Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

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Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

Postby admin » Tue Feb 18, 2020 2:22 am

"Above All Nations Is Humanity": "Maluna a'e o na lahui a pau ke ola ke kanaka"
by Kalidas Nag, M.A., University of Calcutta, D. Litt., University of Paris[Dr. Kalidas Nag, Visiting Professor in the Oriental Institute of the University of Hawaii, delivered this address at the Annual Commencement of the University, June 22, 1937.]
University of Hawaii Bulletin
Volume 16, Number 8, June, 1937

I

My predecessor on this platform, Dr. Edwin R. Embree, President of the Julius Rosenwald Fund, told you last year of his grand aspiration and his realistic dream: the birth of the "New Civilization" through the "mingling of the East and West." Some dreams are just fantastic and illusory; others are based on our deepest longings and hopes, peopling the world of our subconscious being, and hence their potency and positive character.

In a 1944 address in Nashville, Tennessee, on July 4—provocative both for its timing and its substance—[Edwin R. Embree] proclaimed the coming of a new order in race relations and international affairs. The war, he predicted, would shift the center of world politics from Europe and the Atlantic to Asia and the Pacific. China and Japan would be major powers, demanding equal status with the U.S., Great Britain, and the Soviet Union and, he asserted, they would expect fair treatment for their distant relatives in North America. More than a year before Japan’s surrender, with the battle for Saipan raging as he spoke, he cautioned against an occupation of the conquered country based on vengeance, rather than one that would allow the Japanese people to divest themselves of their military rulers and become a force for world peace.

-- Edwin Embree As Exemplar: How One Philanthropic Leader Confronted Racial Prejudice During The Second World War, by Alfred Perkins


The Orient suffered from serious historical mutilations and psychological distortions but it is a reality in human history. So, too, the Occident is very much of a reality today, almost dictating the pace of the modern world. Politically and economically the East and the West have often been found to be in conflict, because of maladjustments and misunderstandings. Culturally, the two hemispheres of Humanity are indispensable partners in a vast cosmic drama. These are not mere figures of speech but basic realities. And speaking on this solemn occasion, before my departure from this noble University to participate in the World Conference on Education in Tokyo, which takes as its major topic of discussion "A Twentieth Century Program of Education," I beg leave to affirm that our future education should and must be based on an adequate synthesis of eastern and western cultures. With all its aggressive sense of superiority, western education and culture appear today to be terribly inadequate, judged from the standpoint of moral progress and peace for mankind. So, with all its traditions of spirituality and renunciation, the eastern life and society are darkened today by an atmosphere of poverty, despair, and ignorance dangerously subversive to the world order. The western methods of dividing and dominating the East are doomed to failure; and no less so the eastern reactions against the West, either to treat it as a dangerous "enemy" or a successful "barbarian."

It is indeed a tragic irony of history that the two sister civilizations, so complementary to one another, have not yet found their "Laboratory of Synthesis" in most of our universities of the East and the West. Western science and technology are invading the eastern schools and colleges, divorced pathetically from the correctives of the creative life of the West manifested through her Arts and Literature. So, also, a sprinkling of "Orientalism" is found in the western institutes of higher education in their syllabi of Sociology, Anthropology, Comparative Philology, and such other humanistic studies. But even academic approaches of the Occident to the Orient are vitiated often by an unconscious condescension, a veiled imperialism, or colonialism actual or potential. Thus even the so-called modern Humanities are tainted by the original sin of "the un-human"; and consequently our observations and studies are just materials for the exploitation of one another's weaknesses!

When and how should we organize a new World Education Board, based on mutual respect and cooperation, which alone can drag us out of this quagmire of suspicion and hatred, threatening the peace of the world? This is a challenging question which has to be faced and answered, not only by our universities and cultural organizations but also by our political and economic trusts which are facing today the serious charge of betrayal of trusts! We accuse no one, and we invite one and all in reorganizing the World Trust, without which world security and peace are mere illusions. With malice for none and charity for everyone, we shall join hands, men and women of today and tomorrow, to rebuild the neglected and often desecrated Temple of Humanity, singing in chorus with our whole soul the sublime song of the Pacific expressed in the words inscribed at the entrance gate of this University, both in the musical Hawaiian language and in English:

"Maluna a'e o na lahui a pau ke ola ke kanaka."
"Above All Nations Is Humanity."


Facing, as I do, the representatives of some of the outstanding nations of East and West, here under the harmonious sky of Hawaii, I cannot help expressing some of the doubts and aspirations of our generation. Doubts, if any, have got to be boldly faced; and aspirations severely tested in the light of reality. I know that many of us have become skeptical about the possibility of our nationhood naturally evolving into Humanity. Some are asserting that to reach Humanity one must outgrow nationhood. That again appearing to be a problematic, nay dangerous, experiment, some swing to the opposite extreme, saying that to safeguard our nationhood we must throw overboard the cult of Humanity!

A few of us suspect, however, that whether we like it or not we float, move and have our being on the infinite ocean of Humanity which ultimately supports and regulates the variegated flotilla of diverse nations. Each nation-boat may imagine itself to be self-contained and independent of the others; but all of them stagnate or push forward according to their special rhythmic adjustments with the deep undercurrents of the ocean of Humanity. It is sheer foolhardiness to ignore the ocean while we are lost in our special dances on our particular boats. It may be wise and graceful to adjust our steps with the elemental rhythms of the dancing waves. Our sophisticated civilization has a fair chance of surviving if it learns the moral lesson of the superb technique of Hawaiian surf-riding. Every nation from East or West, must learn this basic rhythm of Humanity or be engulfed for good. Several apparently invincible nations have thus been submerged in history, emerging only as archaeological fossils of a dead past, crowding the galleries of our museums. The lesson of history is clear and it is for us of this modern age to make a choice: suicide or survival, war and extermination or peace and fulfillment of life? The twentieth century confronts us with this life-and-death question. Our entire thought and action should grapple with these vital issues if we are objective enough to visualize the future, and realistic enough to accept the lessons of science and history.

We know that despair and doubts are darkening our horizon today. From the awful experience of the last World War we learned what a penalty we shall have to pay if we follow again blindly the dictates of egotism and greed, leading inevitably to violence and war. Europe tried that path and may try it again and again. Asia, older in age and experience, ever speaks through her great seers that it is wiser to renounce than to grab, and that peace is more effective than war in the social economy and hygiene of Humanity. Twenty-five centuries ago India promulgated through her great sons, Mahavira and Buddha, the great principles of Non-violence (ahimsa) and Fraternity (maitri). The selfsame messages go out to the world from the makers of modern India, as Gandhi and Tagore.

Ram mohun Roy (1772-1833), the Father of Modern Indian Renaissance, and a junior contemporary of George Washington, sounded the keynote through his essays on comparative religion, harmonizing the apparently conflicting creeds of the East and the West, of Hinduism, Islam and Christianity, laying the foundation of the first Universalist Church (Brahmo Samaj) of India. Freedom of speech and self-expression for all men and women, freedom of worship, freedom for womanhood and her equality with man are some of the problems tackled in a spirit of tolerance and peace which so endeared him to Jeremy Bentham that he saluted Rammohun Roy as his "beloved collaborator in the service of Humanity." The history of India from Rammohun Roy to Tagore and Gandhi is that of a progressive humanization. So it is but natural that two of our leaders of Asiatic Renaissance, Tagore and Gandhi, are deeply interested in the noble experiment that America is making here in the heart of the Pacific. Before sailing from India to join the University of Hawaii, I requested Mahatma Gandhi to send a message to the students of this University, and these are his words:

"I have no inspiring message to give to anybody if non-violence is not its own message. But I can state my own experience of nearly fifty years of practice that there is no force known to mankind which is equal to non-violence. It cannot however be learned through books. It has got to be lived."

-- MKGandhi


Here Gandhi is speaking not simply for his own people but for Humanity as a whole. Those who accept Gandhi only as a national leader do not know his preoccupations for the welfare of mankind, irrespective of creed or color. When America was celebrating the fourth centenary of her discovery, in 1893, Gandhi was opening his heroic campaign of non-violent resistance to the inhuman treatment of man by man in South Africa.

Though Gandhi was concerned for the plight of the Indians of South Africa, he shared the racist beliefs of the Theosophists. Of white Afrikaaners and Indians, he wrote: “We believe as much in the purity of races as we think they do.” Gandhi lent his support to the Zulu War of 1906, volunteering for military service himself and raising a battalion of stretcher-bearers. Gandhi complained of Indians being marched off to prison where they were placed alongside Blacks, “We could understand not being classed with whites, but to be placed on the same level as the Natives seemed too much to put up with. Kaffirs [Blacks] are as a rule uncivilized—the convicts even more so. They are troublesome, very dirty and live like animals.”

Gandhi and Mussolini became friendly when they met in December 1931, with Gandhi praising the Duce's "service to the poor, his opposition to super-urbanization, his efforts to bring about a coordination between Capital and Labour, his passionate love for his people." He also advised the Czechs and Jews to adopt nonviolence toward the Nazis, saying that "a single Jew standing up and refusing to bow to Hitler's decrees" might be enough "to melt Hitler's heart."


-- The Untold Story of Gandhi and Theosophy, by David Livingstone


His activities aroused the attention of no less a personality than Leo Tolstoy. The venerable author of "War and Peace" exchanged several letters with Gandhi which you may read in the volume "Tolstoy and the Orient," published by Paul Birukoff, the disciple of the Russian sage in the last few years of his life.

A little earlier, about 1888, another great thinker and artist of Europe, Romain Rolland who would be the noblest interpreter of Gandhi and his non-violence in the West, also corresponded with Tolstoy. Privileged to collaborate with Mon. Rolland in his study on "Mahatma Gandhi," I saw in 1923, in his Swiss home, the original letter of Tolstoy in reply to the poignant questionings of that adolescent French artist who immortalized himself by writing the epic novel "Jean Christophe" and his Lives of Illustrious Men: Beethoven, Michael Angelo, and Tolstoy. Spending his last days studying Oriental religions, Tolstoy left this world in 1910; and within four years the so-called civilized world plunged itself into an orgy of destruction and carnage rarely paralleled in history. The old world motto "Love Thy Neighbor" was coolly replaced by "Kill Thy Brother!" In the face of that awful sacrilege against all religions, Rolland, the symbol of the awakened conscience of the West, wrote that magnificent vindication of humanity: "Above the Battlefield" and his "Appeal" to the elite of all nations to save modern civilization from utter wreckage. Since then, for the last twenty years, Romain Rolland, the master interpreter of music and musicians, has been trying to hold aloft the torch of Humanity in this age of nationalistic obscurantism. It is a rare privilege for me to make his solemn voice also join in this superb symphony of the souls of many nations which naturally drew the sympathy of the great European harmonist. Receiving from me an account of the quiet and constructive work of my friends of this American territory, radiating inter-racial amity, and specially hearing about the noble outlook of internationalism in our University of Hawaii, Romain Rolland sent me by air mail the following lines:

"I am happy to feel the growth of this new family. We are brothers born of the same spirit of human unity and universal communion. Those who are realizing that in harmony, are happy indeed in that Eden of Hawaii. Here, where I am, in Europe, we must accomplish the same through the tumult of strifes. We are the archers of the Gita. We do not fight ourselves; we fight for the welfare and liberty of all those to come and to build the grand Union of all Nations, the sovereign harmony rich and complex; the symphony which weaves into one garland the beautiful and embracing accords of the whole earth....

To fraternal friends
Of all nations
at the University of Hawaii
With my affectionate greetings.

-- ROMAIN ROLLAND."


These words of the most musical prophet of modern internationalism will, I am sure, gladden your hearts, my friends and students of this University: Hawaiians, Americans, Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and Portuguese -- all enjoying a common culture in a common democracy. I urge you young graduates, going out to the world, to be proud of your Alma Mater and to serve the cause so nobly championed by her. I strengthen my appeal by reminding you of the prophetic words of a great American who addressed you last year: "A population descended from the various stocks of Europe and Asia, from Polynesia and the other islands of the Pacific, is here making a new race and a new culture . . . Appropriately enough, the birthplace of this new culture, compounded of the best of the East and the West, is in the group of islands situated midway between the western world and the Orient."1

India of three hundred and fifty million souls, that vast sub-continent of many races, religions, and cultures, would always be with you in your pursuit of cultural fellowships which is the keynote of Indian history and which, I hope, will be the guiding light of all national histories. My Alma Mater, the University of Calcutta, to which I am grateful for this opportunity to serve you for a while, is so glad to learn about your bold experiment that our Vice Chancellor presented your library with all our research publications -- an example which will be followed by many other universities and learned societies of India.

Through ages India maintained the proud tradition of free cultural exchange, ever since the days of our ancient universities of Taxila and Nalanda. And modern India, nay the entire New Orient, would ever be proud of the fact that its greatest living poet-philosopher, Tagore, came to vindicate Humanity insulted and crucified by the "carnivorous and cannibalistic" nationalism during the last world war. As early as 1899 Tagore wrote that soul-stirring poem "The Sunset of the Century." So in 1917, with the unerring judgment of a prophet, Tagore exposed in his "Nationalism" the festering sores of our modern history. Returning in 1921 from the devastated areas of war-mad Europe, Tagore, with little else but his grand dream to support him, transformed his rural school of Santiniketan into the first international university of India, the Visva Bharati. Here Asiatics, Africans, Europeans, and Americans, Christians and non-Christians, have found their haven of meditation for the welfare of Humanity in that "Abode of Peace." As a member of its governing body, I had the honor of introducing your Professor Sinclair to our venerable Founder-President; and the poet-laureate of Asia, on behalf of India and the Orient, gave this benediction on the Oriental Institute of the University of Hawaii:

"I congratulate the authorities of the Hawaii University for the wise step they have taken in starting an Oriental Institute under its auspices. For this distracted world of ours nothing is perhaps so much needed today as a proper understanding between and appreciation of the cultures of the East and the West. That also is the mission of my university Visva Bharati. Hawaii, situated as it is in the midst of the seas that separate the East from the West, is preeminently fitted to be the center of such an institute and I offer it my best wishes for a glorious and useful career."

-- Rabindranath Tagore


II

It is distinctly a pathological symptom, ominous for our human family, that while countless millions of men and women are hungering for peace, a few politicians are stampeding the nations into rearmament, making war almost inevitable. Collective security is a pious fraud if it is only regional and not universal. It is regrettable that while the experts of the International Labor Office and of the League of Nations are bringing out indisputable evidences showing that cooperation is the only solution of our tragic problems, the tariff walls and muffled war drums are threatening us on all fronts, western and eastern. But, towering high above these vagaries of nationalistic politics and economics, are the clear verdicts of the "Representative Men" of the East and the West. Numerically negligible yet spiritually invincible, these poets, philosophers and philanthropists -- our Tagores, Rollands, and Gandhis -- declare with one voice that the basic religion of mankind is just to be human and that "Humanity is above all Nations."

So, before taking leave of you, I beg to entrust to you of the newborn Pacific race, my concrete dream of a "Laboratory of Human Relations." This University of Hawaii is to me more than a chance experiment of America in the field of international education. It plays the symbolical role of reconciling the glorious traditions of American democracy with the noble Hawaiian traditions of good-will and welcome for all. Its departments of culture show a rare potentiality of expansion and growth with a rich variety in its ethnic basis and with the immense horizon of its geographical situation.


Before developing the story of my Dream-Laboratory, I sketch here the outline of the cultural chart of America's collaboration with her neighbors. Hawaii is culturally connected with New Zealand and the South Pacific cultures through Tahiti. Situated on the crossroads of transpacific liners and clippers, Hawaii is the most valuable and convenient base for American relations with entire Polynesia and Indonesia, through Japan and China, right up to the farthest western base of America in the Orient, the Philippines. There America, true to her democratic traditions, is going to make the first sincere experiment in autonomy for her Filipino citizens. In the new regime of national self-government, the University of the Philippines and allied institutions, if properly developed would, I hope, render a great service by keeping America in intimate relations with French Indo-China, the Dutch East Indies, India, and the Middle East.

Privileged to inaugurate in this University the first series of lectures on the history, thought and culture of the living nations of India and the Near East, I was deeply impressed by the genuine interest in the subject evinced by the students and the public attending the lectures. Compared with Great Britain, France, and Germany, the United States of America was late in entering the field of Oriental studies, especially of India. She has compensated, however, for her loss of time by her generous investments in archaeological explorations and cultural activities in the Near and the Far East, through her great museums, the American Association of Learned Societies, the American Oriental Society, and other similar organizations. Several American universities and museums are excavating in the sites of the dead civilizations in Egypt and Iraq, in Turkey and Persia. The University of Chicago has developed its grand Oriental Institute. Columbia University has its series of Indo-Iranian classics, and Harvard its Oriental Series mainly devoted to India, and its Yenching Foundation attending to Chinese culture. The pre-historic civilizations of the Indus Valley are being explored by the American Association of Learned Societies and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. So, Yale University sent several expeditions to the sub-Himalayan regions in search of the fossil man. Yale also shows keen interest in Polynesian studies, as we find from her intimate collaboration with the Bishop Museum which, with its wonderful collections and research records, is a real pride of Hawaii. The scientific activities of the Bishop Museum are supplemented by the young yet most promising Academy of Arts of Honolulu which very appropriately tries to cultivate in the public of Hawaii, not forgetting its most important element, the children, a taste in Oriental art. So the Pan-Pacific Union, the Institute of Pacific Relations, and the Anthropological and Sociological Societies are doing admirable work in the last few years, cooperating with and supplementing the work of the University of Hawaii. The latter has already provided for the study of Japanese, Chinese and Indian cultures, as well as Hawaiian language and literature. This year, the University has taken a momentous step by inviting an expert musician to open systematic courses on Music. May it help to save from corruption and oblivion the noblest arts of Polynesia, its chants, and rhythms, its music and dances, finding, at last, their sanctuary at a conservatory of the University.

The diversity of human interests, the rich complexity of racial types and traditions in and around the University of Hawaii naturally signalize it as the most promising "Laboratory of Human Relations" that America can develop, here in the heart of the Pacific, for the better understanding of mankind.
I know that "human relations" and "better understanding" are phrases at the tip of the pen of almost every diplomat and journalist. Over-familiarity seems to have bred a silent contempt for such concepts in this age of refined cynicism. Yet I cannot help reiterating with all the conviction I command that the only way of revitalizing our studies and humanizing our sciences is the way of human relations. So, modifying a little the sonorous words of Danton in the age of the French Revolution, I wish to give to you, of the future generation, the following:

"L'humanite, encore l'humanite, tousjours l'humanite."
"Humanity, more humanity, always humanity!"


Human exploitation and race hatred must stop, or this civilization will just go. Every University of the world boasted of its department of Humanities, and yet owing to the lack of concrete touch of human relations the studies degenerated into dead analysis. That is why in the fire-baptism of mankind in the last World War, so many universities could easily betray human trusts. "Can Nations Be Neighbors?" is the challenging title of a book2 of the learned President of the University of Hawaii; and we can answer that question adequately if we can humanize our academic Humanities.

America rang the Liberty Bell for the whole human race a few years before the French Revolution and the grand Statue of Liberty was very appropriately installed at the entrance of the biggest American harbor on the Atlantic. America is a continent of many races, the dominant ones coming from across the Atlantic. Naturally we find, down to this day, that its academic, political, and cultural outlooks are severely circumscribed by the principles and prepossessions of the Atlantic civilization. This is an unbalanced and unhistorical attitude, as I could not help pointing out while attending, as a delegate from India, the World Writers Congress (P.E.N.) at Buenos Aires. In the crowded auditorium of the leading university of the Argentine Republic I asked and got reply to my question: Since the entire body of the two Americas extending from Alaska to Chile is irrigated, nourished, and built through countless ages by the waves of the immense Pacific, what provision has been made so far for the study of this much-neglected Pacific civilization? It has legitimate claims on full one-half of the body of the New World, and yet how few of the American universities and learned societies are Pacific-minded? The earliest colonizers of America, the pre-historic ancestors of the American Indian, came from the Orient, sometimes walking over the ice-bridges or crossing in skin boats which brought the daring folks across the islands to Alaska, as recently stated by Dr. Ales Hrdlicka, the distinguished anthropologist of the Smithsonian Institution. From that dim past down to our days the Pacific races and cultures have been negotiating with America. Yet, where is the clearing house of the information, not to speak of research centers of Pacific civilization?

Spending these few months in the human atmosphere of the University of Hawaii, fraternizing with the teachers and the students of so many different countries and nationalities, I have felt that this University is the most possible and propitious center for the study of Pacific civilization. Here I met, among the several scholars. of the Pacific basin, professors from Alaska in the north, to New Zealand in the south. So, teachers and students from China, Japan and India are working at our Oriental Institute harmoniously, amidst a thousand material handicaps, to develop a living synthesis of the East and the West, as original as it is comprehensive.
Our aim is not the necrology of scientific analysis, abstract and inhuman, but living reactions and interactions of the past, present and future.

III

So I hope that in this "Laboratory of Human Relations" of the University of Hawaii a new faculty of research on Pacific culture and a new chapter in world history may someday be developed through the cooperation and good-will of all nations as neighbors in this world-village. It is significant that two of the leading universities of America, Harvard and Yale, are already Pacific-minded, and I hope that others will follow their example when the case for centralizing Oriental and Pacific research in the University of Hawaii is convincingly demonstrated. Then the Carnegie Corporation would find it necessary to establish a Pacific Division of its Institute of Race Relations;

On August 16, 1947 University of Chicago President Robert M. Hutchins announced the formation of the Committee on Education, Training, and Research in Race Relations. Funded by equal grants of $75,000 from the Carnegie Corporation and the Rockefeller Foundation, the Committee was constituted to be a five-year program under the direction of Louis Wirth, professor of sociology.

-- Guide to the University of Chicago Committee on Education, Training, and Research in Race Relations Records 1944-1962, © 2009 University of Chicago Library


the Rockefeller Foundation would build here laboratories for the study of Oriental and Pacific hygiene; the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace would endow chairs for the study of peace problems of the Orient and Pacific zone. So also the Latin American universities, the universities of China and Japan, of the Philippines and of India, the scientific institutions of Indonesia and of the Near East would gradually come to collaborate with the University of Hawaii, which is the advance-guard of American culture in the Pacific and the Orient. It is the meeting ground of diverse nations of the East and the West. It deserves fully, and will surely draw in the near future, the material and moral support permitting it to fulfill its grand destiny.

Hawaii has often been called the "Geneva of the Pacific," and I plead for the progressive development of the University of Hawaii from a territorial institution into one of the grandest monuments of American internationalism -- a veritable "Pacific Foundation." So many millions have gone to the building up of the departments of Atlantic Civilization. Is it not overdue, this project of a special Foundation for the Study of Pacific Civilization? Arts and sciences, races and literatures would find their special libraries, museums and laboratories. Experts and researchers from all corners of the globe would come here to teach and to learn under this marvellous atmosphere of fellowship. The scholars all the world over would seek the publications of the Foundation for enlightenment; and original texts and translations from the Hawaii University Press would go to enrich the libraries and minds of the various nations.
Here is peace, propitious climate, and rare comradeship; only material resources and tools are lacking. Should the Temple of Humanity be postponed simply on that account?

The answer to this question must come primarily from America, although it should come simultaneously from all the nations immediately interested. If we believe in neighborliness as the soul of all religions, and peace as the real criterion of culture, we should try to make our dream a reality. America has installed the Statue of Liberty on her Atlantic basin. May America with the Pacific Foundation of the University of Hawaii dedicate, in the near future, the first statue of Humanity on the Pacific, announcing peace to all her neighbors! Some future Rodin may design that grand statue of Humanity bearing on the pedestal the noble motto of the University of Hawaii, "Above All Nations Is Humanity."

Our ancestors of the Vedic dawn left us the priceless legacy of world-vision through the following profound message: "To see the Self in the Universe, and the Universe in the Self, is the right seeing." A great philosopher of modern India in the Universal Races Congress (1911) pronounced, in keeping with our ancestral wisdom, that "Nationalism is but the halting stage in our onward march to Humanity." So, the greatest poet of India of today, in his Gitanjali which won the first Nobel Prize from the Orient, sang:

"Thou hast made me known to friends I knew not;
Thou hast given me seats in homes not my own;
Thou hast brought the distant near,
And made a brother of the stranger."


This initiation of individual Man into Humanity is the spiritual dowry of India, and I bring the same to you, my young friends of the University. May right endeavor bring you Unity. May right aspirations bring you Unity. May right achievement bring you Unity. Strive and thrive in rearing the Temple of Humanity. It is a task worthy of the future heroes and heroines of the world. I wish you all success, and conclude with the Vedic prayer which came to impregnate the soul of the Pacific as manifested in some of the fragments of the Polynesian Vedas:

"The One who, himself without colour, by the manifold application of his power
Distributes many colours in his hidden purpose
And into whom, its end and its beginning, the whole world dissolves -- He is God!
May He unite us all with propitious Wisdom!"


-- SVETASVATARA UPANISHAD. IV, 1.


_______________

Notes:

1 "The New Civilization: A Mingling of East and West," by Edwin R. Embree, University of  Hawaii Occasional Papers No. 30, July 1936.
 
2 "There is no greater task, no greater opportunity, confronting education than this: to teach the  nations of the world to understand their neighbors, to respect their neighbors as themselves. Let us educate for mental disarmament, with assurance that physical disarmament will then take care of itself." David Livingston Crawford, Can Nations Be Neighbors?, page 113. (Boston:  The Stratford Company, 1932).
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Re: Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

Postby admin » Tue Feb 18, 2020 2:23 am

Cornelius P. Rhoads
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 2/17/20

More Links to Rockefeller

A final nightmarish human investigation discussed by Lederer with potential relevance to my research was the Puerto Rican Cancer Experiment launched in 1931 by the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Investigations in San Juan. The program's director, Dr. Cornelius Rhoads, carried out the experiment in which thirteen Puerto Ricans died "after being purposely infected with cancer."25 In a letter to a colleague, obtained by the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, Rhoads wrote:

the Porto Ricans [sic] ... are beyond doubt the dirtiest, laziest, most degenerate and thievish race of men ever inhabiting this sphere. It makes you sick to inhabit the same island with them.... What the island needs is not public health work, but a tidal wave or something to totally exterminate the population. It might then be livable. I have done my best to further the process of extermination by killing off eight and transplanting cancer into several more. The latter has not resulted in any fatalities so far.... The matter of consideration for the patients' welfare plays no role here-in fact, all physicians take delight in the abuse and torture of the unfortunate subjects.23,44


Lederer relayed the rest of a lengthy and horrifying story. I learned that Dr. Rhoads, rather than being held accountable for his crimes, was later awarded the Legion of Merit, and then appointed to the staff of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This was during the 1950s when the commission was carrying out radiation experiments on unwitting hospital patients, mentally retarded children, prisoners, and soldiers.23

I later learned, the AEC was intimately involved in the NCI's cancer virus research program during the 1960s and early 1970s. Their "Joint AEC-NCI Molecular Anatomy Cancer Program," directed by Dr. Norman Anderson, extensively studied "human embryo tissues during early and mid gestation." Anderson, and a host of ABC and NCI researchers including Robert Gallo's superior Robert Manaker, injected human fetal specimens with various viral mutants in an effort to develop cancers and vaccines. Among their "major findings," announced in a 1971 DHEW publication, was that by bombarding fetuses with ionizing radiation, the researchers were able to cause tumorlike reactions in adults.45,46


-- Emerging Viruses: AIDS & Ebola: Nature, Accident or Intentional?, by Leonard G. Horowitz, D.M.D., M.A., M.P.H.


Image
Cornelius P. Rhoads
Photograph of Rhoads taken by the U.S. Army, 1943
Born: Cornelius Packard Rhoads, June 20, 1898, Springfield, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died: August 13, 1959 (aged 61), Stonington, Connecticut, U.S.
Citizenship: United States
Alma mater: Bowdoin College; Harvard University
Awards: Legion of Merit; Walker Prize' Clement Cleveland Medal Katherine Berkin Judd Award
Scientific career: Fields: Oncology, pathology, hematology
Institutions: Rockefeller University; Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology

Cornelius Packard "Dusty" Rhoads (June 9, 1898 – August 13, 1959) was an American pathologist, oncologist, and hospital administrator. Beginning in 1940, he served as director of Memorial Hospital for Cancer Research in New York, from 1945 was the first director of Sloan-Kettering Institute, and the first director of the combined Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center. For his contributions to cancer research, Rhoads was featured on the cover of the June 27, 1949 issue of Time magazine under the title "Cancer Fighter".[1]

During his early years with the Rockefeller Institute in the 1930s, Rhoads specialized in anemia and leukemia, working for six months in Puerto Rico in 1932 as part of the Rockefeller Foundation International Health Board contingent. During World War II, he worked for the United States Army helping to develop chemical weapons and set up research centers. Research on mustard gas led to developments for its use in chemotherapy at Sloan Kettering.

