The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glories

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The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glories

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:51 pm

The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glories
by Frederick A. Barber
with forewords by Carrie Chapman Catt and Harry Emerson Fosdick
arranged by Frederick A. Barber of Historical Foundations
© 1932 by Frederick A. Barber

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When George Palmer Putnam went to the War Department to secure photographs for "The Horror of It," a little volume containing stark pictures of the war, which has just been published, Major General Carr of the Signal Corps refused to show him any pictures showing war's gruesome results. "Only those photographs showing the pleasant aspects of war can be released," the General said. "The Department has a moral obligation to the Gold Star Mothers."

Table of Contents:

• Inside Cover
• "The Horror of It," a Book Depicting War Realities, Remarks by Hon. Ross A. Collins of Mississippi in the House of Representatives, March 14, 1932
• Foreword by Harry Emerson Fosdick, D.D.
• Foreword by Carrie Chapman Catt
• Acknowledgments
• Poems and Photographs
1. The Illusion of War, by Richard LeGallienne
2. The Moving Finger
3. The Start
4. The Finish
5. Birds
6. Flies
7. Windrow
8. Transport
9. Cold Steel
10. Harvest
11. The Hunters
12. The Hunted
13. Remains
14. Remember Again!, by R.W. Stewart
15. Blackness
16. Prayers
17. Pyre
18. Putrefaction
19. Slaughter
20. Food
21. Man-Trap
22. Dog-Trap
23. "On The Wire," by Robert W. Service
24. On the Wire
25. Flight
26. Overtaken
27. Hanging
28. Execution
29. Nooses
30. Youth
31. "The Other Side and Other Poems," by Capt. Gilbert Frankau
32. Machine
33. Silent
34. The Nest
35. Ambulance
36. Waiting
37. "In Flanders," by James Norman Hall
38. Inferno
39. Field of Glory
40. Watery Grave
41. Landscape
42. City Street
43. Abandoned
44. Bones
45. "The Inexcusable Lie," by Harold R. Peat
46. At His Post
47. Decapitated
48. Firing Step
49. "Only a Boche," by Robert W. Service
50. Crumpled
51. Life's Blood
52. Asphyxiated
53. At Rest
54. Shrapnel Wound
55. "Song and Cry of a Soldier in the Lines," by Albert Edward Clements
56. Good Soldiers
57. Soldiers
58. Civilians
59. Starving
60. Starved
61. A Word Picture from "War's Hellish Panorama"
62. Famine
63. Debris
64. Left Behind
65. Where They Fell
66. Derelict
67. Mass Grave
68. Homeless
69. Shell Shattered
70. No Man's Land
71. Destruction
72. Desecration
73. Sacrilege
74. Devotion
75. To a Nine Inch Gun, by Anonymous
76. Civilization (?)
77. Cause
78. Effect
79. The Iron Cross
80. The Wooden Cross
81. "The Night Sowers," by Clinton Scollard
82. The Night Sowers
83. Thoroughfare
84. Roadside
85. Those Who Went
86. And Came Back
87. Those Who Went
88. And Never Came Back
89. "God's Challengers," by Marion Perham Gale
90. A Mother's Son
91. The Stretcher Bearer
92. Cart Load
93. Cannon Fodder
94. Until the Judgment Day
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:53 pm

Inside Cover:

As Devastating a Document as Could be Devised for the Ending of War I

HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK:

"Let this book do its quiet work.... Here is war not seen through the lenses of anybody's prejudice but caught in the act by the camera."

CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT:

"Blessings on the camera which provides the means of teaching youth the terrible, undeniable facts of war.... May this book go far."

THE REV. SIDNEY L. GULICK:

"A real contribution to the fundamental program of education for peace.... I trust your book will be read widely."

Here are pictures which tell the story of war as words cannot tell it.

Behind many of the plays and books written by those who fought the Great War lies determination not to forget, but to face again the past for the sake of the future. These men know that war isn't simply glory. They know that "for every Victoria Cross won, there must be 10,000 wooden crosses won."

In this spirit the books' photographs have been collected, many of them originated in our own war archives and those of France and Germany, some from private collections, all authentic.

Actual delineation of war is gruesome -- it cannot be otherwise. The eye of the camera catches the horrible facts, preserving them for posterity, a record shocking in its verity.

"The Horror of It" is a true book -- ghastly true. Nothing like it ever before has been attempted. Inevitably it will stir up sensational approval and condemnation. Whether it be a plea for "pacifism" or for "preparedness," depends on the reader's viewpoint.

