Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 5:57 am

William W. Hartzog
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/16/17

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William W. Hartzog
General William W. Hartzog
Born September 21, 1941 (age 76)
Wilmington, North Carolina
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1963-1998
Rank General
Commands held Training and Doctrine Command
1st Infantry Division
United States Army South
197th Infantry Brigade
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Legion of Merit
Soldier's Medal
Bronze Star with "V" Device
Purple Heart
Other work CEO, Burdeshaw Associates

General William White Hartzog (born September 21, 1941) was a four-star U.S. Army general whose commands during his 35-year career include the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, the 1st Infantry Division, and United States Army South. He was born in Wilmington, North Carolina.[1]

Military career

After graduating from The Citadel in 1963, where he received a degree in English, he was commissioned in the infantry. His first assignment after the Infantry Officer Basic Course was as Executive Officer of an Officer Candidate School company at Fort Benning. In 1965 he was assigned to Fort Kobbe, Panama. He deployed to Vietnam in 1967, eventually commanding a company, and upon return to the United States he attended the Infantry Officer Advanced Course. After graduation, he was assigned as a tactics instructor at the United States Military Academy, then returned to Vietnam in 1972 as a Plans Officer for Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. He attended the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College from 1973 to 1974, then proceeded to Fort Riley, where he served in various staff positions with the 1st Infantry Division. In April 1978, he was given command of the 193rd Infantry Brigade. Following his assignment in Panama, he attended the United States Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, and then served at the War Plans Division in Washington D.C., where he eventually became Chief. He was next assigned as Executive Officer at the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, before taking command of another brigade, the 197th Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning. After serving from 1987 to 1989 as the Assistant Commandant of the United States Army Infantry School, he returned to Panama for a third time as the J-3, United States Southern Command, a position he held during Operation Just Cause. He took command of United States Army South in 1990, and followed that command in 1991 with command of the 1st Infantry Division. He served as Deputy Commander in Chief/Chief of Staff, United States Atlantic Command from 1993 to 1994 before taking command of United States Army Training and Doctrine Command at Fort Monroe, from which he retired in 1998.

Awards and Decorations

Combat Infantryman Badge
Expert Infantryman Badge
Senior Parachutist Badge
Army Staff Identification Badge
Defense Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Army Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Legion of Merit with four oak leaf clusters
Soldier's Medal
Bronze Star with V Device and oak leaf cluster
Purple Heart
Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Air Medal
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Army Commendation Medal with three oak leaf clusters

He was given the Appalachian State University Distinguished Alumni Award in 1996.[2]

Post military

After retiring from the Army, Hartzog became CEO of Burdeshaw Associates, a defense consulting firm,[3] sits on the Board of Directors of the Army Historical Foundation,[4] and is a member of the Defense Science Board.[5]

References

1. [1]
2. Appalachian Alumni Association Distinguished Alumni Award
3. Burdeshaw Associates, Ltd. Executive Leadership
4. Army Historical Foundation Board and Staff
5. Defense Science Board Members, Senior Fellows, and Ex Officio 29 July 2003
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 6:11 am

John N. Abrams
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/16/17

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John N. Abrams
General John N. Abrams
Born September 3, 1946 (age 71)
Cumberland, Maine
Allegiance United States United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1966–2002
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held Training and Doctrine Command
11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Joint Task Force Kuwait
2nd Infantry Division
V Corps
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Relations GEN Creighton Abrams (father)
BG Creighton W. Abrams III (brother)
GEN Robert B. Abrams (brother)
Other work Military analyst, Associated Press

General John Nelson Abrams (born September 3, 1946) is a retired United States Army four-star general who commanded the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command from 1998 to 2002. He is the son of former Army Chief of Staff, General Creighton W. Abrams, Jr. and his two brothers were also Army general officers.

Military career

Abrams was born on September 3, 1946 in Cumberland, Maine.[1] He received his commission through Officer Candidate School in 1966, after enlisting as a tank crewman in 1966.[2] His commands have included the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, Joint Task Force Kuwait, 2nd Infantry Division, V Corps.,[2] and US Army Training and Doctrine Command.

As a young armor officer, Abrams served two years in Vietnam, rising from platoon leader to troop commander. Toward the end of his tour, Abrams commanded an armored cavalry troop in the Mang Yang Pass, where he established such good relations with the Montagnard villagers that a local village chief gave him an elephant. "Isn't that great, Dad?" he asked his father Creighton, who at the time was commander of all U.S. forces in Vietnam. "Well, let me tell you, I knew he was in trouble," Creighton Abrams recounted later. "I asked him if he knew what it meant for a Montagnard village chief to give someone an elephant, and of course he just thought it was a nice thing for the guy to do. Well, sir, I told him in no uncertain terms, 'John, you better pack up and leave that area quick, 'cause you are now engaged to be married to a Montagnard woman. That elephant is a wedding gift!'" John Abrams married Cecilia Bosico in 1969, after a courtship that did not involve an elephant.[3]

In his tour as Commander of the Second Infantry Division he was promoted to Major General and stationed at Camp Red Cloud, near Uijeongbu, Republic of Korea near the Olympic Velodrome. During Operation Desert Storm he could view the combat area by live satellite imaging and see his brother's unit, Gen Creighton Abrams, III, who was the Artillery Commander for Desert Storm.