In early 1932, a letter Rhoads had written in November 1931, which disparaged Puerto Ricans and claimed he had killed and intentionally injected cancer cells into his patients, was given by a lab assistant to Puerto Rican nationalist leader Pedro Albizu Campos. He publicized the letter in the Puerto Rican and American media, which led to a scandal, an official investigation,[2] and a US whitewashing campaign to protect Rhoads and, by extension, Rockefeller interests.[3] In the ensuing investigation, Rhoads defended himself, saying he had written his comments in anger and as a joke to a New York colleague.
[4] Neither Puerto Rico's Attorney General nor the medical community found evidence of his or the project's giving any inappropriate medical treatment, and the scandal was forgotten.[5][6]

In 2002, the controversy was revived. Alerted to the incident, American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), which had established the Cornelius P. Rhoads Memorial Award in 1979,[7] commissioned a new investigation.[8] It was led by Jay Katz, emeritus professor at Yale Law School and a specialist in medical ethics. He concluded there was no evidence of unethical human experimentation, but the letter was so offensive that the prize should be renamed. AACR concurred and stripped the honor from Rhoads because of his racism.[6]

Early life and education

Rhoads was born June 20, 1898, in Springfield, Massachusetts, as the son of an ophthalmologist, Dr. George H. Rhoads, and his wife.[9] He received his early education in Springfield, later attending Bowdoin College in Maine, where he graduated in 1920. He entered Harvard Medical School, where he became class president, and in 1924, he received his M.D., cum laude.[9] Rhoads became an intern at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, and contracted pulmonary tuberculosis. During his treatment and recovery, he developed a lifelong interest in disease research.

Early career

After recovering from TB, Rhoads published a paper on the tuberculin reaction with Fred W. Stewart, who became his longtime colleague. Rhoads taught as a pathologist at Harvard and conducted research on disease processes.[10]

In 1929 Rhoads joined the staff of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, now Rockefeller University, where he worked for Simon Flexner. He was also staff pathologist at Rockefeller Hospital.[11] His early research interests included hematology and poliomyelitis. He worked at Rockefeller until 1939.[12][13]

Puerto Rico

While working for the Rockefeller Institute, in 1931 Rhoads was invited by hematologist William B. Castle to join his Rockefeller Anemia Commission, to conduct clinical research at Presbyterian Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico.[11] This was part of the Rockefeller Foundation's sanitary commission on the island through the International Health Division.[14] Castle's research interest was pernicious iron deficiency anemia, specifically as caused by the parasitic hookworm, which was endemic on the island at rates of 80%, and tropical sprue.[3][6][11] An effective treatment for the latter had just been developed, although the disease's causes remained obscure.[11] As recently as 2010, medical journal Nieto Editores reported that these conditions continued to cause high mortality in Puerto Ricans.[15] The cause of tropical sprue has still not been identified, but since the 1940s, it can be treated with folic acid and a 3 to 6-month course of antibiotics.[16]

Rhoads was to assist Castle, and they established a base in San Juan at the Presbyterian Hospital. Rhoads corresponded often with Simon Flexner at the Rockefeller Institute in New York regarding his research and career interests. In Puerto Rico, the Rockefeller group had more than 200 patients; historian and ethicist Susan E. Lederer notes that, while referred to as patients, they were primarily clinical subjects whose conditions were studied to advance medical research. Because of the effects of anemia and the suspicion that tropical sprue was related to diet, Rhoads experimentally controlled patients' diets.[11] [b][size=110]Lederer notes that in letters from this time, Rhoads referred to his patients as "experimental 'animals'." [11] He wrote: "If they don’t develop something they certainly have the constitutions of oxen."
Rhoads sought to experimentally induce the conditions he was studying in his patients rather than simply treat them.
If they did develop tropical sprue, he could treat it with liver extract.[11]

Castle wanted to perform a similar study in Cidra, in conjunction with the School of Tropical Medicine, which was doing related research, but this was not approved. Rhoads also collected polio serum samples for his boss Flexner at the Rockefeller Institute, for which he was assisted by contacts at the university.[/size][/b]

Scandal

On 10 November 1931, Rhoads was at a party at a Puerto Rican co-worker's house in Cidra. After having some drinks, he left, and found that his car had been vandalized and several items stolen. He went to his office, where he wrote and signed a letter addressed to "Ferdie" (Fred W. Stewart, a colleague from Boston, by then working at the Memorial Hospital for Cancer Research in New York).[11]

He wrote the following:

Dear Ferdie:

The more I think about the Larry Smith appointment the more disgusted I get. Have you heard any reason advanced for it? It certainly is odd that a man out with the entire Boston group, fired by Wallach, and as far as I know, absolutely devoid of any scientific reputation should be given the place. There is something wrong somewhere with our point of view.

The situation is settled in Boston. Parker and Nye are to run the laboratory together and either Kenneth or MacMahon to be assistant; the chief to stay on. As far as I can see, the chances of my getting a job in the next ten years are absolutely nil. One is certainly not encouraged to make scientific advances, when it is a handicap rather than an aid to advancement. I can get a damn fine job here and am tempted to take it. It would be ideal except for the Porto Ricans. They are beyond doubt the dirtiest, laziest, most degenerate and thievish race of men ever inhabiting this sphere. It makes you sick to inhabit the same island with them. They are even lower than Italians. What the island needs is not public health work but a tidal wave or something to totally exterminate the population. It might then be livable. I have done my best to further the process of extermination by killing off 8 and transplanting cancer into several more. The latter has not resulted in any fatalities so far... The matter of consideration for the patients' welfare plays no role here — in fact all physicians take delight in the abuse and torture of the unfortunate subjects.


Do let me know if you hear any more news.

Sincerely, "Dusty"[17]


His unmailed letter was found by one of his staff and circulated among workers at the Anemia Commission. When Rhoads learned of this, he quickly made a public apology at a meeting of all staff and doctors.[11] A while later, he was dismayed to hear that the letter was going to be discussed at a meeting of the Puerto Rico Medical Association. With relations having deteriorated locally, he returned to New York in December 1931.[11]

Publicity and investigations

Image
Pedro Albizu Campos

At the end of December, Rhoads' former lab technician Luis Baldoni resigned; he later testified that he feared for his safety. In January 1932 he gave the Rhoads letter to Pedro Albizu Campos, president of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party.[11] Albizu Campos sought publicity about the incident, sending copies of the letter to the League of Nations, the Pan American Union, the American Civil Liberties Union, newspapers, embassies, and the Vatican.[2]

In addition to distributing the letter to the media, Albizu wrote his own, charging that Rhoads was part of a US plot to exterminate Puerto Ricans. He linked the letter to other complaints about American imperialism, saying that the US governors in Puerto Rico encouraged labor emigration rather than improving employment, and promoted birth control, which was offensive to the majority Catholic residents.[17] Later that year Governor Beverley struggled with a greater political crisis than the Rhoads letter over his own remarks encouraging birth control use on the island. Residents were outraged and he was removed from office.[17]

A photograph of the Rhoads' letter was published on January 27, 1932 in La Democracia, the Unionist newspaper of Antonio Rafael Barceló, with a translation in Spanish of the entire letter. It did not support Albizu Campos' theory of a US conspiracy against Puerto Rico. On February 13, El Mundo published the entire letter, in both Spanish and English.[17]

The Rhoads' letter created one of the first crises for James R. Beverley, newly appointed as the acting Governor of Puerto Rico. He said the letter was a "confession of murder" and "a libel against the people of Puerto Rico", and ordered an investigation, one of his first acts.[17] Beverley said of Rhoads that "he was just a damned fool, ... a good doctor, but not very strong mentally on anything else."[17] Rhoads, already back in New York, released an official response to the media and the governor. He insisted that he was joking in his letter, which was intended to be confidential, calling it a "fantastic and playful composition written entirely for my own diversion and intended as a parody on supposed attitudes of some American minds in Porto Rico," explaining that nothing "was ever intended to mean other than the opposite of what was stated."[2] Rhoads offered to return to clear things up, but never did. The governor's inquiry concluded that Rhoads did not commit the acts included in his letter, nor any other crimes.[2]

Rhoads and his work were investigated by the Puerto Rican Attorney General Ramon Quinones, with review of medical aspects by Dr. P. Morales Otero, representative of the Puerto Rico Medical Association, and Dr. E. Garrido Morales, representing the Commissioner of Health. Sworn testimony was taken from several of Rhoads' patients as well as his colleagues, including Castle, William Galbreath, and George C. Payne. They reviewed the case files for the 257 patients treated by Rhoads and the Rockefeller Commission, including the 13 patients who died during this period. They found no evidence of the crimes described in Rhoads' unmailed letter. The Attorney General and medical community joined in absolving Rhoads of the Nationalist charges that he was part of a U.S. plot to exterminate Puerto Ricans.[5] Rhoads was subject to separate investigations ordered by the acting American governor of Puerto Rico, Beverley, and the Rockefeller Institute, and "neither...was able to uncover any evidence that Dr. Rhoads had exterminated any Puerto Ricans."[8]

Confirmed in Lederer's 21st century account, "records at Presbyterian Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where Rhoads had performed his research, revealed no patients in the young pathologist's care had died under suspicious circumstances."[4][11] Additionally, the investigators were "unable to confirm Rhoads's other claim (omitted in Time's account) that he had 'transplanted cancer into several patients.'"[4][18]

During the investigations, Ivy Lee, who handled public relations for the Rockefeller family, and a team at the Institute began a campaign to defend Rhoads' reputation. He was seen as a promising researcher. The Rockefeller Foundation also wanted to protect its working relationship with medical organizations in Puerto Rico[11] and avoid problems with critics of human experimentation in the U.S. During the early 1930s, there was a revival of the anti-vivisectionist movement in the U.S., which also was concerned about the use of vulnerable populations as human subjects of experimentation: children (especially orphans), prisoners, and soldiers. As Lederer observed, "some members of the medical community...monitored the popular and medical press."[19] Francis Peyton Rous of the Rockefeller Institute was editor of the Journal of Experimental Medicine through the 1930s and 1940s. Although it accepted few articles on clinical research, he was careful about their wording in an effort to avoid criticism by the anti-vivisectionists.[20]

Lee was given access to pre-published versions of the articles on the controversy by both The New York Times and Time. He persuaded Time to eliminate the words "and transplanting cancer into several more," from its published version of the letter.[3] Also, based on the positive testimony of some patients, The New York Times headlined its article as "Patients Say Rhoads Saved Their Lives" and reported on this aspect as well.[21] Rhoads had returned to New York before the scandal broke in Puerto Rico. After the Attorney General's report[5] and that of the Rockefeller Institute in 1932, the controversy quickly faded in the United States.[11][22]

Reaction to the Rhoads scandal and controversy was mixed in the United States, in part due to the Rockefeller campaign. Starr says (in his 2003 article on the scandal) that Rhoads' colleagues did not believe the researcher's attempt to cast his letter as a "fantastic and playful composition...intended as a parody."[2] Some were worried about Rhoads' mental health at the time. A superior dismissed the incident as a case of local ingratitude. Time magazine headlined the incident as "Porto Ricochet"; Starr suggests they meant that Rhoads's humanitarian work in Puerto Rico had come back to bite him.[2]

In Puerto Rico, Albizu Campos used the Rhoads scandal as part of his anti-colonial campaign, attracting followers to the Nationalist Party. In 1950, longtime Puerto Rican pro-independence activists Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola tried to assassinate President Truman to bring their cause to the world stage. When later interviewed, Collazo said that as a young man, in 1932 he heard Albizu Campos speak about the Rhoads letter and decided to devote his life to the Nationalist movement.[8][11][22]

Hematology

Following his study in Puerto Rico, in 1933 Rhoads was chosen to lead a special service at the Rockefeller Institute in clinical hematology, to study diseases of the blood-forming organs. He built on his research on anemia and tropical sprue.[23] In 1934 Rhoads and another researcher published results of the success in using liver extract therapy to treat tropical sprue (and relieve anemia).[24] Their work was recognized as contributing benefit in treatment of the disease by others in the field.[25]

Memorial Hospital and World War II

In 1940, Rhoads was selected as director of Memorial Hospital, which was devoted to cancer care and research, and had recently moved into a new building. Rhoads was selected for his interest in clinical investigation in addition to laboratory research, as the hospital did research as well as treatment.[26] He succeeded James Ewing, a noted oncologist. Ewing had written about cancer transplantation in 1931, a subject which Rhoads had referred to in his scandalous letter written in November of that year.[11] In 1941 Rhoads was studying the use of radiation to treat leukemia.[27]

During World War II, Rhoads was commissioned as a colonel and assigned as chief of medicine in the Chemical Weapons Division of the U.S. Army.[26] He established the U.S. Army chemical weapons laboratories in Utah, Maryland, and Panama. With his enthusiastic participation, secret experiments including race-based tests involving African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Puerto Ricans were performed on more than 60,000 U.S. soldiers. Many were left suffering from debilitating, lifelong aftereffects.[28] For this work, he won the Legion of Merit for "combating poison gas and other advances in chemical warfare" in 1945.[7][28]

Due to his casualty studies on mustard gas from an accident during the war in Italy, Rhoads became interested in its potential for cancer treatment. For the rest of his life, his research interest was in developing chemotherapy for cancer treatment,[26] but he served primarily as an administrator and scientific director at Memorial and Sloan-Kettering. From studies of mustard gas, he developed a drug called mechlorethamine or Mustargen. Its success in clinical trials during the war years was the basis for the development of the field of anti-cancer chemotherapy.[29] Rhoads also became interested in total body irradiation, which led to early work on chemotherapy.[30]

Post-war

In 1945 Sloan-Kettering Institute was founded as a cancer research center, in the hopes that an industrial approach to research would yield a cure.[26] It opened in 1948. While still director of Memorial, from 1945 until 1953 Rhoads also served as the first director of the Sloan-Kettering Institute.[8][26] He was "praised by Memorial for his 'essential role in the evolution of the hospital into a modern medical center.'"[8][26] As director of Sloan-Kettering, he had oversight as well over research related to Department of Defense radiation experiments through 1954. For instance, that year, a Sloan-Kettering team began a multi-year study of "Post-Irradiation Syndrome in Humans."[31]

In 1953, Rhoads stepped back slightly, becoming scientific director of the newly merged Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center.[26] He also continued as the scientific director of Sloan-Kettering operations.[32] He also was an adviser to the United States Atomic Energy Commission regarding nuclear medicine. Some AEC funding supported Sloan-Kettering research into the use of iodine to transport radiation to cancer tumors.[33]

Rhoads continued to serve as scientific director of the Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center until his death.[32] He died of a coronary occlusion on August 13, 1959, in Stonington, Connecticut.[10] In 1979, on the 20th anniversary of his death, the American Association for Cancer Research established the Cornelius P. Rhoads Memorial Prize in his honor, as an annual award to a promising young researcher.[7]

Honors

• Legion of Merit in 1945 for Rhoads' work for the US Army during WWII.[7]
• Trustee of the Charles Kettering Foundation.[26]
• Awarded three honorary doctorates, two for science and one for law.[26]
• Posthumously awarded the Katherine Berkin Judd Award for outstanding contributions to oncology research.[10]
• The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) established the Cornelius P. Rhoads Memorial Award posthumously in his honor in 1979.[7](In 2002, it renamed the award due to Rhoads' racism expressed in his 1932 letter.)[8]

Revival of controversy

In 1982, Puerto Rican social scientist and writer Pedro Aponte-Vázquez discovered new information at various archives which raised questions about the investigations conducted on Rhoads and Rockefeller Project. Most prominent among his findings was a 1932 letter written by Governor Beverly to the associate director of the Rockefeller Foundation, stating that Rhoads had written a second letter "even worse than the first" and which, according to Beverley, the [Puerto Rican] government had suppressed and destroyed.[22] In 1932 the Puerto Rican Attorney General, aided by top-ranking Puerto Rican doctors, had investigated all of the work of Rhoads and the Rockefeller Project, including 13 deaths that occurred among nearly 300 patients treated. They found no evidence of wrongdoing or crimes.[5] In addition, Rhoads' superior at the Rockefeller Project had conducted a close investigation of the 13 patients who died under Rhoads' tenure, but found no evidence of wrongdoing. But in 1982 Aponte-Vázquez urged the Puerto Rico Department of Justice to reopen the case. It refused as Rhoads had been dead for so long.[22]

In 2002, Edwin Vazquez, a biology professor at the University of Puerto Rico, came across Rhoads' 1932 letter and contacted the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) about it. Given the letter's offensive nature, he demanded that Rhoads' name be removed from the AACR award. Others also contacted the AACR, including Puerto Rico's Secretary of State Ferdinand Mercado.[34] Revival of the issue generated a fresh wave of publicity. The AACR, which said it had not known of the 1932 controversy,[8] commissioned an investigation led by Jay Katz, a bioethicist from Yale University. Katz said although "there was no evidence of Dr. Rhoads' killing patients or transplanting cancer cells, the letter itself was reprehensible enough to remove his name from the award." The AACR agreed with his conclusion.[8]

Eric Rosenthal of Oncology Times in 2003 characterized the case as the AACR having to "deal with the embarrassment of having history catch up to modern-day sensibilities."[8] He wrote,

The complicated legacy of Cornelius "Dusty" Rhoads, who died in 1959, should not cause society to promote nor deny his existence but should provide a perspective that neither condones what he wrote or thought—or the whitewashing of the incident by institutions and media of the 1930s—but that does give him due appropriate credit for his accomplishments as well as acknowledgement of his faults and sins."[8]


In 2003 the AACR renamed the award, stripping the honor from Rhoads posthumously. The AACR indicated that the new name would be retroactive and past awardees would receive updated plaques.[8][35]

Representation in other media

Aponte-Vázquez self-published a book in 2005 entitled The Unsolved Case of Dr. Cornelius P. Rhoads: An Indictment; he writes on this topic via his blog and personal website.
• During the 1980s, the Puerto Rican political satire comedy group, Los Rayos Gamma, performed parodies of Rhoads with Jacobo Morales portraying a Cornelio Rodas as an insane, Frankenstein-like scientist bent on the elimination of Puerto Ricans.[36]
• Roberto Busó-García wrote and directed the dramatic film, The Condemned (2013), which he said was loosely based on the Rhoads' controversy in Puerto Rico.[37]

References

1. "Medicine: Frontal Attack", Time. 27 June 1949, accessed 21 October 2013
2. Starr, Douglas (2003). "Revisiting a 1930s Scandal: AACR to Rename a Prize". Science. 300 (5619): 574–5. doi:10.1126/science.300.5619.573. PMID 12714721.
3. The Rhoads Not Given: The Tainting of the Cornelius P. Rhoads Memorial Award. Rosenthal, Eric T. Oncology Times. 10 September 2003. Volume 25. Issue 17. pp. 19-20. Retrieved 8 January 2013.
4. Lederer, Susan E. (2002). "'Porto Ricochet': Joking about Germs, Cancer, and Race Extermination in the 1930s". American Literary History. 14 (4): 720–746. doi:10.1093/alh/14.4.720.
5. "DR. RHOADS CLEARED OF PORTO RICO PLOT", New York Times, 15 February 1932
6. Starr, Douglas (2003). "Revisiting a 1930s Scandal: AACR to Rename a Prize". Science. 300 (5619): 573–4. doi:10.1126/science.300.5619.573. PMID 12714721.
7. Packard, Gabriel (29 April 2003). "RIGHTS: Group Strips Racist Scientist's Name from Award". Inter Press Service. Retrieved 7 September 2013.
8. Rosenthal, Eric T. "The Rhoads Not Given: The Tainting of the Cornelius P. Rhoads Memorial Award", Oncology Times, 10 September 2003. Volume 25. Issue 17. pp. 19-20. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
9. Stephen Hunter & John Bainbridge; American Gunfight: The Plot to Kill Harry Truman, pp. 194-195; Simon & Schuster pub., 2005; ISBN 978-0-7432-6068-8
10. "Cornelius Packard Rhoads 1898–1959". CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. 28 (5): 304–305. 2008-12-31. doi:10.3322/canjclin.28.5.304. PMID 100190.
11. Susan E. Lederer, "Porto Ricochet": Joking about Germs, Cancer, and Race Extermination in the 1930s", American Literary History, Volume 14, Number 4, Winter 2002, pp. 720–746
12. THE EFFECT OF CATAPHORESIS ON POLIOMYELITIS VIRUS, P. K. Olitsky, C. P. Rhoads, and P. H. Long, September 1, 1929 // JEM vol. 50 no. 3 273-277 The Rockefeller University Press
13. Stewart, FW; Rhoads, CP (1929). "Intradermal Versus Subcutaneous Immunization of Monkeys Against Poliomyelitis". J Exp Med. 49 (6): 959–73. doi:10.1084/jem.49.6.959. PMC 2131593. PMID 19869595.
14. "William B. Castle", National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs
15. Norman Maldonado. "The Changing Clinical Picture of Tropical Sprue" (Revista de Hematologia) Archived2011-07-22 at the Wayback Machine, Hematología 2010;11(2): 95-98 April — June 2010. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
16. Cook GC (March 1997). "Tropical sprue: some early investigators favoured an infective cause, but was a coccidian protozoan involved?". Gut. 40 (3): 428–9. doi:10.1136/gut.40.3.428. PMC 1027098. PMID 9135537.
17. Truman R. Clark. 1975. Puerto Rico and the United States, 1917-1933, University of Pittsburgh Press, pp. 151-154
18. Susan E. Lederer. " 'Porto Ricochet': Joking about Germs, Cancer, and Race Extermination in the 1930s," American Literary History. Volume 14. Number 4. Winter 2002. p. 720.
19. Susan E. Lederer, Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America Before the Second World War, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997 paperback, pp. 103-104, 109
20. Lederer (1997), Subjected to Science, p.109
21. "Patients Say Rhoads Saved Their Lives." New York Times 2 Feb. 1932:19.
22. Starr, Douglas (2003). "Revisiting a 1930s Scandal: AACR to Rename a Prize". Science. 300 (5619): 574. doi:10.1126/science.300.5619.573. PMID 12714721.
23. George Washington Corner, A History of the Rockefeller Institute, 1901-1953, Rockefeller Institute Press, 1965, p. 271
24. Rhoads, C.P.; Miller, D.K. (1934). "Intensive liver extract therapy of sprue". Journal of the American Medical Association. 103 (6): 387–391. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750320005003.
25. Philip, CORR (1936). "Intensive Liver Therapy in Sprue". Ann. Int. Med. 9 (9).
26. "Cornelius P. Rhoads", ECommons, Cornell University Library
27. "Postirradiation Changes in the Levels of Organic Phosphorus in the Blood of Patients with Leukemia", Cancer Research
28. Immerwahr, Daniel (2019). "9: Doctors Without Borders". How to Hide an Empire. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. pp. 150–151. ISBN 9780374172145.
29. Gilman A. (1963). "The initial clinical trial of nitrogen mustard". Am J Surg. 105 (5): 574–578. doi:10.1016/0002-9610(63)90232-0. PMID 13947966.
30. Goozner, Merrill. 2004. The $800 Million Pill: The Truth Behind the Cost of New Drugs. p.172
31. Appendix 1: Contract DA-49-007, in "Report on Search for Records of Human Radiation Experiments", US Department of Defense, p. 125
32. "SERVICE FOR DR. RHOADS; Memorial for Sloan-Kettering Director Here Tomorrow", The New York Times
33. "New Hope is Held Out for Cancer Cure", Daytona Beach Morning Journal, 16 June 1948, Retrieved 17 December 2012
34. Starr, Douglas (2003). "Revisiting a 1930s Scandal: AACR to Rename a Prize". Science. 300 (5619): 573–574. doi:10.1126/science.300.5619.573. PMID 12714721.
35. "Cancer Body to Probe Claims that Scientist Killed Subjects", IPS News
36. Collado-Schwartz, Ángel, editor; "El humor como expresión cultural", La Voz del Centro II, Fundación La Voz del Centro, 2006
37. Manohla Dargis, "Disgraced Life Conjures Mysterious Forces", New York Times, February 2013, accessed 21 October 2013

Further reading

• Susan E. Lederer. Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War, Henry E. Sigerist Series in the History of Medicine. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995, reprinted 1997 (paperback).

External links

• C.P. Rhoads, W.B. Castle, "The Pathology of the Bone Marrow in Sprue Anemia", The American Journal of Pathology, 1933;9(Suppl):813-826.5
• C.P. Rhoads, D.K. Miller, "Intensive liver extract therapy of sprue", Journal of the American Medical Association, 1934, 103(6):387-391
• Philip, CORR, "Intensive Liver Therapy in Sprue", Ann. Int. Med., 1 March 1936, Vol 9, No. 9, American College of Physicians
• DOE Openness: Human Radiation Experiments, Department of Energy
• "AACR Award name change", Oncology Times, 2 July 2003
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Bengal British India Society
by BR Khan
Banglapedia
Accessed: 2/17/20

Bengal British India Society founded in Calcutta in 1843, was the second politically inclined public association to be formed in British India, the first being the zamindari association (1837). It was, like its predecessor, avowedly a loyalist body based on limited Indo-British collaboration. But unlike the introvert Zamindari Association, representing solely the interests of the landed aristocracy, the Bengal British India Society was an organisation dominated by a section of the Bengal intellectuals, particularly by the young bengal group that boasted of their western education and awareness.

Its protagonist was a Briton, George Thompson, who, with his love for the Whiggish ideal of progress and interest in Indian affairs, had already established in London a platform by the name of the British India Society (1839) with himself as its head. During his sojourn in India in the spring of 1843 he gathered a group of Bengalis in Calcutta to form a rival body to the Zamindari Association
, presumably as an extension of his own organisation, the British India Society. But ultimately it made its appearance with the appellation of the Bengal British India Society, probably as an autonomous body. It, however, maintained close liaison with the British India Society and with the government in India. Its stated aims and objectives were, to foster good citizenry qualities among the Indian populace, create public awareness about the state of governance and about their 'just rights', and strive for their realisation through peaceful and lawful means consistent with 'loyalty to the person and the government of the reigning sovereign' in England.

Its membership was open to all adults not 'under instruction in any public institution', paying subscription or donating to the society fund and 'conscientiously subscribing' to its aims and objects. But the members of the landed aristocracy studiously kept themselves aloof from it because of its open anti-landlord stance. Its Secretary had launched a trenchant attack on the permanent settlement and the zamindars and indigo planters from its platform and in the press.

Its first 15-member executive committee consisted of four Europeans and eleven Indians with George Thompson as President, GF Remfry and Ramgopal Ghosh as Vice-Presidents, Peary Chand Mitra as Secretary. The Bengali members on the committee were Tarachand Chakravarty, Dakshina Ranjan Mukhopadhyaya, Brojnath Dhar, Krishnamohan Banerjee, Hari Mohan, Govind Chandra Sen, Chandra Sekhar Deb, Shyama Charan Sen and Satkari Datta - all belonging to the Young Bengal group.

Lobbying the bureaucracy and petitioning the government comprised the principal modes of its activity. The Bengal British India Society sent petitions urging upon government for increasing employment of Indians in public offices and for judicial reforms. It is said that the appointment of Indians as Deputy Magistrates and reforms in the Registration Department were the results of these endeavours. But neither the Bengal British India Society nor the Zamindari Association could achieve much, although in the growth of political parties in India they played pioneering roles.
Both languished by 1850.


In 1855 [Keshub Chandra Sen] established "The British India Society" where Rev. James Long and Rev. [Charles] Dall -- the Unitarian missionary took part.




In 1861, at the height of the Indigo revolt by the ryots in Bengal, Long received a copy of the Bengali play Nil Darpan (also transcribed as Neel Darpan or Nil Durpan) from its author Dinabandhu Mitra, who had been one of Long's students at the CMS school on Amherst Street. The play, published anonymously the previous year in Dacca, was sympathetic to the abject condition of the ryots or labourers on indigo plantations and critical of the British land-holding class who kept the ryots in slave-like conditions.[7] Long brought it to the notice of Walter Scott Seton-Karr, Secretary to the Governor of Bengal and ex-President of the Indigo Commission. Seton-Karr, sensing its importance, mentioned Nil Durpan in conversation with the Lieutenant Governor, John Peter Grant. Grant then expressed a wish to see a translation of it and print a few copies to be circulated privately amongst friends. Long had it anonymously translated into English "By A Native" (Long refused to divulge the name of the translator to the trial court; Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay later attributed the translation to Michael Madhusudan Dutt, although this attribution remains contentious[8]) and printed in either April or May 1861.[9] In his introduction to the play, he wrote that "[i]t is the earnest wish of the writer of these lines that harmony may be speedily established between the Planter and the Ryot..."[10] Long sent the translated manuscript to Clement Henry Manuel, the proprietor of the Calcutta Printing and Publishing Press, to print five hundred copies at the cost of some three hundred rupees. Unknown to the Lieutenant Governor, Long began sending out copies in official Government envelopes to prominent Europeans both in India and abroad that had the heading: "on her Majesty’s Service."[11]

The circulation of the play "generated hostility from indigo planters, who brought a lawsuit against Long on the charges that the preface of the play slandered the editors of the two pro-plantation newspapers, the Englishman and the Bengal Hurkaru, and that the text of the drama brought the planters a bad name."[12] As soon as the planters noticed the circulation of the play, W. F. Fergusson, the Secretary of the Landholders' and Commercial Association, wrote to the Governor of Bengal. He inquired as to which parties had sanctioned the play and whether the authority of the Bengal Government had given permission to publish it. He also threatened those who had circulated "foul and malicious libel on indigo planting, evoking sedition and breaches of the peace".[13] He wrote that they must be prosecuted "with an utmost rigour of the law".[14] The Lieutenant Governor replied that some officials had caused the offence; the planters, unsatisfied with the answer, decided to institute legal proceedings with a view to ascertain the authors and publishers of the Nil Durpan. The words mentioned in Long’s Introduction to the play stated that what was presented in it was "plain but true"; this was subsequently used by the planters in their prosecution of Long for publishing defamatory statements. C. H. Manuel, whose name was mentioned as printer of Nil Durpan, was indicted in the Calcutta Supreme Court on 11 June 1861. He pleaded guilty, and his counsel (acting on Long’s advice) named Long as his employer in the matter of publishing.

