Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:32 am

Donald G. Cook
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 3/31/18

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Donald G. Cook
General Donald G. Cook
Born 1946 (age 71–72)
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service 1969-2005
Rank General
Commands held Air Education and Training Command
20th Air Force
45th Space Wing
21st Space Wing
Awards Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit (2)
Other work Board of Directors, Burlington Northern Santa Fe

Donald G. Cook is a retired United States Air Force four-star general who served as Commander, Air Education and Training Command at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas from 2001 to 2005.

Cook entered the Air Force in 1969 through the ROTC program at Michigan State University. He completed undergraduate pilot training at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona. He has commanded a flying training wing, two space wings and the 20th Air Force. He has served as Legislative Liaison in the Senate Liaison Office, on the staff of the House Armed Services Committee, and as Director for Expeditionary Aerospace Force Implementation at U.S. Air Force headquarters. Prior to assuming command of Air Education and Training Command, he was assigned to Air Combat Command as Vice Commander. He is a command pilot and has flown more than 3,300 hours in the B-52D/G/H, T-37B and T-38A.

After retirement, Cook was elected to the Board of Directors of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation, Crane Corporation, HawkerBeechcraft Corporation and USAA Federal Savings Bank.[1]

Education

• 1969 Bachelor of Science degree in communication arts, Michigan State University
• 1975 Squadron Officer School, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
• 1976 Master's degree in business administration, Southern Illinois University
• 1982 Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia
• 1987 Air War College, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
• 1996 National Security Leadership Course, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, and School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Assignments

• December 1969 - December 1970, student, undergraduate pilot training, Williams AFB, Arizona
• January 1971 - April 1972, T-37 instructor pilot, Webb AFB, Texas
• April 1972 - March 1974, T-37 instructor pilot, Moody AFB, Georgia
• March 1974 - June 1974, B-52 training, Castle AFB, California
• June 1974 - June 1978, aircraft commander and instructor pilot, 2nd Bomb Squadron, later, Chief of Mission Development and Chief of Training Flight, 22nd Bomb Wing, March AFB, California
• June 1978 - August 1981, resource manager, Chief, Special Actions Division, and assistant for Colonel Assignments, Headquarters Air Force Military Personnel Center, Randolph AFB, Texas
• January 1982 - March 1984, Chief, Program Evaluation Division, Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Programs, Headquarters Strategic Air Command, Offutt AFB, Nebraska
• October 1984 - June 1986, Commander, 325th Bomb Squadron, Fairchild AFB, Washington
• July 1986 - June 1987, student, Air War College, Maxwell AFB, Alabama
• August 1987 - November 1987, Chief, Special Activities Division, Headquarters U.S. Air Force Programs and Resources, Washington, D.C.
• November 1987 - November 1988, Air Force Representative to the House Armed Services Committee, Washington, D.C.
• November 1988 - July 1989, Deputy Commander for Operations, 7th Bombardment Wing, Carswell AFB, Texas
• July 1989 - June 1990, Vice Commander, 7th Bombardment Wing, Carswell AFB, Texas
• June 1990 - July 1991, Commander, 3415th Air Base Group, Lowry AFB, Colorado
• July 1991 - July 1992, Commander, 47th Flying Training Wing, Laughlin AFB, Texas
• August 1992 - August 1993, Chief, Senate Liaison Office, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force for Legislative Liaison, Washington, D.C.
• August 1993 - January 1995, Commander, 21st Space Wing, Peterson AFB, Colorado
• January 1995 - August 1995, Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick AFB, Florida
• August 1995 - June 1996, Director of Operations, Headquarters Air Force Space Command, Peterson AFB, Colorado
• June 1996 - September 1998, Commander, 20th Air Force, Francis E. Warren AFB, Wyoming
• September 1998 - July 1999, Director for Expeditionary Aerospace Force Implementation, Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.
• July 1999 - June 2000, Vice Commander, Air Force Space Command, Peterson AFB, Colorado
• June 2000 - December 2001, Vice Commander, Air Combat Command, Langley AFB, Virginia
• December 2001 - 2005, Commander, Air Education and Training Command, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas

Flight information

• Rating: Command pilot
• Flight hours: More than 3,300
• Aircraft flown: B-52D/G/H, T-37B and T-38A

Awards and decorations

US Air Force Command Pilot Badge
Command Space and Missile Operations Badge
Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Meritorious Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters
Air Force Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Combat Readiness Medal
National Defense Service Medal with one bronze service star
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters
Air Force Training Ribbon

Effective dates of promotion

• Second Lieutenant November 26, 1969
• First Lieutenant May 26, 1971
• Captain November 26, 1972
• Major July 1, 1981
• Lieutenant Colonel March 1, 1984
• Colonel July 1, 1988
• Brigadier General August 1, 1993
• Major General September 1, 1996
• Lieutenant General October 6, 1999
• General December 17, 2001

References

1. BNSF Elects Air Force Gen. Donald G. Cook (Ret.) To Its Board
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:38 am

James R. Joy
by militarytimes.com
Accessed: 3/31/18

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James Joy was commissioned in the Marine Corps in 1957 upon graduation from Northwestern Missouri State University. He retired as a U.S. Marine Corps Brigadier General in 1996.