THE HORROR OF IT
CAMERA RECORDS OF WAR'S GRUESOME GLORIES
WITH FOREWORDS BY CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT AND HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK
ARRANGED BY FREDERICK A. BARBER of Historical Foundations
BREWER, WARREN & PUTNAM
NEW YORK, 1932

Copyright, 1932 by FREDERICK A. BARBER

To Thomas and Marguerite and all the sons and daughters of the men who served in the World War with the hope that they may never know the horror of it except through books and pictures.
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:55 pm

Remarks of Hon. Ross A. Collins of Mississippi in the House of Representatives
March 14, 1932

(Not printed at Government expense)
United States Government Printing Office, Washington: 1932

REMARKS OF HON. ROSS A. COLLINS

Mr. COLLINS. Mr. Speaker, a little book entitled "The Horror of It," arranged by Mr. Frederick A. Barber, of Historical Foundations, and published by Brewer, Warren & Putnam, New York, came into my possession recently. The book is a camera record of the gruesome glories of the World War.

I asked Mr. G. P. Putnam, of this firm, if any of the photographs were supplied him by the Signal Corps of our War Department, and received the following reply from him:

I have for some time been interested in issuing a book which would, through the use of actual photographs depicting the horrors of war, drive home to those who look at it exactly what war means in human agony and suffering. After collecting from other countries typical pictures depicting the gruesome side of modern military operations, I sent a representative to the Signal Corps, who selected from their large collection of war pictures a group of photographs desired. When the nature of their use was divulged the War Department refused to give them out.

Subsequently I wrote to the Chief of hte Signal Corps again requesting the use of these pictures in a book which I frankly described as designed as a document against war, graphically illustrating the horrors of modern conflict. This request was turned down in a brief letter stating that "there are no pictures on hand such as you desire that are available for publication."

I then called upon Maj. Gen. Irving J. Carr, Chief of the Signal Corps. I explained to him frankly what I wanted and why. With equal frankness, he replied that the department would give out only those pictures which depicted the more pleasing aspects of war -- that it was not "ethical, not decent, and against public policy" to release photographs depicting the repulsive side of war. General Carr said to me:

"To give out any such pictures would be against public policy. It would not be ethical; it would not be decent. Think of the Gold Star Mothers the country sent to France. Over there they saw the lovely cemeteries in which lie the dead of the American Expeditionary Forces. Perhaps their boys lie there. These mothers carried hom in their minds beautiful pictures of these well-kept resting places. That is what they should have -- we can not spoil these memories."

I asked if these mothers and other mothers are not entitled to evidence of the ghastly side of war, bringing home realization of what other wars inevitably will mean. Summed up, General Carr said that the Signal Corps would supply any pictures desired which show the pleasant features of military operations but entirely refused to let us have anything else.

My contention is that the Signal Corps pictures, except those involving secret military matters, should be available to any reputable taxpayer. To me it seems unsound that the Army should decide what war pictures a publisher may use. If the department actually could put into operation its edict, the public would only see those pictures which glorify war.

It is but fair to add that despite the Signal Corps' opposition we were actually able to include in the book certain American photographs which found their way into circulation some years ago, in addition to a selection of authentic pictures from Germany, England, and France, amazing in their stark and shocking reality. Please realize that no "atrocities" are included. The book has no bias of nationality and has blame for no one. Its purpose, as exemplified by its title, is simply to depict the "horror of it" as seen by the truthful camera -- an unemotional document.

Under all the circumstances I suppose we could not expect anything but opposition to its content and its purpose at the hands of the War Department.


It is evident that the War Department has refused the publication of the war pictures in its possession. Such material as might reveal military secrets which would be of use to a possible enemy would naturally not be given out for publication, but the taxpayers of this country have the right to expect the publication of this material now suppressed by the War Department. Not merely the taxpayers but the press should demand this material. It is strange that the press, so zealous regarding its freedom, should accept without protest this infringement of its rights.

We are now brought face to face with the problem. Should Congress, the elected representatives of the people of this country, tolerate in silence this violation of the Constitution? Do we need to be reminded that "Congress shall make no law *** abridging the freedom of speech or of the press ***." Congress could not violate this provision, yet it permits a department of this Government to abridge the freedom of the press and thus carry on, in violation of the Constitution.

If all pictures in the War Department were denied to the press, individuals might be tempted to conclude that the department, fearful of creating a war mind, suppressed all visual aids on this subject. But the department does not merely pretend to suppress; it censors. As noted in the letter already quoted, it permits and encourages the publication of photographs that present the pleasant aspects of war. In fact, one branch of the department is assigned to this task of securing and publishing attractive photographs on war subjects.