Long's trial lasted from 19 to 24 July 1861, at the Calcutta Supreme Court. Mr. Peterson and Mr. Cowie prosecuted, Mr. Eglinton and Mr. Newmarch appeared on behalf of the defendant, and Sir M.L. Wells presided as judge. Wells found Long guilty of libel,[15] fined him one thousand rupees and sentenced him to one month’s imprisonment, which he served in the period of July–August 1861.[16] Kaliprasanna Singha paid the fine of Long's behalf.

-- James Long (Anglican priest), by Wikipedia
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The Zamindari Association [Landholders' Society]
by BR Khan
Banglapedia
Accessed: 2/17/20

The Zamindari Association, reckoned to be the first political association of modern India. Formally launched in Calcutta in March 1838, it was renamed the Landholders' Society shortly afterwards.Landed magnates like Raja Radhakant Dev, Dwarkanath Tagore, Prasanna Kumar Tagore, Rajkamal Sen and Bhabani Charan Mitra were its leading members. The promotion of landholders' interests through petitions to government and discreet persuasion of the bureaucracy was its professed object. Among its aims were securing a halt to the resumption of rent-free tenures and an extension of the permanent settlement of land all over India, including the grant of lease of waste land to their occupants. The demand for reform of the judiciary, the police and the revenue departments was also on its agenda.

To attain its aims and objectives, the Society maintained close contact with the bureaucracy in Calcutta, established links with the British India Society of London and appointed its President, George Thompson, the Landholders' Society's agent in London.

With its distinctive mark of loyalism, the Landholders' Society was an exclusive aristocratic club of native zamindars and compradors. Membership of the club was also extended to non-official Britons engaged in trade and commerce in Bengal.
It was beyond the means of ordinary raiyats to become its members. The Landholders' Society failed to take root in areas outside the Bengal Presidency, where the Permanent Settlement was not in vogue. With its limited field and range of activity, its only achievement was the concession it had extracted from government in the form of exemption of Brahmottara (land donated for the services of Brahmins and temples), to the extent of ten bighas, from rent. The Landholders' Society may be said to have inaugurated the new course of modern institutional politics in India.

The Landholders' Society did not endure long. It became inactive around 1842, becoming almost moribund by 1843, although maintaining a precarious existence till 1850. It was superseded by the Bengal British India Society.
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Part 1 of 4

The Grand Lodge of AF & AM of India
by The Grand Lodge of AF & AM of India
Accessed 2/17/20

Image

Grand Lodge of India
Welcome to Freemasonry
A Brochure for the newly Initiated Candidate
STRICTLY FOR FREEMASONS

Presented to:
Bro.
On the Occasion of his Initiation into Freemasonry in
Lodge
On
Junior Warden; Senior Warden; Worshipful Master

Welcome to Freemasonry

On behalf of Most Worshipful the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of India, we welcome you to the Masonic Fraternity and congratulate you on joining our ancient and honourable institution. Ancient undoubtedly it is, having existed from times immemorial and as you were told during the ceremony of your initiation, honourable it must be acknowledged to be, since it makes all those so, who follow its precepts. We are all the more encouraged to welcome you in our midst because, you freely and voluntarily offered yourself as a candidate for the privileges of Freemasonry and also asserted that you did so, unbiased by improper solicitations from friends against your own inclinations and uninfluenced by mercenary, or other unworthy motives. You also assured us that you were prompted to seek those privileges, by a favourable opinion of the Institution, a desire for knowledge and a sincere wish to be more extensively serviceable to your fellowmen.

About Freemasonry

You must have gathered some information about Freemasonry, from your Proposer and Seconder. You will also no doubt learn more about Freemasonry, as you get more exposure to it. In the meanwhile, this brochure is intended to acquaint you with what Freemasonry is and what Freemasons stand for.

By way of introduction the following general observations about Freemasonry will enable you to further discover Freemasonry. This information is also available in the form of a handy folded card entitled “Discover Freemasonry” which you can collect from the Secretary of your Lodge, for being passed on to any non – Freemason, who enquires from you, details about Freemasonry.

Freemasonry is

• One of world’s largest and oldest secular fraternal organization
A world–wide organization based on the principle of the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man
• Committed to its universal motto of “Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth”
• A unique society of men concerned with moral and spiritual values
• Involved in making good men better and thereby making the world a better place to live
• Engaged in teaching its precepts through a series of rituals and symbolism, by using stone masons’ tools and customs as allegorical guides

Freemasonry is

Not a religion; it however, teaches respect and tolerance for all religions and a belief in a Supreme Being, without reference to any religion
• Not a political party or organization
Not a secret society; however, the mode of recognition amongst Freemasons, are kept secret like the Passwords etc in wide use among internet and credit card users, to prevent frauds and misuse
• Not a social club; its membership consists of a cross section of society, who meet on an equal footing; it also involves family members on social occasions

Freemasonry encourages

• Charity as the predominant Characteristic of every Freemason’s heart
• The moral virtues of Temperance, Fortitude, Prudence and Justice
• Extending fellowship and providing relief to those in distress

Brief History

Freemasonry traces its origin from King Solomon’s times, but its real origin is lost in antiquity
• Freemasonry in its present form originated in England, in 1717; it came to India, at Calcutta in 1729

• Freemasonry exists in over 190 countries in the World
• There are over 5 million Freemasons in the world; in India we have about 20,000 Freemasons
• There are as on date, 380 Lodges in 143 locations all over India, which are the basic units for membership
Prominent Indian Freemasons include Swami Vivekananda, Moti Lal Nehru C. Rajagopalachary, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, Fakhrudhin Ali Ahmed, Actor Ashok Kumar, Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi etc., as also a wide variety of a cross section of society and professionals, such as Doctors, Engineers, Industrialists, Professors, Teachers Advocates, Chartered Accountants, Business Executives, Judges, Officers of various ranks belonging to Armed Forces, Civil Service Officers etc.

How to Join Freemasonry?

• Freemasonry does not solicit or canvass for membership
Those above 21 years of age and who believe in God, as a Supreme Being can join
• One has to be proposed and seconded by a Freemason to join a Lodge which is the basic unit for admission of membership
• Every candidate to Freemasonry is invited to interact with a screening committee of the Lodge which he proposes to join before he is balloted for initiation

For further details about Freemasonry you can visit our website: http://www.masonindia.org or send E –mail to glindia@nde.vsnl.net.in

Organisational Set-up

Before we take you on a retrospect of the ceremony of your initiation, it is desirable that you must know about our organizational set up. Freemasonry all over the world is governed in each country, by a body called the Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons -- Grand Lodge for short. The head of that body is called the Grand Master who is respectfully called and addressed as Most Worshipful (M.W.) the Grand Master.

As you were informed earlier, Freemasonry in its present form had its origin in England in 1717 and that it came to India in 1729. You have also been told that the Lodge is the basic unit of Freemasonry. The first such Lodge came into being in India at Calcutta. In due course several such Lodges were set up in different parts of the country. These Lodges functioned under the Grand Lodges of England, Scotland and Ireland. When we became independent in 1947 and later became a republic in 1956, need was felt for forming our own Grand Lodge. Eventually after finalizing and working out the various details, it was decided in 1961 to establish a Grand Lodge of India. By then, as many as 270 Lodges had been set up in the country. An option was given to these Lodges, to either continue to remain under the respective Grand Lodges of England, Scotland or Ireland, or to come over to the Grand Lodge of India. On a majority of 145 Lodges opting to come over to the Grand Lodge of India, the representatives of the three parent Grand Lodges of England, Scotland newly Initiated and Ireland, got together and formally consecrated the Grand Lodge of India, as a Candidate Sovereign Grand Lodge, over the territory of India, on 25th November 1961, at the Convention Hall of Ashoka Hotel, Delhi, in a colourful and glittering ceremony. M.W. Bro. Sir Syed Raza Ali Khan, the Nawab of Rampur, was installed as the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of India. A Book of Constitutions of the Grand Lodge of India was also adopted. The 145 Lodges which opted to join the Grand Lodge of India are called Foundation Lodges and as a token of their contribution to the formation of the Grand Lodge of India, each such Lodge was presented a Foundation Lodge Jewel by M.W. the First Grand Master. This jewel is presented to the incoming Worshipful Master of each such Foundation Lodge on the occasion of his installation. In case you are a member of such a Lodge we would like you to pay particular attention to its presentation on the occasion of the next Installation Meeting of your Lodge.

In the last over 47 years since then, several Lodges were added to the original 145 Lodges, and as of date, the number of Lodges stands at 360, in 142 locations, in different parts of the country. The headquarters of the Grand Lodge of India is Delhi. M.W. the Grand Master who is the head of the organization for the country as a whole, is elected by an Electoral College and has a tenure of three years. For better administration of these Lodges, the country has been divided into four Regions viz. North, East, West and South, each headed by a Regional Grand Master, located respectively at Delhi, Kolkatta, Chennai and Mumbai. The Head Quarters Office is headed by a Grand Secretary appointed by the Grand Master, to assist him in administering the Lodges and the Regions. At the Regional level, while the four Regional Grand Masters head the respective Regions, they are assisted by a Regional Grand Secretary in each Region.

This brochure has the Logo or the emblem of the Grand Lodge of India on its cover. You will observe that the emblem is in the form of a shield, which has been divided into four quarters. Each quarter represents a Region. The Northern Region is represented by the Qutab Minar, the Eastern Region by the Bengal Tiger, the Western by the Gateway of India and the Southern by the Temple Gopuram. The shades of colours on the cover page viz. Blue, Light Blue & Green which merge with each other are also significant. They represent the colours of the three Parent Grand Lodges of England, Scotland & Ireland which took part in the founding the Grand Lodge of India. The Square & Compasses on the border of the cover page & elsewhere in this brochure are the universal symbol of Freemasonry throughout the world. While the two points of the Compasses represent the limits of Good & Evil as prescribed by God within which we as Freemasons are always expected to act, the Square shows the square conduct expected of us as Freemasons while dealing with each other in society.

You may recall that your attention was drawn during the course of the ceremony of Initiation, to a Warrant issued by the Grand Lodge of India, which is the authority under which your Lodge and other such Lodges function all over the country. You might have noticed that the Lodge, which you have joined, has a number attached to it. Whenever there is a request for opening a Lodge, the members, who wish to found it, make a petition to the Grand Lodge, with the recommendations of the Regional Grand Master concerned and if the Grand Master approves the same, a Warrant for Consecrating such a Lodge is issued by the Grand Lodge, indicating the Serial Number of the new Lodge, on the Rolls of the Grand Lodge of India. Thereafter, the Lodge is Consecrated in an impressive Ceremony by M.W. the Grand Master. If you get an opportunity you may also become a Founding Member of a Lodge and witness the solemn and impressive manner in which a Lodge is founded.

A Recap of your Initiation

Coming now to a recap of your initiation, we would like you to recall the manner in which you were prepared for being initiated. The clothes you wore, were symbolic of your indigent circumstances and your being deprived of all valuables, was to depict you as ‘poor and penniless’, the significance of which was duly explained to you in the Charge that was given to you in the North East part of the Lodge which is appropriately called the 'Charity Charge'. You may remember that you were told that you represented the foundation stone of a new building. On this foundation you were expected 'to raise a super structure perfect in all parts'. The charity lecture also challenged "Have you anything to give in the cause of charity?" You were deliberately prevented from accepting the challenge, as you were deprived of all valuables prior to your entering the Lodge. It demonstrated that charity comes from the heart and is a way of life. It may take the form of your time, your energy, your friendship or financial assistance as your circumstances in life may permit. As for your being hoodwinked, it was intended to impress on you the need for being restored to the blessings of material light, to enable you to discover the three great though emblematical lights in Freemasonry, viz. the Volumes of the Sacred Law and the Square and the Compasses, the significance of each of which was explained to you. The traditional significance of the Cable Tow round your neck and your admission on the point of a sharp instrument were also explained to you.

Another significant aspect we would like you to recall is when soon after you were admitted, you were asked to kneel and the blessings of heaven were invoked, in a prayer on your behalf. Though you may not recall the actual wordings of the prayer, we had prayed on your behalf to God, whom we call the Great Architect of the Universe, to grant that you may so dedicate and devote your life to God’s service, so as to become a true and faithful brother amongst us. You may also recall that you were significantly asked, in all cases of dangers and difficulties in whom you put your trust and you were guided to reply that you put such trust in God. You were then informed that we were indeed glad that your faith was so well founded and that relying on such sure support, you may safely rise and follow your leader, with a firm but humble confidence, because, where the name of God is invoked, you will not face any dangers. This is symbolic of a fresh beginning of your journey through life from that moment onwards, as a Freemason, based on such faith in God and assisted by our Masonic principles. You have been admitted to what is known as Craft Masonry and have undergone the first of the three stages of that Degree, called the First Degree, or the Entered Apprentice Degree. You will soon be passed to the Second Degree, called the Fellow-craft, after you have proved your proficiency in the first degree, by answering certain questions and then raised to the third Degree, called the Master Mason, after you have shown similar proficiency in the second degree. These questions and answers will be given to you at the respective stages and it is expected that you come fully prepared with the answers at the time of your passing and raising. You may for this purpose take the assistance of your proposer/seconder and/or the Secretary of your Lodge.

The Working Tools of the first Degree, viz. the Twenty four inch gauge, the common gavel and the chisel were explained to you, indicating, how as Free and accepted or speculative Masons, we apply these tools to our morals. The other two degrees also have similar working tools, whose application to our morals, will be explained to you in due course. Together, these working tools symbolically lay down for you as a Freemason and for all Freemasons throughout the world, the principles and tenets of our conduct through life. On your completing the third degree and becoming a Master Mason, your attention will be called to a retrospect of the degrees through which you have passed, the better to enable you to distinguish and appreciate the connection of our whole system and the relative dependency of its several parts.

The ceremony of your Initiation, you may recall, ended with the Charge after Initiation, which is considered as one of the most beautiful portions of our Masonic Ritual. It explained to you the important duties, which as a Freemason, you owe to God, to your neighbour and to yourself. It pointed out your responsibilities as a Citizen of the world, as also the duty you owe to your own country. As an individual, it recommended that Prudence (meaning careful attitude) should direct you; Temperance (meaning exercise of self control) should chasten (correct) you; Fortitude (meaning moral strength and enduring courage) should support you and that Justice (fairness) should be the guide of all your actions. You were also reminded of the other excellences of Character namely Secrecy, Fidelity and Obedience. As a last general recommendation the Charge exhorted you to dedicate yourself to such pursuits as to enable you to be respectable in life, useful to mankind and an ornament to the Society of which you have become a member. On another occasion you will be told that whenever you are to decide on any offence -- a situation which may arise quite often in our daily life -- you should neither minimize it or exaggerate it, but should judge such offence with candour (meaning without any bias or reservation), admonish (meaning warn or scold) with friendship and reprehend (meaning censure or punish) with mercy. You will also be told on yet another occasion that to improve the morals and correct the manners of men in society must be your constant care. For this you will be advised that you are always to recommend to inferiors, obedience and submission; to equals courtesy and affability (friendliness) and to superiors kindness and condescension (respect). Thus between the lessons of the Working tools of the three degrees and the various principles and tenets of behaviour which are forcibly brought to your notice, Freemasonry chalks out for you a Way of Life and hopefully fulfill its objective of making the good man that you are, a better person.

Such dear brother, has been the high light of the ceremony of your Initiation and the object of Freemasonry and we do also hope that it has enabled you to appreciate the value of Freemasonry and further that the importance of Truth, Honour and Virtue have been indelibly imprinted in your heart.

Book of Rituals

You may be given a copy of the first Degree Ritual. It is strongly recommended that you go through it, so that you may be able to appreciate the process of your initiation. In due course when you see other candidates being initiated you will appreciate your own initiation much better. After you have become a Master Mason you will be given the full Book of Rituals, indicating the process by which candidates are initiated, passed and raised in the three degrees of Freemasonry. By familiarizing yourself with the Ritual, you can volunteer to do portions of it during initiation, passing and raising of Candidates and thereby be better able to understand and appreciate it. This Book of Rituals will serve you as a guide throughout your Masonic Career, as you progress in Freemasonry through various offices.

Your duties & obligations as a Member of the Lodge

The Members of the Lodge which you have now joined are now your brethren as indeed are all Freemasons throughout the world, without reference to Caste, Creed, Religion, Language, or the Country to which they belong. You are particularly requested to remember the Charge given to you when you were invested with the distinguishing badge of a Freemason, which though simple in appearance, was said to be more ancient than any other honour. The importance of love and harmony in the Lodge which should at all times characterize Freemasonry, was also emphasized by asking you to settle differences if any with any members amicably, outside the Lodge, so that the harmony within the Lodge is not disturbed.

Your Lodge meets on certain fixed days of the month, as specified in its Bye Laws, a copy of which was also given to you. You will be receiving notice of such meetings, by what are known as 'Summons'. You are expected to attend such meetings without fail, unless due to unavoidable circumstances of your public or private avocations, you are unable to do so, in which case you should communicate your apologies, through any brother, about your inability to attend the meeting. You are to observe proper decorum during the meetings and come appropriately dressed as per prescribed dress code and attend the Lodge in appropriate regalia. You are not to discuss religion or politics in your Lodge at any time.
The Festive Board after the meeting is also so to say an extension of the meeting within the Lodge Temple and requires observance of proper etiquette and decorum, as also modest behaviour. If you are called upon to make a speech at the Festive Board, make it brief and interesting and to the point. In case of doubts and difficulties feel free to consult senior brethren of your Lodge. The meetings of the Lodge are conducted as per agenda as indicated in the summons. Policy aspects of the Lodge are discussed in a Permanent Committee of the Lodge, whose decisions as minuted, have to be approved in the Lodge, before they can be given effect to. At all regular meetings of a Lodge, a collection is made for Charity, where members make their contribution, according to their personal choice, the total of which is counted, announced and recorded in the minutes. It is also usual for Brethren to announce suitable amounts as their contribution to Charity on special occasions such as their own birth days, or the birth days of their near and dear ones. It is our tradition that all such contributions are thankfully received and faithfully applied.

Many Lodges involve the Ladies and family members in their outside the Lodge activities such as charity projects, etc. In many locations Ladies Association of the Members of the Lodge have also been formed to coordinate such activities. You may also find out details in this regard and involve your family in such activities.

Your progress in the Lodge

In due time, after you have become a Master Mason, you may, based on your seniority in the Lodge and regular attendance and the interest you take in the working of the Lodge, be appointed to various offices, in your Lodge, commencing from the Office of Inner Guard, which is the starting point in the ladder leading to the highest Office in the Lodge –- the Worshipful Master. The other Offices in the ladder as you ascend are, the Junior Deacon, the Senior Deacon, the Chaplain, the Junior Warden and the Senior Warden. The Worshipful Master of the Lodge is elected once a year, from amongst current and Past Wardens, if any and the Past Masters of and in the Lodge. The Treasurer and the Tyler of the Lodge are also elected every year, while the Secretary’s appointment is the choice of the Worshipful Master.

Bye Laws of your Lodge and the Book of Constitutions

The Book of Constitutions of the Grand Lodge, a copy of which has been given to you, lays down the Rules & Regulations by which The Grand Lodge, the Regional Grand Lodge, the Daughter Lodges & the Members are governed. You have also been given a copy of your Lodge Bye Laws, which have been approved by the Grand Lodge, and prescribes the various fees payable by the members and the manner in which these are allocated. According to these Bye Laws and the provisions contained in the Book of Constitutions, any member who is in default of his membership fees for one year, is liable to be automatically excluded, after giving due notice. Each Lodge, is required to submit various half yearly and annual returns to the Regional Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge, along with certain fees, based on its membership, as prescribed in the Bye Laws of the Region and the Book of Constitutions of the Grand Lodge. The accounts of the Lodge are also duly audited and passed annually in the Lodge. The Lodge Books and records are also subject to inspection by the representatives of the Regional Grand Lodge.

Master Mason's Certificate Freemasonry

After you have been made a Master Mason, you will be awarded a Certificate by the Grand Lodge of India. This certificate is in the nature of a Passport, which will on its production, enable you to attend any Master Masons Lodge, anywhere within the country, the details regarding their location and dates of their meeting etc can be accessed from the Grand Lodge website: http://www.masonindia.org. You can also attend Lodges in other Countries, subject to the Grand Lodges of those countries and the Grand Lodge of India being in recognition with each other. Before doing so, you have to get in touch with the Grand Lodge of India, through your Regional Office, who will issue a certificate of introduction in your favour. Your actual admission into such a Lodge would however depend on your ability to prove yourself, through the signs, tokens and words of the three degrees, which were explained to you and which are to be guarded as secret, except when you are asked to prove yourself for admission to Lodges of which you are not a member.

Charitable Projects

The importance of Charity as the predominant characteristics of a Freemason’s heart has already been amply illustrated to you. All Lodges in the Country are engaged in some charitable project, or the other, at their local level each according to its capacity and capability. Likewise, the Regions and the Grand Lodge are also involved in some major charitable projects. You are encouraged to learn more about these charitable activities, both at the Lodge level and the Regional level and take an active part in them.

It is desirable at this stage, that you should first acquaint yourself with the Charitable Projects and other activities of the Grand Lodge. From out of the monies received as direct donation and from the Lodges along with the returns, a portion is allocated to what is known as the Grand Lodge Fund of Benevolence, which is intended for contribution to various charitable causes all over the country and for providing relief on occasions like floods, cyclone, earthquake, Tsunami etc. The Grand Lodge also has a Building Fund, to help Lodges in the construction and maintenance of their Masonic Temples. Funds are also earmarked for scholarships and bursaries to deserving children, including children of Armed Forces and Police personnel killed in action. Specific appeal for donations is also called on occasions of national disaster, and the amount so collected is thankfully received and faithfully applied. Regional Grand Lodges also have such benevolent funds for providing relief within the Region.

It will be of interest for you to know that Grand Lodge of India received substantial donations from Grand Lodges all over the World and from Lodges and Brethren within the country, for providing relief to the victims of Tsunami which hit the country in December 2004. Out of these funds, the Grand Lodge of India constructed a Tsunami Relief Community Centre in Pallam Village in Kanyakumari district, at a cost of Rs.45 lakhs and donated it for use by the villagers. Financial assistance of about Rs.40 lakhs is also being provided by the Grand Lodge towards construction of tenements for about 40 villagers at Pallam. An Orphanage is also being managed by the Grand Lodge of India at Karaikal near Pondichery, for children between the ages of 5 to 12 who have been orphaned by Tsunami, by providing them shelter, clothing, food, medical care and education. This brochure carries a photograph of the Grand Lodge of India Tsunami Relief Community Centre, Pallam Village, Kanyakumari, Pallam District, Tamil Nadu on the inner back cover.

Grand Master's Rupee Club

Apart from the above, collection is also made from the brethren, all over the country, to a fund called the Grand Master’s Rupee Club. This is based on the premise that if the Grand Master came knocking at your door every day of the year and appealed for contribution to Charity, you would not hesitate to give at least one Rupee each day! Thus every brother is encouraged to contribute at least Rs.365 in a year as a lump sum and become a member of the Rupee Club. You could also become a life Member of the Club by paying a lump sum of Rs.4000. The fund so collected is utilized for various charitable purposes, by way of immediate relief at the discretion of the Grand Master. A form for becoming a Member of the Grand Master's Rupee Club is attached to this brochure. You may use it to become an Annual or Life Member. You will be given an attractive badge which you can wear at all Masonic Functions.

Square & Compasses – Quarterly Magazine of the Grand Lodge

The Grand Lodge brings out a Quarterly Magazine aptly called the ’Square and Compasses’, which is the universal sign of Freemasonry. This gives news of various Masonic events that take place from time to time within the country and elsewhere in the world, as also interesting Masonic information, besides erudite articles on various aspects of Freemasonry. The Annual Subscription for this magazine, as of date is Rs150 for 4 issues and Life Time Subscription is Rs.1500. A form for enrolment is included in this brochure. In order to improve your Masonic knowledge we strongly recommend you to become an annual or life time subscriber.

Joint Meetings/Area Meetings/Half yearly/Annual Meetings of Regions/Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge etc.

Apart from the meetings of the Lodges regularly on the stated days, often Joint and Area Meetings are also arranged by Lodges on occasions. All the Regions also hold their Half yearly and Annual Meetings, in different parts of their respective Regions. The Grand Lodge of India also holds Annual meetings called Annual Communication by turns in the four Regions. We strongly recommend that you should avail of these opportunities for interaction with senior brethren, as also brethren from other Regions, since attending such meetings will give you better exposure and insight into Freemasonry.

The Annual Meetings of the Region/Grand Lodge are in the nature of General Body meetings of which the Agenda includes passing of the Annual Audited Accounts of the Regions/Grand Lodge.

From time to time special meetings called 'Devine Service' and 'Memorial Service' to mourn the passing away of a brothren are held sometimes in the presence of ladies & non Masons.

Apart from these, 24th June is observed as Universal Brotherhood Day, throughout the world. Lodges & the Regions organize special events or charity projects and also hold Seminars/Workshops/Masonic Quiz etc. to commemorate the day. We strongly urge you to take active part in such events.

Masonic Ranks and Long Term Service Jewels

All that remains for us now is to satisfy your curiosity about Masonic Ranks. Both the Regional Grand Master and the Grand Master confer annually, Regional and Grand Ranks on deserving Past Masters, who show merit and ability and render valuable service in the cause of Freemasonry. While some of these are called Active Ranks involving specific work at the Regional and Grand Lodge level, others are called Past Ranks and are honorary and decorative in nature and are conferred by way of recognition of merit. There is also a hierarchical structure in these Ranks. Grand Ranks are conferred on brethren after they reach a certain Rank in the Region. Brethren with Grand Ranks above a certain level, both Active and Past, are called Very Worshipful Brethren and those above still higher Ranks, are called Right Worshipful Brethren. Only the Grand Master and those who have held that office in the past, are entitled to be called Most Worshipful Brethren.

Commemorative Jewels and Certificates are also formally awarded in an impressive Ceremony by the Grand Master or the Regional Grand Masters to brethren on their completion of 70/60/50/40/25 years, of Service to Freemasonry, often in the presence of the family members of the brethren and non-Masons, if the Lodges of which they are members so desire. We encourage you to attend such event when an occasion presents itself not only to witness the grandeur of the event, but also to appreciate the respect and regard we pay to age and experience.

M.W. the Grand Master also recognizes outstanding contributions to Freemasonry, by award of Order of Service to Masonry (OSM) which is the highest honour that a deserving brother can receive.

Higher degrees in Freemasonry

By way of last general information we would like to bring to your notice that apart from Craft Freemasonry, of which you have now become a member there are also other higher degrees in Freemasonry called the Royal Arch Chapter, The Mark Master and the Royal Ark Mariners which you can join, after you have become a Master Mason and have gained some experience and knowledge of Craft Masonry. The senior brethren of your Lodge, who are members of these higher degrees can guide you in this regard. You will, we are sure benefit further and gain more insight and useful knowledge, if you become a member of these degrees in due course.

Best wishes for a long fruitful Masonic Career

You are now a Freemason & a "Brothren" to all Freemasons in the world. Although there are other members who are more experienced and of higher rank, you are their equal as a man and their 'brother'. You enjoy the same rights and privileges as any other Freemasons, except for the forms of recognition associated with the higher degrees, which we have no doubt will come to you in due time. You are now a valued member of your Lodge and we would like you to make a real effort to get to know other members & join in various activities of your Lodge and enjoy your Freemasonry in full.

In the end we pray to the Great Architect of the Universe that the foundation laid today will enable you to enjoy a long fruitful and satisfying Masonic career. We once again congratulate you on your being admitted to our Masonic Fraternity and look forward to your active association and involvement in the various activities of your Lodge as well as that of your Region and the Grand Lodge.