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION:

Defense Superior Service Medal
AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Peace Time Awards
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Brigadier General
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General James R. Joy, United States Marine Corps, was awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal for exceptionally superior service to the Defense Department of the United States.

Legion of Merit
AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Vietnam War
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Brigadier General
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General James R. Joy, United States Marine Corps, was awarded the Legion of Merit with Combat "V" for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States.

Legion of Merit
AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Peace Time Awards
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Brigadier General
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General James R. Joy, United States Marine Corps, was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States.

Legion of Merit
AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Peace Time Awards
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Brigadier General
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General James R. Joy, United States Marine Corps, was awarded a Second Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States.

Legion of Merit
AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Peace Time Awards
Service: Marine Corps
Rank: Brigadier General
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:
(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Brigadier General James R. Joy, United States Marine Corps, was awarded a Third Gold Star in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Legion of Merit for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:16 am

Ode to Jim Joy '57: Retired Brigadier General, U.S. Marine Corps
by Mitzi Lutz
Photography by Darren Whitley
Northwest Alumni Magazine
July, 2005

NOTICE: THIS WORK MAY BE PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT

YOU ARE REQUIRED TO READ THE COPYRIGHT NOTICE AT THIS LINK BEFORE YOU READ THE FOLLOWING WORK, THAT IS AVAILABLE SOLELY FOR PRIVATE STUDY, SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH PURSUANT TO 17 U.S.C. SECTION 107 AND 108. IN THE EVENT THAT THE LIBRARY DETERMINES THAT UNLAWFUL COPYING OF THIS WORK HAS OCCURRED, THE LIBRARY HAS THE RIGHT TO BLOCK THE I.P. ADDRESS AT WHICH THE UNLAWFUL COPYING APPEARED TO HAVE OCCURRED. THANK YOU FOR RESPECTING THE RIGHTS OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS.


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Let's be clear about something: Jim Joy is a man of his word.

As a retired brigadier general from the United States Marines Corps, he's one of those true Americans who has put himself in harm's way to protect his country. He's an old-fashioned, Missouri-born, tell-it-like-it-is guy. But don't believe him when he says "Marines don't smile."

For one thing, he has many, many reasons to smile. He has a wonderful family. He’s healthy, retired and plays golf three days a week. He survived two tours and two ferocious attacks in Vietnam. He was called upon by the President of the United States to take charge of a situation following one of the nation’s darkest moments. He was the leader of a multimillion-dollar organization. He served nearly 20 years on the United States Olympic Committee.

Joy’s life has been a series of challenges – from professional to personal – that brought him to a place where, really, he has plenty to smile about.

 MISSION: MARINES

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JOY AS A HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR, 1953.

Jim Joy loves sports, but as a kid growing up in the small town of Conception Junction, he never played on a football team. But his road to the Marines, where he would have a distinguished career, would begin on the gridiron.

During high school, Joy was such an athlete that he caught the attention of Bearcat football coach Ryland Milner who recruited him to play for Northwest. Joy, at 5-foot-7 and barely 150 pounds, accepted the offer and played for three years.

“I worked on the railroad in the summer and told the foreman I wanted to carry the jack and the handle all the time so I could get in shape,” he said. “Everyone laughed because it was more than 100 pounds! They thought I’d last maybe three days. Well, I lasted all summer, and needless to say, I was in excellent shape.”

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 JOY’S FINAL ASSIGNMENT AS AN ACTIVE MARINE WAS SPEARHEADING THE MARINE CORPS RECRUITING EFFORT FROM 1985 TO 1988.

Joy didn’t receive much playing time as a Bearcat, but it didn’t stop him from receiving a little ribbing from his teammates.

“I guess it was a combination of my Indian ancestors and the sound I made every time I was hit on the football field, because they gave me the nickname Chief Ugh,” he said.

The “chief” knew he wanted to become a high school coach, but first he was determined to become a Marine.

