Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:43 am

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Bjork (Laura Levine, 1991)
Levine shot Bjork -- then the Sugardubes' lead singer -- when the band was recording Stick Around for Joy near Woodstock, New York. "Like a slvan sprite," Levine said, the uninhibited Icelandic chanteuse "immediately began peeling off her clothes in the summer drizzle."

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The Allman Brothers Band (Stephen Paley, 1969)
From the photo session for the cover of their debut, this outtake of (from left) Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks, Jai Johanny Johanson, Gregg Allman, Duane Allman and Dickie Betts was taken near the band's hometown, Macon, Georgia. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Janis Joplin (Bob Seidemann, circa 1966)
Still the lead singer for Big Brother and the Holding Company, Joplin, with her characteristic bravado masking her natural shyness and insecurity, insisted, "Take my picture naked, Seidemann, you motherfucker." One of the frames later became a poster about which Joplin raved in a letter to her family, "I'm the first hippie pinup girl. What a kick!"

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Red Hot Chili Peppers (Mark Seliger, 1992)
This portrait was originally intended for the cover of Rolling Stone. As the issue was going to press, guitarist John Frusciante (far-right) quit the band. So, using a digital process, he was removed (as was some stray pubic hair) from the picture. With Frusciante are (from left) drummer Chad Smith, vocalist Anthony Kiedis and bassist Flea (ne Michael Balzary).

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Axl Rose (Herb Ritts, 1991)
New York City: For the cover of Rolling Stone, at the time of the concurrent release of Guns n' Roses' two Use Your Illusion albums, Ritts photographed the band's twenty-nine-year-old front man in the early morning hours. Though he had anticipated a brief shoot, Ritts said, "Axl kept changing clothes on the set. You just could not resist, you know. His lips and his form, and the fact that he had those symbolic tattooes. It was pretty amazing."

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Sid Vicious (Bob Gruen, 1978)
On their very brief tour of the United States, the Sex Pistols were magnets for abuse. At this show in Dallas, Texas, a female fan gestured to Vicious to lean down for a kiss -- and then punched him in the nose, causing it to bleed profusely. Reveling in the gore, Vicious spit blood on her. Then he smashed a beer bottle on his amp, using the shards to slash his chest, tearing open a previous (self-inflicted) arm wound. Vicious later reunited with his attacker in a San Francisco love nest where he OD'd and almost died. (Star File)

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Henry Rollins (Julian Broad, 1994)
Tokyo: Broad caught the thirty-three-year-old singer and spoken-word performance artist as he prepared for a Japanese concert. Rollins, the ex-lead vocalist of Los Angeles-based hardcore band Black Flag, "goes through this yoga-est routine," said the photographer. "Then off he goes."

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Gene Vincent (Photographer unknown, circa 1957)
Virginia-born Eugene Vincent Craddock Transformed himself into rockabilly cat Gene Vincent after leaving the Navy in 1955. His signature song, "Be-Bop-A-Lula," hit the Top Ten the next year. Touring England with fellow rocker Eddie Cochran in 1960, Vincent was severely injured in a car crash that killed Cochran. Vincent recovered, but his career never regained momentum. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Cream (Art Kane, 1967)
Philadelphia: Kane squired the members of Cream -- guitarist Eric Clapton, drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce -- to the railroad tracks because he wanted to depict the "hard-travelin' blues underpinnings" of the band's sound. Due to friction among the members, the trio broke up, giving a farewell concert on November 26, 1968, at London's Royal Albert Hall.
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:46 am

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Eurythmics (Claude Gassian, 1986)
Photographed on a train somewhere between Brussels and Paris, Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart, who were lovers when they first played together in the Tourists, had developed a platonic relationship after forming the Eurythmics.

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Paul Simon (Raeanne Rubenstein, circa 1980)
After his split with Art Garfunkel in 1970, Simon's solo career was well underway by the time this photograph was taken. Here, the singer appears as if he is the character from his song "Stranded in a Limousine," off the 1977 album Greatest Hits, Etc.

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Prince (Terry Gydesen, 1993)
Lisbon, Spain: Having recently become "the artist formerly known as," the Minneapolis-born star -- whose birth name is Prince Rogers Nelson -- was waiting in his limousine to go onstage when this photograph was snapped.

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Dr. Dre (Mark Seliger, 1993)
Los Angeles: While on the site of a shoot for the former N.W.A. member's video "Let Me Ride" -- a song about a favorite car -- Seliger took out a red handkerchief to wipe his forehead. He was warned to put it away at once -- it had the wrong gang associations and could lead to trouble.