We would very much welcome your feedback on the contents of this Brochure as well as your first impression on becoming a Freemason. Please therefore feel free to share your views with us by writing to the Grand Secretary, Grand Lodge of India, or by sending an e-mail to: glindia@nde.vsnl.net.in

GRAND LODGE OF INDIA
Application for Subscription to Square and Compasses


I am happy to renew my subscription/become new Subscribing Member of “The Square and Compasses” commencing from _____
Annual Subscription Rs. 150/-
Or
Life Time Subscription Rs. 1500/-
Cheque/Demand Draft may be made payable to “GRAND LODGE OF INDIA” (For outstation Cheque please add Rs. 50/-as Bank Commission).
Date _____
Signature _____
Name _____
Lodge No _____
Address _____

***

GRAND LODGE OF INDIA
GRAND MASTER'S RUPEE CLUB
Application for Membership


I am happy to renew my annual membership/become new Subscribing Annual Member of “GRAND MASTER'S RUPEE CLUB” for the Calendar Year _____
Cheque/Demand Draft for Annual Subscription for Rs. 365/- (Rs. 366/-for leap year) Or Cheque/Demand Draft for Life Subscription for Rs. 4000/-
In favour of “GRAND MASTER'S RUPEE CLUB” is attached.
Note: For outstation Cheque, please add Rs. 50/- as Bank Commission.
Date _____
Signature _____
Name _____
Lodge No _____
Address _____
(Grand Master's Rupee Club is eligible for Income Tax exemption under Section 80G of Income Tax Act)

***

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Grand Lodge of India, Tsunami Relief Community Centre, Pallam Village, Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu

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Grand Lodge of India
Freemasons' Hall, Janpath, New Delhi-110001
Tel.: 23321956, 23321949 Telefax: 23320276
e-mail: glindia@nde.vsnl.net.in
http://www.masonindia.org

***
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REGIONAL GRAND LODGES

THE REGIONAL GRAND LODGE OF EASTERN INDIA
Postal Address: The Regional Grand Lodge of Eastern India, Freemasons’ Hall, 19, Park Street Calcutta -700016 India
Office Hours: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. (Monday to Friday) 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. (Saturday)
Telephone: 91-33-22299669
Regional Grand Master - rgm@rgleast.com
Regional Grand Secretary - rgsec@rgleast.com AND rgleast@gmail.com
Asst. Regional Grand Secretary - info@rgleast.com
Website at http://www.rgleast.com
Lodges in the Region

THE REGIONAL GRAND LODGE OF NORTHERN INDIA
Postal Address: The Grand Lodge of Northern India, Freemasons’ Hall, Janpath, New Delhi - 110001 India
Office Hours: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. (Monday to Friday)
Telephone: 91-11-23328061, Telefax: 23730275
E-mail: office@rglni.org
Web site: http://www.rglni.org
Lodges in the Region

THE REGIONAL GRAND LODGE OF SOUTHERN INDIA
Postal Address: The Regional Grand Lodge of Southern India, Freemasons’ Hall, 87, Ethiraj Salai, Chennai (Madras) - 600 008
Office Hours: 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. (Monday to Friday) 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. (Saturday)
Telephone: 91-44-28272311 or 91-44-28272019
Telefax: 91-44-28272019
E-mail: rglofsi@gmail.com ; rglofsi@yahoo.com
Website: http://www.masonsouthernindia.org
Lodges in the Region

THE REGIONAL GRAND LODGE OF WESTERN INDIA
Postal Address: The Regional Grand Lodge of Western India, Freemasons’ Hall, Damodardas Sukhadvala Marg, (Raveline Street), Fort, Mumbai - 400 001
Office Hours: 10:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. (Monday to Friday) 10:30 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. (Saturday)
Telephone: 91-222-2071120, Telefax: 91-222-2074875. After Office hours: 91-222-3720320
E-Mail: rglowi@hotmail.com
Website: http://www.masonindiawest.org/
Lodges in the Region

***

GRAND LODGE OF INDIA
LIST OF HOLIDAYS - 2013

No. / Holiday / Date / Day of Week


1 NEW YEARS DAY 1ST JANUARY TUESDAY
2 REPUBLIC DAY 26TH JANUARY SATURDAY
3 HOLI 27TH MARCH WEDNESDAY
4 GOOD FRIDAY 29TH MARCH FRIDAY
5 RAM NAVAMI 19TH APRIL FRIDAY
6 MAHAVIR JAYANTI 24TH APRIL WEDNESDAY
7 IDUL FITR 9TH AUGUST FRIDAY
8 INDEPENDENCE DAY 15TH AUGUST THURSDAY
9 RAKSHA BANDHAN 20TH AUGUST TUESDAY
10 JANMASHTAMI 28TH AUGUST WEDNESDAY
11 MAHATMA GANDHI BIRTHDAY 2ND OCTOBER SATURDAY
12 DUSSEHARA(DASHAMI) 13TH OCTOBER SUNDAY
13 DIWALI 3RD NOVEMBER SUNDAY
14 BHAI DUJ 5TH NOVEMBER TUESDAY
15 CHRISTMAS DAY 25TH DECEMBER WEDNESDAY

***

MASONIC INFORMATION

No. / TITLE / AUTHOR


73 PAPER PRESENTED BY THE GRAND SECRETARY, AT THE 10TH WORLD CONFERENCE OF GRAND LODGE HELD AT LIBREVILLE, GABON ON 4TH, 5TH & 6TH NOVEMBER, 2009.
By R.W.Bro S.Krishnan, O.S.M. Grand Secretary,Dy G.M.

72 DIVINE SERVICE - A UNIQUE INDIAN MASONIC CEREMONY
By Justice Devinder Gupta O.S.M.,

71 INTRODUCTION TO FREEMASONRY AND A QUICK OVERVIEW OF ITS HISTORY.
By R.W.Bro Justice Devinder Gupta, Dy. G. M. Grand Lodge of India

70 FREEMASONRY AND CHARITY
By “KUMAR” (W.Bro. VIJAY KUMAY GAUHAR P.M. LODGE ASOKA NO 93, GLI, )

69 THE RELEVANCE OF FREEMASONRY IN THE PRESENT
By W. Bro. J. N. Chowdhary - Lodge Sanchi No. 247

68 THE HIDDEN MYSTERIES OF NATURE & SCIENCE
By Wor. Bro. Dr. V. V. CHETTY P.R.G. Br. V. S. L., P.G.Tyier.

67 MY REMINISCENCES AS REGIONAL GRAND MASTER
By R. W. Bro. A. S. RAJASABAI, O.S.M., P.DY.G.M.P.R.G.M. of SOUTHERN INDIA

66 OPENING OF THE NEW FREEMASONS HALL, MADRAS

65 WHY ONLY MEN ARE FREEMASONS
By W. Bro. T. JANARADHAN NAIR

64 DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STEWARDS
By W. Bro. AMUDACHARI P. S. G. D.

63 THE GRAND PRINCIPLES OF FREEMASONRY
By W. Bro. P. A. Krishnaswami, M.A., P.A.G.D.C.

62 THE TYLER
By W. Bro. Amudachari, P.S.G.D.

61 MAHATMA GANDHI AND FREEMASONRY
By R. W. Bro. K. Gopalswami, P. Dy. G. M.

60 THE DIRECTOR OF CEREMONIES
Bro. W. Bro S. Amudachari, P.S.G.D.

59 DO YOU KNOW YOURSELF TO BE A MASON ?

58 THE WORSHIPFUL MASTER
By W. Bro. S. AMUDCHARI, P. S. G. D.

57 PYTHAGORAS, THE ENLIGHTENED MASON
By W. Bro. M. V. NARASIMHA IYENGAR, P. A. R. G. Std. Bearer

56 THE ROLE OF FREEMASONRY IN OUR PERSONAL LIFE
By Late R. W. Bro. R. Krishnasamy O.S.M. P.Dy.G.M. P.Dy. R.G.M.

55 ORATION OF R. W. BRO. JUSTICE
R. Bhattacharya P. Dy. G. M. at the Rededication Ceremony in the Silver Jubilee Meeting of Gurakhpur Lodge No. 157 held on 21.2.88

54 SYMBOLISM IN MARK MASONRY
By W. Bro. C. K. Prabhakaran, P. M., The Mount Mark Lodge No. 50

53 WHY I BECAME A MASON ?
R.W. Bro. A. S. RAJASABAI
P.A.G.M., P.DV. R. G. M., A.R.G.M.

52 YOUR LODGE AND YOUR COMMUNITY
R. W. Bro. Dr. M. N. MAHADEVAN
O.S.M. Dy. G. Master, P. Dy. R.G.M.

51 THE ANTIQUITY OF MASONRY
By W. Bro. JAMSHED D. MEHTA, Lodge Narmada - 224
W. M. Light of Zoroaster Lodge - 222 (Calcutta)

50 MASONIC ETIQUTTE & ETHICS
By R. W. Bro. J. L. BURY, Ass.t G. M. P. Dy. R. G. M. (From "The Golden Pagoda" the Bulletin of Lodge Golden Pagoda No. 195. March 1978 Issue )

49 ROUGH AND PERFECT ASHLAR
R. W. Bro. I. V. S. S. MURTY, P.Dy. G. Swd. Br., A.R.G.M.

48 FUTURE OF FREEMASONRY
R. W. Bro. K. S. MENON P.G.J.M., P.Dy. R G M, A R. G M.

47 DARKNESS VISIBLE
V. W. Br. Dr. V. V. Chetty P. G. Regd. P. Dy. R. G. M.

46 MASONIC LIGHT A SYMBOL OF TRUTH AND KNOWLEDGE
R. W. Bro S. Kandaswamy Mudaliar
(P.A.G.M., PDy.R.G.,M)

45 WHO IS MASON ?
R. W. Bro H. J. Rushi, P. A. G. M., Grand Secretary

44 FREEMASONARY AND SECRECY
R. W. Bro Prem Nath Khanna. A. G. M.

43 RELEVANCE OF FREEMASONRY TO RELIGION
Bro. V. K. CHACKO, P.R.G. Supdt. of Works

42 THE THREE RUFFIANS
V. W. Bro. S. CHINTOPANTH, P. G. D. of C. P. Dy. R. G. M.

41 MASONIC VIRTUES
Wor. Bro. B. Damodar Rao
P. M. Lodge Morland

40 WHY A CRAFT MASON SHOULD JOIN A CHAPTER
By. Ex. Comp. HORMUSJI S. JASSAWALA, M.B.E.

39 CHAPTER RITUAL : AN INTERPRETATION
By. E. Comp. N. NAGARAJA RAO

38 THE APATHETIC MASON AND HOW TO ENTHUSE HIM
By. Wor. Bro. C. V. KRISHNAMOORTHY, P.A.G.D.C., P.J.R.C.D., P.M. No. 58 GLI

37 HOW MASONRY HAS INFLUENCED ME ?
By. Bro. PRABHAT KUMAR, S.W. No. 39 GLI

36 THE NATURE AND PURPOSE OF FREEMASONRY
By. R. W. Bro. M. N. Mahadevan, O. S. M., P. Dy. G. M., P. Dy. R. G. M.
President of the Board of General Purpose

35 WHAT DOES FREEMASONRY STAND FOR ?
By R. W. Bro. MULLAFEROZE, P.Dy. G.M., P.Dy. R.G.M.

34 WHEN I WAS INITIATED ....
By R. W. Bro. AMIYA KUMAR GUHA, P. Asst. G. Swd. Br.

33 THE LIMITATIONS OF FREEMASONRY IN INDIA
By R. W. Bro. C. A. RAMAKRISHNAN, I.C.S. (Retd.), P.Dy.G.M., P.R.G.M., O.S.M. A.G.M.

32 WHEN, WHERE, AND UNDER WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES MASONIC ISTITUTION HAS TAKEN SHAPE
By R. W. BRO. Priojshah Pestonji Debara
P. Dy. G. M., P. Dy. R. G. M., (S.I.)

31 PREPARATION AND DELIVERY OF THE RITUAL
Compiled by R.W. Bro V. Rajendran

30 THE CLARION CALL OF FREEMASONRY
By Wor. Bro. P. R. SUBRAMANIAN, P.G.Tyier, P.R.G.I.G.

29 THE RITE OF DESTITUTION
By Bro. W. P. A. R. NAGARAJAN

28 EXCLUSION VS. MEMBERSHIP RETENTION
By Wor. Bro. T. P. SANTANAKRISHNA NAIDU, P.A.G.D.C., P.A.R.G.M.

27 SELF-IMMOLATION IN FREEMASONRY
By Wor. Bro. P. C. CHATTERJEE, G.S.D. (GLI), P.A.R.G.M. (RGL.EI)

26 THE DESIGN OF COMMUNICATING HAPPINESS
By Wor. Bro. L. F. SHROFF.
P.M. Lodge Beamon, No. 1069 S.C.

25 BRETHREN, BUILD YOUR HOME ON LOVE AND TRUST
By M. E. Comp. E. M. CASSINATH,
Grand Superintendent, U.S.R.A.F.I.C.

24 IN QUEST OF TRUTH
By Wor. Bro. HOSHENG HORMASJI KASED
P.M. Lodge Zanzibar, No. 3897

23 FREEMASONS AS FRIENDS
By Rt. Wor. Bro. ANANDRAI M. MEHTA, P.G.J.W., P. Dep. Reg. G.M. (W.I)

22 SOME THOUGHTS ON FREEMASONRY
By W. Bro. Rev. P. A. KRISHNASWAMI, M.A. P.A.G. CHap. (Eng.)

21 THE THREE GREAT EMBLEMATICAL LIGHTS
By S. N. MITRA, P.J.G.D.,P.J.R.G.W.

20 THE ANTIQUITY OF MASONRY
By R. W. Bro. K.A.M.A. KALIAPPA NADAR, P. Dy.G.M., P.Dy.R.G.M.

19 RANDOM REFLECTIONS
By R. W. Bro. P. S. JAMBURAMASWAMI Iyer, P.G.S.W., P.Dy.R.G.M.

18 THE ANTIENT LANDMARKS OF THE ORDER
By V. Wor. Bro. SHANKAR K. AIYER, P.G. Chap., Asst. R.G.M. (W.I.)

17 THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA & FREEMASONRY
By V. Wor. Bro. G. P. TANDON, P.G.D. of C.,P. Dy. R. G. M. (N.I)

16 FREEMASONRY AND THE UNITY OF MAN
By R. W. Bro. C.S. Bhasker, P.A.G.M., P. Dy. R.G.M.

15 RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT
By Rt. Wor. Bro. C. A. Ramakrishnan, I.C.S. (Retd)

14 MASONRY - THE IDEAL TEMPLE OF HUMANITY
His Highness Maharaja Sree Jaya Chamaraja Wadeyar Bahadur

13 THE LAST AND THE GREATEST TRIAL
W. Bro. P. K. A. Narayanan

12 QUALIFICATIONS FOR MASONRY
W. Bro. Dr. R. Subramanian
PG. Asst. Secretary, PARG Master

11 FREEMASONRY AN ETHICAL FRATERNITY
S. Kandaswami Mudaliar
P.DY.G.M. P.DY.R.G.M. P.M., LODGE ASOKA

10 THE GRAND LODGE OF INDIA
Reproduced from the Grand Lodge of Scotland Year Book 1962

9 REPORT OF R. W. BROTHER GEORGE S. GAMBLE
Deputy Grand Master, Ireland

8 EXTRACTS FROM THE REPORT OF THE DEPUTY GRAND MASTER
by R. W. Bro Rt. Hon. the Earl Gadogan, MC, D.L., on the Masonic Mission to India in November 1961

7 FREEMASONRY AND THE LAY PUBLIC
by W. Bro. Dr. V. V. CHETTY, P.J.R.G.W., P.A.G.D.C

6 ON MASONIC ETIQUETTE
By R. W. Bro. M. K. Sridharan
Regi. Grand Director of Ceremonies

5 OUR ORDER
V. W. Bro. K. S. Menon, P. G. Chaplain, P. Dy. R. G. M., Assistant Reglonal Grand Master

4 OUR DEBT TO FREEMASONRY
By R. W. Bro. R. Krishnasamy, O. S. M., P. Dy. G. M. Deputy Reglonal Grand Master

3 MASONRY IN LITERATURE
Wor. Bro. D. C. Rajagopalan, PM. PRGIG

2 MASONIC SYMBOLISM
BRO DR. K. JYOTHINDRA KUHAR

1 MASONIC RITUAL
W. Bro. C. S. Madhavan, L / Jyothi No. 253

***

LODGE MEETINGS FOR THE MONTH

Lodge Meetings for February 2020


This calender is based on the regular meeting dates of lodges. It is possible that a lodge might have changed its meeting on a particular day by dispensation. Visitors are requested to contact the respective secretaries of lodges for correct information.

01 Sat
Lodge Hope No. 4 at Masonic Temple, Meerut.
Lodge Morning Star No. 7 at Freemasons’ Hall Sarojini Naidu Marg, Lucknow.
Lodge Victoria No. 9 at Freemasons’ Hall 175, Camp, Belgaum 590 009.
Lodge Ajodhya-On-Sarju No. 13 at Freemasons’ Hall Lodge Road Faizabad.
Lodge Mount No. 14 at Freemasons’ Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 600 008.
Lodge Jumna No. 18 at Freemasons’ Hall Qudsia Gardens Jumna Marg Delhi 110 054.
Lodge Mysore No. 34 at Freemasons’ Hall Mysore.
Lodge Malwa No. 37 at Freemasons’ Hall A.B.Road, Indore.
Lodge Tyrrell Leith No. 43 at Freemasons’ Hall Productivity Road Vadodara 7. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Friendship No. 47 at Freemasons’ Hall Golf Course Road Ajmer.
Lodge Pandyan No. 49 at Masonic Temple Freemasons’ Hall, Chokkikulam, Madurai 625002.
Lodge H.M.Rustomjee No. 68 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Universal No. 100 at Freemasons’ Hall Gorakhpur. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Star Of The South No. 101 at Freemasons’ Hall No.2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025.
Lodge Indraprastha No. 124 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Star Of Rampur No. 136 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Yadavindra No. 141 at Freemasons' Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Formanite No. 155 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Shah Jairotary No. 160 at Masonic Hall, Opp.Sunder Talkies, The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Poona Past Masters No. 167 at H.N.Merchant Masonic Temple, Kirlee, Pune 411 003. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Sarvothama No. 176 at Sarvothama Masonic Temple, Mundamveli, Cochin 682507.
Lodge Shyam Kinkor No. 184 at Freemasons' Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Concord No. 204 at Masonic Temple, 232, Race Course Road, Coimbatore 641 018. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Pachauri No. 214 at Freemasons' HallLadies Club Premises Near Roadways Bus Station, Pratapgarh.
Lodge Sindhuvan No. 216 at Masonic Complex, Near Pansara Rly. Yamuna Nagar 135 001.
Lodge Kasargode No. 257 at Freemasons' Hall Vidyanagar Kasargod.
Lodge Perfect No. 264 at Gosha Mahal Baradari Masonic Temple, Hyderabad.
Lodge Kamal At Sangam No. 266 at Freemasons' Hall 2-B, Kutchery Road Allahabad.
Lodge Lyons Centenary No. 274 at Masonic Temple Hubli.
Lodge Tamiravarni No. 289 at Freemasons' Hall Palayamkottai.
Lodge Vindhyachal No. 305 at Hotel Residency Zone-1, M.P.Nagar, Bhopal.
Lodge Bundelkhand No. 306 at Freemasons' Hall Jhansi.
Lodge Chennai No. 317 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Chapter Justitia No. 65 at Freemason's Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai Egthore Chennai
Chapter Mangalore No. 67 at Hotel Pentagon Pumpwell Mangalore.
Mark Lodge Hannay No. 15 at Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple, Freemasons' Hall Beach Road, Visakhapatnam 530 001.
Mark Lodge Salem No. 25 at Freemasons' Hall Suramangalam, Salem 635 005.
Mark Lodge Jai Pratap No. 56 at Freemasons' Hall Ajmer.

02 Sun
Lodge Ubique No. 53 at Freemasons’ Hall 93, Charnock Road Barrackpore 24 Parganas (N)-743, Cantonment 101.
Lodge Godavery No. 89 at Anand Resency A.C.Conference Hall Jampeta, Rajahmundry.
Lodge Bharat Jyoti No. 144 at Lucknow Freemasons' Hall Sarojini Naidu Marg Lucknow.
Lodge Rai Bahadur Behari Lal No. 215 at Masonic Hall, M.G.Marg, Kanpur.
Lodge Gondwana No. 226 at Freemasons' Hall Civil Lines, Nagpur.
Lodge Friendship On Tamsa No. 303 at Officers Club Azamgarh.
Lodge Wynad No. 314 at Greeshmam Resorts Lakkidi 673 576. Wynad.
Lodge Steel City No. 339 at Freemasons' Hall Near Bye Pass Road Jn.,Anakapalle.
Mark Lodge Charity No. 67 at Freemasons' Hall 49, Staff Road Ambala Cantt.

03 Mon
Lodge Northern Star No. 21 at Freemasons’ Hall 6A, The Mall, Ferozepore Cantt. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Aryan No. 30 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Vidya No. 164 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Poorvanchal No. 345 at Hotel Swosti, Janpath Bhubaneswar, Orissa

04 Tue
Lodge Peace & Concord No. 63 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata.
Lodge St.Mary No. 75 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Ranchi No. 104 at Freemasons’ Hall The Ranchi Club Ranchi.
Lodge Italia Williams Manian No. 158 at St.John's Masonic Hall, Secunderabad.
Lodge Karunya No. 360 at Sarvothama Masonic Temple, Mundanveli, Kochi

05 Wed
Lodge Charity No. 8 at Freemasons’ Hall 49, Staff Road, Ambala Cantt 133 001.
Lodge Sohrab Davar No. 113 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Hindustan No. 114 at Masonic Hall, Opp.Sunder Talkies, The Mall, Kanpur. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Samyukta Sena No. 126 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Bhogilal Shah No. 147 at Masonic Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur 440 001.
Lodge Raksha Dal No.166 at H.N.Merchant Masonic Temple, Kirlee, Pune 411 003.
Lodge Lions Of Eastern India No. 182 at Freemasons' Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Keys No. 297 at Hyderabad Goshamahal Baradri Masonic Hall, Hyderabad 500 012. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Engineers No. 340 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Chapter Cornwallis No. 33 at Freemason's Hall Damodardas Sukhda Wala Marg, Fort, Mumbai.
Chapter Himalaya No. 76 at Freemasons' Hall Saharanpur 247 001. - Installation Meeting.

06 Thu
Lodge Nipal No. 38 at Freemasons’ Hall Gorakhpur.
Lodge Ekram No. 45 at St.John’s Masonic Hall, Nehru Nagar Secunderabad.
Lodge Raza No. 112 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Harmony No. 217 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Vidisha No. 262 at S.A.T.I. (Degree) Vidisha 464 001. (MP) - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Barabati No. 323 at Hotel Surya Kiran Cantonment Road Dr.P.K.Parija Chowk Cuttack.
Chapter St.John The Baptist No. 3 at Freemason's Hall 18, Beacher Road, Cantt, Dehradun
Chapter Gibbs No. 99 at Freemasons' Hall No.2, Primrose Road, Bangalore 560 025.
Mark Lodge Accountants No. 101 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
R.A.M. Lodge Raisina No. 87 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi-110001

07 Fri
Lodge Hyderabad No. 50 at Freemasons’ Hall Goshamahal Baradari Hyderabad.
Lodge Stanley No. 78 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Dhanbad No. 95 at Freemasons’ Hall Luby Circular Road Dhanbad. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Radiance No. 116 at Freemasons' Hall, Civil Line, Nagpur
Lodge Bharat Mata Masters No. 121 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Irish Friendship No. 128 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Srinivasa Gopala No. 190 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Veeraswami No. 200 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Cannanore No. 234 at Freemasons' Hall Talap, Kannur 670 004.
Chapter Tirhoot No. 25 at Freemason's Hall Patna.
Chapter Republic No. 34 at Freemason's Hall Damodardas Sukhda Wala Marg, Fort, Mumbai
Mark Lodge Durga No. 26 at Freemasons' Hall Allahabad. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Sangam No. 26 at Freemasons’ Hall Allahabad. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Level No. 105 at Freemasons' Hall Exhibition Road, Pune - 411001 - Installation Meeting.

08 Sat
Lodge Goodwill No. 5 at Freemasons’ Hall Bellary.
Lodge St. Andrew’s No. 6 at Masonic Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur 440 001.

Lodge St. David In The East No. 11 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Deccan No. 20 at Freemasons’ Hall Goshamahal Baradari Masonic Building, Hyderabad 12.
Lodge Industry No. 23 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Ganges No. 48 at Masonic Hall Kanpur.
Lodge Ligonier No. 51 at Freemasons’ Hall Mathura Cantt.
Lodge Dharwad No. 54 at Masonic Hall, Michigans Orchard Navalur, Dharwad.
Lodge Kathiawar No. 59 at Masonic Hall Rajkot.
Lodge Coronation No. 64 at Freemasons’ Hall Khandwa.
Lodge Unity & Perseverance No. 73 at Masonic Temple, 659, 6th Avenue, S.E.Rly, Kharagpur 721301.
Lodge True Brotherhood No. 76 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Justitia No. 82 at Freemasons’ Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai Egmore, Chennai 600 008.
Lodge Bhore Ghaut No. 83 at Freemasons’ Hall 4, A.B.Road Indore.
Lodge Scindia No. 88 at Freemasons’ Hall Race Course Road Gwalior.
Lodge Murray Hammick No. 90 at Freemasons’ Hall Chittoor. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Phulkian No. 94 at Freemasons’ Hall Patiala.
Lodge Tata No. 115 at Freemasons' Hall 20, Hill View Road Jamshedpur 831 001.
Lodge Charterd Accountants No. 152 at Freemasons' Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Gorakhpur No. 157 at Freemasons' Hall Gorakhpur.
Lodge Palghat No. 159 at Freemasons' Hall Chandra Nagar Palakkad.
Lodge Fulchand Petal No. 163 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Bhilai No. 169 at Freemasons' Hall Civil Lines Raipur.
Lodge Rani Jhansi No. 177 at Freemasons' Hall Jhansi. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Rayala Sundaram No. 181 at H.No.41/473-O, Kothapeta Kurnool. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Coromandel No. 186 at Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple, Beach Road
Lodge Tiruchirapalli No. 203 at Freemasons' Hall Tiruchirapalli.
Lodge Dr.Sarosh Bhacca No. 229 at K.B.Murfatia Rotary Memorial Hall, Sir P.T.Mahila College, Vanita Vishram, Athwa Lines, Surat.
Lodge Jailene No. 230 at R.K.Institute, E-Block, Sanjay Nagar, Ghaziabad.
Lodge Baroda No. 239 at Freemasons' Hall B.P.C.Road, Vadodara 390 007.
Lodge Chambal No. 242 at Deaf & Blind School, Jhalawar Road, Kota.
Lodge Ernakulam No. 243 at Ernakulam Masonic Hall Thrikkakara Ernakulam Kochi 682 003.
Lodge Sanchi No. 247 at Hotel Residency Maharana Pratap Nagar Zone I, Bhopal.
Lodge Montfort No. 249 at Yercaud Library & Sports Club, Small Lake, Yercaud. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Fragrance of Brotherly Love No. 250 at Freemasons' Hall Varanasi Cantt.
Lodge Vivekananda No. 254 at Vivekananda Masonic Charitable Trust Building, Kovalam Road, Kanyakumari. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Mount Shivalik No. 283 at Freemasons' Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh.
Lodge Jayachamaraja No. 308 at Freemasons' Hall Opp.Town Hall, Mysore.
Lodge Prerana No. 313 at Freemasons' Hall Yeyyady Padav Mangalore 575 008.
Lodge Goddess Kanakadurga No. 331 at Freemasons' Hall Purnanandampet Vijayawada 16.
Lodge Mahamaham No. 341 at C.V.Narasimhan Hall, Gopal Rao Library Building, Gandhi Adigalar Salai, Kumbakonam.
Lodge Ellora No. 343 at H.N. Merchant Masonic Temple, 673, Elphinstone Road, Kirkee, Pune
Lodge Bhola No. 344 at Freemaons Hall Ladies Club Premises, Near Roadways Bus Station, Pratapgarh
Lodge Kritapura No. 357 at Gadag-Betgeri Gymkhana, First Floor, M.G. Circle, GADAG
Chapter Bharathi No. 106 at Pondicherry - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Kudal No. 17 at Freemasons' Hall Bharathi Ula Road Race Course Madurai 625 002.
Mark Lodge Sundaram No. 47 at Freemasons' Hall Varanasi. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Chandigarh No.61 at Freemasons' Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh.
Mark Lodge Chittoor No. 81 at Freemasons' Hall Masonic Grounds Chittoor 517 001. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Star Of Delhi No. 103 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Mark Lodge Engineers No. 110 at Freemason Hall 14, Ethir Salai Egmore, Chennai
R.A.M. Lodge Kudal No. 17 at Freemasons’ Hall Bharathi Ula Road, Race Course Madurai.
R.A.M. Lodge Hira Hazmat No. 20 at Freemasons’ Hall Qudsia Garden, Delhi - 110 054. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Umballa No. 67 at Freemasons' Hall Staff Road, Ambala Cantt. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Kanyakumari No. 76 at Vivekananda Masonic Cheritable Trust Building Kovalam Road, Kanyakumari - Installation Meeting.

09 Sun
Lodge Benevolence No. 117 at Freemasons' Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur
Lodge Harmandir No. 170 at Freemasons' Hall Jalandhar Cantt.
Lodge Fragrance No. 236 at Masonic Hall, (Opp.Sunder Talkies) The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Asansol No. 251 at Freemasons' Hall Asansol. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Sakthi No. 288 at Masonic Temple, 19, Bungalowpudur Road Lakkampatti, Karattadipalayam (PO) Gobichettipalayam 683 453.
Lodge Ananth No. 315 at Sarvothama Masonic Temple, Mundamveli Kochi 682 507.
Lodge Andhra Masters No. 316 at Goshamahal Baradari Masonic Hall, Hyderabad.
Mark Lodge Thiruvananthapuram No. 82 at Freemasons' Hall Vezuthacaud Thiruvananthapuram. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Calicut No. 108 at Calicut
R.A.M. Lodge Chandigarh No. 61 at Freemasons’ Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh
R.A.M. Lodge Thiruvananthapuram No. 82 at Freemasons' Hall Vazhuthacaud Thiruvanan- thapuram - Installation Meeting.

