Letters of Fyodor Michaeilovitch Dostoevsky to his Family an

That's French for "the ancient system," as in the ancient system of feudal privileges and the exercise of autocratic power over the peasants. The ancien regime never goes away, like vampires and dinosaur bones they are always hidden in the earth, exercising a mysterious influence. It is not paranoia to believe that the elites scheme against the common man. Inform yourself about their schemes here.

Letters of Fyodor Michaeilovitch Dostoevsky to his Family an

Postby admin » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:10 am

Letters of Fyodor Michaeilovitch Dostoevsky to his Family and Friends
Translated by Ethel Colburn Mayne
First edition, October, 1914
Second edition, re-set, November 1917

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


Table of Contents: [PDF HERE]

• TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE
• CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE OF DOSTOEVSKY'S LIFE
• LETTERS
o 1. To his Father: May 10, 1838
o 2. To his Brother Michael: August 9, 1838
o 3. To his Brother Michael: October 31, 1838
o 4. To his Brother Michael: January 1, 1840
o 5. To his Brother Michael: September 30, 1844
o 6. To his Brother Michael: March 24, 1845
o 7. To his Brother Michael: May 4, 1845
o 8. To his Brother Michael: October 8, 1845
o 9. To his Brother Michael: November 16, 1845
o 10.To his Brother Michael: February 1, 1846
o 11. To his Brother Michael: April 1, 1846
o 12. To his Brother Michael: September 17, 1846
o 13.To his Brother Michael: Undated, 1846
o 14. To his Brother Michael: November 26, 1846
o 15. To his Brother Michael: Undated, 1847
o 16. To his Brother Michael: Undated, 1847
o 17. To his Brother Michael: July 18, 1849
o 18. To his Brother Michael: August 27, 1849
o 19. To his Brother Michael: September 14, 1849
o 20. To his Brother Michael: December 22, 1849
o 21. To his Brother Michael: February 22, 1854
o 22. To Mme. N. D. Fonvisin: Beginning of March, 1854
o 23. To Mme. Maria Dmitryevna Issayev: June 4, 1855
o 24. To Mme. Praskovya Yegorovna Annenkov : October 18, 1855
o 25. To Apollon Nikolayevitch Maikov: January 18, 1856
o 26. To General E. I. Totleben: March 24, 1856
o 27. To Baron A. E. Vrangel: April 13, 1856
o 28. To his Brother Michael: May 31, 1858
o 29. To his Brother Michael: May 9, 1859
o 30. To Frau Stackenschneider: May 3, 1860
o 31. To Mme. V. D. Constantino: September 1, 1862
o 32. To N. N. Strachov: September 18 [30], 1863
o 33. To A. P. Milyukov: June, 1866
o 34. To Apollon Maikov: August 16 [28], 1867
o 35. To his Niece Sofia Alexandrovna : September 29 [October 11], 1867
o 36. To Apollon Maikov: October 9 [21], 1867
o 37. To P. A. Issayev: October 10 [22], 1867
o 38. To his Sister Vera, and his Brother-in-Law, Alexander Pavlovitch Ivanov: January 1 [13], 1868
o 39. To his Niece Sofia Alexandrovna: January 1 [13], 1868
o 40. To P. A. Issayev: February 19 [March 3], 1868
o 41. To Apollon Maikov: May 18 [30], 1868
o 42. To Apollon Maikov: June 10 [22], 1868
o 43. To Apollon Maikov: October 7 [19], 1868
o 44. To his Niece: October 26 [November 7], 1868
o 45. To Apollon Maikov: December n [23], 1868
o 46. To his Niece: January 25 [February 6], 1869
o 47. To N. N. Strachov: February 26 [March 10], 1869
o 48. To his Niece: March 8 [20], 1869
o 49. To N. N. Strachov: March 18 [30], 1869
o 50. To his Niece: August 29 [September 10], 1869
o 51. To Apollon Maikov: October 16 [28], 1869
o 52. To Apollon Maikov: February 12 [24], 1870
o 53. To N. N. Strachov: February 26 [March 10], 1870
o 54. To N. N. Strachov: March 24 [April 5], 1870
o 55. To Apollon Maikov: March 25 [April 6], 1870
o 56. To his Sister Vera, and his Niece: May 7 [19], 1870
o 57. To N. N. Strachov: June n [23], 1870
o 58. To his Niece: July 2 [14], 1870
o 59. To his Niece: August 17 [29], 1870
o 60 To N. N. Strachov: October 9 [21], 1870 .
o 61. To Apollon Maikov: December 15 [27], 1870
o 62. To Apollon Maikov: December 30 [January 11], 1870-71
o 63. To Apollon Maikov: March 2 [14], 1871
o 64. To N. N. Strachov: April 23 [May 5], 1871
o 65To N. N. Strachov: May 18 [30], 1871
o 66. To Mme. Ch. D. Altschevsky: April 9, 1876
o 67. To Vsevolod Solovyov : July, 1876
o 68. To Mile. Gerassimov: March 7, 1877
o 69. To A. P. N. : May 19, 1877
o 70. To N. L. Osmidov: February, 1878
o 71. To a Mother : March 27, 1878
o 72. To a Group of Moscow Students: April 18, 1878
o 73. To Mile. N. N. : April 11, 1880
o 74. To Frau E. A. Stackenschneider: July 17, 1880
75. To N. L. Osmidov: August 18, 1880
o 76. To I. S. Aksakov: August 28, 1880
o 77. To Dr. A. F. Blagonravov: December 19, 1880
• RECOLLECTIONS OF DOSTOEVSKY
o By D. V. Grigorovitch (1837-1846)
o By A. P. Milyukov (1848-1849)
o By P. K. Martyanov (1850-1854)
o By Baron Alexander Vrangel (1854-1865)
o By Sophie Kovalevsky (1866)
• CONTEMPORARY JUDGMENTS
o R. P. Pobyedonoszev to I. S. Aksakov
o I. S. Aksakov to R. P. Pobyedonoszev
o Turgenev to Slutchevsky
o Turgenev to Dostoevsky
o Turgenev to Polonsky
o Turgenev to Mme. Milyutin
o Turgenev to Saltykov (1875)
o Turgenev to Saltykov (1882)
o Tolstoy to A. N. Strachov
• INDEX
• ILLUSTRATIONS
o Portrait of Dostoevsky, Petersburg, 1879
o Dostoevsky's Birthplace (the Workhouse Hospital at Moscow)
o Dostoevsky's Father
o Michael Dostoevsky
o Dostoevsky's Mother
o Dostoevsky at Semipalatinsk (1858) in Ensign's Uniform
o F. M. Dostoevsky
o Facsimile of " The Possessed," Part III., beginning of Chapter I
o Dostoevsky, Petersburg, 1876
o Dostoevsky's Study in Petersburg
o Portrait of Dostoevsky, Petersburg, 1879
o Dostoevsky, Moscow, 1880
o Dostoevsky's Handwriting in 1838 (Letter to his Brother Michael, August 9)
o Dostoevsky, Moscow, 1863
o Dostoevsky on his Death-Bed, January 29, 1881
o The Widow and Children of Dostoevsky at his Grave in Petersburg