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Michael Jackson (Barry Plummer, 1972)
London: Fourteen-year-old Jackson was touring Europe when Plummer captured the then-exuberant singer. After spending the past three years with the Jackson 5, he released in 1972 his first solo album, Got to Be There, which yielded the Number One hit "Ben," about a pet rat.

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Buddy Holly (Lewis Allen, circa 1958)
Rochester, New York: Allen caught Holly aboard the band bus. The other two passengers were probably members of a package show with whom Holly was touring. It was on such a tour, in 1959, that Holly was killed when he chose to fly rather than ride in the bus.

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Peter Gabriel (Anton Corbijn, 1986)
Bath, England: Corbijn shot Gabriel near the musician's recording complex, Real World Studios. His breakthrough solo album, So, was released around this time, yielding the chart-topping "Sledgehammer." That same year, he joined the Amnesty International tour.

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Emmylou Harris (David Gahr, 1975)
New York City: Gahr first photographed Harris when she was a teenager performing in Greenwich Village folk clubs. This picture, taken in Central Park, coincided with the release of Harris's Pieces of the Sky, which took the singer to the top of the country charts. Gram Parsons had given Harris her C&W start by enlisting her to sing on his albums G.P. and Grievous Angel. Parsons died of an overdose in 1973, leaving Harris to keep his music alive.

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Captain Beefheart (Anton Corbijn, 1980)
From this Mojave Desert encounter, a deep friendship developed between Corbijn and Beefheart, a.k.a. Don Van Vliet, who later said: "I told him ... just shoot the meat! ... He brought out ... my love of animals. He got parts of me I didn't even know I had ... Anton shoots the edges and occasionally ... even the bent parts!"

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Viv Albertine (Anton Corbijn, 1980)
Palm Springs, California: Corbijn had hopes of shooting the guitarist and her band, the Slits, in the buff for Return of the Giant Slits. (On their debut, Cut, the femme-punks wore only mud.) This day, however, the clothes stayed on.
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:49 am

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Van Morrison (Eliott Landy, 1969)
Woodstock, New York: Morrison was living in the town that gave the festival its name. Landy, also a village resident, took this photo in the backyard of the home of the Band's Richard Manuel and Garth Hudson. Other shots would grace the cover of 1970's Moondance.

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Robyn Hitchcock (Dan Borris, 1993)
Around the time of Hitchcock's 1993 album, Respect, Borris framed the ex-Soft Boy leader striking a characteristically eccentric pose.

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Jackson Brown (Frank W. Ockenfels 3, 1993)
Photographing Browne after the release of his tenth album I'm Alive, Ockenfels wanted to capture an "older and wiser" Browne without playing into the hype surrounding his recent breakup with actress Daryl Hannah.

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Carole King (Kurt Markus, 1992)
Montana: On her ranch in Big Sky Country, the fifty-year-old King displayed "her charm and generosity and touchable womanliness," recalled Markus.

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Leonard Cohen (Raeanne Rubenstein, circa 1970)
Nashville, Tennessee: For this photo session, Rubenstein traveled to the farm where Cohen lived. She found the idiosyncratic Canadian singer-songwriter, who had recently released his third album, Songs of Love and Hate, "handsome, friendly and naturally poetic."

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Sting (Kevin Westenberg, 1992)
Wiltshire, England: This photo came from the cover shoot for Ten Summoner's Tales -- Sting's fourth platinum LP. The ex-Police-man later told Rolling Stone, "I don't feel guilty for being rich and famous."

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Roger Daltry (Terry O'Neill, 1978)
Sussex, England: O'Neill photographed the thirty-four-year-old singer at his country estate to show a different side from his onstage persona with the Who -- the preeminent instrument-smashing band. Who Are You was released the same year; in September drummer Keith Moon died of a drug overdose.

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The Rolling Stones (Arthur Elgort, 1981)
Elgort joined the Stones at a Massachusetts farm where they were rehearsing for the Tattoo You tour. When Keith Richards unexpectedly climbed onto a horse, Elgort said he was delighted, because both the animal and the guitarist were "lazy and gray."

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The Band (Elliott Landy, 1969)
Woodstock, New York: Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko and Garth Hudson had been rehearsing that summer in the living room of a house overlooking the Ashokan Reservoir. The Band didn't want to take too much time away from playing, so they did the session in the backyard. Some shots were used for the group's acclaimed second album, The Band.