10 Mon
Lodge Pestonji Kapadia No. 149 at Freemasons' Hall 9, Exhibition Road Pune 411 001.
Lodge Ratan No. 175 at Masonic Hall 96, The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Golden Pagoda No. 195 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Sainik No. 196 at Freemasons' Hall, No.2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025.
Lodge Secuderabad No. 211 at St.John's Hall, Secunderabad. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge United Nations No. 227 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Chapter Samyukta Sena No. 41 at Freemason's Hall Janpath New Delhi. - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Discovery No. 53 at Freemason's Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Republic No. 28 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Unity No. 57 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
R.A.M. Lodge Republic No. 28 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001 - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Star Of Delhi No. 103 Freemasons Hall, Janpath, New Delhi

11 Tue
Lodge Bangalore No. 15 at Freemasons’ Hall No.2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Coorg No. 55 at Freemasons’ Hall, Medikeri.
Lodge Calcutta No. 349Freemasons’ Hall, 19 Park Street Kolkata.
Chapter St. John's No. 1 at St. Johns Masonic Hall Secunderabad. - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Millennium No. 108 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 600 008.
Chapter Nicopolis No. 109 at Viziaram IVth Memorial Masonic Temple, Vizianagaram.
Mark Lodge Victoria No. 86 at Freemasons' Hall Camp, Belgaum.

12 Wed
Lodge Good Fellowship No. 71 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Raisina No. 97 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Vishwanath No. 111 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Sunder Raza No. 133 at Masonic Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur 440 001.
Lodge Aryavarta No. 145 at Masonic Hall, 96, The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Raksha Sena No.162 at St.John's Masonic Hall, Secunderabad. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Karan No. 244 at Birodari Model Town Masonic Hall, Near Police Post, Model Town, Karnal. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Professionals No. 268 at Freemasons' Hall 2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025.
Lodge Bhrigu Chetan No. 321 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Mark Lodge Shyam ,Narendra No. 24 at Freemasons' Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Shyam & Narendra No. 24 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata-700016 - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Western Star No. 60 at Dr. T.D. Nair Memorial Freemasons’ Hall Talap, Kannur - Installation Meeting.

13 Thu
Lodge Anamallai No. 106 at Freemasons’ Hall Paralai Estate Iyerpadi 642 108.
Lodge Star Of India No. 118 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Utkal No. 193 at Hotel Moti, Berhampur.
Lodge Mount Charity No. 232 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Accountants No. 277 at New Delhi Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Round Table No. 282 at Freemasons' Hall Race Cousre, Coimbatore 641 018.
Mark Lodge Holmesdale in the East No. 2 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
R.A.M. Lodge Sir Jamshedjee Jeejeebhoy No. 2 at Freemason’s Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001 - Installation Meeting.

14 Fri
Lodge Independence with Philanthropy No. 2 at Freemasons’ Hall 2-B, Kutcherry Road Allahabad.
Lodge Hiram No. 32 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Star Of Agra No. 36 at Freemasons’ Hall 112, Taj Road Agra.
Lodge Imperial No. 96 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Patna No. 105 at Freemasons’ Hall Budh Marg Patna.
Lodge Shanthi No. 146 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Sri Brahadeeswara No. 150 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Coimbatore No. 172 at Masonic Temple Race Course Road Coimbatore 641 018.
Lodge Narmada No. 224 at Ahuja Rotary Hall Pachpedi, Jabalpur
Lodge Justice Prakash Narain No. 281 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Marwar No. 301 at Hotel Residency High Court Colony Jodhpur.
Lodge Swarn Jayanti No. 312 at Arun Vihar Community Centre, Sector 37, Noida.
Chapter Friendship No. 47 at Freemason's Hall 9, Exhibition Road Pune 411004
Chapter Rao Bahadur Ranchhodbhai Patel No. 56 at Freemason's Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Meerut No. 81 at Freemasons' Hall 65, Rookee Road, Meerut Cantt.
Mark Lodge Sir John Edge No. 14 at Freemasons' Hall (Behind Telegraph Office) The Mall, Kanpur. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Dhanbad No. 71 at Freemasons' Hall Luby Circular Road Dhanbad.
Mark Lodge Level No. 105 at Hormasjee N. Merchant Masonic Temple 469, Elphinstone Road Kirkee, Pune 411 003.
R.A.M. Lodge Ark in Cawnpore No. 14 at Freemasons’ Hall The Mall, Kanpur - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Visakha No. 95 at Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple Visakhapatnam 530 001
R.A.M. Lodge V.O. Abraham No. 98 at V.O. Abraham Markos Masonic Hall, Vadavathoor, Kottayam 686010 - Installation Meeting.

15 Sat
Lodge Courage with Humanity No. 3 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street, Kokata 700 016.
Lodge St. Thomas in the East No. 12 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Mayo No. 19 at St.John’s Masonic Hall Secunderabad.
Lodge Southern Cross No. 24 at Freemasons Hall, Oorgaum, Kolar Gold Field. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Hamilton No. 26 at Sh.K.B.Marfalia Rotary Memorial Hall, Sir P.T.Mahila College, Vanita Vishram, Athwa Lines, Surat.
Lodge Islam No. 27 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Independence No. 33 at Lodge Premises Masonic Temple, 12, Ram Tirath Marg, Lucknow.
Lodge Rohilla Star No. 35 at Mehfil Hall, Hotel Delite, Faridabad.
Lodge Carnatic No. 39 at Freemasons’ Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 600 008.
Lodge Hubli No. 44 at Masonic Temple Hubli.
Lodge Waltair No. 56 at Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple, Freemasons’ Hall Beach Road, Visakhapatnam 530 001.
Lodge Excelsior No. 60 at Freemasons’ Hall Kalka.
Lodge Atal Sen No. 77 at Freemasons’ Hall Cantt, Varanasi.
Lodge Wallace No. 99 at Freemasons’ Hall Gorakhpur.
Lodge Sunder Heera No. 119 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Suryoday No. 143 at Masonic Hall, The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Gen. Williams Roorkee No. 151 at Masonic Temple Gandhi Bal Niketan Amber Talab, Roorkee.
Lodge Port Of Bombay No. 153 at Freemasons' Hall 4, A.B.Road, Indore. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Bhopal No. 154 at Hotel Palash, Bhopal. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Trinity No. 171 at Freemasons' Hall Collector's Office Road Cantonment Trichy 620 001.
Lodge Vishwakarma No. 173 at Freemasons' Hall Kartar Singh Sarabha Nagar Ludhiana 141 001.
Lodge Thirunal No. 179 at Freemasons' Hall 2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Trichur No. 180 at William Masonic Hall Chembukavu Thrichur. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Goodwill & Peace No. 189 at Freemasons' Hall Thanjavur.
Lodge Rajasabai No. 212 at Masonic Temple, Freemasons' Hall Race Course Road, Chokkikulam, Madurai 625002.
Lodge Light Of Aligarh No. 219 at Malviya Pustakalya Aligarh.
Lodge Calicut No. 237 at Freemasons' Hall West Hill, Calicut 673 005.
Lodge Gomantak No. 248 at Narayan Rao Radhabhai Memorial Trust Hall, Hemmady Regency, Melbhat Margao. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Raghunathji No. 255 at Rotary Bhawan Gandhi Nagar Jammu 180 004.
Lodge Mewar No. 259 at Rani Village Udaipur.
Lodge Bhojpur Past Masters No. 261 at Hotel Palash, Bhopal.
Lodge Pragati No. 267 at Freemasons' Hall Qudsia Bagh Delhi 110 054.
Lodge Meridian No. 287 at Freemasons' Hall Race Course, Coimbatore 641 018.
Lodge Susruta No. 298 at Ernakulam Masonic Hall Thirikkakora Kochi 682 033.
Lodge Kamrup No. 302 at Freemasons' Hall "Ananda Kutir" Pinaki Path, R.G.Barua Road (W), Guwahati.
Lodge Millennium No. 327 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Nityanand No. 330 at 154, Sector 13, Hisar.
Lodge Karni No. 332 at Hotel Marudhar Ambedkar Circle Hospital Road Bikaner.
Lodge Sahyadri No. 351Miraj
Chapter Sri Brahadeeswara No. 45 at Freemasons' Hall Thanjavur. - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Saurashtra No. 73 at Masonic Hall, Rajkot. - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Udyog No. 83 at Freemasons' Hall Kartar Singh Sarabha Nagar Ludhiana.
Mark Lodge Sampatrao No. 21 at Freemasons' Hall Productivity Road Baroda 390 007.
Mark Lodge Nagpur No. 22 at Masonic Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur.
R.A.M. Lodge Gorakhpur No. 42 at Freemasons’ Hall Gorakhpur - 273 001.

16 Sun
Lodge Trivandrum No. 168 at Freemasons' Hall Thiruvananthapuram.
Lodge Gopal No. 252 at Freemasons' Hall 17/1, The Mall (Behind Telegraph Office) Kanpur.
Lodge Trimurty No. 294 at Freemasons' Hall Nagpur 440 001.
Lodge Karnataka Masters No. 325 at Freemasons' Hall No.2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Kalinga No. 337 at Hotel Nagavali Srikakulam 1.
Chapter Dharwad No. 116 at Freemason Hall Michigans Orchard Dharwad
R.A.M. Lodge Sir John Edge No. 11 at Freemasons’ Hall Kartar Singh Sarabha Nagar Ludhiana.
R.A.M. Lodge Nagpur No. 22 at Masonic Hall Nagpur. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Godavery No. 89 at Hotel Anand Regency Jampeta Rajahmundry

17 Mon
Lodge Professor Thacker No. 188 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Chapter Ramchandra No. 50 at Freemason's Hall Janpath New Delhi

18 Tue
Lodge Anchor And Hope No. 1 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Sir Andrew Fraser No. 72 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street Kolkata 700 016. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Reginald Spence No. 109 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge G.K. Devarajulu No. 221 at Masonic Temple 232, Race Course, Coimbatore.
Chapter Mahadevan No. 52 at Freemason's Hall No. 2, Primrose Road, Bangalore.
Chapter Thacker Jairotary No. 64 at Freemason's Hall The Mall Kanpur - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Faridabad No. 70 at Freemason's Hall Janpath New Delhi - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Bhrigu Chetan No. 102 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi.
R.A.M. Lodge Om Vighneswara No. 63 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.

19 Wed
Lodge St. John The Evangelist No. 22 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Fidelity No. 40 at Freemasons’ Hall Moradabad.
Lodge Comrades No. 66 at Freemasons’ Hall Saharanpur.
Lodge H.H.The Nawab of Rampur No. 178 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Noshir Mehta No. 246 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Sabarmati No. 271 at Jehan Numa Palace Bhopal.
Lodge Golden Orange No. 304 at Freemasons' Hall Civil Lines Nagpur.

20 Thu
Lodge Siwalik Dr.Durga Prasad No. 62 at Freemasons’ Hall 18, Beacher Road Cantonment, Dehradun. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Elysium No. 69 at Freemasons’ Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Gibbs No. 86 at Freemasons’ Hall 2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025.
Lodge Chartered Accountant No. 131 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge General Williams No. 165 at Poona Masonic Hall, 9, Exhibition Road, Pune 411 001.
Lodge Khurshedji Cama No. 209 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Alleppey No. 275 at Neroth Mathew & Joseph, Masonic Hall, Thumpoly, Alleppey. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Lingaraj No. 307 at Hotel Garden Inn, Bhubaneswar.

21 Fri
Lodge Rock Of Gwalior No. 16 at Freemasons’ Hall Jhansi.
Lodge Unity No. 29 at Freemasons’ Hall 2-B, Kutcherry Road Allahabad.
Lodge Level No. 41 at The Hormasji N. Merchant, Masonic Temple, 469-E, Elphinstone Road Kirkee , Pune 411 003.
Lodge Jagat Banerjee No. 98 at Freemasons’ Hall 19, Park Street, Kolkata 700 016.
Lodge Cornwallis No. 107 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Mother India No. 110 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Justitia No. 137 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Artificers No. 138 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Om Vighneswara No. 218 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Dr. Maneckji Modi No. 256 at Freemasons' Hall Exhibition Road Pune 1.
Lodge Zenith No. 258 at Masonic Temple Race Course Coimbatore 18.
Lodge Maharaja No. 311 at Freemasons' Hall Qudsia Bagh, Jumna Road, Delhi.
Lodge Vembanad No. 319 at Sarvothama Masonic Temple Mundamveli Cochin 682 007.
Lodge Engineers No. 336 at Goshamahal Baradri Masonic Temple Hyderabad 500 012.
R.A.M. Lodge Universal Brotherhood No. 23 at Hotel Residency M.P. Nagar Bhopal

22 Sat
Lodge Truine Brotherhood No. 42 at Freemasons’ Hall, Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Southern Cross No. 46 at Freemasons’ Hall, Palayamcottai.

Lodge The Sir Lawrence Jenkins No. 70 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Salem No. 79 at Freemasons’ Hall Suramangalam Salem 5.
Lodge Sunut No. 80 at Freemasons’ Hall Vasranasi Cantt.
Lodge Burroughs Strange No. 87 at Freemasons’ Hall, Vijayawada.
Lodge Deolali No. 91 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Asoka No. 93 at Freemasons’ Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 600 008. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Raza Jubilee No. 132 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Fellowship No. 140 at Freemasons' Hall Shahibaug Road Ahmedabad 4.
Lodge C.A. Ramakrishnan No. 192 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Harawtar No. 202 at Freemasons' Hall Hotel Residency Zone-I, M.P.Nagar, Bhopal. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Victory No. 213 at Masonic Temple, Muzzaffarnagar.
Lodge Light Of Zoroaster No. 222 at 20, Hill View Road Jamshedpur 831 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Harballabh No. 240 at Zahariamal Complex, Near Local Bus Stand, Hardial Road, Jalandhar Cantt.
Lodge Padmagiri No. 260 at Freemasons' Hall Collector's Office Road Tiruchirappalli 1.
Lodge Ramalinga No. 265 at Freemasons' Hall Near Bye-Pass Road Anakapalli.
Lodge Meenakshi No. 269 at Masonic Temple Freemasons' Hall Race Course Road Chockikulam, Madurai 625 002.
Lodge Abhyarudra No. 278 at Inner Wheel Community Hall, Warangal.
Lodge Ooty No. 292 at Holiday Inn, Gem Park, Ooty.
Lodge G.P.Tandon No. 295 at Freemasons' Hall 2-B, Kutcherry Road Allahabad.
Lodge Civil Lines No. 310 at Freemasons' Hall Qudsia Bagh, Jamna Road, Delhi.
Lodge Maland No. 356 at Kadur Club, Spencer Road, Chikkamagalur - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Progress No. 10 at Freemasons Hall Janpath New Delhi - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Mount Everest No. 16 at Freemason's Hall Varanasi
Chapter Star Of Gwalior No. 20 at Freemasons Hall Jhansi.
Chapter Southern Cross No. 21 at Freemason's Hall Palayamkottai.
Chapter Phulkian No. 35 at Freemason's Hall Patiala.
Chapter Shah Sundaram No. 51 at Ganges Masonic Hall 96/1, The Mall, Kanpur
Chapter Dr.Ganesh Joshi No. 79 at Masonic Temple Hubli.
Chapter Coimbatore No. 91 at Masonic Temple, 232, Race Course Road Coimbatore 641 018.
Mark Lodge Professor Thacker No. 41 at Shri Kanchanlal Bhaidas Rotary Memorial Hall, Sir P.T.Mahila College, Vanita Vishram, Athwa Lines, Surat. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Gorakhpur No. 42 at Freemasons' Hall Civil Lines, Gorakhpur.
Mark Lodge Hubli No. 66 at Masonic Temple Hubli. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Quarries No. 90 at Freemasons' Hall 53, Shastri Marg Jhansi-284 001.
Mark Lodge Dharwar No. 97 at Masonic Hall, Michgans Orchard Dharwad.

23 Sun
Lodge Clair No. 57 at Freemasons’ Hall Meerut.
Lodge Matheran No. 135 at Masonic Hall, Civil Lines, Nagpur.
Lodge Colonel Choudhary No. 201 at Freemasons' Hall 4th Line, Siddartha Nagar, Guntur 6.
Lodge Kailashpat No. 223 at Masonic Hall, The Mall, Kanpur.
Lodge Kashi Nath No. 231 at Masonic Complex, Durga Enclave, Near Suresh Sharma Nagar, Bareilly.
Lodge Chandigarh No. 241 at Freemasons' Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh.
Lodge Vanchindad No. 273 at Freemasons' Hall Jayasankar, Anandevalleeswaram, Kollam.
Lodge Freedom No. 296 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Kerala Masters No. 309 at Ernakulam Masonic Hall, Thrikkakara, Kochi. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Travancore No. 329 at Freemasons' Hall Vazhuthacaud Trivandrum 695 014.
Lodge Bheemli No. 338 at Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple, Beach Road, Visakhapatnam.
Lodge Rapti No. 355 at Freemasons Hall, Gorakhpur
Chapter Chamba No. 26 at Freemasons Hall, Ferozepur Cantt.
Chapter Kistna No. 27 at Freemason's Hall Vijayawada
Mark Lodge Saragarhi No. 11 at Freemasons Hall, Kartar Singh Sarabha, Nagar, Ludhiana.
R.A.M. Lodge Abraham No. 6 at Freemasons’ Hall Bellary 4. - Installation Meeting.

24 Mon
Lodge Engineers No. 120 at H.N.Merchant Masonic Hall, 469, Laxman Rao Kirloskar Marg, Kirkee, Pune 411 003.
Lodge Noshir Chenoy No. 187 at St.John's Hall Secunderabad.
Lodge Justice Dinshah Madon No. 210 at Freemasons' Hall Damodardas Sukhadwala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Indus No. 284 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.

25 Tue
Lodge Tirupur No. 324 at Poppys Hotel Avanashi Road, Tirumurugan Poondi, Tirupur.

26 Wed
Lodge Mount Everest Lebong No. 52 at Freemasons’ Hall, 19, Park Street, Kolkata.
Lodge United Services No. 58 at Freemasons’ Hall 2, Primrose Road Bangalore 560 025.
Lodge East & West No. 127 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Ramaprasad No. 228 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Lodge Vijaynagar No. 279 at Freemasons' Hall Kallahalli Road Hospet.
Lodge Ishwar No. 299 at Freemasons' Hall Qudsia Bagh Delhi.
Lodge Raisina Hill No. 322 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Chapter Cyrus No. 14 at Freemasons Hall Damodardas Sukhdawala Marg Fort Mumbai - Installation Meeting.
Chapter Bhogilal Shah No. 39 at Freemason's Hall Civil Lines, Nagpur.
Chapter Justice Dinshah Madon No. 69 at Freemason's Hall 9, Exhibition Road Pune - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge William Jairotary No. 44 at Freemasons' Hall (Behind Telegraph Off.) The Mall, Kanpur. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Vijayanagar No. 84 at Vijayanagar Freemasons' Hall, Kallahalli Road, Hospet.
R.A.M. Lodge Sundaram Jairotary No. 44 at Freemasons’ Hall The Mall, Kanpur - Installation Meeting.

27 Thu
Lodge Morland No. 25 at Freemasons’ Hall Goshamahal Baradari Masonic Temple, Hyderabad 500 012.
Lodge Accountants No. 194 at Freemasons' Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore, Chennai 8.
Mark Lodge Mallet, Chisel No. 7 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Chilka No.69 at Hotel Moti Berhampur.

28 Fri
Lodge Berar No. 28 at Amravati Camp Masonic Lodge Hall, Amaravati Camp.
Lodge Fraternity And Perseverance No. 31 at Freemasons’ Hall Varanasi Cantt.
Lodge Jennings No. 102 at Freemasons’ Hall Damodardas Sukhadawala Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001.
Lodge Punjab No. 129 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge University No. 142 at Visakhapatnam Hamilton Memorial Masonic Temple, Beach Road, Visakhapatnam.
Lodge Seven Stars No. 225 at Masonic Temple, 232, Race Course, Coimbatore. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Star Of Delhi No. 328 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Chapter St.J ohn's No. 2 at Freemason's Hall 14, Ethiraj Salai, Egmore Chennai
Chapter Eureka No. 6 at Freemason's Hall No. 2, Primrose Road Bangalore.
Chapter Sundaram No. 68 at Freemason's Hall sector 18-B Chandigarh.
Mark Lodge Yadavindra No. 85 at Freemasons' Hall Sector 18-B, Chandigarh. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Ernakulam No. 93 at Ernakulam Masonic Hall Thrikkakara Cochin 682 033.
Mark Lodge Taj Mehal No. 114 at Freemason's Hall 112, Taj Road Agra Cantt.
R.A.M. Lodge Pragati No. 75 at Freemasons' Hall Qudsia Bagh Delhi 110 054. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Ernakulam No. 93 at Ernakulam Masonic Hall, Thrikkakara Kochi-682025

29 Sat
Lodge Central India No. 84 at Freemasons’ Hall 4, A.B.Road Indore.
Lodge Chhattisgarh No. 85 at Freemasons’ Hall Raipur.
Lodge Raza Jubilee No. 132 at Freemasons' Hall Janpath, New Delhi 110 001.
Lodge Kohinoor No. 139 at Freemasons' Hall Kaisargarh Palace J.L.Nehru Marg, Jaipur.
Lodge Mangalore No. 156 at Hotel Pentagon Pumpwell, Mangalore 2.
Lodge Bharathi No.161 at 42, Eswaran Koil Street, Pondicherry 605 001. - Installation Meeting.
Lodge Kakinada No. 199 at Freemasons' Hall Kakinada.
Lodge Kottayam No. 245 at V.O.Markos Masonic Hall, Vadavathoor, Kottayam 10.
Lodge Jyothi No. 253 at Freemasons' Hall Suramangalam Salem 5.
Lodge Pearl City No. 290 at Freemason's Hall, V.M.S. Nagar, Tuticorin 628 002
Lodge Aruvi No. 293 at T.D.Arunachalam Hall, Madurai Road, Tenkasi.
Lodge Nagendra No. 348Deoria
Mark Lodge Hira No. 51 at Freemasons' Hall Lucknow. - Installation Meeting.
Mark Lodge Tuticorin No. 88 at Rotary House of Friendship South Cotton Road Tuticorin. - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Bhushan No. 51 at Freemasons’ Hall Sarojini Naidu Marg, Lucknow - Installation Meeting.
R.A.M. Lodge Venkateswara No. 73 at Masonic Temple Cochin 682 507 - Installation Meeting.

This calendar is based on the regular meeting dates of lodges. It is possible that a lodge might have changed its meeting on a particular day by dispensation. Visitors are requested to contact the respective secretaries of lodges for correct information.
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Re: Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