One Sunday edition carry these -- marching soldiers, troops of men on horseback, cadet troops headed by well-dressed bands playing martial music, youngsters at target practice, girl majors in military uniforms saluting cadet officers. While this "afternoon tea" portrayal of war is being secured daily, and released daily by the War Department for the purpose of propagandizing the institution of war, why not reveal to the taxpayers the reverse side of the picture? Why not publish the real, the serious side of war? Why not tell the American people the whole truth? If the War Department does not feel called upon to publish the whole truth, it should not prevent the press from placing the truth before the people of this country. In other words, why prevent a citizen from publishing pictures of the realities of war? Why not portray the maimed, the dead, and the dying, as well as well-dressed troops marching to martial music down streets lined with joyous, cheering crowds? But the press is told by the War Department that the American public must not be told the whole truth.

In this regard we should compare ourselves with other countries. The countries of Europe have opened their archives to their citizens. Many of the photographs in this book have been secured from official sources in other countries. It should be observed that our citizens, denied permission to publish the whole war story by our War Department, have found these same pictures the common property of the citizens of other countries. The freedom in this country should be as great as that in any other country in this regard.

"The Horror of It" is a portrayal of the whole truth of the institution of war as revealed in the torn bodies and minds of individuals. It pictures not ambition and idealism but the physical clash of forces and soldiers as pawns of war. It is realism to the nth degree. In the face of this stark realistic portrayal of the whole truth of war, the War Department's idealistic presentation of war as marching troops, banners waving, bands playing, can no longer be carried on. The War Department's idealism must be replaced by the realism of war itself.

The Government of the United States should not favor, or permit, any department of the Government to carry out any system by which the people of this country should not be given the whole truth. It is only by this means that there can be a release of civilization from the nightmare of war.
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:55 pm

FOREWORD
By Harry Emerson Fosdick, D.D.

This book of authenticated photographs is a hard-headed answer to the common charge made against the peacemakers that they are soft-headed idealists. No piece of strategy on the part of the militarists is more emotionally effective than their endeavor, often successful, to picture themselves as clear-sighted and realistic while the devotees of the peace movement are sentimental and visionary.

This book say s in effect that if the militarists want realism we will give it to them. Here is war not seen through the lenses of anybody's prejudice but caught in the act by the camera. This is war's plain, stark, ugly meaning. Back of the camouflage of uniform and music, oratory and popular cheering, this is the gist and essence of war at the point where it specifically operates.

To be sure, war is like infantile paralysis in that, though it starts with a flash of hectic fever, its more dreadful aspect is its long drawn out aftermath. This book has not photographed the endless miseries which follow war for many years. No camera could catch the agonies of innumerable homes now where, as the direct issue of the world's disorganization in the Great War, the days are hard and the nights are terrible. This book merely presents photographs of a few characteristic scenes from the first hectic fever which is war's beginning. These scenes, however, are startling enough. Some of us saw their like at first hand. They ought to stop the mouths of those who think war a moral tonic, or a glorious tradition, or an inspiration to useful patriotism, or a way of advancing human progress.

There is no difference between militarists and peace lovers on one matter: we all believe in national defense. We differ deeply, however, as to the means of achieving it. The idea that in this closely interrelated world of mutual economic interests national defense can be achieved by such activities as are depicted in this book seems to some of us sheer insanity. When we fight each other we destroy ourselves. We are spending this year among the great nations five billion dollars on armaments to do to each other the sort of thing this book portrays, and we call that national defense. It is of course both national and international ruination.

Let this book, then, do its quiet work. Let it say in scenes which did actually occur and will occur again, in forms more horrible if war returns, that war is a mad and barbarous business. When Verestchagin painted his picture "The Conquerors," depicting the world's military heroes riding down a desolate landscape amid piled rows of naked dead, the Czar's government would not allow it to be exhibited in Russia. It was one of the first endeavors realistically to paint the truth about war. Here is another endeavor, with the camera's lens for the p0ainter. When we talk war, if we are realistic and honest, this is what we must mean.
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:55 pm

FOREWORD
By Carrie Chapman Catt

Yesterday the President of a great bank said to a U.S. Senate Committee: "Boys actually born since the Great War are just entering the Universities of Germany." So they are in every nation -- boys who have learned less of the realities, than of the romance and adventure of war.

Whether the nations will continue to pay out more than three quarters of their incomes for wars, past, present and future, or turn their common sense and reason upon methods of war prevention depends upon these boys from whose numbers the statesmen of the future will emerge.

Blessings on the camera which now for the first time in the history of the world, provides the means of teaching youth the terrible, undeniable facts of war. The camera tells the truth, speaks all languages and can cross all frontiers.

To all peoples this little book offers a silent but heartrending prayer that courts, round-tables, conventions, and conferences shall speedily become the substitutes for battlefields since no longer can a nation that thinks itself civilized maintain the policy of war.

May book and prayer travel far and wide, leaving their unforgettable impress upon the understanding of the leaders of all men.
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 7:56 pm

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Here are pictures that tell the true story of war as words cannot tell it. They represent only a very few selections from the many thousands available in public and private collections.