Major General Abrams was active in community affairs and worked with the Amerasian Children's Fund, The Pearl Buck Association and the American Red Cross. He redesigned the 2nd Infantry Division (2nd ID) logo to depict a "handsome Indian" and placed this design on another of his creations, the 2nd ID sports jacket. He also designed and produced a 2nd ID sports cap. He was instrumental in improving morale to this combat unit and community support from the Korean civilians. The original drawings, art work, and first production runs were kept by Col. G F (Coach) Sweetman, who was responsible for their production.

After completing his tour in Korea, he was promoted to Lieutenant General and assigned as commander of V Corps in Germany, a unit also commanded by Lt. Gen Colin Powell. He was the second officer in U.S. Army history to command the same unit as his father, the other being General George Smith Patton.

In 1998 he was promoted to general and assigned as Commander, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), which oversees all training in the U.S. Army. He held this position until his retirement in 2002.

Abrams received his Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Bowling Green University, a Master of Science degree in Public Administration from Shippensburg University, and an honorary Doctor of Education degree from Norwich University.[4]

Awards and Decorations

Army Staff Identification Badge
11th Armored Cavalry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia[2]
Army Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster
Silver Star with oak leaf cluster
Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters
Bronze Star with Valor Device and three oak leaf clusters
Purple Heart
Meritorious Service Medal
Air Medal with award numeral 2
Army Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster
Army Achievement Medal with oak leaf cluster
National Defense Service Medal with two bronze service stars
Vietnam Service Medal with one silver and one bronze service star
Southwest Asia Service Medal with 1 bronze service star
Armed Forces Service Medal
Army Service Ribbon
Overseas Service Ribbon with Award numeral 5
NATO Medal for Former Yugoslavia
Vietnam Gallantry Cross with silver star and two bronze stars
Gallantry Cross Unit Citation Ribbon
Civil Actions Unit Citation Ribbon
Vietnam Campaign Medal
Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

Post military

After retiring, Abrams became a military analyst for the Associated Press.[2] He is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Abrams Learning & Information Systems, Inc., a consulting and technology firm.[4]

See also

The first father-son U. S. Army Generals to command the same unit were George S. Patton, Jr. and George S. Patton IV, commanding the 2nd Armored Division.

Another Link between Patton and Abrams families was that Creighton, John's father, was Patton's spearhead commander in World War II, where Patton praised him as being the only tank commander equal to himself.[5]

Images gallery

Image
General Abrams, 1990

References

1. "General Officer Announcement 334-98". U.S. Department of Defense. June 30, 1998.
2. "AP Signs Four-Star General for Military Expertise".
3. Sorley, Lewis (1992). "Thunderbolt - From the Battle of the Bulge to Vietnam and Beyond: General Creighton Abrams and the Army of His Times". New York: Simon & Schuster: 294–295
4. ALIS Inc. Management Team Archived 2012-03-28 at the Wayback Machine.
5. "Nation: Pattern's Peer". Time. 14 April 1967.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 6:22 am

Charles E. Wilhelm
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/16/17

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Charles E. Wilhelm
Charles E. Wilhelm, USMC
Born August 26, 1941 (age 76)
Edenton, North Carolina
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1964-2000
Rank General
Commands held 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit
1st Marine Division
Marine Corps Combat Development Command
Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic
U.S. Southern Command
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star
Defense Superior Service Medal (2)
Bronze Star
Other work Research, U.S. Army War College
Fellow, Center for Defense Information
Vice President, Battelle.

General Charles E. Wilhelm (born August 26, 1941) is a retired United States Marine Corps general who served two combat tours of duty in Vietnam. He later served as Commanding General of the 1st Marine Division; as a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense; and as the Commander, U.S. Southern Command (1997–2000). General Wilhelm retired from the Marine Corps in 2000, after 37 years of service.

Biography

Charles E. Wilhelm was born in 1941, a native of Edenton, North Carolina. Wilhelm graduated from Florida Southern College in 1964 with a B.S. in journalism. He earned a M.S. degree in management from Salve Regina College. He is a graduate of the Army Infantry Officer’s Advance Course and the Naval War College, which in 1999 awarded him its Naval War College Distinguished Graduate Leadership Award.