Postby admin » Tue Feb 18, 2020 2:26 am

Part 3 of 4

CRAFT LODGES ARRANGED STATION WISE

STATION / LODGE NAME & NO. / DAY OF MEETING


Agra Star of Agra, No.36 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Ahmedabad Fellowship, No.140 4th Saturday (Except May)
Ajmer Friendship, No.47 1st Saturday (In March 2nd Saturday)
Aligarh Light Of Aligarh, No.219 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Allahabad Independence With Philanthropy,No.2 Second Friday (Except June)
Allahabad Unity, No.29 3rd Friday (Except May, June)
Allahabad Kamal At Sangam, No.266 1st Saturday(Except May & June)
Allahabad G.P.Tandon, No.295 4th Saturday (Except May & June)
Alleppey Alleppey, No.275 3rd Thursday Of Every Month
Ambala Cantt. Charity, No.8 First Wednesday Of Every Month
Amravati Camp Berar, No.28 4th Friday Of Every Month
Amritsar Universal Brotherhood, No.100 1st Saturday (Except July, Aug. ,Sept.)
Anakapalle Steel City, No.339 1st Sunday Of Every Month
Anakapalli Ramalinga, No.265 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Asansol Asansol, No.251 2nd Sunday (Except May, June ,Oct)
Aurangabad Ellora, No.343 2nd Saturday In Every Month
Azamgarh Friendship On Tamsa, No.303 1st Saturday Except May & June
Bangalore Bangalore, No.15 2nd Tuesday Of Every Month
Bangalore United Services, No.58 4th Wednesday Of Every Month
Bangalore Gibbs, No.86 3rd Thursday Of Every Month
Bangalore Star Of The South, No.101 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Bangalore Thirunal, No.179 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Bangalore Sainik, No.196 2nd Monday Of Every Month
Bangalore Professionals, No.268 2nd Wednesday Of Every Month
Bangalore Sanjeevini, No.300 1st Friday (Jan, Mar, May, July, ,Sept ,Nov)
Bangalore Karnataka Masters, No.325 1st Sunday Of Feb May, Aug , Nov
Bangalore Saatvik, No.370 3rd Monday Of Every Month
Bareilly Kashi Nath, No.231 4th Sunday (Except May & June)
Baroda Tyrrell Leith, No.43 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Baroda Baroda, No.239 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Barrackpore Ubique, No.53 1st Sunday Of Every Month
Belgaum Victoria, No.9 First Saturday Of Every Month
Bellary Goodwill, No.5 Second Saturday Of Every Month
Berhampur Utkal, No.193 2nd Thursday Of Every Month
Bhopal Bhopal, No.154 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Bhopal Cherian, No.183 3rd Tuesday of (Jan, Mar May July Sept, Nov
Bhopal arawtar, No.202 4th Saturday (Except April & May)
Bhopal Sanchi, No.247 2nd Saturday (Except May & Jun)
Bhopal Bhojpur Past Masters, No.261 2nd Friday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bhopal Sabarmati, No.271 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Bhopal Vindhyachal, No.305 1st Saturday (Except Jan, Mar ,May ,Jul ,Sep ,Nov)
Bhopal Bhojpal, No.372 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Bhubaneswar Lingaraj, No.307 3rd Thursday Of Every Month
Calicut Calicut, No.237 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Chandigarh Yadavindra, No.141 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Chandigarh Chandimandir, No.238 2nd Monday In Jan , Mar ,May ,Jul ,Sep, Nov
Chandigarh Chandigarh, No.241 4th Sunday (Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec)
Chandigarh Mount Shivalik, No.283 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Chennai Mount, No.14 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Chennai Carnatic, No.39 3rd Saturday (Except May & June)
Chennai Justitia, No.82 2nd Saturday Of Every Month (Except May & June)
Chennai Asoka, No.93 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Chennai Madras Masters, No.103 1st & 3rd Meet Coinciding With Rgl 2nd&4th On 1st Jun,1st Dec
Chennai Shanthi, No.146 2nd Friday(Except May & June)
Chennai S Brahadeeswara, No.150 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Chennai Vidya, No.164 1st Monday Of Every Month
Chennai Srinivasa Gopala, No.190 1st Friday (Except May & June)
Chennai C.A.Ramakrishnan, No.192 4th Saturday (Except May, June, Dec)
Chennai Accountants, No.194 3rd Thursday (Except May)
Chennai Veeraswami, No.200 1st Friday (Except May & June)
Chennai Harmony, No.217 1st Thursday (Except Jan, May, June, Oct) (Last Friday In Apr & 1st Sat In July)
Chennai Om Vighneswara, No.218 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Chennai Ramaprasad, No.228 4th Wednesday (Except April, May, June)
Chennai Mount Charity, No.232 2nd Thursday Of Every Month
Chennai Chennai, No.317 1st Saturday (Except April To June)
Chennai Millennium, No.327 3rd Saturday (Except Apr, May, Jun, Dec)
Chennai Engineers, No.340 1st Wednesday Except May And June
Chennai G.K.Selvarajan, No.365 4th Friday Of Every Month (Except May & June)
Chennai Prudentia, No.369 1st Saturday In Jan, Mar, Apr, Sep, Oct, Dec & 2nd Saturday In Aug, Nov, Ist Wednesday In Feb And One Regular Outstation Meeting In The Month Of May, Jun Or Jul At Any Masonic Center In S.I.
Chikkamagalur Malnad, No.356 4th Saturday Of Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Chittoor Murray Hammick, No.90 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Cochin Susruta, No.298 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Cochin Kerala Masters, No.309 Penultimate Sunday In Feb., May, Aug, Nov
Cochin Ananth, No.315 2nd Sunday Of Every Month
Cochin Vembanad, No.319 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Cochin Karunya, No.360 First Tuesday Of Every Month
Coimbatore Coimbatore, No.172 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Coimbatore Concord, No.204 1st Saturday (Feb, April, June, Aug, Oct, Dec)
Coimbatore G.K.Devarajulu, No.221 3rd Tuesday (Except Mar, May, Dec)
Coimbatore Seven Stars, No.225 Last Friday (Except Jan, May & Sept)
Coimbatore Zenith, No.258 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Coimbatore Round Table, No.282 2nd Tuesday (Except Apr, May, Dec)
Coimbatore Meridian, No.287 3rd Saturday (Except May & Dec)
Courtallam Aruvi, No.293 Last Saturday (Feb, April, Jun To Aug, Nov)
Cuttack Barabati, No.323 1st Thursday Of Every Month
Dehradun Siwalik Dr.Durga Prasad, No.62 3rd Thursday Of Every Month
Delhi Jumna, No.18 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Delhi Pragati, No.267 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Delhi Ishwar, No.299 4th Wednesday Of Every Month
Delhi Civil Lines, No.310 4th Saturday (Except Apr & Jun)
Delhi Maharaja, No.311 3rd Friday (Except May, June)
Delhi Mayur, No.333 2nd Monday (Jan, Mar, July, Sept, Nov
Deoria Nagendra, No.348 Last Saturday In Jan, Feb, Apr, Jul, Sep, Nov
Dhanbad Dhanbad, No.95 1st Friday Of Every Month
Dharwad Dharwad, No.54 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Ernakulam Ernakulam, No.243 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Erode Kalingaraya, No.220 4th Sunday Of Every Month
Faizabad Ajodhya-On-Sarju, No.13 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Faridabad Rohilla Star, No.35 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Ferozepore Cantt Northern Star, No.21 1st Monday Of Every Month
Gadag Kritapura, No.357 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Ghaziabad Jailene, No.230 2nd Saturday (Except May, June)
Gobichettipalayam Sakthi, No.288 2nd Sunday (Except May, Sep, Dec)
Gorakhpur Nipal, No.38 1st Thursday Of Every Month
Gorakhpur Wallace, No.99 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Gorakhpur Gorakhpur, No.157 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Gorakhpur Lions Of Eastern India, No.182 1st Wednesday (Feb, April, June, Aug, Nov, Dec)
Gorakhpur Gorakhnath Past Masters, No.286 1st Saturday (Jan, Apr, July, Oct)
Gorakhpur Poorvanchal, No.345 2nd Sunday Of Apr, Sep, Dec
Gorakhpur Rapti, No.355 4th Sunday Of Jan, Feb, Mar, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec
Guntur Colonel Choudhary, No.201 Last Sunday Of Every Month
Gurgaon Dronacharya, No.285 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Guwahati Kamrup, No.302 3rd Saturday (Except Jun, Jul)
Gwalior Scindia, No.88 2nd Saturday (Except May & June)
Hisar Nityanand, No.330 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Hospet Vijaynagar, No.279 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Hubli Hubli, No.44 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Hubli Lyons Centenary, No.274 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Hyderabad Deccan, No.20 2nd Saturday Of Every Month (Except May)
Hyderabad Morland, No.25 4th Thursday Of Every Month (Except May)
Hyderabad Hyderabad, No.50 1st Friday Of Every Month
Hyderabad Perfect, No.264 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Hyderabad Bhagyanagar Masters, No.326 2nd Friday Of Mar, Jun, Sep And Dec
Hyderabad Engineers, No.336 3rd Friday Except May
Hyderabad Keys, No.297 1st Wednesday (Except May)
Indore Malwa, No.37 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Indore Bhore Ghaut, No.83 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Indore Central India, No.84 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Indore Port Of Bombay, No.153 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Indore Indore Past Masters, No.368 3rd Friday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Jabalpur Narmada, No.224 2nd Monday Of Every Month
Jaipur Kohinoor, No.139 3rd Wednesday Of Every Month
Jalandhar Harmandir, No.170 2nd Sunday Except Jul, Aug
Jalandhar Harballabh, No.240 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Jammu Raghunathji, No.255 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Jamshedpur Tata, No.115 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Jamshedpur Light Of Zoroaster, No.222 4th Saturday (Feb, April, June, Aug, Nov, Dec)
Jhansi Rock Of Gwalior, No.16 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Jhansi Rani Jhansi, No.177 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Jhansi Bundelkhand, No.306 1st Monday In Every Alternate Month
Jodhpur Marwar, No.301 2nd Saturday (1st Saturday In March)
Jorehut Jorehaut, No.353 1st Thursday Of Jun, Sep, Nov & 1st Sunday Of Aug
Kakinada Kakinada, No.199 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Kalka Excelsior, No.60 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Kannur Cannanore, No.234 1st Friday Of Every Month
Kannur Western Star, No.363 3rd Sunday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kanpur Ganges, No.48 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Kanpur Hindustan, No.114 1st Wednesday (Except June & July)
Kanpur Ancient Landmarks, No.130 3rd Wednesday Of Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sept, Nov
Kanpur Suryoday, No.143 3rd Saturday (Except May & June)
Kanpur Aryavarta, No.145 2nd Wednesday (Except May & June)
Kanpur Shah Jairotary, No.160 1st Saturday (Except May & June)
Kanpur Ratan, No.175 2nd Monday (Except June & July)
Kanpur Rai Bahadur Behari Lal, No.215 1st Sunday (Except June, July)
Kanpur Kailashpat, No.223 4th Sunday (Except May & June)
Kanpur Fragrance, No.236 2nd Sunday (Except May & June)
Kanpur Gopal, No.252 3rd Sunday (Except June & July)
Kanpur Siddhartha, No.361 3rd Friday Of Every Month Except May & June
Kanyakumari Vivekananda, No.254 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Karnal Karan, No.244 2nd Wed In Every Month
Kasargode Kasargode, No.257 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Khandwa Coronation, No.64 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Kharagpur Unity & Perseverance, No.73 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Kirkee (Pune) Level, No.41 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Kirkee (Pune) Engineers, No.120 4th Monday Of Every Month
Kirkee (Pune) Raksha Dal, No.166 1st Wednesday Every Month, In Jan.2nd Wed.
Kirkee (Pune) Poona Past Masters, No.167 1st Saturday (Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
Kochi Sarvothama, No.176 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Kodaikanal Kodaikanal, No.235 2nd Saturday (Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov, Dec)
Kolkata Anchor & Hope, No.1 Third Tuesday (Except Oct.)
Kolkata Courage With Humanity, No.3 Third Saturday (Except May, Oct)
Kolkata St.David In The East, No.11 Second Saturday (Except Oct.)
Kolkata St.Thomas In The East, No.12 3rd Saturday (Except May & Oct)
Kolkata Mount Everest Lebong, No.52 Last Wednesday (Except May & Oct)
Kolkata Peace & Concord, No.63 1st Tuesday (Except May & Oct)
Kolkata Duke Of Abercorn, No.67 Last Saturday (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov.)
Kolkata H.M.Rustomjee, No.68 1st Saturday (Except March & Oct.)
Kolkata Good Fellowship, No.71 2nd Wednesday (Except May & June)
Kolkata Sir Andrew Fraser, No.72 3rd Tuesday In Jan, Feb, Mar, Jun, Jul, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kolkata St.Mary, No.75 1st Tuesday (Except Oct)
Kolkata True Brotherhood, No.76 2nd Saturday (Except May & Oct.)
Kolkata Stanley, No.78 1st Friday (Except June, Oct.)
Kolkata Jagat Banerjee, No.98 3rd Friday (Except Oct.)
Kolkata Barr Pollock, No.125 4th Tuesday (Except (Feb, May, July, Oct, Dec)
Kolkata Charterd Accountants, No.152 2nd Saturday (Except Mar, May, Oct.)
Kolkata Shyam Kinkor, No.184 1st Saturday (Except May & Oct)
Kolkata Sisir Ghosh, No.191 3rd Tuesday (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov)
Kolkata Chetan Shahani, No.198 2nd Friday (Jan, Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Nov.)
Kolkata Somesh Sengupta, No.346 1st Thursday In May Aug Nov Mar
Kolkata Calcutta, No.349 2nd Tuesday Of Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Kolkata Professionals, No.350 2nd Friday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Kollam Vanchinad, No.273 1st Sunday Of Every Month
Kota (Rajstan) Chambal, No.242 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Kottayam Kottayam, No.245 Last Saturday (Dec In 3rd Saturday)
Kumbakonam Mahamaham, No.341 2nd Saturday Except Apr, May, June
Kurnool (A.P.) Rayala Sundaram, No.181 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Lucknow Morning Star, No.7 First Saturday Of Every Month
Lucknow Independence, No.33 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Lucknow UP Masters, No.134 3rd Sunday (Jan, Apr, Sep, Nov)
Lucknow Bharat Jyoti, No.144 1st Sunday of Every Month
Ludhiana Vishwakarma, No.173 3rd Saturday (Except May, Jun, Jul)
Madikeri Coorg, No.55 2nd Tuesday (Except June, July, Aug.)
Madurai Pandyan, No.49 1st Saturday (Except May)
Madurai Rajasabai, No.212 3rd Saturday (Except May )
Madurai Meenakshi, No.269 4th Saturday (Except May)
Mangalore Mangalore, No.156 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Mangalore Prerana, No.313 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Margao- Goa Gomantak, No.248 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Mathura Cantt. Ligonier, No.51 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Meerut Hope, No.4 First Saturday Of Every Month
Meerut Clair, No.57 Last Friday Of Every Month
Miraj Sahyadri, No.351 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Mohali S.A.S.Nagar, No.291 2nd Sunday (Except Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec)
Moradabad Fidelity, No.40 3rd Wednesday Of Every Month
Mumbai Eastern Star, No.17 3rd Tuesday In Jan, Mar, Jun, Jul, Sep, Nov
Mumbai Islam, No.27 3rd Saturday (Except May)
Mumbai Aryan, No.30 1st Monday In Jan, Feb, May, Jun, Sep & Nov
Mumbai Hiram, No.32 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Mumbai The Sir Lawrence Jenkins, No.70 4th Saturday (Except May & Oct.)
Mumbai Deolali, No.91 4th Saturday (Except July & Aug.)
Mumbai Jennings, No.102 4th Friday (Except May, Oct & Dec)
Mumbai Cornwallis, No.107 3rd Friday (Except Mar, May, Jul, Sept, Nov)
Mumbai Reginald Spence, No.109 3rd Tuesday (Except May, June, Oct)
Mumbai Mother India, No.110 3rd Friday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Mumbai Vishwanath, No.111 2nd Wednesday (Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct & Dec)
Mumbai Sohrab Davar, No.113 1st Wednesday (Except Jan, May, Sept)
Mumbai Star Of India, No.118 2nd Thursday (Except May)
Mumbai Ashok, No.122 Last Working Day (Except Feb, May, Sep, Dec)
Mumbai Republic, No.123 Last Week Day (Except Feb, May, Oct, Dec)
Mumbai Chartered Accountant, No.131 3rd Thursday In Feb, Jun, Oct,, Dec
Mumbai Star Of Rampur, No.136 1st Saturday (Jan, Feb, March, June, Aug, Sep, Nov ,Dec)
Mumbai Artificers, No.138 3rd Friday (Except May & Oct)
Mumbai Fulchand Patel, No.163 2nd Saturday (Except April & Oct)
Mumbai Manockjee Cursetjee, No.185 2nd Monday (Jan., Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov)
Mumbai Golden Pagoda, No.195 2nd Friday Of Every Month
Mumbai Jehangir Mody, No.205 Ist Fri (Jul) ,2nd Fri (June),3rd Fri (Mar, Sep.),4th Fri(Jan)
Mumbai Unity, No.207 1st Tuesday (Jul, Nov, Dec And 2nd Thurs In Aug)
Mumbai Khurshedji Cama Rustomji, No.209 3rd Thursday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Nov
Mumbai Justice Dinshah Madon, No.210 4th Monday In Jan, Mar, Jun, Jul, Sep, Nov
Mumbai Noshir Mehta, No.246 3rd Wed In Jan, Feb, Apr, Jul, Nov & 1st Fri In Jun, Aug, Oct
Mumbai Freedom, No.296 Last Sunday (Except May, Aug, Oct)
Mussoorie Dalhousie, No.10 First Saturday (March To Dec.)
Muzaffarnagar Victory, No.213 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Mysore Mysore, No.34 First Saturday Of Every Month
Mysore Jayachamaraja, No.308 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Nagpur St.Andrew's, No.6 Second Saturday Of Every Month
Nagpur Radiance, No.116 1st Friday (Except Jun & Oct)
Nagpur Benevolence, No.117 2nd Sunday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct & 30th Of Dec.
Nagpur Sunder Raza, No.133 2nd Wednesday In Every Month
Nagpur Matheran, No.135 4th Sunday Of Every Month
Nagpur Bhogilal Shah, No.147 1st Wednesday Of Every Month
Nagpur Gondwana, No.226 1st Sunday (Except Apr, May)
Nagpur Trimurty, No.294 3rd Sunday Of Every Month
Nagpur Golden Orange, No.304 3rd Wednesday In Every Month
Nagpur Nagpur Past Masters, No.342 3rd Friday Of Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Nagpur Vivekananda, No.367 First Thursday Of Every Month
Nainital Kumaon, No.148 2nd Monday (March To Nov And 1st Sunday In Dec.)
Nashik Nashik, No.358 2nd Saturday In Jan, Mar, Apr, Jun, Jul ,Aug, Sep, Nov, Dec
New Delhi St.John The Evangelist, No.22 3rd Wednesday Of Every Month
New Delhi Industry, No.23 2nd Saturday (Except June)
New Delhi Truine Brotherhood, No.42 Last Day (Feb To Nov & 1st Sunday In Jan)
New Delhi Takht-I-Suliman, No.65 29th Of Every Month Except February
New Delhi Elysium, No.69 3rd Thursday (Except June & July)
New Delhi Imperial, No.96 2nd Friday Of Every Month
New Delhi Raisina, No.97 2nd Wednesday Of Every Month
New Delhi Raza, No.112 1st Thursday Of Every Month
New Delhi Sunder Heera, No.119 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
New Delhi Bharat Mata Masters, No.121 1st Friday (Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
New Delhi Indraprastha, No.124 1st Saturday (Except Jan, June, July)
New Delhi Samyukta Sena, No.126 1st Wednesday (Except May, June, July)
New Delhi East & West, No.127 4th Wednesday Of Every Month
New Delhi Irish Friendship, No.128 1st Friday (Except May, Jun, July)
New Delhi Punjab, No.129 4th Friday (Except May & June)
New Delhi Raza Jubilee, No.132 29th Day Except June & Dec .And Last Day In February
New Delhi Justitia, No.137 3rd Friday (Except June & July)
New Delhi Formanite, No.155 1st Saturday Of Every Month
New Delhi H.H.The Nawab Of Rampur, No.178 3rd Wednesday (Except May & June)
New Delhi Professor Thacker, No.188 3rd Monday Of Every Month
New Delhi Rajdhani, No.197 30th Day Of Jan, March, May, July, Sept, Nov
New Delhi Dharma, No.208 3rd Friday (Except Feb, June Oct)
New Delhi United Nations, No.227 2nd Monday (Except June, Aug, Nov)
New Delhi Dhanvantri, No.272 3rd Sunday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
New Delhi Accountants, No.277 2nd Thursday Of Every Month
New Delhi Justice Prakash Narain, No.281 2nd Friday (Except June, July)
New Delhi Indus, No.284 4th Monday Of Every Month
New Delhi Bhrigu Chetan, No.321 2nd Wed Of Every Month And 2nd Sun Of Jan
New Delhi Raisina Hill, No.322 4th Wednesday (Except May & June)
New Delhi Star Of Delhi, No.328 4th Friday Except June
New Delhi Sincerity, No.362 Ist Sunday Of Every Month
New Delhi Pinnacle, No.364 4th Saturday (Except June & July)
New Delhi Rising Star, No.366 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
New Delhi Golden Jubilee, No.373 3rd Wednesday Of Every Month (Except June, July)
Noida Swarn Jayanti, No.312 2nd Friday -Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Oorgaum Southern Cross, No.24 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Ooty Ooty, No.292 4th Saturday(Except July, Nov, Dec)
Palai Palai, No.318 1st Saturday (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Oct ,Dec)
Palayamcottai Sourthern Cross, No.46 Penultimate Saturday Of Every Month
Palghat Palghat, No.159 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Panchgani Panchgani, No.276 3rd Sat In Feb, Apr, Sep, Dec At Panchgani & 3rd Tues In May, Jun, Jul, Oct, Nov Jan At Pune
Pathanamthitta Sabaridesam, 374 2nd Sunday of February, April, June August, October & December
Patiala Phulkian, No.94 2nd Saturday of Every Month
Patna Patna, No.105 2nd Friday (Except Jul, Aug, Oct,)
Pondicherry Bharathi, No.161 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Pratapgarh Pachauri, No.214 1st Saturday (Except May And June)
Pratapgarh Bhola, No.344 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Pune Pestonji Kapadia, No.149 2nd Monday Of Every Month
Pune General Willams, No.165 3rd Thursday Of Every Month
Pune Dr.Maneckji Modi, No.256 3rd Friday Of Every Month
Raipur Chhattisgarh, No.85 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Raipur Bhilai, No.169 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Rajahmundry Godavery, No.89 1st Sunday Of Every Month
Rajkot Kathiawar, No.59 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Rajkot, Baroda, Ahmedabad, Surat Gujarat Past Masters, No.371 Last Sunday Of The Month Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Ranchi Ranchi, No.104 1st Tuesday (Except May & June)
Roorkee Gen.Williams Roorkee, No.151 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Saharanpur Comrades, No.66 3rd Wednesday Of Every Month
Salem Salem, No.79 Penultimate Sat (In Dec. When On Sat Falling Between 15th & 21st
Salem Jyothi, No.253 Last Saturday (Except April)
Sant Kabir Nagar Sant Kabir, No.347 3rd Sunday In Jan., April, Jun, Jul, Sept, & Dec
Secunderabad Mayo, No.19 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Secunderabad Ekram, No.45 1st Thursday Of Every Month
Secunderabad Italia Williams Manian, No.158 1st Tuesday Of Every Month
Secunderabad Raksha Sena, No.162 2nd Wednesday Of Every Month
Secunderabad Naoshir Chenoy, No.187 4th Monday (Except May)
Secunderabad Eagle, No.334 2nd Tuesday (Jan, April, July & Oct)
Secunderabad The Model, No.335 1st Saturday (Except Feb, May, Aug, Nov.)
Secundrabad Secuderabad, No.211 2nd Monday (Except May)
Shillong Shillong, No.61 3rd Thursday (April To Oct., 10 Day Of March, 1st Thursday Of Nov
Shimla Prospect, No.92 1st Wednesday (April To Dec.) (2nd Sat .In March)
Shimla Himparbat, No.233 2nd Saturday (April To Dec)
Shimla Kinner Kailash, No.320 Last Sunday (April To Dec)
Silchar Light On The Barak, No.354 1st Thursday Of Apr, Jul, Oct
Srikakulam Kalinga, No.337 3rd Sunday Of Every Month
Surat Hamilton, No.26 Third Saturday Of Every Month
Surat Dr.Sarosh Bhacca, No.229 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Thanjavur Goodwill & Peace, No.189 3rd Saturday (Except May)
Thiruvananthapuram Travancore, No.329 4th Sunday Except Dec
Tiruchirapalli Trinity, No.171 3rd Saturday (Except May)
Tiruchirapalli Tiruchirapalli, No.203 2nd Saturday (Except May)
Tiruchirapalli Padmagiri, No.260 4th Saturday (Except May)
Tirunelveli Tamiravarni, No.289 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Tirupur Tirupur, No.324 Last Tuesday Except June & Dec
Trichur Trichur, No.180 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Trivandrum Trivandrum, No.168 3rd Sunday Of Every Month
Trivandrum Ananthapadmanabha, No.280 Friday Preceding 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Tuticorin Pearl City, No.290 Last Saturday Of Every Month
Udaipur Mewar, No.259 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Udaipur Karni, No.332 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Valparai Anamallai, No.106 2nd Thursday (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sept, Nov) 2nd Saturday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Varanasi Fraternity And Preserverance, No.31 4th Friday Of Every Month
Varanasi Atal Sen, No.77 3rd Saturday (Jan, Feb, Mar, Oct, Nov, Dec.)
Varanasi Sunut, No.80 4th Saturday Of Every Month
Varanasi Fragrance Of Brotherely Love, No.250 2nd Saturday (Except May & June)
Varanasi Buddha, No.270 1st Friday Of Every Month
Vashi Navi Mumbai, No.359 4th Friday Of Jan, Mar, Apr, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Nov, Dec
Vidisha Vidisha, No.262 1 st Saturday Of Every Month
Vijayawada Burroughs Strange, No.87 Penultimate Saturday Of Every Month
Vijayawada Goddess Kanakadurga, No.331 2nd Saturday of Every Month
Visakhapatnam Waltair, No.56 3rd Saturday Of Every Month
Visakhapatnam University, No.142 4th Friday Of Every Month
Visakhapatnam Coromandel, No.186 2nd Saturday Of Every Month
Visakhapatnam Andhra Masters, No.316 2nd Sunday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Visakhapatnam Bheemli, No.338 4th Sunday Of Every Month
Vizianagaram Nicopolis, No.81 Last Tuesday Of Every Month (In Dec. On 31st)
Warrangal Abhyarudhra, No.278 4th Saturday (Except May)
Wynad Wynad, No.314 4th Saturday of Every Month
Yamunanagar Sindhuvan, No.216 1st Saturday Of Every Month
Yercaud Montfort, No.249 2nd Saturday (Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec)


***

ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER'S ARRANGED STATION WISE

LOCATION NO. / CHAPTER NAME / DAY OF MEETING


Agra Jumna, No.15 Last Friday In Jan, Mar, Sep, Nov.
Ahmedabad Pestonji Kapadia, No.48 1st Saturday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sep & Nov.
Ajmer Ajmer, No.23 1st Saturday In Jan, Sep, Nov And Sun Following 2nd Saturday In Mar
Allahabad Sandeman, No.7 4th Friday(Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov)
Ambala Umballa, No.80 1st Sunday In Jan, Mar, Sep & Nov.
Bangalore Eureka, No.6 3rd Fri (April, Jun, Oct, Dec) 4th Fri, (Feb, Aug)
Bangalore Mahadevan, No.52 3rd Tuesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bangalore Gibbs, No.99 1st Thursday(Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
Belgaum Victoria, No.96 2nd Tuesday (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct)
Bellary Goodwill, No.12 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Berhampur (0rissa) Taptapani, No.117 2nd Thursday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Bhopal Keystone Of Western India, No.4 1st Saturday In Jan, Apr, July, Oct
Bhopal Jai Hind, No.46 Any Day In Jan, Apr, July, Dec
Calicut Calicut, No.94 Last Monday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Cannanore Western Star, No.84 4th Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Chandigarh Sundaram, No.68 4th Friday In Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Chandigarh Yadavindra, No.127 Ist Saturday Of Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Chennai St.John's, No.2 4th Friday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Chennai Madras, No.13 2nd Wednesday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct.
Chennai Discovery, No.42 1st Tuesday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sep, Nov.
Chennai Sri Brahadeeswara, No.45 3rd Saturday In Feb, June, Aug, Nov
Chennai Justitia, No.65 1st Saturday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Nov
Chennai Om Vighneswara, No.82 2nd Wednesday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Chennai Chennai, No.97 4th Thursday (Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Chennai Dakshin Principals, No.103 3rd Sunday (Mar, Jul, Nov)
Chennai Accountants, No.104 1st Thursday (Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Chennai Millennium, No.108 2nd Tuesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Chennai Engineers, No.112 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Cochin Sarvothama, No.86 Last Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Coimbatore Concord, No.72 1st Monday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Coimbatore Coimbatore, No.91 4th Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Dehradun St.John The Baptist, No.3 1st Thursday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Delhi Chalmers, No.9 2nd Saturday(Mar, Jun, Sep.& Dec)
Delhi Pragati, No.88 4th Friday In March, May, Sept.& Dec
Dharwad Dharwad, No.116 3rd Sunday In Feb, June, Oct
Hospet Vijayanagar, No.93 2nd Wednesday(Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Hubli Dr.Ganesh Joshi, No.79 4th Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Hyderabad Hyderabad, No.58 4th Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Indore Bharat, No.75 2nd Friday In Mar, Jun, Sep.& Dec
Jhansi Star Of Gwalior, No.20 4th Saturday In Feb, Mar, Nov & Dec
Kanpur Shah Sundaram, No.51 4th Saturday(Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec)
Kanpur Bhupat Bhalla, No.60 3rd Monday In Jan, Mar, Apr, Jul, Oct
Kanpur Thacker Jairotary, No.64 3rd Fri In Apr, July, Oct, Dec & 3rd Tues In Feb.
Kanpur Dwarka, No.118 2nd Friday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sep, Nov
Kanyakumari Kanyakumari, No.87 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Kolkata New Union, No.8 3rd Wednesday (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov)
Kolkata Progress, No.18 3rd Monday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sep, Nov.
Kolkata Shamrock Rose & Thistle United, No.19 4th Wednesday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
Kolkata Ubique, No.29 2nd Saturday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Kolkata Discovery, No.53 2nd Monday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov
Kolkata Fortitude, No.55 1st Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Nov.
Kolkata The Calcutta Chapter, No.113 1st Thursday In Feb, Apr, Sep & Dec
Kolkata The Bengal, No.114 3rd Thursday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Kolkata Arunendra, No.123 Last Tuesday In Apr, Jul, Oct
Kottayam Kottayam, No.90 2nd Friday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Lucknow Ramsay, No.5 2nd Saturday In Mar, May, Jul, Nov
Ludhiana Udyog, No.83 3rd Saturday In Jan, Feb, March & April
Madikeri Coorg, No.107 2nd Tuesday In Mar, May, Sept.& st Tuesday In Dec
Madurai Pandyan, No.24 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, July, Oct
Mangalore Mangalore, No.67 1st Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Meerut Meerut, No.81 2nd Friday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Mumbai Cyrus, No.14 4th Wed In Feb. April, June, Aug, Oct, 1st Mon In Dec.
Mumbai Cornwallis, No.33 1st Wednesday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Dec.
Mumbai Republic, No.34 1st Friday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Mumbai Rao Bahadur Ranchhodbhai Patel, No.56 2nd Friday In Feb, April, July & Oct.
Mussoorie Deodar, No.85 3rd Saturday In Apr, Aug, Oct & Dec.
Mysore Mysore, No.31 3rd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Nagpur Bhogilal Shah, No.39 30th Day Of Jan, Mar, Jun, Aug, Oct & Dec
Nagpur Trinity, No.77 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep.& Dec.
Naini Tal Gabriel, No.11 4th Friday (April To November)
New Delhi Progress, No.10 4th Saturday In Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec.
New Delhi Raisina, No.37 3rd Thursday (Jan, March, May, July, Sept, Nov)
New Delhi The Irish, No.38 3rd Monday In Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept.
New Delhi Sunder Heera, No.40 31st Day (Jan, May, July, Aug, Oct) 30th Day Of March
New Delhi Samyukta Sena, No.41
New Delhi Ramchandra, No.50 3rd Monday(Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec)
New Delhi Bharat Mata Installed First Principals, No.62 2nd Tuesday In May, Sep & Dec
New Delhi Faridabad, No.70 3rd Tuesday In Feb, Aug, Oct, Dec.
New Delhi Kailash Perbat, No.98
New Delhi Bhrigu Chetan, No.102 4th Saturday Of Mar, May, Sep, Nov
New Delhi Star Of Delhi, No.105 2nd Tuesday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
New Delhi Accountants, No.110 2nd Monday In Jan, May, Aug, Nov
New Delhi Raisina Hill, No.121 1st Sunday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
New Delhi Elysium, No.122 3rd Sunday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Oorgaum Kgf Kindred Hope, No.100 4th Sunday (Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Palayamkottai Southern Cross, No.21 Penultimate Saturday (Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
Palghat Sri Janardhana, No.66 3rd Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Patiala Phulkian, No.35 4th Saturday In Jan, Feb, April, Oct, Nov.
Patna Tirhoot, No.25 1st Friday In Feb, Mar, Jul, Aug, Nov &Dec
Pondicherry Bharathi, No.106 2nd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Pune Friendship, No.47 2nd Friday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Pune Justice Dinshah Madon, No.69 4th Wednesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Pune Level, No.120 2nd Tuesday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Rajkot Saurashtra, No.73 3rd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov.
Saharanpur Himalaya, No.76 1st Wednesday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec.
Salem Salem, No.30 1st Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Secunderabad St.John's, No.1 2nd Tuesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Secunderabad Charminar, No.78 1st Wednesday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Secunderabad Triple Tau, No.126 1st Monday In Feb, May Aug, Nov
Shillong Shillong, No.49 3rd Tuesday In Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct
Shimla Prospect, No.54 4th Wednesday (Apr To Jun And Aug To Oct)
Thiruvananthapuram Travancore, No.119 4th Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Tiruchirapalli Trinity, No.63 Fri.Preceding, 3rd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Trichur Williams, No.95 2nd Saturday (Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Trivandrum Thiruvananthapuram, No.92 Sun Succeeding 2nd Sat In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Trivandrum Trivandrum, No.125 Sunday Following The Third Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Tuticorin Pearl City, No.111 Second Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Udaipur Ayodhya, No.59 Last Saturday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Nov, Dec
Vadodara Tyell Leith, No.28 4th Saturday In Jan, Mar, Aug, Nov
Varanasi Mount Everest, No.16 4th Saturday Of Jan, Feb, Mar, Sep, Nov
Varanasi Sudhansu Sen, No.74 1st Saturday In Feb,Jul,Oct,Dec.
Vijayawada Kistna, No.27 Sun Very Next To Penultimate Sat In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Visakhapatnam Waltair, No.17 1st Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Visakhapatnam Visakha, No.101 3rd Friday(Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec)
Vizianagaram Nicopolis, No.109 2nd Tuesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov

***

MARK LODGES ARRANGED STATION WISE

LOCATION / MARK LODGE NAME & NO. / DAY OF MEETING


Agra Cantt. Taj Mehal, No.114 Last Friday In Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Ahmedabad Pestonji Kapadia, No.35 1st Monday In Jan, Jun, Aug, Oct
Ajmer Friendship & Harmony, No.56 1st Saturday In Feb, Aug, Nov.& 2nd Saturday In March
Aligarh Jyoti, No.55 3rd Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Allahabad Durga, No.26 1st Friday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec
Ambala Charity, No.67 1st Sunday In Feb, Aug, Oct, Dec
Anakapalle Sarada, No.96 2nd Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Azamgarh Girdhar, No.116 2nd Sunday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bangalore Hiram, No.4 2nd Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Bangalore Gibbs, No.94 1st Thursday In Jan, Jun, Oct
Bangalore Techcity, No.111 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Belgaum Victoria, No.86 2nd Tuesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bellary Aubrey Saunders, No.6 4th Sunday In Jan, Apr, July, Oct
Berhampur Chilka, No.69 4th Thursday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bhopal Universal Brotherhood, No.23 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Bhopal Bhopal, No.54 1st Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Calicut Calicut, No.108 2nd Sunday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Cannanore Western Star, No.60 2nd Wednesday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec.
Chandigarh Chandigarh, No.61 2nd Saturday In Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Chandigarh Yadavindra, No.85 4th Friday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Chennai St.Mark's In The East, No.1 1st Fri In Jan, July, Oct & On St. Mark Day In April
Chennai Justitia, No.45 Last Saturday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sep, Nov
Chennai Mount, No.50 3rd Thursday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Chennai Unity, No.57 2nd Monday In Feb., May, Aug & Nov
Chennai Om Vighneswara, No.63 4th Monday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Chennai Chennai, No.92 3rd Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Chennai Dakshin Mark Masters, No.100 3rd Sunday In Mar, Jul, Nov
Chennai Accountants, No.101 1st Thursday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Chennai Millennium, No.106 2nd Tuesday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Chennai Engineers, No.110 2nd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov.
Chennai Prudentia, No.123 3rd Saturday In Apr, Jul, Oct, Dec
Chittoor Chittoor, No.81 2nd Saturday In Feb, Jun, Sep, Dec
Cochin Sarvothama, No.73 Last Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Cochin Ernakulam, No.93 Last Friday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Coimbatore G.K.Devarajulu, No.70 1st Thursday In Jan., Apr, Jul & Oct.
Coimbatore Coimbatore, No.79 1st Tuesday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Dehra Dun Voussior, No.8 1st Thurs (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov)
Delhi Lukis, No.20 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Delhi Pragati, No.75 4th Friday Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Dhanbad Dhanbad, No.71 2nd Friday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Dharwad Dharwad, No.97 4th Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Faridabad Rohilla Star, No.127 1st Saturday Of Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Ghaziabad Hindon River, No.126 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Gobichettipalayam Sakthi, No.121 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
/Erode
Gorakhpur Gorakhpur, No.42 4th Saturday In Jan, Feb, Mar & Apr
Gorakhpur Lions Of Eastern India, No.115 2nd Sunday Of Feb, Aug, Sep, Nov
Gurgaon (Haryana) Hira, No.51 1st Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Hospet Vijayanagar, No.84 4th Wednesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Hubli Hubli, No.66 4th Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Hyderabad Charminar, No.58 3rd Thursday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Indore Malwa, No.78 3rd Friday Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Jaipur Jaipur No. 129 2nd Saturday in Feb, Apr, Oct & Dec
Jalandhar Jalandhar, No.83 3rd Saturday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Jhansi Quarries, No.90 4th Saturday- Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kakinada Kakinada, No.124 2nd Sunday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Kanpur Sir John Edge, No.14 2nd Friday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct & Dec
Kanpur P.C.Kapur Vishwanathan, No.38 4th Saturday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Oct
Kanpur William Jairotary, No.44 4th Thursday In Apr, Sept, Nov & 4th Wed In Feb.
Kanpur Amar Nath, No.120 Friday In Jan, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kanyakumari Kanyakumari, No.76 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep.& Dec
Kolkata Capestone, No.3 Last Monday In Apr, Jul, Sep, And 1st Monday In Dec.
Kolkata Keystone, No.13 1st Wednesday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Kolkata Shyam & Narendra, No.24 2nd Wednesday In Feb, May, Aug, Dec.
Kolkata Sunil Singh Roy, No.46 Last Tuesday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Kolkata The Calcutta Mark Master Masons, 4th Thursday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov
Kolkata Bengal Mark Master Masons, No.113 3rd Thursday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov.
Kottayam V.O.Abraham, No.98 2nd Friday Of Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Lucknow Headstone Of The Corner, No.9 2nd Saturday (Jan, Apr, Jun, Sep)
Ludhiana Saragarhi, No.11 Last Sunday (Feb, Oct, Nov & Dec)
Madurai Kudal, No.17 2nd Saturday In Feb, Jun, Aug & Nov
Mangalore Mangalore, No.77 1st Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct.
Meerut Goodwill, No.64 3rd Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Mumbai Holmesdale In The East, No.2 2nd Thursday In Feb, June, Aug & Dec
Mumbai Friendship & Harmony, No.19 3rd Wednesday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec.
Mumbai Republic, No.28 2nd Monday In Feb, Apr, Jun & Oct
Mussoorie Mussoorie, No.80 3rd Wednesday In May, Jul, Sep & Nov.
Mysore Mysore, No.53 2nd Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Nagpur Nagpur, No.22 3rd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov.
Nagpur Orange City, No.122 4th Wednesday (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct)
New Delhi Fidelity, No.5 4th Saturday (Jan, May, Aug, Nov.)
New Delhi Mallet & Chisel, No.7 4th Thursday In Feb, May, Aug & Dec.
New Delhi Samyukta Sena, No.29 2nd Monday In Apr, Aug, Dec
New Delhi Sunder Heera, No.30 1st Friday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec.
New Delhi East & West, No.33 2nd Thursday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
New Delhi Raisina, No.87 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
New Delhi Anchor, No.91 1st Wednesday In Jan, May, Jul, Nov
New Delhi Indus, No.99 1st Thursday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
New Delhi Star Of Delhi, No.103 2nd Saturday (Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
New Delhi Bhrigu Chetan, No.104 4th Saturday In Apr, Jul, Oct And 4th Sunday Of January
New Delhi Accountants, No.107 2nd Monday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Nov
New Delhi Elysium, No.119 1st Tuesday In Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep, Nov
Palayamkottai Chera, No.16 Penultimate Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Palghat Palghat, No.59 4th Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Patna New Capestone, No.12 1st Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Puducherry Bharathi, No.109 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Pune Colonel Choudhary, No.37 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Pune Level, No.105 2nd Friday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Rajahmundry Godavery, No.89 3rd Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Rajkot Rajkot, No.48 3rd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Saharanpur Shakumbhri, No.68 2nd Wednesday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
Salem Salem, No.25 1st Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Secunderabad Srinivasagopala, No.31 Last Saturday Of Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct
Secunderabad Whitestone, No.128 2nd Tuesday In Mar & 4th Monday In May, Aug, Nov
Shillong Light In The East, No.102 4th Saturday In Apr, Jun, Aug, Dec
Shimla Pinnacle, No.10 3rd Wednesday In May To Oct
Shimla Prakash, No.74 3rd Saturday May, July, Sep & Nov.
Surat Professor Thacker, No.41 4th Saturday (Feb., June) 3rd Saturday In Oct
Thiruvananthapuram Travancore, No.118 4th Sunday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Thiruvananthapuram Trivandram, No.125
Tirchirapalli Srinivasa, No.43 Friday Preceding 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec.
Trivandrum Thiruvananthapuram, No.82 Sunday Following 2nd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Tuticorin Tuticorin, No.88 Last Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Udaipur Kohinoor, No.52 Last Saturday In Mar, Jul, Oc, Nov
Vadodara Sampatrao, No.21 4th Saturday (May, Aug, Nov.) 3rd Saturday In Feb
Varanasi Sundaram, No.47 2nd Saturday In Feb., April, August & Dec.
Varanasi Kashi Vishwanath, No.117 Forth Sunday In Jan, Mar, May, Aug, Oct
Vijayawada Coromandel, No.18 Sunday Very Next To The Penultimate Sat In Jan ,Apr, Jul, Oct.
Visakhapatnam Hannay, No.15 1st Saturday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov.
Visakhapatnam Visakha, No.95 2nd Friday Of Jan, Apr, July, Oct

***

ROYAL ARCH MARINER' LODGE ARRANGED STATION WISE

LOCATION / NAME& NO. / DAY OF MEETING


Agra Cantt. Taj Mehal, No.114 Last Friday Of Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Ahmedabad Pestonji Kapadia, No.35 1st Monday In Jan, Jun, Aug & Oct
Ajmer Pushkar Raj, No.56 March-Sunday Following 2nd Saturday in Jan, Aug, Nov
Aligarh Roshani, No.55 1st Sunday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Allahabad Sangam, No.26 1st Friday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec.
Ambala Umballa, No.67 1st Sunday Of Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Anakapalle Krishna, No.96
Bangalore Antiquity, No.4 2nd Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul & Oct.
Bangalore Gibbs, No.94 1st Thursday In Mar, Jul, Dec
Bangalore Techcity, No.111 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Bellary Abraham, No.6 4th Sunday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov.
Berhampur(Orissa) Rushi Kulya, No.69 4th Thursday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Bhopal Universal Brotherhood, No.23 3rd Saturday In Jun, Sep, Dec
Bhopal Bhopal, No.54 1st Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Cannanore Western Star, No.60 2nd Wednesday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Chandigarh Chandigarh, No.61 2nd Sunday In Feb, Apr, Oct, Dec
Chandigarh Yadavindra, No.85 1st Sunday Inn Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Chennai Gurdial Gill, No.31 1st Thursday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Chennai Om Vighneswara, No.63 3rd Tuesday In Feb, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Chennai Chennai, No.92 4th Monday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Chennai Dakshin, No.100 Third Sunday (March, July And November)
Chennai Millennium, No.106 2nd Tuesday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Chennai Engineers, No.110 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Chennai Prudentia, No.123 3rd Saturday Of Jan, Mar, May, Sep
Cochin Venkateswara, No.73 Last Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Coimbatore Coimbatore, No.70 1st Friday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Coimbatore G.K.Devarajulu, No.79 1st Sunday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Dehra Dun Orchard, No.8 1st Thursday (Jan, Mar, Sept, Nov)
Delhi Hira Hazmat, No.20 2nd Saturday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Delhi Pragati, No.75 4th Friday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Dharwad Dharwad, No.97 4th Saturday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Gobi Sakthi, No.121 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Gorakhpur Gorakhpur, No.42 3rd Saturday In Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr
Gorakhpur Madhusudan, No.115 2nd Sunday Of Feb, Aug, Sep, Nov
Gurgaon (Haryana) Bhushan, No.51 1st Sunday Of Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Hospet Vijayanagar, No.84 2nd Wednesday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Hubli Hubli, No.66 4th Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Hyderabad Charminar, No.58 3rd Thursday In Mar, Jun, Sept, Dec
Indore Malwa, No.78 3rd Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Jhansi Cantt. Vidya Betwanti, No.90 Sunday Following 4th Saturday In Feb, Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kanpur Ark In Cawnpore, No.14 2nd Friday (Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec)
Kanpur Rustomji, No.38 4th Saturday In Jan, Mar, Jul, Sept, Nov.
Kanpur Sundaram Jairotay, No.44 4th Thursday In Apr, Sept, Nov, 4th Wed In Feb.
Kanpur Som Nath, No.120 First Friday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Oct, Dec
Kanyakumari Kanyakumari, No.76 4th Saturday Of Apr, Jul, Oct. And Any Day In January
Kirkee (Pune) Level, No.105 First Friday (Feb, May, Aug, Nov)
Kochi Ernakulam, No.93 Last Friday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov
Kolkata Rainbow, No.3 Last Monday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Sep, Nov
Kolkata Anil Banerjee, No.13 1st Wednesday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
Kolkata Shyam & Narendra, No.24 2nd Wednesday (Feb, May, Aug, Dec)
Kolkata Sherosh, No.46 Last Tuesday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Kolkata The Bengal, No.113 Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Kottayam V.O.Abraham, No.98 Last Saturday In Feb, May, Nov & 2nd Friday In Aug
Lucknow Ark In Oudh, No.9 2nd Saturday In Jan, Apr, June & Sept.
Ludhiana Sir John Edge, No.11 3rd Sunday In Feb, July, Oct, Dec
Madurai Kudal, No.17 2nd Saturday In Feb, Jun, Aug, Nov
Mangalore Mangalore, No.77 1st Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Mumbai Sir Jamshedjee Jeejeebhoy, No.2 2nd Thursday In Feb, Jun & Aug
Mumbai Friendship & Harmony, No.19 3rd Wednesday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Mumbai Republic, No.28 2nd Monday In Feb. ,Apr, Jun & Oct
Mussoorie Mussoorie, No.80 3rd Wednesday In May, Jul, Sept & Nov
Mysore Jayachamaraja, No.53 2nd Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec
Nagpur Nagpur, No.22 Sunday Following 3rd Saturday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Nagpur Orange City, No.122 Sunday Following 4th Wednesday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
New Delhi Mount Ararat, No.5 4th Saturday In Jan, May, Aug & Nov.
New Delhi P.M.Sundaram, No.30 3rd Thursday(Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct)
New Delhi P.S.East & West, No.33 4th Thursday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct.
New Delhi Raisina, No.87 1st Thursday In Feb, May, Aug, Nov
New Delhi Star Of Delhi, No.103 2nd Monday Of Feb, May, Aug, Nov.
New Delhi Bhrigu Chetan, No.104 4th Saturday In Feb, Jun, Aug,
New Delhi Accountants, No.107 2nd Monday In Feb, Apr, Jul ,Oct
New Delhi Elysium, No.119 1st Tuesday Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov
Palayamkottai Chera, No.16 1st Saturday In Jan, Apr, July, Oct
Palghat Janardhana, No.59 3rd Sunday In Mar, Jun, Sep & Dec.
Patna Ashok, No.12 1st Friday In Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Pondicherry Bharathi, No.109 2nd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Pune (Kirkee) John L.Burry, No.37 3rd Saturday In Mar, Jun, Sept & Dec.
Rajahmundry Godavery, No.89 3rd Sunday In Jan, Apr, Oct
Rajkot Rajkot, No.48 3rd Saturday Of Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct
Salem Salem, No.25 1st Saturday In Apr, Jul & Oct
Secunderabad C.A.Ramkrishnan, No.1 Last Saturday In Jan., Apr, Jul & Oct.
Sharanpur Shakumbhri, No.68 2nd Wednesday (Jan, Mar, May, July, Sept, Nov)
Shillong In The Hills, No.102 4th Saturday In Apr, Jun, Aug, Oct
Shimla Sunshine, No.10 3rd Wednesday (Mar To October)
Shimla Narain, No.74 3rd Saturday In May, July, Sept. & Nov.
Thiruvananthapuram Thiruvananthapuram, No.82 Sun Following 2nd Sat in Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Thiruvananthapuram Travancore, No.118
Tiruchirapalli Srinivasa, No.43 3rd Friday In Feb, Apr, Aug, Nov
Tuticorin Tuticorin No. 88 2nd Saturday of Feb, May, Aug, Nov
Vadodara Amin D.M.Manasvi, No.21 4th Saturday In May, Aug, Nov & 3rd Saturday In Feb
Varanasi Varuna, No.47 4th Friday In Mar, May, Aug, Dec
Vijayawada Coromandel, No.18 Sunday Next To Penultimate Sat. Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec
Visakhapatnam Waltair, No.15 2nd Friday In Mar, Jun, Sep, Dec.
Visakhapatnam Visakha, No.95 2nd Friday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov
Visakhapatnam Kakinada, No.124 2nd Sunday In Feb, May, Aug & Nov

***

LINKS TO DAUGHTER LODGES

CITY / LODGE NAME

Ahmedabad / Lodge Fellowship no 140
Ajmer / Lodge Friendship 47
Bangalore / Lodge Sainik no 196
Bangalore / Lodge Star of The South no 101
Bangalore / Gibbs, 86
Bangalore / Lodge Thirunal no 179
Bangalore / Lodge United Services No.58
Cannanore / Cannanore, 234
Chandigarh / Mount Shivalik 283
Chennai / Mount, 14
Chennai / The Millennium Lodge, 327
Chennai / Asoka, 93
Chennai / Srinivasagopala 190
Chennai / Lodge Vidya, No. 164
Hyderabad / The Model Lodge no 335
Hyderabad / Lodge Keys 297
Kolkata / Good Fellowship, 71
Kolkata / Sir Andrew Fraser, 72
Mumbai / Lodge Sir Lawrence Jenkins no 70
Mumbai / Lodge Fulchand Patel No 163
Nagpur / All lodges in Nagpur
Nagpur / Lodge Bhogilal Shah no 147
Nagpur / Gondwana, 226
Nagpur / Trimurty, 294
New Delhi / Lodge Indus No. 284
Secunderabad / Lodge Eagle no 334
Secunderabad / Ekram, 45
Simla / Kinner Kailash, 320
Srikakulam / Lodge kalinga No.337
Thiruvananthapuram / Trivandrum, 168
Trivandrum / Lodge Ananthapadmanabha, 280
Vadodara / Lodge Tyrrell Leith no 43
Visakhapatnam / Waltair, 56
Visakhapatnam / Coromandel, 186
Visakhapatnam / University, 142
Vizianagaram / Lodge Nicopolis No. 81
Yercaud / The Montfort Lodge no 249
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Part 4 of 4

DISCOVER FREEMASONRY

Freemasonry is one of the world's oldest secular fraternal societies. It is a world-wide organisation based on the principle of the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of man. It is a society of men concerned with moral and spiritual values. Its members are taught its precepts by a series of ritual which follow ancient forms and use stone masons' customs and tools and allegorical guides. It seeks to make good men better and thereby make the world a better place in which to live. Freemasonry has been in existence in the present form for nearly 280 years in the world and for over 250 years in India. There are more than 150 Grand Lodges functioning all over the world. The Grand Lodge of India was consecrated as a Sovereign Grand Lodge with full Masonic jurisdiction over the territories of the Republic of India in November 1961. The primary unit organisation of Freemasonry is a Lodge. We have as of now 320 Lodges and over 200 other Masonic bodies located in different parts of the country with a total membership of about 22,000 Freemasons. Masonic organisations throughout the world are engaged in many philanthropic and charitable projects. In India, too, the Masonic Fraternity is involved in several charitable projects, all over the country: The General Williams Masonic Polyclinic and a Masonic Public School in Delhi, as also a Masonic Medical care center for children in Coimbatore, the adoption of an entire village located in a backward area, for all-round development in Health, Sanitation, Education & Housing in Visakhapatnam Distt. & Construction of Sheds for cyclone victims in Andhra Pradesh, many Scholarships and Bursaries awarded to deserving students, helping institutions for the handicapped and the aged and holding of periodical Blood donation camps, Eye camps and other Health Camps etc., are examples of some of the socially relevant activities of Masonic organisations all over the country. Freemasonry is best explained through answers to some specific questions as indicated below:--

What is the object of Masonry?

The Motto of Freemasonry is Brotherly Love, Relief & Truth.

• Freemasonry seeks to make good men better. It encourages the practice of the moral virtues of Temperance, Fortitude, prudence and Justice.
• It inculcates obedience to God & observance of the Laws of the country.
• It is committed to extend the hand of fellowship & provide Relief to those in distress.

What Freemasonry is not?

It is not a Religion. However, it emphasises secularism by teaching respect for and tolerance towards all religions.

It is not a political party or organisation.

It reminds them of the filial affection one should always have for the Land of their birth, to remain loyal to the laws of the land which, for the time being, may be the place of their residence, or afford them protection.

It is not a secret society

• There is nothing secret or secretive about Freemasonry. Freemasonry does not conceal the time and place of its meeting, nor does a member hide the fact of his membership.
• Like many other Societies, it regards some of its internal affairs as private matters of concern only for its members.
• There is no secret about its aims & principles. Copies of its Constitutions and Rules can be obtained by interested members of the public from its offices.

It is not a social club

However, it provides the means of socialising among its members, which consists of a cross section of society drawn from all walks of life who meet on an equal footing. It also involves the families of members on such social occasions.

How does Masonry get its membership?

Freemasonry does not canvass for members. The person must seek for membership of a Masonic Lodge of his own free will and accord. He would, however, be provided all information he wishes to know.

Who is eligible to become a Mason?

No atheist can become a Mason. Anyone who is of good moral character and believes in the existence of Almighty God and a belief in the Supreme Being, no matter by what name He is called, or what faith the person professes, is eligible.

What does Freemasonry expect from one who joins it?

• He must understand and appreciate its high ideals and objectives and put in to actual practice its motto of "Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth".
• Patriotism & Loyalty to one's own country and the Fraternity at all times is a bounden duty.
• It expects that a Freemason should do unto others, as he would wish others would do unto him.
• Charity is the predominant characteristic of a Freemason's heart. He is always expected to "give" to Freemasonry rather than expect to "receive" anything from it for personal benefit.
• That he will practice outside the Lodge those duties & virtues that he is taught inside the Lodge.

Freemasonry Teaches

• Kindness in the home,
• love for one another,
• courtesy in society,
• resistance towards evil,
• help for the weak,
• pity and concern for the unfortunate,
• forgiveness for the penitent,
• fairness in work,
• honesty in business,

and above all, reverence and love for God.

In fact Freemasonry is a Way of Life.

Indian Order of Freemasons

The Indian Order of Freemasons has, as its head, its Grand Master, who is elected for a term of three years. M.W. Bro. Maj. Gen. Dr. Sir Syed Raza Ali Khan, the Nawab of Rampur, was the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of India. The present Grand Master, who is 14th on the line since the time the Grand Lodge of India was formed, is M.W. Bro. Capt. Dr. Balaram Biswakumar, O.S.M. Some of the prominent Indians who have been Freemasons are Swami Vivekananda, Shri C. Rajagopalachari, Shri Moti Lal Nehru, Shri Fakhuridin Ali Ahmed, and also several serving and retired judges of Supreme Court and High Courts, serving and retired Defence Personnel and Civilian Officer,s besides many Industrialists, Businessmen, Business Executives and other Professionals.

Applications for membership

There is no canvassing of membership. Candidates for membership are expected to come of their own free will and accord. Whatever information is required will be furnished. Applications duly proposed and Seconded by members are entertained by the Lodges and are scrutinised and balloted in the Lodge. Thereafter, the candidates are initiated into Freemasonry according to ancient custom and receive various degrees. Regional and Grand Lodge ranks are conferred on their attaining sufficient proficiency, based on merit and seniority.

The Clock of Life

The clock of life is wound but once,
And no man has the power
To know just when the hands will stop,
At late or early hour,
Now is the only time you have,
Live, love and toil with a will,
Put no faith' in tomorrow,
For the clock may then he still.

For further information contact:

HOW TO JOIN FREEMASONRY?

The absolute requirements for becoming a Mason are:

be a man, at least 21 years old
• Have belief in a Supreme Being (of any faith. No particular religion or faith is required or excluded. All are welcome.)
• You should be someone who does, or wants to learn to, enjoy the company of other men from all different social classes, faiths, backgrounds, races, countries, etc. Masonry is universal in its ideals.
• if you are a family man, Masonry considers that your family obligations come FIRST, so you must be sure that:
• You have the time to participate (usually two or three evenings/month at first for meetings and instruction, and then at least one evening per month for meetings from then on -- often more if you get involved in lodge activities.)
o You can afford the initiation fees and the annual dues without hardship to yourself or your family.
o You should be coming to Masonry "of your own free will and accord", to learn to improve yourself and to enjoy the company of other good people, not because someone keeps pestering you to join or because you think it will help you "get ahead" in business.

To join, all you have to do is ask a Mason:

• Preferably someone you know, or at least who lives or works nearby, or...
• If you think that you don't know any Masons in your area, you could send an e-mail to Mr. Vinod Puri at vinod@vpuri.net giving him details of your name, age, profession, home or postal address, phone numbers and email address, and ask that anyone who lives in your general area reply to you.
• You can call the Grand Lodge/Regional Grand Lodge office and get information.

ARE YOU A MASON?

Have You Ever Considered Becoming a Mason?

As published by the Masonic Renewal Committee of North America

Freemasonry is the oldest, largest Fraternity in the world. It's members have included Kings, Presidents, Prime Ministers, Statesmen, Generals, Admirals, Supreme Court Chief Justices, corporate CEOs, opera stars, movie stars, and probably, your next door neighbor. And Masonry is always ready to welcome good men in the Fraternity. It's ready to welcome YOU, if in your heart you can answer "yes" to a few questions.

Do you believe that there is such a thing as honor, and that a man has a responsibility to act with honor in everything he does? Masons teach that principle. We believe that a life not founded on honor is hollow and empty -- that a man who acts without honor is less than a man.

Do you believe in God? No atheist can be a Mason. Masons do not care what your individual faith is -- that is question between you and your God -- but we do require that a man believe in a Supreme Being.

Are you willing to allow others the same right to their own beliefs that you insist on yourself? Masonry insists on toleration -- on the right of each person to think for himself in religious, social and political matters.

Do you believe that you have a responsibility to leave the world a better place than you found it? Masonry teaches that each man has a duty not only to himself but also to others. We must do what we can to make the world a better place. Whether that means cleaning up the environment, working on civic projects, or helping children to work or read or see -- the world should be a better place because we have passed through it.

Do you believe that it is not only more blessed to give than to receive, it's also more fun? Masons are involved with the problems and needs of others because we know it gives each of us a good feeling -- unlike any other -- to help. Much of our help is given anonymously. We're not after gratitude, we're more than rewarded by that feeling which comes from knowing we have helped another person overcome some adversity, so that their life can go on.

Are you willing to give help to your Brothers when they need it, and to accept their help when you need it? Masonry is mutual help. Not just financial help (although that's there, too) but help in the sense of being there when needed, giving support, lending a sympathetic ear.

Do you feel that there's something more to life than financial success? Masons know that self-development is more precious than money in the bank or social position or political power. Those things often accompany self-development, but they are no substitute for it. Masons work at building their lives and character, just as a carpenter works a building a house.

Do you believe that a person should strive to be a good citizen and that we have a moral duty to be true to the country in which we live? Masons believe that a country is strong as long as freedom, equality, and the opportunity for human development is afforded to all. A Mason is true to his government and its ideals. He supports its laws and authority when both are just and equitably applied. We uphold and maintain the principles of good government, and oppose every influence that would divide it in a degrading manner.

Do you agree that man should show compassion for others, that goodness of heart is among the most important of human values? Masons do. We believe in a certain reverence for living things, a tenderness toward people who suffer. A loving kindness for our fellow man, and a desire to do right because it is right. Masonry teaches that although all men are fallible and capable of much wrong, when they discover the goodness of heart, they have found the true essence of virtue. Masonry helps men see their potential for deep goodness and virtue.

Do you believe that men should strive to live a brotherly life? Masons see brotherhood as a form of wisdom, a sort of bond that holds men together -- a private friendship that tells us we owe it to each other to be just in our dealings and to refuse to speak evil of each other. Masons believe a man should maintain an attitude of good will, and promote unity and harmony in his relations with one another, his family, and his community. Masons call this way of believing the Brotherhood of Man. It really means that every Mason makes it his duty to follow the golden rule. This is why Masonry has been called one of the greatest forces for good in the world.

IF YOU ANSWERED "YES", YOU SHOULD CONSIDER BECOMING A MASON.

Freemasonry offers much to its members -- the opportunity to grow, the chance to make a difference, to build a better world for our children. It offers the chance to be with and work with men who have the same values and ideals -- men who have answered "YES" to these questions.

It's easy to find out more. Just find a Mason and ask him about Masonry. You probably know several Masons. Perhaps you've seen the Square and Compasses like the one in this brochure or on a pin or tie tack or bumper sticker. If you know where the lodge is in your community, stop by, or look up the number of your local Masonic lodge in the phone book and ask for the secretary of the lodge. He'll be happy to help you.

Have you ever considered becoming a Mason? We'd like a chance to talk with you.

***

FAQ ON INDIAN FREEMASONRY
(by V. Rajendran OSM, P. Dy. G.M)


Q). When did Freemasonry come to India?

A). The honor of receiving Freemasonry in India goes to Calcutta. In 1730 officers of the East Indian Company held their meetings in Fort William, Calcutta. The number given to the Lodge was 72.

Q). What was the first Lodge in Madras?

A). No. 222 EC, in 1752, and it does not appear to have received a name.

Q). What was the first Lodge in Bombay?

A). Bombay Lodge No. 234 EC in 1758.

Q). What was the first Lodge in Punjab?

A). Lodge No. 489 EC, in 1786.

Q). What effect did the existence of two competing Grand Lodges in England [Ancients and Moderns] have on Freemasonry in India?

A). Inasmuch as numerous Lodges had been constituted in India by the Moderns, while others had come into existence Ancient auspices, quite naturally much of the Ritualistic differences established themselves into the respective Lodges. This situation was complicated somewhat by the fact that there were also Lodges in India of Irish & Scottish origins.

However, it was in India where both the warring groups joined together in harmony long before the formation of the Union of England. In 1785, the Atholl Lodge at Madras surrounded its powers and accepted the United Prov. Grand Lodge. The old Atholl Lodge was recorded as lodge of Perfect Unanimity [later numbered as No. 150]. Madras had thus stolen a march of 27 years over the United Grand Lodge of England, which was formed in 1813.

Q). Who was the first Indian Mason?

A). Omdat-ul-Omrah, the Nawab of Carnatic. The second Indian Mason was M. Bandeh Ali Khan, initiated in Marine Lodge, Calcutta in 1812.

Q). Who was the first Hindu to be admitted into Freemasonry?

A). Bro. Ranganath Sastry in Lodge Perfect Unanimity No. 233, Madras in 1857.

Q). The earliest Sikh to be made a mason?