Every man who took part in the World War knows that such scenes were not exceptional. Even more gruesome photographs could be shown -- some too horrible to print -- but these will serve their purpose if they convey to the youth of our nation a realization of war in its true colors.

For assistance in gathering together pictures from the official records of the United States, France, England and Germany, and from private collections, I am deeply indebted to Lieut. G. Burling Jarrett, Mr. George H. Grubb, Mr. C. H. Brooks and Mme. Lilian Cridler Segonne.

Acknowledgment is also made to Les Archives Photographiques d'Art et d'Histoire for official French photographs, to the Societas-Verlag, Frankfort, for permission to include pictures from their publications, to the International News Photos, Inc., the Acme News Photos and to the Near East Foundation for photographs taken on the Eastern front.

In the selection of verse and prose quotations that appear in these pages, I am indebted for valuable assistance to Rev. Eliot White and especially to Vincent Godfrey Burns whose anthology of war poems, "The Red Harvest," has been invaluable.

I also acknowledge with grateful appreciation the help and encouragement, during a rather gruesome task, that was given me by Dr. Francis Trevelyan Miller, Capt. Horace B. Wild, Dr. Sidney L. Gulick, Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdick and particularly by George Palmer Putnam, a warm friend and an inspiring publisher, to whom this book owes its inception as well as its completion.

FREDERICK A. BARBER
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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:01 pm

THE ILLUSION OF WAR
By Richard Le Gallienne

War
I abhor,
And yet how sweet
The sound along the marching street
Of drum and fife, and I forget
Broken old mothers, and the whole
Dark butchery without a soul.

***

Oh, it is wickedness to clothe
Yon hideous, grinning thing that stalks
Hidden in music, like a queen
That in a garden of glory walks
Till good men love the thing they loathe;
Art, thou hast many infamies,
But not an infamy like this.
Oh, snap the fife and still the drum,
And show the monster like she is.

By permission of the Copyright owners, Dodd, Mead & Co., Inc.

***

The Moving Finger writes; and having writ,
Moves on; nor all your Piety or Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it.

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THE START

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THE FINISH

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BIRDS

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FLIES

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WINDROW

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TRANSPORT

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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:07 pm

COLD STEEL

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HARVEST

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THE HUNTERS

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THE HUNTED

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REMAINS

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REMEMBER AGAIN!
By R. W. Stewart

Rain in the blackness. Stabs of flame in the blackness.
Whines and groans in the blackness.
Remember?
Remember again.

Rockets at dawn. Shells, come and gone.
Mists in the dawn.
Cheers in the dawn.
Remember?
Remember again.

Stillness at noon. Curses in the stillness of noon.
Writhing bodies at noon. Still bodies at noon.
Remember? Remember again.

Flashing shovels at twilight. Prayers at twilight.
Dry-eyed men at twilight. Soul-twisted men at twilight.
Remember?
Remember again.

Time will pass. Crises will rise.
Remember?
Remember again.

These verses originally appeared in the editorial columns of the Boston Herald. They were sent to the Herald by the author, who described himself as a private in the army and asked that the verses be "put some place."

***

BLACKNESS

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PRAYERS

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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:11 pm

PYRE

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PUTREFACTION

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SLAUGHTER

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FOOD

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MAN-TRAP

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DOG-TRAP

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O God, take the sun from the sky!
It's burning me, scorching me up.
God, can't You hear my cry?
Water! A poor, little cup!
It's laughing, the cursed sun!
See how it swells and swells
Fierce as a hundred hells!
God, will it never have done?
It's searing the flesh on my bones;
It's beating with hammers red
My eyeballs into my head;
It's parching my very moans.
See! It's the size of the sky,
And the sky is a torrent of fire,
Foaming on me as I lie
Here on the wire . . . the wire. . . .

Of night and of death I dream;
Night that will bring me peace,
Coolness and starry gleam,
Stillness and death's release:

From "On The Wire," by Robert W. Service

From "Rhymes of a Red Cross Man," published by Barse & Co.

***

ON THE WIRE

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Re: The Horror of It: Camera Records of War's Gruesome Glori

Postby admin » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:17 pm

FLIGHT

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OVERTAKEN

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HANGING

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EXECUTION

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NOOSES

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YOUTH

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War -- a dirty, loathsome, servile murder-job;
Men, lousy, sleepless, ulcerous, afraid;
Men stunned to brainlessness, and gibberings;
Men maimed and blinded: men against machines;
Flesh versus iron, concrete, flame and wire;
Men choking out their souls in poison gas;
Men squelched into the slime by trampling feet;
Dead bodies used to build a trench again;
Men disemboweled by guns five miles away,
Cursing with their last breath the living God
Because he made them his image.

From "The Other Side and Other Poems," by Capt. Gilbert Frankau, Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., publishers

***

MACHINE

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