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Bob Dylan (Elliott Landy, circa 1970)
Woodstock, New York: Dylan invited his friend Landy over one day to help assemble a new trampoline. Landy then captured Dylan at play, on the trampoline and off.
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:55 am

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Tom Waits (Frank W. Ockenfels 3, 1992)
Having just played the deranged Renfield in 1992's Bram Stoker's Dracula, Waits showed up with a carful of props to use for the session. Ockenfels finally asked him to pose for a straightforward head shot, which Waits could only tolerate for a few minutes. In this final frame, Waits was growling for Ockenfels to stop.

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Natalie Merchant (Jon Ragel, 1989)
Detroit: Before a show at an outdoor auditorium on a very hot afternoon, Merchant and her band, 10,000 Maniacs, wandered onto a nearby golf course. The sprinklers happened to come on, and the sweaty, uncomfortable shoot was saved.

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Frank Zappa (David Gahr, 1967)
New York City: Gahr, who frequently covered the Greenwich Village music scene in the sixties, photographed the twenty-seven-year-old Zappa the night he and the Mothers of Invention appeared at Cafe Au Go Go on MacDougal Street. The Grateful Dead played upstairs at the club on the same evening.

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Billy Joel (Mary Ellen Mark, 1987)
Red Square, Moscow: Mark photographed the thirty-eight-year-old Joel during his summer tour, which was being filmed by her husband. Joel was the first U.S. pop star to take a fully staged rock production to the Soviet Union. The album Kohuept documented the shows.

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David Bowie (Terry O'Neill, 1974)
London: During a shoot for the post-Ziggy Stardust LP Diamond Dogs (an adaption of Orwell's 1984), the over-sized canine "suddenly started to try and sing," O'Neill recounted, "much to mine and David's astonishment."

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Tom Petty (Mark Seliger, 1991)
Joshua Tree National Monument, California: This photo session was set up to promote the album Into the Great Wide Open. "The camel actually ran away with me at one point," Petty reminisced bemusedly. "I'd say all in all a miserable day."

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Dwight Yoakam (Mark Seliger, 1993)
Hollywood: It was decidedly not Nashville, so Seliger rented a horse for a photo session on Hollywood Boulevard. The chaps and stance, he said, were unmistakenly Yoakam. The maverick country crooner had recently released his sixth album, This Time, and portrayed a trucker in the film Red Rock West.

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Village People (Bill King, 1979)
King shot the original members -- biker Glenn Hughes, construction guy David Hodo, Navy man Victor Willis, sailor Alex Briley, cowboy Randy Jones and Indian Felipoe Rose -- as they gained notoriety for their double-entendre songs "Y.M.C.A." and "Macho Man."

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The Eagles (Henry Diltz, 1972)
California: On a Western movie set, Diltz and the band were inspired by an old photo. In the re-creation, roadies, producers and a graphic artist made up the posse who killed the outlaws portrayed by (from left) Jackson Browne (with mustache), Eagles Bernie Leadon, Glenn Frey, Randy Meisner and Don Henley, and J.D. Souther.

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Willie Dixon, Big Joe Williams, Memphis Slim (David Gahr, 1961)
New York City: Gahr encountered the trio -- bassist-songwriter Dixon, forty-six; blues shouter Williams, fifty-eight; and pianist Memphis Slim, forty-six -- as they emerged from a recording session for Folkways.
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:58 am

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The Beastie Boys (David LaChapelle, 1986)
New York City: After the release of the Beasties' debut, Licensed to Ill, the rambunctious trio met LaChapelle in Midtown for this portrait. He had Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz, Adam "MCA" Yauch and Michael "Mike D" Diamond approach the camera and make the goofy faces that would become the group's trademark.

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Simon and Garfunkel (Photographer unknown, circa 1965)
New York City: Having first begun harmonizing together as sixth-graders in Queens, New York, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel initially called their vocal duo Tom and Jerry. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Mick Jagger (Peter Anderson, 1981)
London: At a press conference the Rolling Stones held in the backyard of Soho's Le Beate Route club, Anderson, "overwhelmed by the paparazzi and Jagger himself," snapped a picture and captured both.

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John Lydon (Anton Corbijn, 1983)
The Dutch photographer shot Lydon, once known as Johnny Rotten, in Hoboken, New Jersey, with the Manhattan skyline across the Hudson River. Lydon had recently moved to New York City and was promoting the film Corrupt, starring the ex-Sex Pistol and Harvey Keitel.