Military career

General Wilhelm held a variety of command positions. He commanded a rifle platoon and company during two tours in Vietnam; served as a company commander in Headquarters Battalion and 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division; was the Senior Advisor to a Vietnamese Army Battalion; Inspector-Instructor, 4th Reconnaissance Battalion; Deputy Provost Marshal, U.S. Naval Forces Philippines; and commanded the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

General Wilhelm’s staff assignments include Assistant Battalion Operations Officer; Operations Officer and Executive Officer, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines. He served on the staffs of III Marine Amphibious Force; Logistics, Plans, and Policy Branch, Installations and Logistics Department, HQMC, and J-3, Headquarters, U.S. European Command.

In August 1988, while assigned as the Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, II Marine Expeditionary Force, he was promoted to brigadier general, and was subsequently assigned as the Director of Operations, HQMC. In July 1990, he was selected to serve as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy and Missions, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict. General Wilhelm assumed duties as Commanding General, 1st Marine Division, in July 1992. He served as Commander Marine Forces Somalia from December 1992 to March 1993 as part of the U.S. led coalition in Operation RESTORE HOPE. General Wilhelm was confirmed for promotion to lieutenant general and assumed duties as the Commanding General, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Quantico, Virginia, July 15, 1994. In August 1995, he was assigned as Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Atlantic/Commanding General, Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic/Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Europe/Commander, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South/Commanding General, II Marine Expeditionary Force/Commanding General, Marine Striking Force Atlantic, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. He was confirmed for promotion to general and assumed duties as the Commander, U.S. Southern Command on September 25, 1997; he served in this position until October 2000. General Wilhelm retired from the Marine Corps on November 1, 2000.

Post-retirement

After retiring from the Marine Corps, General Wilhelm was a researcher with the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.[1] General Wilhelm is Distinguished Military Fellow on the staff of the Center for Defense Information.[2] In 2003, Wilhelm became Vice President at Battelle, responsible for homeland security issues.[3]

Awards & decorations

General Wilhelm’s personal decorations include:

1st Row Defense Distinguished Service Medal Navy Distinguished Service Medal
2nd Row Silver Star Defense Superior Service Medal w/ 1 oak leaf cluster Bronze Star w/ valor device Defense Meritorious Service Medal
3rd Row Meritorious Service Medal Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal w/ valor device Army Commendation Medal w/ valor device Joint Service Achievement Medal
4th Row Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal Combat Action Ribbon Navy Presidential Unit Citation w/ 1 service star Joint Meritorious Unit Award w/ 1 oak leaf cluster
5th Row Navy Unit Commendation Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation National Defense Service Medal w/ 1 service star Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal w/ 1 service star
6th Row Vietnam Service Medal w/ 7 service stars Southwest Asia Service Medal w/ 2 service stars Humanitarian Service Medal w/ 1 service star Navy Sea Service Deployment Ribbon w/ 1 service star
7th Row Navy & Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon w/ 2 service stars Vietnam Gallantry Cross w/ 2 gold stars Vietnam Staff Service Medal Order of the Aztec Eagle
8th Row Vietnam Gallantry Cross unit citation Vietnam Civil Actions unit citation Vietnam Campaign Medal Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia)

References

1. "Gen (Ret). Charles E. Wilhelm". U.S. Army War College. Retrieved 2006-10-07.
2. "CDI (Washington, D.C.) Staff". Center for Defense Information. Retrieved 2006-10-07.
3. "Retired Marine Corps General Charles E. Wilhelm joins Battelle". Battelle (press release). March 6, 2003. Retrieved 2006-10-07.
"General Charles E. Wilhelm - Retired". General Officer biographies. United States Marine Corps. Archived from the original on 2012-02-20. Retrieved 2009-03-18.
"General Charles E. Wilhelm, USMC (Retired)". Who's Who in Marine Corps History. History Division, United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2009-03-18.
"Distinguished Military Fellow: Gen. (Ret.) Charles E. Wilhelm, USMC". CDI. Retrieved 2006-10-07.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:26 am

The Advanced Research Projects Agency [EXCERPT]
A Study Prepared by Richard J. Barber Associates, Inc.
December, 1975

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L.P. Gise [Admiral Lawrence Gise] believes that Lt. Col. George Brown, USAF, a military assistant in Holaday's office, actually came up with the name ARPA. (Discussion with L.P. Gise, April 7, 1975.) ...

L.P. Gise recalls that when Wilfrid McNeil offered him the top administrative job in ARPA, the Vinson threat was so real that McNeil assured him another job would be found for him in OSD if ARPA could not be set up:

So the Agency was controversial even before it was formed. My deal with McNeil was that I would come over and handle the administrative end of the business, with the assurance that if the Agency went up in blue smoke that he would absorb me in his immediate office, and he had a job set up for that purpose. But it was that tenuous back in those days.
...