“Several of the Bearcat football players I watched before I came to Northwest were Marines, including Paul Tobin who was a co-captain, and about a dozen of the guys on the team when I was a freshman were in the Marine officer program,” Joy said. “There was no draft going on at the time, but the Marines struck my fancy – their spirit, their determination.”

After he graduated from Northwest in 1957, Joy, who later earned two master’s degrees, intended on staying in the military for three years. He miscalculated by 28 years.

MISSION: FAMILY

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SINCE THEIR DAYS TOGETHER AT NORTHWEST, JIM AND PATTY JOY HAVE STOOD BY EACH OTHER DESPITE THE PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CHALLENGES THEY’VE BEEN DEALT. TODAY, THEY LIVE IN ROGERS, ARK., AND ENJOY SPENDING TIME WITH THEIR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN.

Following his college graduation, Joy headed to the First Marine Division in Camp Pendleton, Calif., and married his college sweetheart, Patty New ’58. Patty taught elementary school until their first child was born in 1961. But during childbirth, Patty, at age 25, suffered a cerebral incident that left her unable to talk and the right side of her body paralyzed – a condition from which she would never fully recover.

“Patty needed the best medical attention in the country at the time. For her to receive that, I knew I needed to stay in the Marine Corps,” Joy said. “She could get great speech and physical therapy in Washington, D.C., so in 1963 the Marine Corps transferred us to that area.”

Because of her mother’s paralysis and loss of speech, Joy’s oldest daughter, Amy, became a speech therapist and lives in Virginia. Their youngest daughter, Abby, is an executive for Wal-Mart and lives just a few miles from her parents in Rogers, Ark.

Joy said the toughest part of his military career was being separated from family.

“I had two yearlong tours in Vietnam and another six months in Lebanon,” he said. “I had the reputation in the Marines of being cool under fire, and my men always knew I was in charge, but being away from your family is tough on anyone.”

MISSION: VIETNAM

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IN 1966, JOY, NOW A FATHER OF TWO YOUNG DAUGHTERS, GOT HIS ORDERS FOR HIS FIRST TOUR IN VIETNAM.

Joy’s first tour in Vietnam was in 1966-67 as a company commander. In 1971- 72, he returned to Vietnam as an adviser with the Vietnamese Marines where he was involved in two heavy battles.

His involvement in the Easter Offensive (when the North Vietnamese Army launched a large-scale attack on the South) is chronicled in the book “The Easter Offensive, The Last American Advisors.”

“In a three-day period, all of the Vietnamese Army regiments were overrun, and then our Vietnamese Marine brigade had to evacuate our fire bases and make about a 25-kilometer march over very rugged terrain,” Joy said. “It was a very harrowing experience, and we lost half of the brigade – they were either killed or captured.”

After being reequipped and receiving new personnel, Joy and his comrades were thrown back into battle.

“Believe it or not, the same thing happened again just a few months later,” he said. “We had to start a counter attack and the next thing we know, there’s no one between us and the North Vietnamese and the DMZ. All of the Vietnamese Army units fell back and left our brigade facing the North.”

Joy and his troops had to evacuate again, and things went from bad to worse. “We were under a tank and infantry attack,” he said. “There were only about five of us Americans left between North Vietnam and South Vietnam when we were finally extracted by helicopter under a very, very dire situation. We really thought we may be going to the ‘Hanoi Hilton’ and joining the other Americans whose planes we saw being shot down.”

Joy is confident one of the reasons he advanced through the military ranks to brigadier general is due to his heavy combat experience. This experience would be put to use when he received an assignment from the Commandant of the Marine Corps General P.X. Kelley and President Ronald Reagan in 1983.

MISSION: LEBANON

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JOY’S TROOPS IN LEBANON WERE VISITED BY MANY ENTERTAINERS IN 1983, INCLUDING BOB HOPE (LEFT, WITH JOY), CHARLTON HESTON AND BROOKE SHIELDS.

The intensity of the battles Joy faced in Vietnam would pale in comparison to his assignment in Lebanon.

“You have defining moments in your life,” Joy said. “I’ve had several of these – Patty’s bad illness, the big battles in Vietnam, and in 1983 when I was selected by President Reagan to go over and take charge in Lebanon following one of the darkest days in the history of our country when 241 Marines were killed.”

Before departing for Lebanon to secure the safety of the U.S. military and to complete his mission, Joy and his wife met with President Reagan.

“He gave me quite a pep talk,” Joy said. “It was like talking to your grandfather. He said ‘Jim, I’m very proud of you, and we don’t want to lose any more Marines over there.’”

Joy had his orders, but he didn’t know what the future held.