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Janet Jackson (Yuru Elizondo, 1993)
This photo was taken at Long Beach Airport the same year that her fifth album, janet., leapt to the top of the charts, as did the single and video for "That's the Way Love Goes." Jackson's image was becoming more overtly sexual: That fall she would appear bare-breasted on a Rolling Stone cover.

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Michael Hutchence (Enrique Badulescu, 1990)
Los Angeles: The thirty-year-old lead singer of INXS danced constantly throughout the session, which was done about the time the group released X. The Australian band had been together for ten years before hitting the pop stratosphere with the 1987 album Kick.

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Graham Nash (Graham Nash, 1974)
New York City: This self-portrait, which Nash entitled "Portrait in the Plaza," is one of many photographs the singer-songwriter has taken of himself and fellow musicians.

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Frank Zappa (Norman Seeff, 1976)
Los Angeles: Seeff saw the thirty-six-year-old Zappa as a genius, someone who "would improvise with anything that was lying around and keep going, image after image."

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Little Richard (Photographer unknown, 1962)
At the height of his success, the singer renounced rock & roll for gospel, becoming an ordained minister in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. He did not, however, renounce his gleeful spirit. (Colin Escott/Showtime Archives, Toronto)

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Fabian (Photographer unknown, 1959)
Teen idol Fabian had just turned from singing to acting -- his Top Ten hit "Hound Dog Man," an imitation of Elvis Presley, was also the title of his first film. The following year, he would costar with John Wayne in North to Alaska. (Globe Photos)
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:00 am

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James Brown (Photographer unknown, 1967)
In the midst of a rigorous year of touring and recording, including "Cold Sweat - Part 1," the Hardest Working Man in Show Business pauses for a recreational moment. Brown had been a semi-pro boxer as a teenager. (Archive Photos)

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Mick Fleetwood and John McVie (Mark Seliger, 1992)
Los Angeles: Seliger thought of the wedding-theme idea because the performers were -- after having been together in Fleetwood Mac for twenty-five years -- essentially married to one another. When Fleetwood heard the suggestion, he immediately declared that he should be the bride.

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Arlo Guthrie (Mary Ellen Mark, 1969)
Mark had met the singer-songwriter on the set of the movie Alice's Restaurant, based on Guthrie's 1967 recording. He invited her to his wedding to Jacklyn Hyde, where Mark took this snapshot -- not even an official wedding portrait. That summer, Guthrie, the son of legendary folksinger Woody Guthrie, appeared at Woodstock.

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Mothers of Invention (Art Kane, circa 1968)
For this Life magazine session, Kane wanted to portray the musical group as a family and took the idea of mothers -- and their babies -- as a theme. He gathered some of the musicians' infants, then booked about thirty more from a modeling agency. As soon as they began to shoot, one of the babies urinated, which inspired the others to do so as well, creating in Kane's words, "the fountains of Rome."

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Courtney Love (Guzman, 1992)
Los Angeles: At home with Kurt Cobain and Frances Bean, Love was asked if she could be photographed undressed. She agreed, at ease with her postnatal body.

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Dion (Al Wertheimer, 1958)
Bronx-born Dion DiMucci and his group, the Belmonts, had recently charted for the first time when Wertheimer photographed the teen crooner enjoying a big Italian meal at home with his mom. The next spring the group's smash "A Teenager in Love" hit Number Five. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Donovan (Chris Walter, circa 1965)
Born Donovan Leitch in Glasgow, Scotland, the folksinger's debut album, Catch the Wind, with its hit title track, had recently put the spotlight on Britain's answer to Bob Dylan. (Photofeatures)

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George Harrison (Jurgen Vollmer, 1961)
Only seventeen years old when the fledgling Beatles played Hamburg, German, in 1960, Harrison was deported for being underage. After his birthday in February 1961, the group returned for another stint in the spring, when this photo was taken. (Star File)

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Chuck Berry (Jimmy Willis, 1957)
Waco, Texas: The seminal rock & roller's song "School Day" had been a Number Three hit when this photo of Berry with his young fans was taken. His album After School Sessions was issued by Chess Records the next year.

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Bob Dylan (Eliott Landy, 1968)
Woodstock, New York: Landy, having photographed Dylan for the Saturday Evening Post, visited the elusive songwriter, here holding his son Jesse, to show him the pictures -- and had the opportunity to shoot some more.
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:03 am

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Bruce Springsteen (David Michael Kennedy, 1982)
Brewster, New York: Springsteen used a Kennedy landscape photo for the cover of Nebraska and wanted him to take the publicity pictures as well. Kennedy exposed the singer-songwriter's then-solitary, inward nature, exemplified by the acoustic album that Springsteen recorded by himself on a four-track recorder.