Clark and York joined ARPA in late March 1958. Clark began to assemble a small staff of technically-oriented military officers. Wilfrid McNeil, Assistant Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), recruited Lawrence P. Gise from the AEC to handle the Agency's financial management activity ...

An office of Program Control and Administration (headed by L.P. Gise) consisting of seven civilian professionals, was set up to handle budgetary control and assignment of funds to Service agents for contracting (through what became formalized as the "ARPA Order" system), management reporting systems, and internal ARPA Administration....

Almost immediately following the decision to create TOD [Technical Operations Division], a further reorganization took place (Jauary 1959). [82] It elevated L.P. Gise to the position of Assistant Director for Administration. He retained broad program administration functions ...

There apparently was lengthy discussion of acquiring the Naval Research Laboratories as well. [89] Johnson personally visited ABMA and JPL and other facilities. His top management adviser, L.P. Gise, argued strongly against taking them, or creating an ARPA procurement structure, because the administrative burden would ultimately drag ARPA down. [90] ... Gise had considerable experience with the management of AEC's network of field installations and Johnson placed a high value on his judgment. Johnson cited the "administrative burden" theory publicly whenever asked about the issue and the notion of a streamlined, hard-hitting ARPA shunning ownership of laboratories and utilizing the facilities of others became part of the established folklore in the Agency. Gise seemed to be most influential in rejecting ABMA and Johnson reacted so negatively to the Director of JPL, personally, that there was never any doubt that he would stay clear of it. ...

At the very end of his tenure he did "go public" with a demand for more funds for the Saturn IB booster project, but that was independent of whether ARPA or some other agency managed it. On one occasion, perhaps this one, Johnson was reprimanded by the President for letting it be known on the Hill that he wished there was more money for military space programs. Of the White House reprimand, said L.P. Gise, "I know he got a big kick out of it. It didn't bother him, obviously." (Discussion with Gise, April 7, 1975.) ...

On one occasion, Snyder called for a showdown on a space public affairs launch policy issue before Secretary Gates. L.P. Gise and L.W. Huff were summoned by Gates to give the ARPA case. Snyder lost. ...

During this period -- summer and fall of 1958 -- both NASA and a national space program were being established. NASA indicated an interest in acquiring SATURN. In the course of a key budget review meeting in November -- attended by Killian, Quarles, Glennan, Dryden, York, Gise, and David Young, but not Johnson -- all money for SATURN was deleted from the budget and the question of perhaps transferring such responsibility to NASA was raised.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:34 am

John J. Ballentine, Admiral, USN
(Naval Aviator Number 2878)
by epnaao.com
Accessed: 12/17/17

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John Jennings Ballentine was born in Hillsboro, Ohio, on October 4, 1896, son of the late George McClelland and Ora (Eakins) Ballentine. He attended Hillsboro High School before his appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, from the Sixth District of Ohio in June 1914. Graduated and commissioned Ensign on June 29, 1917, he subsequently progressed in rank attaining that of Vice Admiral to date from November 1, 1949. On May 1, 1954 he was transferred to the Retired List of the U.S. Navy, and was advanced to the rank of Admiral on the basis of combat awards.

After graduation from the Naval Academy in 1917, he had consecutive duty during World War I in the USS Nebraska and at the Naval Auxiliary Reserve Officers School, Pelham Bay Park, New York; and from February 1919 served until May 1920 in the USS Arizona. He then reported for flight training at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, a member of the fifth class trained at that station. Designated Naval Aviator (heavier than air), on November 22, 1920, he had additional training in land planes with the U. S. Army Air Corps, Carlstrom Field, Arcadia, Florida, and in pursuit planes at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas.

In May 1921 he reported to Atlantic Fleet, Torpedo Plane Division, Yorktown, Virginia, for duty in the first torpedo plane squadron, in the Fleet. The title of this unit was changed to Torpedo Plane Squadron One, attached to the USS Sandpiper. In June 1922 he reported as Officer in Charge, Naval Air Detail, Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren, Virginia, where he served until February 1926. During that period Carl Norden, a Navy consultant, designed his first bombsight in 1923, and the then Lieutenant Ballentine put it through its original tests at the Dahlgren proving Ground, and later tested the first production model. He also controlled, from the ground, the first airplane operated under radio control.