The illustrations are from photographs taken, by permission, from the originals in the Moscow Museum.
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Re: Letters of Fyodor Michaeilovitch Dostoevsky to his Famil

Postby admin » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:48 am

TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE

IN the German translator's [1] preface to this volume it is pointed out that a complete collection of Dostoevsky's letters does not yet exist. "The first volume of the first collected edition of Dostoevsky's works (St. Petersburg, 1873), contains only a selection, which is usually lacking in the later editions." Herr Eliasberg goes on to tell us that "a series of letters which were to have been included in the present work was at the last moment withdrawn by the novelist's widow; the corrected proofs of these are to be preserved in a sealed portfolio at the Dostoevsky Museum in Moscow."

The present volume derives chiefly from the book by Tchechichin: "Dostoevsky in the Reminiscences of his Contemporaries, and in his Letters and Memoranda" (Moscow, 1912). The letters here numbered XXXVIII., XLIV., L., LVL, and LVIII. are lacking in Tchechichin's book, and were taken from a Russian monthly journal, Rousskaya Starina. Those numbered XXXIX., XLVI., XLVIIL, and LIX., which are incompletely given by Tchechichin, are here given in full.

From Tchechichin's work were also taken a number of notes, as well as the reminiscences of Dostoevsky by his contemporaries, which here form an Appendix.

The present text, therefore, while it contains much that is relatively "inedited," yet cannot pretend to full completeness. On comparing it with a French translation of some of the letters, issued by the Societe du Mercure de France in 1908, it is seen to be a good deal the more judiciously edited of the two the German translator has pared away many repetitions, much irrelevant and uninteresting matter, while he has used material of the highest biographical value which the French editor either unaccountably omitted, or, it may be, had not at disposal. Of such are the letters enumerated above ; and, more than all, the peculiarly interesting passage in Letter XXXIV., which relates Dostoevsky's historic quarrel with Turgenev.

A word about the punctuation. It has been, so far as was thought at all feasible, left as Dostoevsky offered it. Like Byron, he "did not know a comma; at least, where to put one" or rather, in Dostoevsky's case, where not to put one, for his lavish use of the less important and lucid sign is very remarkable. Here and there, this predilection has been departed from by me, but only when it too deeply obscured the sense ; elsewhere, since even punctuation has its value for the student of character, Dostoevsky's "system" is retained in all its chaotic originality.

_______________

Notes:

1 Herr Alexander Eliasberg (R. Piper and Go., Munich).
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