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Neil Young (Joel Bernstein, 1971)
Sitting inside the small caretaker's cabin on his newly purchased Broken Arrow Ranch in northern California, the twenty-six-year-old Young took a break from writing the songs for 1972's Harvest. Bernstein believes the photograph expresses Young's "contemplative, interior mood."

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The Grateful Dead (Gene Anthony, circa 1967)
San Francisco: Anthony took this portrait at the house of 710 Ashbury Street shared by the Dead -- (clockwise from front) Ron "Pigpen" McKernan, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann and Jerry Garcia.

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Johnny Cash (Photographer unknown, circa 1960)
After recording for Sun, Cash moved to Columbia in 1959. Here, on a rare respite from hard livin' on the road, he relaxes at home. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Elvis Costello (Anton Corbijn, 1977)
Amsterdam: Touring to promote his first album, My Aim is True, the twenty-three-year-old Costello was crashing in a hotel room so small Corbijn had to squeeze his over-six-foot frame into a cupboard to get the shot.

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Linda Ronstadt (Annie Leibovitz, 1976)
In the wake of Heart Like a Wheel and Prisoner in Disguise, which established Ronstadt as a major pop star, Leibovitz framed her in a domestic moment.

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Bob Dylan and Joan Baez (Daniel Kramer, 1965)
New Haven, Connecticut: After a concert, Kramer, Dylan, Baez and her family returned to the hotel and, several drinks later, went into a photographic frenzy. By 2:30 A.M., various props were involved, though Kramer doesn't remember how they got around to using the iron on Baez's hair.

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Elvis Presley (Photographer unknown, 1957)
To portray singer Deke Rivers in Loving You, Elvis dyed his hair black. The other young man here is thought to be his cousin Gene Smith. (Jeff Cahn Collection)

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Patti Smith (Robert Mapplethorpe, 1978)
Becoming pals with Mapplethorpe in 1967, when he was an art student, Smith later said: "Robert helped me take all this totally nebulous energy and put it in a form."
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:05 am

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Mick Jagger (Terry O'Neill, 1963)
O'Neill caught Jagger getting ready for an appearance on Thank Your Lucky Stars. The BBC-TV show's producer reportedly told the band's manager to replace "that vile-looking singer with the tire-tread lips."

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Snoop Doggy Dogg (Jean Baptiste Mondino, 1994)
Los Angeles: Mondino photographed Calvin Broadus the year he broke big: His Number One debut album, Doggystyle, became the biggest-selling rap album, and his song "Murder Was the Case" inspired a film of the same name directed by Dr. Dre.

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Bo Diddley (Photographer unknown, circa 1958)
The inventor of the rock & roll beat that bears his name, Bo Diddley, born in McComb, Mississippi, was photographed helping his bass player half-sister, the Duchess, with her do. (Michael Ochs Archives)

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Isaac Hayes (Raeanne Rubenstein, circa 1980)
Atlanta: Rubenstein arrived at Hayes's sparse plantation-style home as he was preparing for the session. She thought the soul singer's daily head-shaving ritual would make a better portrait than a more formal pose. Hayes agreed.

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Kate Bush (Anton Corbijn, 1981)
London: Corbijn, who has said he strives "to show people as they really are," photographed the twenty-three-year-old Bush. When she was sixteen, Bush's four-octave voice caught the attention of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, who guided her early career path.

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Bonnie Raitt (Bill King, 1975)
New York City: King shot the bottleneck slide guitarist and blues singer when her fifth album, Home Plate, came out. Although acclaimed, her mass popularity didn't arrive for fifteen years.

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David Byrne (William Coupon, 1979)
The twenty-seven-year-old Talking Heads mastermind, in his PJs, looks as if he'd just gotten the idea for the song "Stay Up Late," which would appear on the band's 1985 album, Little Creatures.

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Iggy Pop (Robert Mapplethorpe, 1981)
Iggy once wrote, "I've been spit at, I've been slugged, I've been egged. I've been hit with paper clips, money, brassieres, underwear, old rags and expensive garments ... Yeah, you get used to it after a while."