He assumed command of Torpedo Squadron 20, attached to the USS Jason, Asiatic Fleet, in April 1926. In May 1927 he was assigned to the USS Marblehead of Light Cruiser Division Three, where he assumed command of Observation Squadron 11. While serving in the Asiatic, he made two special trips to Tokyo, Japan, to make official inspection of Japanese naval aviation and aircraft manufacturing facilities. He was commended by the Navy Department for reports submitted after those inspections. He returned to the United States in August 1927, and had another tour of duty until June 1931 as Officer in Charge, Naval Air Detail, Dahlgren, Virginia. He received letters of commendation from the Navy Department for various aviation ordnance developments during both tours of duty at the Naval Proving Ground.

He commanded Torpedo Squadron Two, based on the USS Saratoga, from July 1931 until June 1933, when he reported for duty in the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. There he served for two years as Head of the War Plans Section, and one year in the Plans Division, being detached in May 1936. He next had sea duty as Navigator of the USS Wright, flagship of Commander Aircraft, Base Force (title changed to Battle Force, September 28, 1937). In June 1937 he became Operations Officer on that staff, and in January 1938 transferred to the USS Saratoga for duty as Gunnery Officer on the Staff of Commander Aircraft, Battle Force, from January until June 1938, and as Operations Officer until May 1939. He served in the Personnel Division of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, Washington, D.C., from June 1939 until May 1940, and as Head of the Flight Division until June 1941. He went to sea as Executive Officer of the USS Ranger, and on December 26, 1941, assumed command of the USS Long Island. From May until December 1942 he was Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Carriers, Atlantic Fleet, and received a Letter of Commendation with authorization to wear the Commendation Ribbon from the Secretary of the Navy, for meritorious service as Chief of Staff to Commander Air Group, Western Naval Task Force, during action off Casablanca on November 8, 1942.

On January 2, 1943 he reported to the Bethlehem Steel Company, Quincy, Massachusetts, to fit out the USS Bunker Hill, which he commanded from her commissioning, May 25, 1943, until February 5, 1944. He was awarded the Silver Star Medal for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the USS Bunker Hill in action against enemy Japanese forces during the assault on Rabaul Harbor November 11, and the invasion and occupation of the Gilbert Islands, November 18 to 26, 1943."He was also awarded the Legion of Merit with Combat "V," for "exceptionally meritorious conduct....as Commanding Officer of the USS Bunker Hill, during the capture and occupation of Tarawa and Makin,, the capture and defense of the Marshall Islands and strikes on Nauru and Kavieng, from November 29, 1943 to February 5, 1944..." He is entitled to the Ribbon for, and a facsimile of, the Presidential Unit Citation to the Bunker Hill "for extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces in the air, ashore and afloat in the South Central, Southwest, and Western Pacific, from November 11, 1943 to May 11, 1945 .."

In February 1944 he was promoted to Rear Admiral, and reported for duty as Deputy and Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Aircraft, Pacific Fleet, at Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, and remained in that assignment until October 1944. For "meritorious service as Deputy Commander Air Force, Pacific Fleet, and as Aide and Chief of Staff to the Commander Air Force, Pacific Fleet, during operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific War Area, from February to September 1944..." he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal. The citation points out that he "supervised and directed Air Force planning in preparation for three major offensive operations and controlled the movement of Air Force Units to permit maximum preparation for combat and insure the availability of our fighting forces for employment against the enemy. In addition, he coordinated the efforts of all divisions of the staff in the formulation of effective plans necessary for the logistic support of our forces...''

On his return to the United States, he became Commander Fleet Air, Seattle, Washington. He was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Legion of Merit for "exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as Commander Fleet Air, Seattle, from September 29, 1944 to June 18, 1945. Rear Admiral Ballentine employed every means at his disposal in achieving the goal of his vital mission, exercising a high degree of care in the selection and training of personnel which was reflected in the outstanding combat records of the units which came under his command. By his skill in resolving the many administrative complexities of his task, he performed a service essential to the successful execution of a mission of highest importance to the war effort..."

After brief duty in command of Carrier Division 7, with his flag in the USS Bon Homme Richard, from June until August 1945, he was assigned duty as Fleet Liaison Officer for Commander in Chief, Pacific, at Headquarters of the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, pacific. He had the honor of landing at Atsugi Airport on August 30, in the airborne occupation of Japan and of escorting General of the Army Douglas MacArthur to the surrender ceremonies aboard the USS Missouri on September 2, 1945. "For exceptionally meritorious conduct...as Liaison Officer between the Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet, and the Supreme Commander for the Allied Forces for the occupation of Japan from August 30 to December 20, 1945..." he was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a Third Legion of Merit. The citation continues in part: "As the representative of the Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet, Rear Admiral Ballentine accompanied the Supreme Allied Commander on his flight into Japan on August 30 and, by his astute Judgment and initiative, rendered invaluable service in connection with the arrangements for the formal surrender of Japan, the recovery of Allied personnel from Japanese prison camps, the repatriation of the Japanese from overseas, the seizure of Japanese naval vessels, stations and equipment, and the removal of mines from Japanese waters...''