A). Bro. Duleep Singh in Lodge Star in the East in 1861.

Q). Which Province had segregation preventing Indians from being admitted into Freemasonry?

A). In Bengal, where the bye-law No. 55 of the PGL (EC) prevented Indians from being admitted into Freemasonry. Ultimately the first Hindu to be admitted in Bengal was Bro. P C Dutt in 1872, that too after very many "black-balling" and nine years of persistent appeals.


The first Hindu to become a Freemason was PC Dutt from Calcutta. The year was 1863 -- six years after the 1857 Revolt -- and the British were still suspicious of "natives." Since membership was open to all men of good character, who believe in a "Supreme Being," the Provincial Grand Master of Calcutta Hugh Sanderman hunted out a religious loophole to deny Dutt membership. He argued that as a Hindu, Dutt didn't believe in a single God but rather a pantheon of deities. After making an impassioned speech arguing that all Hindu deities are reflections of a single God, Dutt joined the Lodge of Anchor and Hope in 1872.

Today, the Sandhurst Temple in Fort's 120-year-old Freemasons' Hall -- the foundation stone was laid in 1897 -- boasts a wooden altar with books of all faiths including the Gita. The altar stands on a checkered square in the centre of a large room where a fresco of an "all-seeing" eye, representing the "Supreme Being," observes proceedings....

New initiates aren't forced to drink red wine from a skull like in "The Lost Symbol." But each new member must kneel before the altar, place his hand on a holy book of his choice, and swear an oath of loyalty. "Members vote for or against admitting a new initiate by dropping white or black balls into a box," explains Malkani. This tradition led to the phrase "blackball", still used when someone fails to win membership to an exclusive club.

While barriers of race and religion have been torn down, discrimination on the basis of sex remains. India has a ladies only lodge in Gurgaon but it isn't recognized by the Grand Lodge of India, which has yet to welcome a woman into the craft. "Ladies can't be brothers," reasons senior Mason.


-- The Freemasons Chamber of Secrets in Fort Turns 120, by Nergish Sunavala, 9/3/17


Q). What were the foreign Constitutions whose Lodges functioned in India?

A). Dutch Constitution -- Lodge Solomon was founded on April 7, 1758 at Tandelga near Chinsurah in Bengal by the commander of the merchant fleet of the Netherlands East India Company, Bro. Jacob Larwood Van Chevichaven.

French Constitution -- Lodge Sincere Amite, Pondicherry was chartered in 1787. There were quite a few Naval Lodges. Though Naval Lodges were not recognized by the Grand Lodge of France, the members of the Naval Lodge in due course found their way to get affiliated to and remain under the protection of a stationary Lodge.

Scottish Constitution -- Into the sub-continent the first Lodge under the Scottish Constitution was consecrated in 1801 in Ceylon (Sri Lanka). One Lodge Hope No. 334 SC, Karachi was charted in 1767; in 1770 it was shifted to New Castle and in 1782 to New York. The date of its arrival in India cannot at present be stated. Lodge Hope was chartered by the PGM of Western India on April 25, 1842.

Danish Constitution -- Introduced in Tranquebar (near Nagapattinam, Tamil Nadu) in 1805. The Danish colony at Tranquebar was fairly numerously populated by Danes. Due to the efforts of one Bro. Ewald, a warrant was granted for a Lodge at Tranquebar in 1807 by the National Grand Lodge of Denmark. The name of the Lodge was "De L’amour Fraternelle" (to Brotherly Love).

Irish Constitution -- The Light of the North No. 357 at Kurnaul [now Karnal] in 1835. This Lodge survived for three years only. The next was Lodge Duke of Abercon No. 382 IC, in Calcutta in 1905.


Q). Name some of the prominent Indians who were Freemasons.

A). Swami Vivekananda (initiated in 1884 under the name of Bro. Narendra Nath Dutt in Lodge Anchor & Hope, Calcutta); Motilal Nehru -- Lodge Harmony, Kanpur (Father of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and grandfather of Indhira Gandhi); C. Rajagopalachary (Governor General of India); Sir C P Ramaswamy Iyer (Divan of Travancore); Dr. P V Cheriy (Governor of Maharashtra); and Fakruddin Ali Ahmed (President of India).

Q). Which is the oldest building used as a Masonic Temple in India?

A). The Goshamahal Baradari, Hyderabad, built in 1682 by Sultan Abul Hassan Tanasha.

Q). When was the Grand Lodge of India formed?

A). November 24, 1961 in New Delhi.

Q). Name the parent Grand Lodges of Grand Lodge of India.

A). The Grand Lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland.


Q). Who were the principal officers at the consecration of the GLI?

A). Dy. GM of Grand Lodge of England, RW Bro Earl of Cadogon, Grand Master of Grand Lodge of Scotland, MW Bro. Archibald, and Dy. GM of Grand Lodge of Ireland, RW Bro George S Gamble.

Q). Who was the founder Grand Master of GLI?

A). MW Bro. H H Major General Syed Raza Ali Khan, Nawab of Rampur.

Q). How many Lodges opted to become the Founder Lodges of the G.L. of India?

A). 145 Lodges, with a total membership of 7466, opted to become the founder Lodges of the Grand Lodge of India.

FREEMASONRY COMES TO INDIA

In 1717 A.D. when an era of comparative peace and harmony dawned on the European scene, the Grand Lodge of England took shape at a meeting of the local Lodges of London, to elect a Grand Master. A United constitution was drawn up and recognized by all the Lodges. A democratic tradition in the election of the Worshipful Master of a Lodge was prescribed. The Worshipful Master was authorized to appoint his team of officers.

It is therefore of interest that within 12 years of the constitution of the Grand Lodge of England, constituted for the purpose of exercising supervision over the lodges in London, and its neighboring areas, a petition was sent by a few Brethren in India to constitute a Provincial Grand Lodge in Calcutta. The Petition having been granted, a Provincial Grand Master was appointed to supervise Masonic activity in India and the Far East in 1728 A.D.

Full details regarding how the First Lodge was constituted in India, are preserved in the Minutes of the Grand Lodge in London. First a petition was presented on December 28, 1728 and at the end of the minutes of that meeting, the text of the "Deputation" from the Grand Master: "to Empower and Authorize our well beloved Brother Pomfret....that he do, in our place and stead, constitute a regular Lodge, in due form at Fort William in Bengal in the East Indies...." This was signed and sealed "the 6th day of February 1728/9 and in the year of Masonry 5732 (which shows that the Grand Lodge used Usher's Chronology in dating the Masonic era -- as the Grand Lodge of Scotland still.

The Lodge at Fort William -- that is, Calcutta -- appears in the Engraved List of 1730, as No. 72. It was to meet at Fort William in Calcutta. The coat of Arms was adopted from the East India Company: a golden lion, rampant guardant, supporting between the forepaws a regal crown. In 1729, Captain Ralph Farwinter was appointed "Provisional Grand Master for East India in Bengal," and also James Dawson as "Provincial Grand Master" for East Indies.

The Provincial Grand Lodge of Madras was formed in 1752, and The Provincial Grand Lodge of Bombay was created in 1758. Although it appeared in the Roll of Grand Lodge, there is no record of how it came into being.

The first Indian Mason was Omdat-ul-Omrah, Nawab Carnatic, initiated in 1775. The doors to Hindu Masonry was flung wide-open might one say, by the unstoppable determination of one Mr. P.C. Dutt of Calcutta to become a member of the craft. After much opposition from the Provincial Grand Master (Hugh Sanderman) and nine years after he was proposed for initiation Mr.Dutt became Bro. Dutt in Anchor and Hope, No. 234, in 1872. Twenty-three years later, he was Deputy District Grand Master.

THE BIRTH OF THE GRAND LODGE OF INDIA

It was towards the end of October 1959 that the Most W. Grand Masters of England, Ireland and the Immediate Past Grand Master Mason of Scotland met in London to discuss the future of Freemasonry in India. The three Grand Masters considered that "an independent Grand Lodge of India is desirable and that its establishment should....be gradually but actively pursued."

A representative Steering Committee was set up consisting exclusively of Indian Brethren in proportion to the number of Lodges under each of the three Constitutions, with R.W.Bro Lt.Gen. Sir Harold Williams, K.B.E., C.B., as Chairman, with the aim of establishing an independent Grand Lodge of India on the best possible foundations. The Steering Committee met at important centers of Masonic activities in the North, East, South and West of India and its report was unanimously signed early October 1960. On December 1, the three Grand Masters issued "Notes on the proposed Grand Lodge of India for the information and guidance of Lodges in India." Therein they reiterated their declared attitude towards an independent Grand Lodge of India, but left it to Lodges in India to decide whether to opt for or against joining such a body, adding that if the Brethren in India decided in favor of an independent Grand Lodge, they would accept the decision and establish with it the closest fraternal relations and that Lodges not wishing to participate would continue to enjoy the existing rights under their respective Grand Lodges.

Out of a total of 277 individual Lodges in India (excluding Pakistan, Ceylon and Aden, which were excluded for the poll), 145 opted for the new Grand Lodge of India. This represented a little over 52 per cent.

INAUGURAL MEETING

Image

The Grand Lodge of India was officially constituted at ten minutes to six o'clock on Friday the 24th November 1961 in the Ashoka Hotel, New Delhi. There were three delegations from the Grand Lodge of Scotland, Ireland and England in that order.

After the three delegations were received and greeted, the Grand Master Mason of Scotland proceeded with the Consecration. Thereafter, The Deputy Grand Master of Ireland officially constituted the new Grand Lodge saying "in the name of the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland and Scotland and by the command of their Grand Master, I constitute and form you, my good Brethren into the Sovereign Grand Lodge of India, you are empowered henceforth to exercise all the rights and privileges of a Grand Lodge according to the ancient usage's and landmarks of the Craft. May the Grand Architect of the Universe prosper, direct and counsel you in all your proceedings."

After the Consecration and Constitution, the Deputy Grand Master of England assumed the Throne and installed Major General Dr. Sir Syed Raza Ali Khan, G.C.I.E.,D.Litt., LL.D., His Highness The Nawab of Rampur, as the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of India. The Aprons, Collars, Gauntlets etc. for the new Lodge were provided jointly by the three parent Grand Lodges.

In addition to the three parent Grand Lodges, the M.W. Grand Master of the Grand Lodges of the State of Israel, the M.W. Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Alberta (Canada) and about 1,491 Brethren from all over India were present at this historic event.

SOME VERY WELL KNOWN INDIAN FREEMASONS

Freemasonry has always fascinated people from all walks of life. The kaleidoscope of its membership has included Royalty, Aristocracy, Gentry and Commoners alike. Freemasons in India have been no exception, and have contributed to India over the last three centuries in no small manner.

Some of the Eminent Indian Masons

• Sir Phirozeshah Mehta
• Dadabhoy Nowroji Tata
Swami Vivekananda
• W.C. Bannerjee
• President Dr. Rajendra Prasad
President Dr. S. Radhakrishnan
• Pandit Motilal Nehru
• President Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed
• Sir Dorabji Jamshedji Tata
• J.R.D. Tata
• Goculdas Narottam Morarjee
• Ebrahim Currimbhoy
• Dr. B.G. Kher
• Bhulabhai Desai
• Dr. C. Rajagopalachari
• Sir C.P. Ramaswamy Iyer
• Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy
• D.L. Vaidya
• Dr. D.R. Bhandarkar
• Sir N.G. Chandavarkar
• M.R. Jayakar
• Dwarkadas Narainji
• Sir Purshottamdas Thakurdas
• Sir Chimanlal Setalvad
• T.G. Khaitan
• Dharamsey Morarjee
• Narsingir Pratapgir
• Sir Bhalchandra K. Pradhan
• Dr. Sir Tehmuiji Nariman
• P.M. Kanga
• Sir Sultan Mohammad Shah, Aga Khan
• Dr. Badruddin Tyabji
• Sir Sayyad Ahmad Khan Dahlavi
• Mohammadbhoy Currimbhoy Ebrahim,
• Ebrahim Rahimtulla Currimbhoy
• Dr. R.N. Cooper
• Dr. P.V. Cherian
• Maharaja Ganga Singh
• Maharaja Duleep Singh
• Maharaja Randheer Singh
• Maharaja Digvijay Smghji
• Maharaja Mahinder Bhupinder Singh
• Maharaja Yadvinder Singh
• Maharaja Sir Bhawani Singh
• Maharaja N.N. Bhup
• Maharaja J.N. Bhup
• Maharaja R.J. Bhup
• Maharaja Viziaram Raj
• Maharaja Chhatarsinghji
• Maharaja Mayurdhwaj Jaladhip
• Thakursaheb Daulatsinhji
• Sir Gangadharrrao Patwardhan
• Shrimant Shankarrao Patwardhan
• Balasaheb Pant
• Pantbahadur Raghunathrao Shankarrao
• Sir Syed Reza Ali Khan
• Sir Syed Ahmed Ali Khan
• Sahebzada Abu Samad Khan
• Ibrahim Khan
• Mirza Husain Yawar Khan
• Maharajkumar Mohammad Amir Hyder Kha
• Nawabzada Khan Mohammed Tolay
• Nawabzada Syed Hussam Bilgrami
• Nawab Jung Nawab Hyder
• Nawab Sir Amin Jung Jung Bahadur
• Chintamanrao Patwardhan
• Sampatrao Gaikwad
• Shrimant Bhau Ramrao Venkatrao
• Diwan Suryashankar Mehta
• Sheikh Abdul Khaliq
• Sorab M. Bharucha
• Sir. Samuel Runganadhan (first India's High Commissioner in London)
• Sir David Devadoss, Judge, Madras High Court
• Sardar Sir R.J. Vakil
• David Abraham
• S.V. Sista
• Ayaz Peerbhoy
• Rasesh Mafatlal
• Justice D.P. Madon
• Justice Prakash Narain.
• J.B. Kanga
• D.D. Davar
• M.P. Kapadia
• D.R. Pradhan
• R.K. Saiyad
• Parikshit Sahni
• Ashok Kumar Ganguly.
• Dr. Phiroze Sethna.
• Nanik Rupani.
• G. L. Raheja.
• Narayan Varma.
• Sir Reginald Spence.
• Jamshed N Guzder
• Dr. Shantilal J Mehta
• Dr. Framroz Sethna
• Dr. Homiyar Dastoor
• Dr. Mohanlal Modi
• Dr. Jamnadas Merchant
• Rustomji A Wadia
• David Shellim
• Nariman S Patel
• Damodar D. Meht
• Maharaja Jaya Chamaraja Wadeyar
• Justice P.N.Khanna
• Justice G Ramanujam
• Justice S.S.Ali
• Justice R Bhattacharya
• Justice V Ramaswamy
• Justice S Natarajan
• Justice A.B.Saharya
• Dr Gaur Hari Singhania
• Justice S Padmanabhan
• Justice V Ratnam
• Justice B.S.Sinha
• Justice Devinder Gupta
• H.H. Marthanda Varma
• Justice U Sinha
• Justice A.R.Lakshmanan
• Justice S Jagadeesan
• C.A. Ramakrishnan I.C.S.
• Prof M.S. Thacker
• Justice K Veeraswami
• Justice T Ramprasad Rao
• Cav. Dr. G.K Devarajulu
• Justice N.S. Ramaswamy
• Sitaram Jaipuria
• G Ramaswamy
• V.P. Raman
• Srikanta Datta Narasimharaja Wadiyar
• Sir Jamshedjee Jeejeebhoy
His Holiness Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah, Aga Khan
• Dr. Badruddin Tyabji
• The Nawab Of Pataudi Mansur Ali Khan
• Lt. Gen. H.H.Maharaja Jivaji Rao Scindia, Maharaja of Scindia
• Mr Madhav Rao Scindia
• Maharaja of Bobbili
• Ardaseer Cursetji Wadia
• Deshabandu Chittaran Das
• Gaganendranath Tagore
• W.C. Banwejee
• Sir Rash Bihari Ghose
• Kishab Chandra Sen
• Romesh Chanra Dutt
• Sir Syed Ahmed Khan
• Sir Lakshmanaswami Mudaliar - Vice-Chancellor, Madras University
• Dr. Malcolm Adiseshiah - Vice-Chancellor, Under Secretary General UNESCO
• Mr. Zal Irani
• Dr. M.G.K. Menon - Scientist
Mr. K.P.S. Menon, I.C.S.
• Nawab Salar Jung
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Re: Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

Postby admin » Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:49 am

George Thompson (abolitionist)
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 2/19/20

Image
George Thompson
1851 daguerreotype
Member of the United Kingdom Parliament for Tower Hamlets
In office: 1847–1852
Preceded by: Charles Richard Fox
Succeeded b: Charles Salisbury Butler
Personal details
Born: 18 June 1804, Liverpool, England
Died: 7 October 1878 (aged 74), Leeds, England
Nationality: British
Political party: Radical
Spouse(s): Anne Spry (m. 1831; died 1878)
Children 6
Occupation: Abolitionist, activist, politician

George Donisthorpe Thompson (18 June 1804 – 7 October 1878) was a British anti-slavery orator and activist who toured giving lectures and worked for legislation while serving as a Member of Parliament. He was arguably one of the most important abolitionists and human rights lecturers in the United Kingdom and the United States.

Early life

Thompson had little formal education and was largely self-taught. In early adulthood, he began a life of professional activism, starting with his role in founding a mutual improvement society at the age of eighteen, as well as his membership in debate societies. This suggests an early interest in self-betterment and the issues of the day. His father worked aboard a slave trading vessel, and his stories of the horrors of the slave trade planted the issue in the younger Thompson’s mind from an early age. He recalls the stories that his father told in some of his later writings, recounting his father’s observations of the inhumane treatment of slaves.[1]

Activism in Britain

Image
George Thompson

Initially Thompson had little knowledge of slavery, though he had gained a reputation as an able orator. He was hired by the society to try to get slavery immediately abolished on moral and religious grounds, a concept called "immediatism." He quickly took up the dissemination of the Society's creed: "To uphold slavery is a crime before God, and the condition must, therefore, be immediately abolished." In 1832 he travelled to Scotland, where he gained an interest in the abolition of slavery in the United States and other parts of the world. While in Scotland he also met William Lloyd Garrison, who would remain a lifelong friend and colleague, as well as Nathaniel Paul, an African-American abolitionist. In Glasgow in 1833 he debated with Peter Borthwick, who had been appointed by the West India Association to defend slavery.[2]

Thompson was invited by Garrison to visit New England, and this proposal was not only accepted by his supporters in Glasgow but the Edinburgh Emancipation Society was formed so that it too could back Thompson's journey.[3] From 1836 to 1847 he was active in every major anti-slavery debate in Britain, including the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London.[4] In 1847 he was elected to the House of Commons as a Member of Parliament (MP) for Tower Hamlets.[1]

Thompson was also an advocate of East Indian reform, free trade, Chartism, nonresistance, and the peace movement. However, he was most prominent in his work to eliminate slavery at home and abroad, often protesting legislation that offered limited or gradual restriction on slavery. Favoring a quick and decisive emancipation of all slaves, he was ultimately unsatisfied with the British Emancipation Act of 1833, because it forced slaves to work as apprentices for six years after their "liberation." He therefore used his position in Parliament to push for additional legislation.[1]

Image
Portrait of William Lloyd Garrison, George Thompson and Wendell Phillips, ca.1850-1851 (photo by Southworth & Hawes)

Activism in the United States

George Thompson was an active lecturer, and he willingly pointed out the role that America played in the perpetuation of slavery. He first traveled to the United States in 1834, where he attracted the attention of pro-slavery men, and barely escaped being captured by them after one of his lecturing sessions. His lecture circuit that year was credited with the formation of over 150 anti-slavery societies around the US, and inspired many to join the anti-slavery cause.[5] The resistance to his platform did not abate, and he was forced to return to Britain, via Tasmania (Australia). The Hobart Town Courier newspaper, 8 Jul 1836, carried a letter, penned by Thompson in November of the previous year, intended for Patrick Letham of Glasgow. In his letter, Thompson states that he had arrived "within the hour" at New Brunswick, Canada, by British brig, having "left the United States to escape the assassin's knife". The editor's note adds that attempts to "burn and murder" him had been made in several US towns.[6]

When the Fugitive Slave Law was passed in 1850, Thompson returned to the United States, and he was this time quite popular among proponents of abolitionism, now that the movement had increased in size and influence.

In 1859, with his son-in-law Frederick William Chesson, he founded the London Emancipation Society, which strongly supported the Union side in the American Civil War.[7]

During a final visit in 1864, he allied with William Wells Brown in advocating the destruction of slavery. He also met Abraham Lincoln, and both supported and witnessed the final destruction of the Confederacy at Fort Sumter in 1865.[1]

British India Society

He was involved in the setting up of the British India Society in 1839.[8] He was also the President of the Bengal British India Society, which was established in 1843.[9]

Return to England

Thompson became ill and traveled back to his home country, where he died in 1878. While his advocacy of abolitionism went relatively unnoticed after his death, his efforts to effect a worldwide abolitionist movement cannot be ignored. His profession as activist allowed him to make a living by supporting the cause that he cared about, as well as enabling him to make unprecedented steps in freeing enslaved peoples around the world.

Personal life

On 29 January 1831 in Islington, Thompson married Anne Erskine Lorraine Spry. Thompson had several children who survived to adulthood: Louisa Eliza Spry (m. Frederick Arthur Nosworthy), Amelia Ann Everard[10] (m. Frederick William Chesson), George Herbert (m. Marianne Cronin), and Edith. Another son, named after William Lloyd Garrison, died aged 15. A daughter, named after Elizabeth Pease, died aged 6.[11]

References

1. Gifford, Ronald M. (2007). "Thompson, George". American National Biography Online October 2007 Update. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 27 January 2008.
2. Whyte, Iain. Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 1756-1838 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006), pp. 230-1.
3. "Slavery in The United States". The Liberator. 27 April 1834.
4. The Anti-Slavery Society Convention, 1840, Benjamin Robert Haydon, accessed 19 July 2008
5. Born, Michael. "Richard S. Rust, a minister with a mission". Retrieved 8 February 2020.
6. Hobart Town Courier-8 July 1836 pg4
7. "London Emancipation Society". Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations. Taylor and Francis. 2005. ISBN 0-203-80119-9.[permanent dead link]
8. "The British India Society » Britain – India – Empire". arts.leeds.ac.uk. Retrieved 18 February 2018.
9. Khan, BR (2012). "Bengal British India Society". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
10. Drew, John (29 October 2016). "Into the Heart of Bengal". The Daily Star. Retrieved 4 November2016.
11. Wigtownshire newspaper for 4 Sept 1851 reads: "NOSWORTHY, Fred. Arthur - Married 19/8/1851 - At St. Luke's Church, Chelsea, on the 19th ult., Fred. Arthur, youngest son of the late Captain Richard Nosworthy, Paymaster, Second West India Regiment, to Eliza Louisa Spry, eldest daughter of George Thompson, Esq., M.P. for the Tower Hamlets."
Wikimedia Commons has media related to George Donisthorpe Thompson.

External links

• Works by George Thompson at Project Gutenberg
• Works by or about George Thompson at Internet Archive
• Lee, Sidney, ed. (1898). "Thompson, George" . Dictionary of National Biography. 56. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
• The Liberator Files, Items concerning George Thompson from Horace Seldon's collection and summary of research of William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator original copies at the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts.
• Thompson Chesson Scrapbooks From the Rare Book and Special Collections Division at the Library of Congress
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Re: Freda Bedi Cont'd (#2)

Postby admin » Thu Feb 20, 2020 4:26 am

Ramgopal Ghosh
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 2/19/20

Image
Ramgopal Ghosh
Born: 1815, Kolkata, Bengal, British India
Died: 15 January 1868, Kolkata, Bengal, British India
Nationality: Indian
Occupation: Businessman

Ramgopal Ghosh (Bengali: রামগোপাল ঘোষ) (1815–1868) was an Indian businessman, social reformer, orator and one of the leaders of the Young Bengal group. He was called the Indian Demosthenes.[1][2] Ghosh was one of the persons who helped John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune to establish his girls school.[3]

Early life

The family hailed from Bagati, near Mogra in Hooghly District. His father, Gobinda Chandra Ghosh had a small shop in Kolkata's China Bazar. His maternal grandfather, Dewan Ramprasad Singha, used to work in the office of King Hamilton & Co. in Kolkata.

It was in Calcutta, in 1790, that the British East India Company first began the trading business that would, by 1858, lead to its control over all of India. Hamilton & Co. was the first British silversmith to set up shop in Calcutta. The pieces they produced in Calcutta, mainly for British consumption, were of polished silver with smooth lines and minimal decoration.

Later on, in Bovanipore, a suburb of Calcutta, local silversmiths Grish Chunder Dutt, Dass & Dutt, and Goopee Nath Dutt created elaborately designed, répoussée, and chased scenes of Indian village and farming life, with human figures, animals, and trees. Ghosh was born in his maternal grandfather's house.[4]

-- Indian Silver during the Raj, by Harish K. Patel with Veronica J. McDavid


There are two opinions about his childhood. The first says that he initially joined Sherburne's School and started learning English. At that time Hara Chandra Ghosh, then a student of Hindu College and later one of the leading Derozians [Young Bengalis], married a relative of his. Observing the keenness of young Ramgopal, Hara Chandra pestered the former's father to get him admitted in Hindu College. His father did not have the means to pay for his education at Hindu College. However, one Mr. Rogers of King Hamilton & Co. agreed to pay the fees and he was admitted to Hindu College. The second opinion is that Mr. Rogers got him admitted in Hindu College right from the beginning.[4]

Ghosh did not have to continue that way for long. His brilliance attracted the attention of David Hare and soon he was on the latter's free student list. In time he joined the class of Derozio. He became friendly with Ramtanu Lahiri and the other Derozians. His dedication attracted Derozio's attention and he used to coach him in English philosophy and poetry outside class hours.[4]

When Derozio established the Academic Association, Ghosh became one of its leading members. It was in the meeting of the Association that Ghosh learnt to express himself fluently in English. The meetings of the Academic Association were attended by such people as Sir Edward Ryan, who was a judge of the Supreme Court and W.W.Bird, who later became lieutenant governor of Bengal. They warmly appreciated Ghosh's talent and openly encouraged him.[4]

Business activities

Ghosh had to leave his studies unfinished and get on in working life. On the recommendation of David Hare, he started working with a Jewish businessman named Joseph. Later, another businessman name Kelsall joined the firm, Ghosh served them as a middle-man. When the two fell out, Ghosh formed a jointly owned firm Kelsall, Ghose & Co., and still later, around 1848, he floated his own firm, R.G.Ghosh & Co. In the process he accumulated fabulous wealth.[4]

One of the great qualities of Ghosh was that he never forgot his old friends. Even as he went up the financial and social ladder he kept close contact with them and helped them whenever they were in need. There were occasions when he helped his old friends such as Ramtanu Lahiri and Rasik Krishna Mallick.[4]

When his grandfather died, there was a hue and cry in society that he was opposed to Hindu religion and there was possibility of his being ostracised. His father appealed to him to declare publicly his faith in Hindu religion but he turned to his father and said, "I am ever willing to obey you and bear any pains for that but I cannot tell a lie." When this spread around, he gained in the esteem in society. On another occasion his business had nosedived and there was possibility of his becoming bankrupt. His friends advised him to transfer his assets to others but he refused to follow an illegal path.[4] His personal integrity has been acknowledged even by more recent historians.[5]

Oration and social reforms

His speeches on the Black Acts (1850), which aimed at bringing disputes between Europeans and Asians under the jurisdiction of the Company's courts and those criticising the European protests against a well-intentioned government move to bring Europeans on par with the natives in judicial treatment were a landmark.[2] He was the first, as early as 1853, to demand the eligibility of Indians in the civil service examinations. In 1854, he was the first Indian to propose the establishment of universities in India. He supported the move of Dwarkanath Tagore to send four students to England for higher medical studies.[1]

Ghosh not only delivered fiery speeches but also wrote effectively. His publication of a booklet A Few Remarks on Certain Draft Acts, Commonly Called Black Acts so angered the English that he was forced out of his position as vice-president of the Agri-Horticultural Society.[4] He was closely associated with the publications of the time, such as Jnananwesan and Bengal Spectator.[1] He took an active part in the establishment of the British Indian Association and was a member of its committee.[6]


He not only indulged in politics but also other causes. It was at his initiative that a decision was taken to erect a statue of David Hare. He was the first to offer one month's income for the purpose; others followed[4] and the statue stands to this day in the compound of Presidency College.

In his last days, he wrote off loans totalling Rs. 40,000 given to his friends.[4]

References

1. Sengupta, Subodh Chandra and Bose, Anjali (editors), 1976/1998, Sansad Bangali Charitabhidhan (Biographical dictionary) Vol I, (in Bengali), pp 480–481, ISBN 81-85626-65-0
2. Sengupta, Nitish, 2001/2002, History of the Bengali-speaking People, p 228, UBS Publishers' Distributors Pvt. Ltd., ISBN 81-7476-355-4
3. Acharya, Poromesh, Education in Old Calcutta in Calcutta, the Living City, Vol I, edited by Sukanta Chaudhuri, pp 87, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-563696-1.
4. Sastri, Sivanath, Ramtanu Lahiri O Tatkalin Bangasamaj, (in Bengali)1903/2001, p 76-80, New Age Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
5. Sengupta, Nitish, p232.
6. Sastri, Sivanath, pp 115–116,
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