 128, 226, 261, 290
CBS , 63, 83, 156, 177, 226, 293
CNN, 59, 103, 177, 226, 252
Fox, 103, 177, 220, 226
MSNBC, 3, 128, 177
NBC, 2, 61, 63, 221, 226
television news and talk shows, 175-
76
Charlie Rose Show, 176
Connection, 177
Eye on America, 83
Hardball, 145, 174, 280-81
Meet the Press, 111, 175, 255-56,
282
NewsHour, 63, 218
Nightline, 279-80
One on One, 252
Oprah, 175-76, 238, 272
Politically Incorrect, 175
Queen Latifah Show, 176
60 Minutes, 173-74, 179
This Week, 261, 275, 277
Today Show, 183, 221
20/20, 173
Terkel, Studs, 211, 323
third parties, xii, 47, 58-59, 63, 65,
105, 126, 137, 155, 162, 219,
245, 249, 256, 262, 279, 295,
300, 304
Thomas" Marlo, 250
Thomas, Norman, 267, 279-80
Thompson, Tommy, 295
Tigar, Michael, 67
Time Dollars, 68, 336
Time magazine, 48, 177, 179
Tobias, Paul, 67-68
Todd Whitman, Christine, 4-5, 308
Tomorrow, Tom, 286, 323
tort law, 51, 130, 262-66, 328, 330
town meetings, 38-39, 123, 125
toxics, 25, 62, 102, 131, 134, 153,
184, 273. See also pollution
trade, 13, 44, 47-48, 52-53, 80, 89,
96, 106, 112, 124, 143-45, 169-
70, 191-92, 193, 196, 199, 235,
260, 278, 310-11, 319, 332, 352
Traficant, James, Jr., 228
trial lawyers, 130, 262-66
Trister, Michael, 64-65, 343
Truman, Harry, 303
Trumka, Richard, 32, 194-95
Truskoff, Lou, 206
Truth, Sojourner, 207
Tsongas, Paul, 43
Turner, Ted, 91, 93

U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 306
U.S. News & World Report, 108, 177
United Auto Workers, 105-6, 127,
144, 160, 191-93, 352
United Electric Radio and Machine
Workers, 193
United Electrical Workers, 270
United Mine Workers, 195
United Steel Workers, 160, 192-93,
261-62
Universal (Seagram), 157
Unsafe at Any Speed, 19
urban decay, 4-6, 154, 166-67, 284
USA Today, 39, 145, 174, 198, 226

vanden Heuvel, Katrina, 121
Vedder, Eddie, 142-43, 206, 210-15,
323
Ventura, Jesse, 109, 182, 202, 279-80
Vermont, 125
Viacom, 156-57
Vidal, Gore, 37
Vieques Island, Puerto Rico, 308
Vietnam War, 20, 148, 281-82
Village Voice, 113, 145, 177
Vines, Lanny, 93
violence, 1, 102
Vladeck, Judith, 121
von Hoffman, Nicholas, 178, 238
vote swapping, 277
voter rationales, xiii, 86, 87, 137,
204, 291
"lesser of two evils," 27, 58, 62,
71, 106, 145, 193-94, 203, 209,
211, 252, 270
low expectations, 57, 244, 314
voters
elderly, 2
non-, 197-98, 216, 287, 294
turnout, 2, , 182, 197, 210
registration, 182, 206, 217, 250

Wagner Act labor rights laws, 28
Wake Us Up When It's Over, 39
Wall Street Journal, 16, 29-30, 46,
50, 63, 113, 146, 179, 222, 226,
259, 298
Wallace, Henry, 242, 349-50
Wallace, Mike, 173-74, 293
Wallis, Jim, 16
Walter Reed Institute of Health, 108
Walton, Richard, 113
Wardlaw, B., 91
Warren, James, 213
Washington Post, 9-11, 30-32, 47,
59, 63, 113, 145, 160, 162, 165-66,
172, 169, 178-80, 185, 226,
245, 290, 294, 298, 300, 303
Washington, D.C., xiii, 89-90, 166-68
vote, 288-89
Washington, George, 132, 314
Waters, Maxine, 15
Waxman, Henry, 30, 111-12, 244
wealth disparities, 11, 13, 31, 92,
244, 251-52, 289, 302, 312,
330
Webster, Daniel, 317
Weill, Sandy, 251
Weissman, Steve, 169
welfare reform, 44, 62, 70, 207, 252
Wellford, Harrison, 244
Wellstone, Paul, 45, 69, 109, 244,
257
West Virginia, 109
West, Cornel, 101, 142, 287-88, 309,
323
West, Dave, 132-33
Which Side Are You On?, 70
White Plume, Alex, 134
Whitehead, Alfred North, 315
Whittelsey, Frances Cerra, 254
Whittle, Richard, 8-9
Wilde, Oscar, 312
Wilentz, Sean, 267
Wiley, George, 92
Will, George, 275
Williams, Tony, 166
Winsted, Connecticut, 17
Witcover, Jules, 39
Wolfe, Sidney, 147
women's issues, 28, 102, 122, 253-
55, 267
Woodrow, Wilson, xii, 150, 245, 301
Woolsey, James, 133
workers, 28, 122, 329
health and safety, 25-26, 28, 58,
130-31, 143, 192, 196, 318
working poor, 92
World Bank, 11, 89
Worley, David, 34
Wright, Jim, 22-23, 34
WTO (World Trade Organization),
13, 89, 112, 124, 205. See also
trade issues; GATT

Yard, Molly, 260-61
Yauch, Adam, 286
Yokich, Steve, 105-6, 127, 191-93, 196
Young, Don, 131
Young, Quentin, 67
youth, 1-2, 115, 129, 152, 216, 236,
271, 294, 314, 318

Zero, Jerry, 70
Zimbalist, Andrew, 81
Zion, Howard, 209, 323
Zogby surveys, 103, 164
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