In January 1946 he was ordered to the Military Staff Committee of the Security Council, United Nations, and was designated Chief of Staff and Aide to the Representative of the Chief of Naval Operations on that Committee. In July 1947 he assumed command of Carrier Division One, and made a four-months cruise in the Mediterranean in the USS Midway in the winter of 1947 48 and a similar cruise with the Sixth Task Fleet in the USS Roosevelt in 1948-49.

He returned to the Navy Department for duty as a Member of the General Board from May to November 1949 when, with the accompanying rank of Vice Admiral, he assumed command of the Sixth Task Fleet at Toulon, France. On April 11, 1951 he became Commander Air Force, Atlantic Fleet, and served in that capacity until relieved of all active duty pending his retirement, effective May 1, 1954.

It is of interest that Admiral Ballentine, as Commander Carrier Division One and Commander Sixth Fleet, spent four consecutive Christmas Days in Naples, Italy.

In addition to the Silver Star Medal, the Legion of Merit with two Gold Stars and Combat "V," the Bronze Star Medal, the Commendation Ribbon, and the Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, Admiral Ballentine has the World War I Victory Medal, the Yangtze Service Medal; the American Defense Service Medal with Bronze "A"; American Campaign Medal' the European-African- Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with one bronze star (five engagements); the World War II Victory Medal' the Navy Occupation Service Medal, Asia Clasp; and the National Defense Service Medal. He also has the Navy Expert Pistol Shots Medal. From the Government of Greece, he received the decoration Grand Cross of the Order of Phoenix, and was named Commander in the French National Order of the Legion of Honor.

He was married to the former Catherine Howard Sheild of Yorktown, Virginia, and they had one son, John J. Ballentine, Jr.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:26 am

Separate Church and Hate
by Charles Carreon

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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:27 am

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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:44 am

Yitzhak Rabin assassinated: November 4, 1995
by history.com
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin is fatally shot after attending a peace rally held in Tel Aviv’s Kings Square in Israel. Rabin later died in surgery at Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv.

The 73-year-old prime minister was walking to his car when he was shot in the arm and the back by Yigal Amir, a 27-year-old Jewish law student who had connections to the far-right Jewish group Eyal. Israeli police arrested Amir at the scene of the shooting, and he later confessed to the assassination, explaining at his arraignment that he killed Rabin because the prime minister wanted “to give our country to the Arabs.”

Born in Jerusalem, Rabin was a leader of the Arab-Israeli war of 1948 and served as chief-of-staff of Israel’s armed forces during the Six-Day War of 1967. After serving as Israel’s ambassador to the United States, Rabin entered the Labour Party and became prime minister in 1974. As prime minister, he conducted the negotiations that resulted in a 1974 cease-fire with Syria and the 1975 military disengagement agreement between Israel and Egypt. In 1977, Rabin resigned as prime minister over a scandal involving his holding of bank accounts in the United States in violation of Israeli law. From 1984 to 1990, he served as his country’s defense minister.

In 1992, Rabin led the Labour Party to election victory and became Israel’s prime minister again. In 1993, he signed the historic Israeli-Palestinian Declaration of Principles with Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and in 1994 concluded a formal peace agreement with the Palestinians. In October 1994, Rabin and Arafat shared the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Israeli foreign minister Shimon Peres. One year later, Rabin was assassinated. Peres succeeded him as prime minister.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:12 am

Marine Corps History: The Emblem and Seal
Source: Reference Branch, USMC History Division
by Military.com
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Historic Marine Emblem

The history of the Marine Corps emblem is a story related to the history of the Corps itself. The emblem of today traces its roots to the designs and ornaments of early Continental Marines as well as British Royal Marines. The emblem took its present form in 1868. Before that time many devices, ornaments, and distinguishing marks followed one another as official marks of the Corps.

In 1776, the device consisted of a "foul anchor" of silver or pewter. The foul anchor still forms a part of the emblem today. (A foul anchor is an anchor which has one or more turns of the chain around it). Changes were made in 1798, 1821, and 1824. In 1834 it was prescribed that a brass eagle be worn on the hat, the eagle to measure 3 ½ inches from wingtip to wingtip. During the early years numerous distinguishing marks were prescribed, including "black cockades", "scarlet plumes," and "yellow bands and tassels." In 1859 the origin of the present color scheme for the officer's dress uniform ornaments appeared on an elaborate device of solid white metal and yellow metal. The design included a United States shield, half wreath, a bugle, and the letter "M."