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“The situation in Beirut was the most challenging thing I’ve ever had to undertake,” he said. “If you look at some of the pictures from Beirut, you can see that I’m very tired. I was working 20 hours a day for six months solid. I later learned my men called me “Raccoon Eyes” because I had such dark circles under my eyes. When you’re in combat, you may have a battle that lasts a couple of days, but you don’t have battles that last six months where you’re under excruciating pressure. It was hardball.”

When Joy and his troops left six months later – although difficult for Joy to accept – 12 more Marines had been killed. Because of his stellar service, the president of Lebanon awarded him the Order of Cedar, the highest award the government gives to any foreign officer. He also received the U.S. Department of Defense Superior Service Medal.

SPOTLIGHT: LEBANON, 1983

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JOY WAS PRESENTED THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SUPERIOR SERVICE MEDAL BY MAJ. GEN. STEVE OLMSTEAD

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THE DAY AFTER HE RETURNED FROM LEBANON, JOY FOUND HIS WAY TO THE NEAREST GOLF COURSE.

■ U.S. Marines were in Lebanon to secure peace to the city of Beirut and to prevent the area from becoming a battlefield following a civil war among the Christians, Muslims and Palestinians. On Oct. 23, 1983, a truck packed with explosives blew up a Marine barracks at Beirut International Airport killing 241 Marines.

■ In November 1983, Joy was appointed the first commanding general of the 22nd Marine Amphibious Unit in Lebanon, and in February 1984 he became the commander of the Joint Task Force, Lebanon.
 
MISSION: LIFE AS A CIVILIAN

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JOY WAS FEATURED ON THE COVER OF MILITARY MARKET MAGAZINE IN 1988 WHEN HE BECAME THE DIRECTOR OF THE MARINE CORPS MWR PROGRAMS.

■ Director of the Marine Corps Morale Welfare and Recreation programs, 1988-1996

■ MWR programs, now called Marine Corps Community Services, aim to improve the quality of life for Marines and their families by providing recreation programs and family services such as libraries, dry cleaners, convenience stores, bowling alleys, fitness centers and childcare facilities

■ From 1988 to 2005, Joy was a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee, serving in several capacities on the Olympic Foundation as well as the audit, budget, nominating and executive committees

■ Currently lives in Rogers, Ark., and works parttime as a consultant

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JOY’S MANY MEDALS ARE A TESTAMENT TO HIS DISTINGUISHED MILITARY CAREER
 
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JOY WEARS HIS U.S. OLYMPIC COMMITTEE BLAZER AS A PROUD REMINDER OF NEARLY 20 YEARS OF SERVICE TO AMERICAN ATHLETES.

Joy’s passion for his profession continued following his retirement from active duty in June 1988 where he had most recently been spearheading the Marine Corps recruiting effort. For the next eight years, he served as the director of the Marine Corps Morale Welfare and Recreation programs.

“I took off my uniform one day and put on a suit the very next day, but fortunately, I was able to work with the same people I had worked with for the previous 31 years,” he said.

Joy, who now had to learn his way around Capitol Hill, had a big job ahead of him, constructing a new organization by putting four separate entities into one large $750 million business, the MWR.

“Funds were available for things like libraries and fitness centers because they’re tied into the mission of developing Marines,” Joy said, “but 90 percent of my budget was from nonappropriated funds. Money for things like golf courses, marinas and stables had to be generated the old fashioned way – by earning it.”

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THOUGH RETIRED FROM TWO CAREERS, JOY, PICTURED IN HIS HOME OFFICE, REMAINS BUSY AS A PART-TIME CONSULTANT.

Also about the time Joy retired from active duty, the Olympic Committee was looking for volunteers with experience managing big organizations and big budgets, and Joy’s leadership skills caught the committee’s attention. He also knew how to speak his mind.

“It all boils down to common sense and being able to articulate your position,” Joy said. “With the Olympics, I kind of had the reputation of being a bulldog, but at the same time I’m an eternal optimist. I think it goes back to my days on the battlefield during Vietnam and Lebanon. Even though there were some very difficult situations, I never gave up or thought I wouldn’t make it.”

Likewise, Jim and Patty Joy have never given up on their devotion to each other and are looking forward to their retirement years.

“I’m going to phase down my consulting business and take care of ‘grandma,’” Joy said. “When you’ve been as busy as I have, it’s hard to just stop. I’ll still be active and keep my fingers in the Olympics. Patty and I will do some traveling and enjoy the grandkids, and I’ll continue to golf, hunt and fish.”

After a lifetime of service, Joy, a true American and dedicated family man, has a lot to look forward to. And that’s certainly something to smile about. ■
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