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Grace Jones (Steven Klein, 1990)
Paris, France: Born in Spanishtown, Jamaica, the six-foot-tall Jones transformed herself from model to cult-disco diva to rock-noir singer. Her first dance hit was 1977's "I Need a Man."

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Lavern Baker (Photographer unknown, circa 1955)
The R& B singing sensation was hitting her stride in the mid-fifties, though she got her start performing in the late forties. (Frank Driggs Collection)
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:09 am

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Wilson Pickett (Jerry Schatzberg, 1967)
New York City: During the photo session, Schatzberg played Pickett's records, including that year's smash "Funky Broadway," and the soul man cut loose, singing along while posing.

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Grace Slick; Jerry Garcia (Herb Greene, 1966; 1967)
San Francisco: The wall of hieroglyphics behind Slick and Garcia, in portraits taken a year apart, became a backdrop for many of the San Francisco performers Greene photographed in the late sixties. Though it came to be associated with the Matrix nightclub, it was actually the wall of Green's dining room. He had steamed off the old wallpaper and found a beautiful patina underneath, with "Happy New Year" written across it. One day Green's roommate drew the ancient symbols all over the wall, and, although Greene was furious at the time, the Egyptian imagery actually suited the psychedelic Haight-Ashbury scene perfectly.

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L. L. Cool J (Albert Watson, 1992)
New York City: L.L. Cool J -- for Ladies Love Cool James -- had already recorded several rap classics, including "Going Back to Cali" and "Mama Said Knock You Out," when he posed for Watson.

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Curtis Mayfield (Mark Seliger, 1993)
Mayfield was the architect of the sixties Chicago soul sound, as well as the man who wrote the theme for Superfly. Seliger met with the artist at his home outside Atlanta, Georgia. This shot, taken of Mayfield posed upright, depicts his continuing vibrance despite the complete paralysis resulting from a 1990 accident, when a lighting rig fell on him during an outdoor concert in Brooklyn, New York.

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The Jefferson Airplane (Jim Marshall, 1967)
San Francisco: For a Look magazine story, Marshall aimed his wide-angle lens at the two-year-old Airplane peering down upon him. The 1967 lineup included (clockwise from bottom) Marty Balin, paul Kantner, Grace Slick, Jorma Kaukonen, Spencer Dryden and Jack Casady.

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The Rolling Stones (Art Kane, circa 1969)
London: Kane was granted only fifteen minutes to get a portrait of (clockwise from top) Bill Wyman, Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts. He did manage to catch the original lineup, though, for it soon changed: Jones left the band in June 1969 and died the next month.

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Marvin Gaye (Annie Leibovitz, 1972)
Leibovitz's camera exposed a solitary, contemplative side of Motown's quintessential romantic. Gaye, then thirty-three, would be murdered by his father twelve years later.

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Kim Thayil; Chris Cornell (Frank W. Ockenfels 3, 1993)
Guitarist Thayil and front man Cornell of Seattle-based Soundgarden hated being photographed -- their nine years of band experience hadn't helped. So Ockenfels placed his emphasis on the lighting by creating an effect like that made by the sun reflecting off the surface of a swimming pool.

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Madonna (Peter Lindbergh, 1994)
Thirty-six-year-old Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone was still looking out for Number One when this shot was taken prior to the release of Bedtime Stories. (Harper's Bazaar)
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Re: Rolling Stone Images of Rock & Roll

Postby admin » Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:14 am

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Bootsy Collins (Dennis Keeley, 1988)
Disappearing into the dressing room for three mysterious hours, the bass-playing funkmeister reemerged, Keeley reminisced, as "Moses from the mountain" -- perfect in every detail, with twelve pairs of spectacles on hand.

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Natalie Cole (Peggy Sirota, 1993)
Culver City, California: During the photo session at Smashbox Studios, Sirota played Cole's new album of standards, Take a Look, and the forty-three-year-old vocalist -- the daughter of Nat King Cole -- began to sing along.

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Steven Tyler (Dennis Keeley, 1989)
Los Angeles: Photographing all five members of veteran rockers Aerosmith together that day was, according to Keeley, "a logistical nightmare"; the forty-one-year-old lead vocalist, however, "gave it his all -- as usual," he said.

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Ice-T (Mark Seliger, 1993)
New York: Seliger used the duct-tape gag because the shoot occurred in the midst of controversy over "Cop Killer," by the rapper's rock band Body County; the song was later removed from the group's LP.

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Nirvana (Mark Seliger, 1992)
Seliger caught (from left) Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic after Nevermind had transformed the trio into reluctant superstars.
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