In 1868, Brigadier General Commandant Jacob Zeilin appointed a board "to decide and report upon the various devices of cap ornaments of the Marine Corps." On 13 November 1868, the board turned in its report. It was approved by the Commandant four days later, and on 19 November 1868 was signed by the Secretary of the Navy.

The emblem recommended by this board consists of a globe (showing the Western Hemisphere) intersected by a foul anchor, and surmounted by a spread eagle. On the emblem itself, the device is topped by a ribbon inscribed with the Latin motto "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful). The uniform ornaments omit the motto ribbon.


The general design of the emblem was probably derived from the British Royal Marines' "Globe and Laurel." The globe on the U.S. Marine emblem signifies service in any part of the world. The eagle also indirectly signifies service worldwide, although this may not have been the intention of the designers in 1868. The eagle which they selected for the Marine emblem is a crested eagle, a type found all over the world. On the other hand, the eagle pictured on the great seal and the currency of the United States is the bald eagle, strictly a North American variety. The anchor, whose origin dates back to the founding of the Marine Corps in 1775, indicates the amphibious nature of Marines' duties. On 22 June 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an Executive Order, which approved the design of an official seal for the United States Marine Corps. The new seal had been designed at the request of the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr.

The new seal consisted of the traditional Marine Corps emblem in bronze; however, an American bald eagle replaced the crested eagle depicted on the 1868 emblem, and is depicted with wings displayed, standing upon the western hemisphere of the terrestrial globe, and holding in his beak a scroll inscribed with the Marine Corps motto "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful) with the hemisphere superimposed on a foul anchor. The seal is displayed on a scarlet background encircled with a Navy blue band edged in a gold rope rim and inscribed "Department of the Navy, United States Marine Corps" in gold letters. Coincident with the approval of this seal by the President, the emblem centered on the seal was adopted in 1955 as the official Marine Corps Emblem.
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Re: Mrs. Kay Griggs on How the Government Works

Postby admin » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:25 am

Jacob Zeilin
by Wikipedia
Accessed: 12/18/17

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Jacob Zeilin
7th Commandant of the Marine Corps (1864-1876)
Born July 16, 1806
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died November 18, 1880 (aged 74)
Washington, D.C.
Place of burial Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Years of service 1831-1876
Rank US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General
Commands held Commandant of the Marine Corps
Battles/wars
Mexican-American War
Battle of Rio San Gabriel
Siege of Los Angeles
Battle of La Mesa
Battle of Guaymus
Battle of San Jose
Battle of Mazatlán
American Civil War
First Battle of Manassas
Siege of Charleston Harbor
Signature

Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin (July 16, 1806 – November 18, 1880) was the first United States Marine Corps non-brevet general. He served as the seventh commandant of the United States Marine Corps from 1864 to 1876.[1]

Early life

Jacob Zeilin was born in Philadelphia on July 16, 1806. He attended the United States Military Academy from 1822 to 1825,[2] but dropped out due to poor grades in philosophy and chemistry.[3]

U.S. Marine Corps career

Zeilin was commissioned in the Marine Corps as a second lieutenant on October 1, 1831. After completing the preliminary training of a Marine officer in Washington, D.C., Zeilin's first tours of duty were ashore at the Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, and at Gosport, Virginia. He first went to sea on board the sloop of war Erie in March 1832, which was followed by a tour of duty at Charlestown (Boston), Massachusetts. In August 1834, he again joined the sloop Erie on a long and eventful voyage which lasted for more than three years. He was promoted to first lieutenant on 12 September 1836.[2]

From September 1837 to April 1841, Zeilin again served at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and New York. In February 1842, he returned to sea duty, on board the USS Columbus, and during the cruise that followed spent several months on the Brazil station. Upon the conclusion of this tour of sea duty, and after again serving at important Marine Corps stations on the east coast of the United States from 1842 to 1845, he was transferred to duty aboard the frigate USS Congress of the U.S. Pacific Squadron.

Mexican-American War

During the Mexican-American War, Zeilin commanded the Marine Detachment embarked in Congress, which ship was attached to Commodore Robert F. Stockton's force. He took part in the conquest of California (1846–1847) and was brevetted to the rank of major (two grades above his rank at the time) for gallantry during the action at the San Gabriel River crossing on January 9, 1847. Later, he took part in the capture of Los Angeles and in the Battle of La Mesa.[4]

On 28 January 1847, Zeilin was appointed Military Commandant of San Diego and served in that capacity until the completion of the conquest of California. He was promoted to the regular rank of captain on 14 September 1847. During the following few months, Zeilin, with the Marines of the Pacific Squadron, participated in the capture of important ports in lower California and the west coast of Mexico, and served as Fleet Marine Officer of the Pacific Squadron.[1] In September 1847, he served with the forces that captured Guaymas and those that met the enemy at San Jose on the 30th. For the remainder of the war, Mazatlán was his center of activity, and he fought in several skirmishes with the Mexicans in that area.[4]

Interwar period

After the close of the war with Mexico, Zeilin proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia, where he served for a time, then to New York. He remained at New York until June 1852. He was selected to accompany Commodore Matthew C. Perry as Fleet Marine Officer in the famous expedition to Japan, serving with the Marine Detachment in USS Mississippi in which he cruised to Japan with the expedition. With elaborate ceremonies, the Marines under his command took a prominent part in the expedition. He was the second person to set foot on shore at the formal landing of the naval forces at Kurihama, Yokosuka, Japan on 14 July 1853, and was one of those later accorded special honor for his part in the expedition that opened the doors of Japan to the outside world.[1]

Upon his return from Japan, he was again stationed at Norfolk. This duty was followed by his being placed in command of the Marine Barracks of the Washington Navy Yard. After remaining for a time at Washington, he again went to sea, this time aboard the frigate Wabash, on the European Station, until 1859.[1]

American Civil War

During the early part of the American Civil War, Zeilin was on garrison duty in command of Marine Barracks, firstly at Philadelphia and later at Washington, D.C. Five days later, he was appointed to the regular rank of major. On July 21, 1861, he commanded a company of Marines during the First Battle of Manassas and received a slight wound.[1]

In 1863, Zeilin was given command of the battalion of Marines sent to support the naval force whose mission was the capture of Charleston, South Carolina, but, because of illness, he returned after a few weeks of this duty to garrison duty at Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Later, he returned to sea, serving with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron under Rear Admiral John Dahlgren. In 1864, Zeilin assumed command of the marine barracks at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.[1]

Commandant of the Marine Corps

On June 10, 1864, he was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Marine Corps in the rank of colonel. His faithful and efficient performance of the duties of Commandant of the Marine Corps during the trying period of the last year of the war and those years immediately following the close of the war is evidenced by the fact that he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general on 2 March 1867.[1] Upon his promotion, he became the Marine Corps' first general officer.

After the war, Brigadier General Zeilin successfully defended the Marine Corps against its critics. In 1868, Zeilin approved of the design of the "Eagle, Globe, and Anchor," as the emblem for the Marine Corps.[1]

Zeilin retired from the Marine Corps on November 1, 1876 after serving over forty-five years as a Marine Corps officer.[1] When considering his time at West Point, he served over 49 years in uniform.[5]

Personal life

Zeilin married Virginia Freeman on October 22, 1845.[6][7] Together they had one son, William Freeman Zeilin (1851-1880) and two daughters, Margaret Freeman Very (1850-1911) (wife of Edward Wilson Very) and Anne V. Stockton (wife of one of Senator John P. Stockton's sons).[5][8]

General Zeilin was a member of the Pennsylvania Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States - a military society of officers who served in the Union armed forces.

On 18 November 1880, he died in Washington, D.C.[5] He is buried in Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.[9]

Namesakes

Two ships in the United States Navy have been named USS Zeilin in his honor: USS Zeilin (DD-313) in 1920 and USS Zeilin (AP-9) in 1941.

He is the namesake for Zeilin Road, on Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia.

He is the namesake for Zeilin Street, on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in California.

References

1. "Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin, USMC (deceased)". www.history.usmc.mil. United States Marine Corps History Division. Retrieved 31 December 2014.
2. Millett, Allan Reed; Jack Shulimson (2004). Commandants of the Marine Corps. Annapolis, MD: US Naval Institute Press. pp. 85–96. ISBN 0-87021-012-2.
3. Nofi, Albert (1997). The Marine Corps Book of Lists. Conshohocken, Pa.: Combined Pub. p. 144. ISBN 9780938289890. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
4. Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John (1889). Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, Volume 6. New York: D. Appleton & Sons. pp. 657–658. Retrieved 31 December 2014.
5. "Death of Gen. Zeilin". Army and Navy Journal and Gazette. 18: 314. 1881. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
6. Tucker, George Holbert (2001). Abstracts from Norfolk city marriage bonds (1797-1850) and other genealogical data. Baltimore, Md.: Reprinted for Clearfield Co. by Genealogical Pub. Co. p. 179. ISBN 9780806351155. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
7. Laas, Virginia Jeans; Cornish, Dudley Taylor (1999). Wartime Washington: The Civil War Letters of Elizabeth Blair Lee. Chicago: University of Illinois Press. p. 469. ISBN 9780252068591. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
8. "Not a Dime for her Husband". The Washington Times. Washington, DC. January 31, 1895. p. 6. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
9. Jacob Zeilin at Find a Grave
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